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NASA’s new Orbiting Carbon Observatory shows potential tectonically-induced CO2 input from the ocean?

Guest essay by Martin Hovland, Geophysiscist and Professor Emeritus, Center for Geobiology, University of Bergen, Norway The newly released satellite OCO2-data indicates that there is CO2 input in tectonically active oceanic areas. This becomes evident by pairing seafloor topography and tectonic data with the recently published OCO2-results. Thus, in the released OCO2 dataset, showing the…

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An Engineer’s Questions Regarding Holocene Climate Change

(And Other Questions Concerning an Exothermic Earth) Guest essay by Ronald D Voisin In this post I want to discuss core geo-reactor issues as they might affect the somewhat modest climate change observed through the course of the Holocene. The Earth is estimated to be exothermic to the tune of 44TW. This estimate comes from…

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When will we ever stop running out of resources?

This is a shout-out to  Tim Worstall’s latest “Weekend Worstall” column on The Register Limits to Growth is a pile of steaming doggy-doo based on total cobblers The Guardian praised it? Right, now we know for sure   Keeping a technologically based civilisation on the road isn’t all that easy. There must be stuff available…

New evidence for oceans of water deep in the Earth

From Northwestern University  (h/t to Harold Ambler) Water bound in mantle rock alters our view of the Earth’s composition Researchers from Northwestern University and the University of New Mexico report evidence for potentially oceans worth of water deep beneath the United States. Though not in the familiar liquid form — the ingredients for water are…

How Earth avoided global warming before SUV’s

From the European Association of Geochemistry, a claim that looks to be little more than paleo-dowsing. Though, ya gotta love the silly claim that Earth would have hit a runaway greenhouse effect like Venus, had it not been for some mountains forming, sucking up all the CO2. Plus we’ve seen the Earth hit 5000PPM CO2…

When worlds collide – study says our moon was formed by a collision with planet-sized body

From the European Association of Geochemistry New isotopic evidence supporting moon formation via Earth collision with planet-sized body A new series of measurements of oxygen isotopes provides increasing evidence that the Moon formed from the collision of the Earth with another large, planet-sized astronomical body, around 4.5 billion years ago. This work will be published…