More “settled science” – Unexpected environmental source of methane discovered

Some nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain an enzyme for the simultaneous production of ammonia and methane UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON HEALTH SCIENCES/UW MEDICINE An unexpected source of methane in the environment has been inadvertently discovered. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria are the chief means by which nitrogen gas in the air is changed into a form that plants and animals can…

So much for the ‘methane bomb’ – study finds methane hydrate dissociation…’not caused by climate change’

From the HELMHOLTZ CENTRE FOR OCEAN RESEARCH KIEL (GEOMAR) and the soon to be defunct “Arctic Methane Emergency Group” comes this good news. Methane hydrate dissociation off Spitsbergen not caused by climate change Study identifies post-glacial processes as main reason Methane hydrates, also known as flammable ice, occur in many regions of the oceans. But…

NASA-led Study Solves a Global Methane Puzzle

From NASA GODDARD: A new NASA-led study has solved a puzzle involving the recent rise in atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas, with a new calculation of emissions from global fires. The new study resolves what looked like irreconcilable differences in explanations for the increase. Methane emissions have been rising sharply since 2006. Different research…

Researchers nail down the long-sought source of ocean methane

From the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY and the “settled science” department. An abundant enzyme in marine microbes may be responsible for production of the greenhouse gas CAMBRIDGE, MA — Industrial and agricultural activities produce large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. Many bacteria also produce methane as a byproduct of their…

Turning wasted Methane into liquid fuel

From the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY A new way to harness wasted methane Approach developed at MIT could help curb needless ‘flaring’ of potent greenhouse gas. CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Methane gas, a vast natural resource, is often disposed of through burning, but new research by scientists at MIT could make it easier to capture this gas…