EIA: “About 25% of U.S. power plants can start up within an hour”

Guess “Did you know?” by David Middleton In a world where mostly unreliable power plant (solar & wind) construction is on the rise, backup power generation becomes more important every day. Unreliable generation capacity in the US has doubled since 2013 and now comprises 12% of our generating capacity. Backup power needs to be able…

Brooklyn Fractivists for Freezing in the Dark

Guest “I couldn’t make this schist up, if I was trying” by David Middleton Activists Demand National Grid Halt Project To Extend A Fracked Gas Pipeline Through North BrooklynBY SYDNEY PEREIRAFEB. 18, 2020 A coalition of North Brooklyn residents and environmental groups are fighting to stop National Grid’s plan to extend a natural gas pipeline…

California energy policies are fueling the housing crisis and homelessness

By Ronald Stein Founder and Ambassador for Energy & Infrastructure of PTS Advance, headquartered in Irvine, California California’s green crusade direction and actions are increasing the costs of electricity and fuels which guarantees growth of the homeless, poverty, and welfare populations, and further fuels (no pun intended) the housing affordability crisis. It’s scary that our…

Florida’s Natural Gas Boom

Guest cheer leading by David Middleton Florida has led the nation in the addition of natural gas-fired electricity generation capacity over the past decade, by a very wide margin. SEPTEMBER 9, 2019Natural gas-fired power generation has grown in Florida, displacing coal Florida added nearly 16 gigawatts (GW) of utility-scale natural gas-fired electric generation between 2008 and…

Climate Policies Increase Risk of Blackouts

Warm and well fed, or hungry in the dark? Guest post by Viv Forbes Which is worse – gradual man-made global warming or sudden electricity blackout? Alarmists try to scare us by claiming that man’s activities are causing global warming. Whether and when we may see new man-made warming is disputed and uncertain. If it…

New strategy for utilizing highly variable wind power

From the American Institute of Physics Using fluctuating wind power Incorporating wind power into existing power grids is challenging because fluctuating wind speed and direction means turbines generate power inconsistently. Coupled with customers’ varying power demand, many wind-farm managers end up wasting power-generation capacity and limiting the service life of turbines through active control –…