A Tiny Particle’s Wobble Could Upend the Known Laws of Physics

For decades, physicists have relied on and have been bound by the Standard Model, which successfully explains the results of high-energy particle experiments in places like CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.…

Uncomfortable knowledge

Donald Rumsfeld famously opined on the problems of decision-making in the face of “known knowns,” “known unknowns” and “unknown unknowns.” To those three categories Rayner added a fourth, “unknown knowns”…

The Eukaryotic Nucleus May Derive from a Giant Virus

This post reports on an unpaywalled paper in the journal “Virus Research” from November last year, offering support for this Viral Eukaryogenesis hypothesis.

Chemists describe a new form of ice

Scientists from the United States, China, and Russia have described the structure and properties of a novel hydrogen clathrate hydrate that forms at room temperature and relatively low pressure.

UVB Activation of AMPs Production in the Skin and the Innate Respiratory Immunity

Acute viral respiratory infections, including COVID-19, are strongly correlated with vitamin D insufficiency. They are also strongly seasonal, peaking in the winter, when the availability of the UVB component of…

Animal instincts could be inherited expert knowledge

In addition to studying complex human reasoning, I have been observing complex instinctive reasoning in animals for many years. Instinctive behavior is often thought of as simple, perhaps even mindless.…

Plant evolves to become less visible to humans

Scientists found that Fritillaria delavayi plants, which live on rocky slopes of China’s Hengduan mountains, match their backgrounds most closely in areas where they are heavily harvested.

The structure of complex issues

We live in a world of complex issues, which can be very frustrating. I have been doing research on the generic structure of issues for a long time. There is…

Free science is here and growing fast

The good news is that the scientific community is responding big time to this extensive popular interest. We are in the midst of a huge wave of activities designed to…

To survive asteroid impact, algae learned to hunt

Tiny, seemingly harmless ocean plants survived the darkness of the asteroid strike that killed the dinosaurs by learning a ghoulish behavior — eating other living creatures.

Science and politics

I am not happy with either the Democratic or Republican plans for science in the U.S. Both sides seem to want to use and misuse science as a club to…

Do Your Own Research?

Both of these essays are valuable – and contain truths we need to be aware of and accept. But they also represent the problem we see all across human endeavors…

What the pandemic has taught us about science

The scientific method remains the best way to solve many problems, but bias, overconfidence and politics can sometimes lead scientists astray

Researchers one step closer to bomb-sniffing cyborg locusts

If you want to enhance a locust to be used as a bomb-sniffing bug, there are a few technical challenges that need solving before sending it into the field.

The next invasion of insect pests will be discovered via social media

New scientifically unnamed species — from fungi to flowers to insects — are now regularly found via Twitter, Facebook and Flickr.

Scientist to resurrect water fleas from U.S. nuclear fallout zone

A researcher of The University of Texas at Arlington could soon uncover the evolutionary effects of nuclear testing by resurrecting decades-old crustaceans.

Fauci: Americans “Don’t Believe Science”

Guest essay by Eric Worrall Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, has just suggested Americans don’t believe science. Anthony Fauci: Americans ‘Don’t Believe Science…

The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text

By analysing brain activity, researchers found that the brain regulates its resource use and tries to identify the most essential information University of Helsinki By analysing brain activity, researchers found…

The most common organism in the oceans harbors a virus in its DNA

University of Washington The most common organism in the oceans, and possibly on the entire planet, is a family of single-celled marine bacteria called SAR11. These drifting organisms look like…

Pleistocene Bird Recovers From Extinction

Guest “what has a higher recovery rate? COVID-19 or Extinction?” by David Middleton What do the Coelocanth, PETM benthic foraminifera, the Incilius genus of toads and Aldabra white-throated rail bird have in…

Many Effects of Hydroxychloroquine against COVID-19

This is a scientific review, published to inform health care professionals and public officials, and for an open peer review. It is not medical advice. Abstract Hydroxycholoroquine (HCQ) is effective…

Pseudo-Science behind the Assault on Hydroxychloroquine

This is a research article published as information for health care professionals and public officials, and for an open peer review. It is not medical advice. Summary I reviewed the…

New paper points out flaw in Rubber Hand Illusion raising tough questions for psychology

University of Sussex A world-famous psychological experiment used to help explain the brain’s understanding of the body, as well as scores of clinical disorders, has been dismissed as not fit-for-purpose…

IP: Award-Winning Atmospheric Scientist Dr. Fred Singer Dies – Pioneering Scientist & The Dean of Climate Skeptical Scientists

Reposted from Climate Depot Marc Morano’s personal note: “I have known Fred Singer for almost two decades. He was as kind as he was brilliant. He had an encyclopedic acknowledge…