Finding: ‘El Niños 10,000 years ago were as strong and frequent as the ones we experience today’

Ancient shellfish remains rewrite 10,000-year history of El Niño cycles Hannah Hickey University of Washington The planet’s largest and most powerful driver of climate changes from one year to the next, the El Niño Southern Oscillation in the tropical Pacific Ocean, was widely thought to have been weaker in ancient times because of a different…

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More on the Lewandowsky and Oreskes Co-Authored Paper Risbey et al. (2014)

In this post, we’ll discuss more inconsistencies in the recently published paper Risbey et al. (2014). These are major flaws in the paper…above and beyond the faults and curiosities discussed in the last post. As you’ll recall, that paper–about climate model portrayals of ENSO and about modeled versus observed global surface temperature trends–was curiously co-authored…

The 2014/15 El Niño – Part 13 – More Mixed Signals

A few interesting things have happened since the July Update last week. On the ocean side, weekly sea surface temperatures in the NINO3.4 region have dropped (just) below the threshold of El Niño conditions (using the standard NOAA base years of 1971-2000 for their Reynolds OI.v2 data). On the atmospheric side, the 30-day running average…