The Ozone Hole Returns to Both Poles

Some years ago, relating to a project I was carrying out, I asked the Max Planck Institute and Cambridge University –both experts in this field-if it were possible that Antarctic ‘ozone hole’ -actually a ‘thinning’ – existed prior to it being first ‘discovered’ in 1957.

Ozone on the rise – suggests pollution controls aren’t ‘working as well as we thought’

In a first-ever study using ozone data collected by commercial aircraft, researchers from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado Boulder found that levels of the pollutant in the lowest part of Earth’s atmosphere have increased across the Northern Hemisphere over the past 20 years. That’s even as tighter…

Emissions of several ozone-depleting chemicals are larger than expected

Recovering and safely destroying the sources of these chemicals could speed ozone recovery and reduce climate change Massachusetts Institute of Technology In 2016, scientists at MIT and elsewhere observed the first signs of healing in the Antarctic ozone layer. This environmental milestone was the result of decades of concerted effort by nearly every country in…

Ozone-depleting substances caused half of late 20th-century Arctic warming, says study

Implicated in a third of overall global warming at the time Earth Institute at Columbia University A scientific paper published in 1985 was the first to report a burgeoning hole in Earth’s stratospheric ozone over Antarctica. Scientists determined the cause to be ozone-depleting substances – long-lived artificial halogen compounds. Although the ozone-destroying effects of these…

Hole In The Ozone Layer Shrinks To Smallest Size On Record

From The Daily Caller NASA image/ screen grab Jason Hopkins Immigration and politics reporter October 22, 2019 12:18 PM ET The hole in the ozone layer shrank to its smallest size since scientists began recording it, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Monday. The ozone layer hole, which roughly sits above Antarctica,…

Ooops. Despite Montreal Protocol, ozone-destroying CFC's on the rise

NOAA finds rising emissions of ozone-destroying chemical banned by Montreal Protocol Emissions of one of the chemicals most responsible for the Antarctic ozone hole are on the rise, despite an international treaty that required an end to its production in 2010, a new NOAA study shows. Trichlorofluoromethane, or CFC-11, is the second-most abundant ozone-depleting gas…