Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #281

The Week That Was: 2017-08-19 (August 19, 2017) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project Quote of the Week. Physics has a history of synthesizing many phenomena into a few theories – Richard Feynman Number of the Week: $4 Trillion THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project…

Researcher ‘has a problem’ with attributing West Antarctic Ice Sheet ‘collapse’ to human activity

From NASA JPL and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, something that maybe journo-hacktivist Susanne Goldenberg should pay attention to before she writes another screed. Reports that a portion of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has begun to irretrievably collapse, threatening a 4-foot rise in sea levels over the next couple of centuries, surged through the news media…

New study: Antarctic and Greenland ice sheet melt may be natural event, no consensus on cause

Ice sheets are the largest potential source of future sea level rise – and they also possess the largest uncertainty over their future behaviour From the University of Bristol Continuous satellite monitoring of ice sheets needed to better predict sea-level rise The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, underscore the need for continuous satellite monitoring of…

Good news: World’s biggest ice sheets likely more stable than previously believed – upsets previous estimates of melting and sea level

Researchers show that high ancient shorelines do not necessarily reflect ice sheet collapse millions of years ago From the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research: For decades, scientists have used ancient shorelines to predict the stability of today’s largest ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. Markings of a high shoreline from three million years ago, for…

Uncertainty be damned, let’s make ice and sea level projections anyway

‘A better path’ toward projecting, planning for rising seas on a warmer Earth From Princeton University, by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications More useful projections of sea level are possible despite substantial uncertainty about the future behavior of massive ice sheets, according to Princeton University researchers. In two recent papers in the journals Nature Climate…