The Coming Global Forest Regrowth

Guest essay by Steve Goreham Last month, Pope Francis visited Peru and spoke about preserving the biodiversity of the Amazon rain forest. For decades, environmental groups have lamented the shrinking of world forests. But trends now point to a coming regrowth of global forests. Deforestation has long been an important environmental issue. President Theodore Roosevelt…

Arctic Restoration — Go Beavers!

Guest Essay by Kip Hansen   Oh those busy,  busy beavers — aren’t they great?  There’s the little guy in the corner of the photo, he and his pals built that dam that slowed the stream and produced a large shallow beaver pond.   The American beaver is a keystone species on the North American continent…

Claim: Planting trees cannot replace cutting CO2 emissions

From the “has anyone told Earth yet?” department and the wild alarmists of the Schellnhuber school of climate doom, comes this claim that’s just another headline grabber made up mostly of opinion. It’s really little more than a transparent attempt at keeping the Paris accord intact. Meanwhile, ignoring these fools, the Earth is greening and…

Taiga Landscape in Quebec, Canada, dominated by Black Spruce Picea mariana

A serious climate opportunity

Why does government refuse to do the one thing that would help our forests and climate? Guest essay by Greg Walcher For years, politicians have waged war on coal, stifled oil and gas production, and advocated carbon taxes and other extreme measures to reduce carbon dioxide, while ignoring one of the most important things they…

There’s no one-size-fits-all solution to climate change

From the Field Museum New study shows where carbon finance should — and shouldn’t — drive conservation efforts The world’s forests are crucial to slowing climate change, but they’re often destroyed to make room for farms, mines, and other economic ventures. One possible solution to deforestation is carbon finance: giving companies and countries monetary incentives…

They are just now figuring this out?

From the University of Washington, something woodsmen, hunters, and campers have observed in forests for hundreds of years.  It’s all about the LWIR. Snow melts faster under trees than in open areas in mild climates It’s a foggy fall morning, and University of Washington researcher Susan Dickerson-Lange pokes her index finger into the damp soil…