A bridge in the climate debate – How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change

This is one of the most important posts ever on WUWT, it will be a top “sticky” post for a few days, and new posts will appear below this one during that time. People send me stuff. Imagine, shooting 40,000 elephants to prevent the land in Africa from going to desert because scientists thought the…

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Apocalypse maybe

Guest post by Matt Ridley My article in Wired in August called “Apocalypse Not” (http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/08/ff_apocalypsenot/) attracted a huge number of comments, many of which were constructive and interesting. It also led to critical responses at other sites. Here is my response to some of those responses. Wired asked me to respond, but then concluded that…

CO2 Is Greening The Planet: African Savannahs Getting a Makeover to Forests

I’ve covered this before, such as when NASA posted satellite data showing that the biosphere is booming thanks to CO2 fertilization. This new study from Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany suggests that the Umbrella Thorn Acacia trees will make a comeback. Tree trumps grass to rule the savannas A new study published today in “Nature”…

After Rio – what next?

It’s time to give all mankind a real chance to enjoy genuine development Guest post by Dr. Kelvin Kemm The Rio+20 World Environmental Conference has come and gone. The “Plus 20” comes from the fact that it took place twenty years after the first such conference, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992. Between…

Post COP 17 – The Road to Nowhere

Guest post by Professor Will Alexander  Roadmaps The key word used during the COP 17 discussions was ‘roadmap’ used by the European Union delegation. The following is a map of my travels through southern Africa. My two principal destinations at the time were surf fishing along the remote Skeleton Coast of Namibia in the northwest,…

Climate change blamed for dead trees in Africa

“Rainfall in the Sahel has dropped 20-30 percent in the 20th century, the world’s most severe long-term drought since measurements from rainfall gauges began in the mid-1800s,” said study lead author Patrick Gonzalez, who conducted the study while he was a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley’s Center for Forestry. “Previous research already established climate change…