Watts Available

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I ponder curious things. I got to thinking about available solar energy. That’s the amount of solar energy that remains after reflection losses.  Just under a third (~ 30%) of the incoming sunshine is reflected back into space by a combination of the clouds, the aerosols in the atmosphere, and…

Undeniable Truths

Out in the webiverse someone asked me “Willis… do you consider yourself a denialist?” Mmmm … an excellent question, with an answer which likely won’t go the direction that they think. First, the term “climate denier”, or in this incarnation “denialist”, was specifically chosen for its overtones of “Holocaust denier”. It is used as a…

Drying The Sky

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Eleven years ago I published a post here on Watts Up With That entitled “The Thermostat Hypothesis“. About a year after the post, the journal Energy and Environment published my rewrite of the post entitled “THE THUNDERSTORM THERMOSTAT HYPOTHESIS: HOW CLOUDS AND THUNDERSTORMS CONTROL THE EARTH’S TEMPERATURE“. When I started…

The Picasso Problem

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach [See update at the end.] Let me start explaining the link from Picasso to climate science by looking at what Dr. Nir Shaviv called “the most boring graph I have ever plotted in my life”. This is the graph of the changes in the best estimate of the range of…

Of Water And Albedo

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach As usual, there is more to learn in the CERES satellite dataset. I got to thinking of the idea put forth by Lacis 2010. He announced model results claiming that if the only modeled greenhouse gas in the modeled atmosphere were modeled water, the model world would basically evolve to a…

Clouds and El Nino

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach After the turn of the century, I became interested in climate science. But unlike almost everyone else, I wasn’t surprised by how much the global temperature was changing. As someone with experience with heat engines and engine governors, I know how hard it is to keep a heat engine stable…

Glimpsed Through The Clouds

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach [See Update at the end.] [See Second Update at the end.] In a recent post, I discussed the new CERES Edition 4.0 dataset. See that post for a discussion of the CERES satellite-based radiation data, along with links to the data itself. In that post I’d said: I bring all of…

How Thunderstorms Beat The Heat

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I got to thinking again about the thunderstorms, and how much heat they remove from the surface by means of evaporation. We have good data on this from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites. Here is the distribution and strength of rainfall, and thus evaporation, around the middle of…