Into The Vortex

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I came across a lovely photograph of a “fire devil”, also called a “fire whirl”. I liked it because the photo perfectly exemplified what is wrong with the current generation of climate models. What is wrong with the models is that they don’t include any of the vortex-based emergent atmospheric…

Driving Forces

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach There’s a new paper published in Nature Scientific Reports called “Identification of the driving forces of climate change using the longest instrumental temperature record”, by Geli Wang et al, hereinafter Wang2017. By “the longest instrumental temperature record” they mean the Central England Temperature, commonly called the “CET”. Unfortunately, the CET is…

Stefan Rahmstorf, Climate Ex-Communicator

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach [see update at the end of the post] Stefan Rahmstorf recently got the AGU Climate Communications Prize, despite acting like a vicious jerkwagon when his claims get questioned by mere mortals, viz: Journalist Markus Lehmkuhland works for the German Science Journalists Association. He wrote an article about Stefan Rahmstorf called Ideology…

Northern Journeys

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I just got back from going up north to see my friends, to investigate core drills for gold ore sampling … oh, and to see the eclipse. We rolled out of home in our camper van, heading up the California coast. Me, I was still recuperating from running my thumb…

When The Model Models Itself

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Eric Worrell posted an interesting article wherein a climate “scientist” says that falsifiability is not an integral part of science … now that’s bizarre madness to me, but here’s what she says: It turns out that my work now as a climate scientist doesn’t quite gel with the way we…

The Rainmakers

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach For more than a decade now I’ve been saying something without getting much agreement, which was: “When you cut down the trees, you cut down the clouds”. I based my saying on my own experience, first growing up in a ponderosa pine and fir forest, and later living in a…

Volcanic Northern Winters

I see there’s a new study, unfortunately paywalled, which starts out by saying: Observations show that all recent large tropical volcanic eruptions (1850-present) were followed by surface winter warming in the first Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter after the eruption. Recent studies show that climate models produce a surface winter warming response in the first winter…