Adelie penguin at eggs. Bellingshausen Station, Antarctic. Author Akulovz, source Wikimedia

Study: Extensive Sea Ice Creates Hardship for Penguins

Who could have predicted that extensive sea ice conditions which make it harder to get to food would make life difficult for penguin populations?

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Video: How simple math can help predict the melting of sea ice

Anurag Papolu, The Conversation To better predict climate change, scientists need accurate models which predict the behavior of many natural processes. One of these is the melting of arctic sea ice, which requires expensive and difficult data collection in the Arctic. Physicist Ivan Sudakov at the University of Dayton and his colleagues have developed a…

Antarctic sea-ice models improve for the next IPCC report

University of Washington The world of climate modeling is complex, requiring an enormous amount of coordination and collaboration to produce. Models feed on mountains of different inputs to run simulations of what a future world might look like, and can be so big — in some cases, lines of code in the millions — they…

Claim: Antarctic Sea Ice Growth Caused by Meltwater

Guest essay by Eric Worrall According to climate scientists, less dense meltwater on the surface of the Antarctic ocean reduced convection between the surface and ocean depths, leaving heat trapped in the depths. One small area of ocean not changed by global warming Date:May 6, 2020 … Climate and marine scientists are observing pervasive warming…

Increasingly mobile sea ice risks polluting Arctic neighbors

University of Colorado at Boulder The movement of sea ice between Arctic countries is expected to significantly increase this century, raising the risk of more widely transporting pollutants like microplastics and oil, according to new research from CU Boulder. The study in the American Geophysical Union journal Earth’s Future predicts that by mid-century, the average…

Arctic sea ice can’t ‘bounce back’

University of Exeter [See my update at the end. -w.] Arctic sea ice cannot “quickly bounce back” if climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests. A team of scientists led by the University of Exeter used the shells of quahog clams, which can live for hundreds of years, and climate models to discover…