Climatology’s startling error of physics: answers to comments

Answers to comments from the original essay on WUWT, here. By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley I make no apology for returning to the topic of the striking error of physics unearthed by my team of professors, doctors and practitioners of climatology, control theory and statistics. Our discovery the climatology forgot the Sun is shining brings…

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Looping the loop: how the IPCC's feedback aerobatics failed

Guest essay By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley This series discusses climatology’s recently-discovered grave error in having failed to take due account of the large feedback response to emission temperature. Correct the error and global warming will be small, slow, harmless and net-beneficial. The series continues to attract widespread attention, not only here but elsewhere. The…

Another climate feedback found: ‘cooling effect of natural atmospheric particles is greater during warmer years’

  From the University of Leeds and the “settled science” department, comes this new idea that combines measurements with a model. Understanding the climate impact of natural atmospheric particles An international team of scientists, led by the University of Leeds, has quantified the relationship between natural sources of particles in the atmosphere and climate change.…

Evaporation Redux

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I got to thinking again about the question of evaporation and rainfall. I wrote about it here a few years ago. Short version—when the earth’s surface gets warmer, we get more evaporation and thus more rainfall. Since what comes down must go up, we can use the Tropical Rainfall Measuring…

Feedback on Feedbacks

Guest essay by Rud Istvan In recent weeks, there have been a number of WUWT guest posts on climate sensitivity related matters. Sensitivity is determined by feedbacks to increased CO2. The delta T to doubled CO2 in the absence of feedbacks is 1.1-1.2C. Monckton calculated 1.166C in his new (and unfinished) ‘Feet of Clay’ series…

How Climate Feedback is Fubar

Guest essay by George White Feedback is the most misunderstood topic in climate science and this misunderstanding extends to both sides of the debate. This is disturbing because the theoretical support for substantial warming cause by man’s CO2 emissions depends exclusively on the ability of positive feedback to amplify something small (3.7 W/m2 of forcing…

Cloud Feedback

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach In the comments to Christopher Monckton’s latest post, Nick Stokes drew attention to Soden and Held’s analysis of feedback in the climate models. I reproduce their Table 1 below: Figure 1. Soden and Held’s Table 1, showing all of the feedback parameters calculated from the models. I found several amazing things in…

Soil feedbacks are a big uncertainty in climate change

From the YALE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY & ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES Managing uncertainty: How soil carbon feedbacks could affect climate change There is more than twice as much carbon in the planet’s soils than there is in its atmosphere, so the loss of even a small proportion of that could have a profound feedback effect on the…

Problems With Analyzing Governed Systems

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I’ve been ruminating on the continuing misunderstanding of my position that a governor is fundamentally different from simple feedback. People say things like “A governor is just a kind of feedback”. Well, yes, that’s true, and it is also true that a human being is “just a bag full of organic…