Winter monsoons became stronger during geomagnetic reversal

Revealing the impact of cosmic rays on the Earth’s climate Kobe University New evidence suggests that high-energy particles from space known as galactic cosmic rays affect the Earth’s climate by increasing cloud cover, causing an “umbrella effect”. When galactic cosmic rays increased during the Earth’s last geomagnetic reversal transition 780,000 years ago, the umbrella effect…

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Electric-blue night clouds are invading the U.S.

Reposted from Dr. Roy Spencer’s Blog I have personally cussed out Dr. Spencer for adding an item to my bucket list which had been almost complete.~ctm June 11th, 2019 by Roy W. Spencer, Ph. D. Over the next few weeks, mid-latitude observers might experience the best noctilucent cloud viewing of their lifetimes. Extremely high-altitude noctilucent…

We now know how insects and bacteria control ice

Proteins help organisms form or inhibit ice crystals University of Utah Contrary to what you may have been taught, water doesn’t always freeze to ice at 32 degrees F (zero degrees C). Knowing, or controlling, at what temperature water will freeze (starting with a process called nucleation) is critically important to answering questions such as…

A new view: Observing Clouds in Four Dimensions

Six cameras are revolutionizing observations of shallow cumulus clouds. The Science While easily seen by people, the cotton-ball clouds (called shallow cumulus clouds) that drift overhead on partly cloudy days are hard for radars and many other instruments to observe and, therefore, hard to model and predict. Scientists situated six digital cameras in pairs at…

An interview with Henrik Svensmark: cosmic rays, clouds and climate

Prof Henrik Svensmark & Jacob Svensmark discuss the connection between cosmic rays, clouds and climate with the GWPF’s Benny Peiser and Jonny Bairstow from Energy Live News after his recent presentation in London. Video and slideshow follow. See his slideshow: Prof Henrik Svensmark & Jacob Svensmark: The Connection Between Cosmic Rays, Clouds and Climate. (pdf) Presentation in…

CERES Edition 4 and the Cloud Radiative Effect

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach One of the enduring questions in climate involves what is usually called “cloud feedback”. When the earth warms up a bit, the clouds change in response. The question is the direction of that response. Does the change in clouds amplify a warming, or does it reduce a warming? Here’s Dr.…