The GPM core satellite found heavy rainfall in storms on Aug. 11, 2016, at 10:26 p.m. EDT falling at a rate of over 3.9 inches (100.1 mm) per hour in one intense downpour in Louisiana. A few storm tops were reaching heights of over 9.9 miles (16 km). CREDIT
NASA/JAXA/Hal Pierce

Analysis of the ‘Landicaine’ over Louisiana

Yesterday on Twitter, Chip Knappenberger coined the term “landicane” to describe the low pressure center that has been gyrating over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico for days has now dropped very heavy precipitation over southeastern Louisiana. Dr. Roger Pielke Sr. has added in the exchange that his previous research points out that wet and marshy…

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Nothing Unusual about the Sea Surface Temperatures and Anomalies for the Hurricane Main Development Region at the 2016 Season’s Start

Guest Post by Bob Tisdale During the hurricane season, I’ll be adding the sea surface temperatures and anomalies of the Main Development Region of hurricane development in the North Atlantic to the Monthly Sea Surface Temperature Updates.  This post will serve as a reference. OVERVIEW The Main Development Region of the North Atlantic (10N-20N, 80W-20W)…

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NASA: 10 year major hurricane drought for U.S. continues

Hurricane season started June 1st, and with it an unprecedented 10 year long drought of U.S. landfalling hurricanes that are Category 3 or higher. Bonnie, the second tropical storm of the 2016 season, drenched parts of the Atlantic coast from Georgia to Rhode Island with up to 8 inches this past Memorial Day weekend. What’s…