volcano-plume

Study: Iceland’s Bárðarbunga volcano sits on a massive magma hot spot

By Kat Kerlin, UC Davis Spectacular eruptions at Bárðarbunga volcano in central Iceland have been spewing lava continuously since Aug. 31. Massive amounts of erupting lava are connected to the destruction of supercontinents and dramatic changes in climate and ecosystems. New research from UC Davis and Aarhus University in Denmark shows that high mantle temperatures…

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Another story about global warming causing volcanoes…

From the National Post Is it volcano season? From Japan to Iceland, scientists probe the reasons why there are so many eruptions lately Eruptions caused by climate change In recent decades, it has become apparent that the consequences of planetary ice loss might not end with rising sea levels. Evidence has been building that in…

Iceland-Bardarbunga-Volcano

Laki caused 1783 – could Iceland’s Bardarbunga Volcano trigger another ‘Year Without a Summer’?

Eric Worrall writes: The British and Icelandic MET offices are expressing concern about the possible effect on the climate, of a potentially enormous volcanic eruption in Iceland. According to The Express, a UK daily newspaper; “BRITAIN could freeze in YEARS of super-cold winters and miserable summers if the  erupts, experts have warned. Britain could face…

Mount Tavurvur erupts in Papua New Guinea on Friday, August 29th, 2014. Image from Roberto Lopez via Twitter

Spectacular eruption of Mount Tavurvur in Papua New Guinea

While we watch Iceland’s unpronounceable volcano, on the other side of the world, in Papua New Guinea, Mount Tavurvur is already causing damage and threatening lives as well as disrupting some international air travel. Mount Tavurvur, is part of the larger Rabaul caldera, seen here: Tavurvur is an active stratovolcano that lies near Rabaul in…

eruption_Barðarbunga

The volcanic area near Bárðarbunga is erupting

A fissure eruption has started north of Dynjujökull, seen in the photo. A live YouTube stream is available below Authorities in Iceland say the fissure is ~10 km north of Vatnajökull and currently measures about 100 meters long. The eruption started shortly after midnight on August 29 in Iceland, however the eruption seems to be subsiding…