Mariana Mazzucato. By Simon Fraser University - Communications & Marketing - link, CC BY 2.0, link

Pro Big Government Economist Calls for a Renewable Energy Moonshot

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

College of London Economist Mariana Mazzucato thinks the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees should be harnessed, to solve big problems like plastics pollution and climate change.

Fixing climate change, poverty and ocean plastic requires a ‘Moonshot’ approach, economist Mariana Mazzucato says

ABC Radio National 
By Belinda Sommer and Richard Aedy for The Money

Nearly six decades ago, President John F Kennedy’s famous “Moonshot speech” rallied the US public behind the Apollo mission to send astronauts to the Moon.

Leading economist Mariana Mazzucato isn’t the first to ask why, if humans can land on the Moon, they can’t also solve some of the huge challenges here on Earth such as climate change, poverty or a plastic-free ocean.

Her answer? Governments should adopt the “mission-oriented approach” of the Apollo project.

“The reason I think it worked is because NASA was very confident,” she says.

Professor Mazzucato contrasts this with modern governments, where consultants are thick on the ground.

She points to the UK, where Cabinet Office minister Lord Agnew accused the British civil service of becoming “infantilised” by an “unacceptable” reliance on expensive consultants.

He said public servants were being deprived “of opportunities to work on some of the most challenging, fulfilling and crunchy issues” such as Brexit and COVID-19.

Read more: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-04-02/mariana-mazzucato-government-changing-capitalism-climate-mission/100036000

I tried working as a government employee. Generous pension scheme, job security, on paper it looked really appealing. But I can’t take the tedium. I like to fix problems. But nobody fixes problems in government service, and nobody wants to fix problems, because fixing problems is a threat to job security. Fixing problems reduces the number of work hours required to fulfil the department’s responsibilities.

There are exceptions, islands of excellence. In my experience well managed police departments are usually run by former operational police officers, who genuinely care about the quality of support people on the front line receive. Electricity utilities used to be staffed by people who cared – until Western governments made their job impossible. Wartime governments hire people who fix problems, because the threat of imminent invasion tends to focus people’s minds. And of course, occasionally great projects like the Apollo Moon Landing can fire people’s imagination to such an extent, people set aside personal convenience for the greater good.

Is solving the alleged climate crisis a project which fires people’s imagination like the moon landing? I doubt it. Climate action consistently appears at the bottom of people’s lists of priorities. Most serious engineers I’ve met think the climate crisis is a joke. Those engineers and scientists who do believe, who care enough to try, quickly learn the task is impossible with anything resembling current technology. Even for those who believe, solving a future problem simply does not carry the immediacy and emotional punch of working to plant a flag on the moon, or stopping a military invasion.

Calling for a renewable energy Apollo project to make renewable energy viable, with current technology, is like calling for the world to be powered by magic – and about as unlikely to produce a worthwhile outcome.

Update (EW): Chris Hanley has posted one of my favourite analysis of why the renewable revolution is a pipe dream.

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Pauleta
April 5, 2021 2:03 pm

I am in my late 40’s and I have been hearing about government fixing a lot of things for more than 40 years. If they couldn’t fix anything by now, I don’t think they will do anytime soon.

Vuk
Reply to  Pauleta
April 5, 2021 2:34 pm

I’m a bit older, my experience is just a bit different.
Governments and their departments I got to know are a bit like single cell organisms, no brains but very good at multiplying themselves, then collapse under their own weight, and hey presto, a new government comes along but no change, the same single cell biology takes over again, and so on, presumably ad infinitum.

Willem post
Reply to  Vuk
April 5, 2021 7:00 pm

Vuk,
Oh, no, they do not ever collapse under their own weight.
They tax, tax, tax, until they get some semblance of “result”
They declare victory after a debacle, or hide, and then move on to create the next debacle, because that is what they are capable of.

Bryan A
Reply to  Willem post
April 5, 2021 8:19 pm

Let’s not forget, we only have 10 years until climageddon destroys the earth and renders it uninhabitable.
If Government or even Google could do it, it would have been done by now and probably with Cold Fusion

Redge
Reply to  Bryan A
April 5, 2021 11:45 pm

And the 10 years started 30 years ago

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Bryan A
April 6, 2021 3:05 am

It’s worse than you think: Kerry says we only have nine years left.

Scissor
Reply to  Pauleta
April 5, 2021 2:44 pm

Yes, even filling potholes seems to stretch their level of competence.

BTW, has it become fashionable in the U.K. for officials to use a balloon to comb their hair?

philincalifornia
Reply to  Scissor
April 5, 2021 4:31 pm

“Yes, even filling potholes seems to stretch their level of competence.”

So true, even though they have propositions here for taxes to do just that.

Defund politicians.

beng135
Reply to  Scissor
April 6, 2021 8:41 am

They already carry balloons for their hot air source — might as well double as a comb.

Reply to  Pauleta
April 5, 2021 6:51 pm

Government consists in identifying problem, getting elected to fix them, but not risking fixing them for fear they will then have served their purpose.

Oldseadog
Reply to  Leo Smith
April 6, 2021 2:24 am

” …… entrepreneurial spirit of government employees ….. “.
Biggest oxymoron I’ve seen for a long time.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Oldseadog
April 6, 2021 3:14 am

Government employees will certainly be as innovative as your average citizen, but then the bureaucracy comes into the picture and gets in their way.

Your bright idea has to pass muster with the bosses, and the bosses are of the mindset “if it’s not broken, don’t fix it” and so they don’t look with enthusiam on proposals from below to change the status quo.

The only way a bureacracy can be really innovative is if the bureaucracy has a real visionary leader at the helm who wants to go in that direction. If the boss wants it done, then the bureaucracy can get it done because the boss will make sure of it.

Unfortunately, too many government bosses don’t have much vision and are not willing to put their position and reputation on the line in order to make big changes.

Bureaucracies are everywhere, not just in government. And they all operate the same way because human psychology is involved in all cases.

hiskorr
Reply to  Tom Abbott
April 6, 2021 5:17 am

We had one of those “visionary leaders” for a while. He wanted things done at “Warp Speed”. He was used to projects done “ahead of time and under budget”. He posed such a threat to the bureaucracy that he could not be allowed a second term.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  hiskorr
April 7, 2021 8:49 am

He got a lot done while he had the power.

lee
Reply to  Tom Abbott
April 6, 2021 6:44 am

And don’t of course forget the Peter principle.

MM from Canada
Reply to  Tom Abbott
April 6, 2021 8:05 pm

“Your bright idea has to pass muster with the bosses, and the bosses are of the mindset “if it’s not broken, don’t fix it” and so they don’t look with enthusiam on proposals from below to change the status quo.”

It’s not just the bosses. Co-workers at your level complain because an innovation might mean they will have to do more work.

John the Econ
April 5, 2021 2:10 pm

Just like government has made housing and education better & cheaper? Why doesn’t this guy focus on fixing the stuff that the government already mismanages and then perhaps he won’t find such resistance to other moonshot goals.

Also consider that landing on the moon (the easy part) and getting people back alive (the hard part) was a completely quantifiable objective. It was clearly achieved or it wasn’t. Fixing “climate change” has no such objective certainty. Also consider that the vast majority of the plastic in the ocean comes from places where we have little to no influence in the matter.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  John the Econ
April 5, 2021 2:26 pm

Governments have consistently made education better and cheaper. Is there a single example of universal education in any country entirely privately funded? Similarly in the
the UK for example social housing built after WWII improved the lives of millions compared to the slum landlords of previous times. It was only the mass sell off thanks to Thatcher that ruined it.

John the Econ
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 2:58 pm

Really? People now going 6-figures into debt for bachelors degrees because freely available government-backed loans allow them to bid up the price for an education to near infinity. Have you already forgotten the housing meltdown where freely available government-backed loans allowed people who’d never otherwise quality for mortgages to bit up the price of housing?

Mr.
Reply to  John the Econ
April 5, 2021 3:12 pm

And studying for degrees & diplomas in disciplines that provide no job prospects outside of government employment.

H.R.
Reply to  Mr.
April 5, 2021 9:02 pm

If you can’t get a job with your Bachelor or Master of Underwater Basket Weaving degree, you can always become a Jurinalist (Swedish pronunciation).
.
.
Yah, but… you’re right, Leo. Most just end up with a government job or become PPPs (Paid Professional Protesters).

n.n
Reply to  Eric Worrall
April 5, 2021 3:37 pm

Children, girls and boys, with “benefits”, is socially forward thinking. Well, for a minority anyway. I don’t think society in the majority is prepared for social progress. No judgment? New labels.

John the Econ
Reply to  Eric Worrall
April 5, 2021 4:24 pm

It’s sad, but we know that the public schools do not exist for the children. Beyond the indoctrination, anyway.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Eric Worrall
April 5, 2021 4:47 pm

Eric,
Just what is the alternative to government funded schools? While you might be lucky enough to be able to afford private school fees there are plenty of families in the UK and Australia who can’t and in fact rely on free school meals to feed their children. And these are people who are working since the minimum wage is not sufficient to live on. Just how many people from working class backgrounds do you think would have been able to rise up the class ladder without the benefit of a government funded education system?

Bullying unfortunately is commonplace in schools. It does not only happen in public schools. I know people who took their kids out of private schools because of bullying there and they were much happier in a state school. It is the fault of the individual school principal not the system.

John the Econ
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 4:54 pm

One alternative: Vouchers that can be spent at any school of the parent’s choosing. The problem with government-run anything is that it’s a monopoly with all of the negative connotations that the word implies.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  John the Econ
April 5, 2021 5:09 pm

John,
Such vouchers still ensure that education is government funded and so is not an alternative. And just how much of your taxes would you like to see going to pay for the profits of the private school sector or do you imagine that schools are run at cost in the private sector?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 5:40 pm

One usually gets what they pay for. Paying taxes to have children ‘baby sat’ and indoctrinated is a waste of money. Perhaps paying more for a decent education would be worthwhile. Spending fewer years in school, and learning as much or more than in state-run schools, would be appreciated by both tax payers and students. But, then there is the consideration that maybe there is an ulterior motive to keep minors in school as long as possible.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
April 5, 2021 5:49 pm

Clyde,
How exactly do you think parents in most countries would be able to afford to pay for a decent education? In the UK for example the average salary for someone working full-time is 31000 pounds while the average price for a private education is over 15000 pounds. And then there is the fact that in the last few decades the price of private education has increased 4 fold. Do you really think a private education is 4 times better than it used to be?

mikebartnz
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 11:17 pm

Quote “Do you really think a private education is 4 times better than it used to be?”
You asked the wrong question there as it should have been about if that cost was better than sending your kid to a public school which in 90% of cases it would be.

John the Econ
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 6, 2021 10:07 am

Right now, I’m paying 5-figures per kid for little more than glorified day care. (and mediocre day care at that) So I’d be more than happy to see the sizable portion of my property tax money spent in any way where market forces impose discipline.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Eric Worrall
April 5, 2021 6:17 pm

Eric,
How do you know it is due to choice and not due to a larger budget. Australia spends about $500 USD more per person on healthcare than the UK and in return Australians live about one year longer. Which given the advantages of climate and lifestyle that the Australians have suggests that the Australian healthcare system is not actually significantly better than the NHS. And even in the NHS you are allowed to choose your GP and you don’t have to stick with a single practice.

Mr.
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 6:16 pm

Just what is the alternative to government funded schools? 

Home schooling.

Teach kids high competency in the 3 Rs.

Then point them to reliable pathways for access to history & knowledge that has not been ‘re-imagined’ (i.e. NOT Google!)

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Mr.
April 5, 2021 6:27 pm

Just who do you think is going to do the home schooling when both parents have to work to pay the bills?

Mr.
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 8:01 pm

Grandparents.
Like we do.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 6, 2021 4:09 am

seeing as between the school fees for indoctrination of the kids as well as childcare /after school care etc costs damned near as much if not the entire womans yrly income IF shes got a reasonable mid level job…
staying home n schooling em better really is an option

Bryan A
Reply to  Mr.
April 5, 2021 9:55 pm

Three “Rs” is outdated and misspelled
The last time I checked the old Merriam Webster
Writing started with a “W”
And Arithmetic started with an “A”

Mr.
Reply to  Bryan A
April 5, 2021 10:41 pm

Correct Bryan.
You’re obviously home-schooled.

mikebartnz
Reply to  Eric Worrall
April 5, 2021 11:45 pm

Interestingly enough in Masterton NZ (population in the early 20,000’s) we have the largest medical centre in the southern hemisphere and I hate the place. There are so many doctors who all tend to specialize in different things that I would have thought that if you had a certain problem you would be sent to the doctor who specialized in that problem but it doesn’t work that way. They are set up in groups of four, so if your doctor isn’t available you get one of the other three. One of the three that was in my group had a tendency to jump to conclusions and I never want to see him again because I have no faith in that sort of doctor or person.
The only thing I like about it is it is tied up with this online portal ManageMyHealth where you can view all test results and doctors notes etc. online. So you can see a test result as soon as your doctor does. That is brilliant.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  mikebartnz
April 6, 2021 3:24 am

You have to be your own doctor. Doctors are fallible just like everyone else, so you are your last line of defense.

mikebartnz
Reply to  Tom Abbott
April 6, 2021 4:59 am

Not only fallible but total idiots like the one that I struck that jumped to conclusions. It was two minutes into the consultation that I decide that.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  mikebartnz
April 6, 2021 4:13 am

and so can everyone else with access SEE your info
and if its an OS corp owning the programs then your supposedly de identified info is sold to big pharma etc as well
you can ASK and get a fax or hardcopy of all your tests etc anyway
I do so I have my own in my hand for using to make sure the docs HAVE read it properly
out of pockets “specialist” a few weeks ago told me my left side …was an issue
well no it was NOT
its the right side
shows how little attention shed paid
so seeing a second specialist tomorrow armed with all the data n printouts

Andrew Wilkins
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 6, 2021 4:55 am

Just how many people from working class backgrounds do you think would have been able to rise up the class ladder without the benefit of a government funded education system?

It used to be that working class children in the UK could rise up the “class ladder” by securing a place at a free and academically selective grammar school by passing the 11+ academic entrance exam. This exam was open to all school children, no matter what social class they came from. Grammar schools provided a free high-quality education that was comparable to the education a child could expect to receive in a private school. Many Labour politicians attended grammar schools, including that daft old marxist hypocrite Jeremy Corbyn.

Then left-wing “academics”, who had spent little time in a classroom and who had a bitter hatred of the concept of intellectual merit, pushed for the abolition of grammar schools. Grammar schools were gradually phased out. “Comprehensive” schools were then introduced, which every child was expected to attend whatever their intellectual ability.

The bitter lefties hailed the comprehensive schools as some sort of level playing field for all children. They conveniently ignored the hard fact that humans are not all intellectually equal – it was far easier for the lefties to believe in some sort of la la land where there was no intellectual bell curve. Predictably, the majority of these comprehensive schools provided a much poorer standard of education than grammar schools: they struggled to provide an education that could encompass children with such a wide level of academic ability.

Over the past quarter century I’ve taught in comprehensive, grammar, and private schools and can testify to the fact that comprehensive schools have been a complete failure. A few grammar schools still remain today, and they are universally excellent, thus proving the left-wing “educational experts” completely wrong.

NB Thatcher was involved in the closing of grammar schools, which she later bitterly regretted – those of us on the right are brave enough to admit our mistakes.

Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 6, 2021 3:44 pm

We spend about 14k per student per year in the US. That would cover the expense in a non government school.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Dennis Topczewski
April 7, 2021 8:57 am

vouchers to allow people to send their children to private schools is rapidly gaining in popularity according to a poll on tv today where even a majority of Democrats favor giving parents the choice of what school their children attend.

No doubt, the Teacher’s Unions keeping kids out of school for much longer than necessary over the Wuhan virus scare, is influencing people to realize they need more education choices than Teacher’s Unions give them.

So the Teacher’s Unions are shooting themselves in the foot by continuing to keep teachers from going back to class. Parents are looking for alternatives.

TonyG
Reply to  Tom Abbott
April 7, 2021 10:25 am

Just read that one state (don’t remember which) is saying that even September 2021 is uncertain.

DonM
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 4:24 pm

Izzak,

as a (likely) product of public education, you do not make a positive example to your point. Government education is not in any way consistently better AND cheaper than it was in the past.

Ridiculous exaggeration is not an effective debate tool (unless/until your audience is already on your side).

philincalifornia
Reply to  DonM
April 5, 2021 4:34 pm

Give the guy a break – he seems like he’s a product of it …..

John the Econ
Reply to  philincalifornia
April 5, 2021 4:55 pm

…or a beneficiary of the government monopoly.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  John the Econ
April 5, 2021 5:03 pm

…or paid to post disinformation.

Granum Salis
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
April 5, 2021 8:53 pm

Please, please, please, don’t go there!

The whole “paid troll” meme is tedious.

That’s what ‘they’ do with “Russian interference” and ‘fact checking’.

I appreciate, for example, Nick Stokes, who comes here with a willingness to engage and argue his side. I disagree fairly consistently with his take on things, but I deplore the ad hominem vitriol that always greets his posts.

Reply to  Granum Salis
April 6, 2021 12:20 am

….and the one day that Izaak actually talk sense, everybody jumps on him…
But also, there are a number of paid trolls on this site. Trolling for money is a growth industry, it “guides the narrative”. On TwatFaceGram they are called ‘fact checkers’, but in the wild, they are called “tryingtoplaynice’ or ‘griff’ or even ‘anti-griff’.
Then you get the ones working for free… because, consensus science!

Tom Abbott
Reply to  paranoid goy
April 6, 2021 3:29 am

Who pays all these trolls? Is this a serious charge? Is there an organized effort to spread alarmist disinformation here and throughout the rest of the internet?

I’m not dismissing the notion. I wouldn’t put it past some unscrupulous, leftwing rich person to pay people to voice a certain opinion onllne, but I have never seen any hard evidence that this takes place.

So I’m asking.

Reply to  Tom Abbott
April 6, 2021 4:55 am

Serious charge? No, it is just a tap-down for people who irritate one on a bad day. As for “paid”, yes, a number of people have come out to tell us about their experiences in centralised troll farms, where each employee is assigned a batch of sites to troll, or given parameters to judge and earmark sites for trolling by others. This site is a prime example, some user names even have multiple posters, as seen by the writing style and pet sound bites.
Proof? Search for any of the documents published by various health departments and think tanks on “steering the narrative” on, for example, covidiocy, mass vaccinations, carbon taxes… Of course, they are not as blatant as to use terms like ‘trolling’, no, they say they “insert realism into the conversation” or “counter misinformation” or just “fact checking”.
Then you get the professionals, like Snopes, who trawl the net for ‘misinformation’ that gets too many hits, and then they publish a hit-piece, where they deliver the real Truth unto their believers. Google is sure to put that one at the top!
Who pays them? Baal Gates openly sponsors a number of these organisations, so do various monopoly industries, like Monsanto, Syngenta, Moderna, Pfizer, Raytheon, basically anyone that makes a living from death and destruction.
Then there are the governmentals, who are ever ready to make sure we “follow the science” of whatever brain fart their economists came up with this time.
The biggest group, of course, and this is my pet peeve, the hordes, hordes I say, of Montessori-educated, libtard, wokist, climastrologist, eugenicist scum commonly known as Bolsheviks. You recognise them by how they love everything and everyone, which they then poetically expound upon, seeding each post with just one little kernel of “Truth” as understood by those who believe the world to be dangerously overpopulated by dissidents and patriots.
Examples? I dunno, just look at all the people on this thread praising the wonders of privatised education and dissing publically educated plebs, each with a little private tale of suffering and redemption by corporate indoctrination, sorry, private schooling. Many actually do it with the best of intentions, just like Ma’m Montessori taught them.
Here’s an example! Take note how many posts on covidiocy try to shame vaccine dissenters by telling us about their friends who succumbed to the horrible covid1984 plague, always with the heart strings, eh? That is actually an official technique amply described in the departmental manuals I mentioned earlier.

Consider this: The operations manual by the NHS for convincing the public to stand behind universal vaccination has four head writers; an oncologist, and three, count them, three psychologists. To tell us about virology? That’s serious professional trolling, brother! I quote:

The report relies on a few foundational practices of effective health communication, namely coordinated communication and consistent messaging, trust building through partnerships, consideration of different health literacy levels in the population, and importantly, prioritizing equity in all aspects of communication.

I underlined the trolling bit, from the intro, the document gets specific later on. I have it on PDF, cannot find the link.
Also, you may be aware They actually did a “clinical study” on something like seven different approaches to shame and accuse people they call “anti-vaxxers” otherwise known as people with working memories and lack of followsomeness. “You are killing granny by not vaccinating” is a popular one.
P.S. I also see myself as a (unpaid) troll; I jump on every Bolshie I can sniff, sometimes getting it wrong, but I need the practice. As we used to say: “Why should the devil have all the good music?”

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Tom Abbott
April 6, 2021 7:11 am

There is no way to know with any certainty if any individual is or is not paid to post, of course, and such a person would never admit to being one. Yet the way some tow the party line so perfectly while refusing to consider that the party line might be wrong does lead one to consider the possibility.

Tossing the idea out and observing the reactions can be interesting…

Greg61
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 5:10 pm

Are you from Mars?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Greg61
April 5, 2021 5:41 pm

More likely from Venus.

LdB
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 6:07 pm

Two fine examples of the over-educated who stayed too long in academia …. the real world works a bit different.

Fact: In this decade the cost of education rose 8 times faster than wages
over-educated dropkick translation: Governments have consistently made education better and cheaper

Tom Abbott
Reply to  LdB
April 6, 2021 3:34 am

Yes, the government made it easy for anyone to go to college by providing loans to go to school, and the colleges saw that the students had plenty of money, so the colleges decided they could raise the price of eductation and the government would pay for it.

And that’s what has happened.

Then the college students graduate with a huge debt hanging over their head. Self-inflicted, or course. They volunteered for the debt.

Meanwhile, the colleges make out like bandits.

John MacDonald
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 7:33 pm

Izaak, I dispute strongly your first statement.In the US, cost per child ranges from $8000 to $27000. There is no correlation to outcomes and learning. And in most school systems the grad rates and learning proficiency are abysmal.
For your question, look up Hillsdale College. They take no government money and provide an excellent liberal arts education. They even teach the Constitution.

Philip
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 8:37 pm

When you wake up your dreaming again, I’ll get you a cup of coffee and then I’ll let you pay off my kids kid’s college loans. Oh while your at it spend a couple million to buy them a shack in California.

mikebartnz
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 5, 2021 11:09 pm

Quote “Governments have consistently made education better”.
What universe do you live on.
In NZ back in the early 1900’s these twelve year olds were asked these algebra questions and in about the 1980’s these trainee teachers were asked the same questions. Guess which group did better. I will give you a clue. It puts a lie to your first sentence above.

Andrew Wilkins
Reply to  Izaak Walton
April 6, 2021 4:13 am

The “mass sell off” you refer to gave people the chance to own their property and get off the government teat. This allowed them to sell the property if they wished and move up the economic ladder. Thatcher quite rightly saw that private enterprise is the way to grow an economy and raise living standards. The 1970s was run by Labour and it resulted in eternal strikes and rubbish piling up in the streets.

BTW Arthur Scargill, the arch socialist and professional Thatcher-hater tried to use Thatcher’s right to buy policy to buy his (very expensive) flat. Why are lefties always the biggest hypocrites?

Don Perry
Reply to  John the Econ
April 5, 2021 8:16 pm

Oh, really? Having spent several decades in education, all I saw as government took over from local control were unfunded mandates to capitulate to the demands of special interest groups that took away from basic education. That’s why we have so many utterly ignorant, uneducated twits running around who can’t spell, speak or write coherently, tell you who fought the war between the states, find Alaska on a map, nor name the three branches of government.

Don Perry
Reply to  Don Perry
April 5, 2021 8:18 pm

Sorry, that reply should have been to Izaak Walton

Editor
April 5, 2021 2:16 pm

“…the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees…” ????

Now there’s an oxymoron.

Regards,
Bob

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Bob Tisdale
April 5, 2021 2:52 pm

Now there’s an oxymoron

That was my immediate thought. She needs to lay off the magic mushrooms.

Observer
Reply to  Bob Tisdale
April 5, 2021 4:46 pm

To be fair, they are quite inventive when it comes to thinking up new taxes.

George Daddis
Reply to  Observer
April 5, 2021 5:55 pm

I just finished re reading Dicken’s Little Dorrit. His description of the Circumlocution Office was prescient.

H.R.
Reply to  Bob Tisdale
April 5, 2021 9:16 pm

That was my second reaction, Bob. My first reaction was a laughing fit.

But then I thought about all those government employees that spend their day running their online businesses and e-bay sales – using government (taxpayer supplied) computers – and I realized that the spark of entrepreneurship still lives in some of our public servants.

Rich Davis
April 5, 2021 2:16 pm

the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees”

Something similar to the piety of prostitutes?


H.R.
Reply to  Rich Davis
April 5, 2021 9:29 pm

Rich, when you compare Climate Cyan Tits to prostitutes, just remember that the prostitutes are at least actually providing something (sex). Have we received anything of value from all the money thrown at ‘Climate Science’?

Wait up… I shouldn’t be so hard on the Climate Cyan Tits. After all, they have provided us with many, many hours of laughter.

Rud Istvan
April 5, 2021 2:22 pm

Obvious that this lady became an economist because she could not cut it as a real world engineer.
In the US we have had the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) for decades. Every technology spin out of the Lab so far has failed. All they mostly do is produce erroneous reports like on how wind will get cheaper or solar cells more efficient. I used one of their bogus wind studies in Climate Etc post ‘True Cost of Wind’ to show how both NREL and EIA deliberately mislead the public on renewables by misstating or cherry picking facts.

Scissor
Reply to  Rud Istvan
April 5, 2021 3:04 pm

NREL began as the Solar Energy Research Institute in 1974.

I worked for a spin out company for a few years and a lot of money was successfully transferred from taxpayers and investors through Wall Street to bankers, executives and employees as well. We didn’t net any energy gain, but we had fun doing it.

Observer
Reply to  Rud Istvan
April 5, 2021 4:34 pm

All they mostly do is produce erroneous reports like on how wind will get cheaper or solar cells more efficient.

That’s not erroneous! They are getting cheaper and more efficient.

Just not enough.

Spetzer86
Reply to  Observer
April 5, 2021 5:03 pm

With all the tax exemptions, rebates and what not thrown at renewables, whether they are really cheaper and better is probably completely up to debate. Once you’ve obscured reality sufficiently, all bets are off.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Rud Istvan
April 5, 2021 4:36 pm

There are a couple exceptions: First Solar began at the Univ. of Toledo as a subcontractor to SERI/NREL developing CdS/CdTe solar cells (a long time ago) as part of the Thin-Film PV Program. Another is the GaP/GaAs/Ge triple cell that came out of the internal High Efficiency III-V semiconductor research and was spun out to Spectrolab (now Boeing). These were only useful for space applications because of the high cost; the first Mars Rovers successfully used them for their power supplies, for example.

Today the PV program has been transformed by DoE toward The Search for The Magic Battery (of interest here at WUWT of course), and making low efficiency cheap perovskite solar cells that degrade quickly, with lots of bureaucratic overhead and paper studies.

philincalifornia
Reply to  Rud Istvan
April 5, 2021 4:38 pm

Yep, having been peripherally associated with those folks, total failure in cellulosic ethanol production, and the grants they supposedly give out to companies are actually grants that they give to themselves. If a company wants to play the game, they have to pay to play (20%).

commieBob
Reply to  Rud Istvan
April 5, 2021 6:16 pm

My recollection is that the folks managing the early space program aggressively hewed to off-the-shelf technology. In other words, they avoided using technology that wasn’t already well understood. Am I correct in remembering it that way?

If you do not need technological breakthroughs, something like a moonshot can work.

If you need technological breakthroughs, better management and more resources will likely guarantee failure. Greatness cannot be planned.

TheMigthyQuinn
April 5, 2021 2:29 pm

…the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees…

OMG – how dumb is this lady. People become government employees because they DON’T HAVE. entrepreneurial spirit.

TomO
Reply to  TheMigthyQuinn
April 5, 2021 2:56 pm

dumb enough to trouser likely $200k / year of our taxes….

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  TomO
April 5, 2021 5:45 pm

That’s actually a form of graft, not an indication of intelligence.

philincalifornia
Reply to  TomO
April 5, 2021 7:48 pm

Yes, but if you take it to the level of “you only have one life”, this imposter parasite can safely say that she was highly successful in stealing money from her fellow humans, and that’s all.

Bet she lives in a nice house though.

Mr.
April 5, 2021 2:30 pm

Governments and diapers need to be changed frequently.
And for the same reasons.

  • Mark Twain
CD in Wisconsin
Reply to  Mr.
April 5, 2021 4:07 pm

How many govt employees does it take to change a light bulb?
Answer: 5…..one to stand on a chair and hold the bulb and four to stand on the floor and turn the chair.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  CD in Wisconsin
April 5, 2021 5:46 pm

But, it the light bulb really wants to change, it can do it on its own — if the government doesn’t get in the way!

philincalifornia
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
April 5, 2021 7:50 pm

No. No way am I going to do the how many blondes does it take to change a lightbulb joke …….

.

No way

.

It’s two actually

Jim G.
Reply to  CD in Wisconsin
April 5, 2021 9:23 pm

Now is that righty tighty/lefty loosey?

Michael in Dublin
April 5, 2021 2:36 pm

I fully agree with economist Mariana Mazzucato that a huge investment should be made to fix climate change, poverty and ocean plastics. She and her supporters must show by their investment that this will work.

The rest of us will, until we are convinced, rather spend our moneys wisely.

George Daddis
Reply to  Michael in Dublin
April 5, 2021 6:01 pm

Just picking on one specific; is “ocean plastics” a real problem?

I’m asking people who make a living at sea; not PBS watchers.

Granum Salis
Reply to  George Daddis
April 5, 2021 9:14 pm

I have read that a high percentage of ocean debris is generated by those that make their living at sea.

Google searches for ‘Pacific garbage patch’ reliably return pictures of Manila harbor or some beach somewhere. Even NOAA has a page that acknowledges that the plastic is not actually visible.

I live a five-minute walk from the Pacific; the garbage I see is mostly from the fishing industry.

Chris Hanley
April 5, 2021 2:44 pm

As this study points out there are physical limits to the energy that can be got from wind and solar as currently employed.
Also even if they could reach optimum efficiency the ratio of energy return on energy invested including storage for both cannot sustain a modern economy, for instance PV panels in locations of moderate insolation like UK are net energy sinks.

commieBob
Reply to  Chris Hanley
April 5, 2021 7:10 pm

That study definitely goes into my collection.

There is a section titled “Moore’s Law Misapplied”. The starry eyed idiots who think Moore’s Law applies to all technology are ignorant of Eroom’s Law. Moore’s Law is an anomaly. It’s opposite, Eroom’s Law, is more prevalent in developing technology. When I was a pup, everyone knew about the Law of Diminishing Returns. I don’t recall hearing anyone talk about that for a while. Anyway, Eroom’s Law is something like that.

The people advocating renewable energy have no understanding of how technology develops. They just have faith that it will do so. Why then do they lack faith that we will learn to adapt to whatever the climate throws at us. Adaptation is demonstrably more likely and cheaper than practical renewable energy.

John Culhane
April 5, 2021 2:49 pm

Yet another economist providing pseudo-intellectual cover for government central planning using inflation this time applying the label “sustainable growth”. Magic money theory is en-vogue at the moment as governments across the world are creating lots of new spending plans through debt with no intention of ever paying it off, as if they need any excuse to tax, borrow and spend . . .

George Daddis
Reply to  John Culhane
April 5, 2021 6:04 pm

Modern Monetary Theory. Venezuela just didn’t do it right! [/sarc]

philincalifornia
Reply to  George Daddis
April 5, 2021 7:12 pm

I was just having a discussion with a colleague earlier today, and we got on to 1930s Germany and remembered that before real communications, the libtardian reptiles had everyone convinced that the National Socialist Party wasn’t a socialist party.

I really miss the spazz icon.

commieBob
Reply to  George Daddis
April 5, 2021 7:31 pm

It’s easy to argue that Venezuela didn’t do it right. The correct way to view Venezuela is as the continuation of arguably the most malign experiment in human history.

How many times has Marxism been tried? How many times has it succeeded?

The ratio of Marxist successes to Marxist attempts is zero.

The Bolshevik plague that began in Russia was the greatest catastrophe in human history.

link

April 5, 2021 2:51 pm

This woman is ignorant. She thinks the government invented the internet and GPS. No, the gov simply didn’t excessively prohibit multiple independent inventors from continuing, although it did try.

Peta of Newark
April 5, 2021 2:52 pm

Here’s a lovely example of Government At Wurk..
The Western Link

At the rate that that joke is helping Climate, Neil Armstrong would never have got closer to the Moon than the top of my stairs.
Not doing bill-payers any favours either

What went wrong when folks get paid for actively doing nothing? ##
beyond crazy

## Is that actually an admission that windmills are= Bad For Climate?

April 5, 2021 2:52 pm

I also think the photo of this woman is just actor Liam Neeson in drag.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Zoe Phin
April 5, 2021 5:49 pm

Only another woman could get away with that! White female privilege. 🙂

TomO
April 5, 2021 2:53 pm

 “entrepreneurial spirit of government employees should be harnessed”

and what would that sinecured eejit know about “entrepreneurial spirit” ? – if the subject to hand were conceited entitlement laced with arrogance one might have to acknowledge some self evident subject expertise.

I could lob ad-homs but I’d be just re-inventing the wheel

pfff … I wonder how much she trousers every year essentially from our taxes for spouting so much tosh?

Editor
April 5, 2021 3:01 pm

comment image

TomO
April 5, 2021 3:05 pm

Professor Mazzucato has been seen elsewhere

  • and I’d feel safe wagering that if she knew about it – she wouldn’t be happy… – which would suit me just fine.
philincalifornia
Reply to  TomO
April 5, 2021 4:42 pm

WOW, that’s an interesting read.

TomO
Reply to  philincalifornia
April 5, 2021 11:24 pm

yup… the lady has previous

April 5, 2021 3:05 pm

In the case of the moonshot, there has to be a passenger: Mariana Mazzucato

Last edited 17 days ago by Krishna Gans
Streetcred
April 5, 2021 3:06 pm

I had a senior GFC job in government for a couple of years and met some very committed individuals, not many though, the rest had made an artform of dodging work and were extremely unreliable in a portfolio that required reliability and a problem solving ability … guess that’s why they dodged work.

Don’t make me laugh, “the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees should be harnessed, to solve big problems … “

Stevek
April 5, 2021 3:08 pm

The structure of government makes it virtually impossible to get anything done. There is a ton of red tape for even small decisions. Politics and power drive the decision making process.

About the best thing government could do would be to cut all the regulations to make it easier for businesses to innovate.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Stevek
April 6, 2021 3:55 am

“The structure of government makes it virtually impossible to get anything done. There is a ton of red tape for even small decisions. Politics and power drive the decision making process.”

That sums it up pretty good.

The best innovators are those who have skin in the game. Private enterprise has skin in the game, government employees usually don’t have skin in the game, so they don’t push nearly as hard to get something accomplished.

Chris Hanley
April 5, 2021 3:12 pm

“The reason I think it worked is because NASA was very confident,” she says.

Because they knew both rocket technology developed through many trials and Newton’s Laws worked.

Last edited 17 days ago by Chris Hanley
Reply to  Chris Hanley
April 5, 2021 3:21 pm

Yep…
comment image

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Chris Hanley
April 6, 2021 4:00 am

Lots of money made NASA confident.

The reason they did so well is because their boss, President Kennedy, had a personal interest in it, and the nation had a personal interest in it after President Kennedy was assasinated. That guaranteed that the mission to the Moon would be attempted, in honor of President Kennedy.

n.n
April 5, 2021 3:32 pm

Renewable as in drivers? As in intermittent? The rocket can take brakes to remain viable. Now, how does it escape the Earth’s gravity well? Carbon credits?

Oh, renewable as in rocket fuel, pumped to replenish (“renewable”) its reservoirs.

Stevek
April 5, 2021 3:33 pm

All a person has to do is spend a week working for a startup company, then spend a week working for the government. Report back on the differences between the two work environments.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Stevek
April 6, 2021 4:05 am

Like night and day.

On the outer Barcoo
April 5, 2021 3:36 pm

“… the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees” … now that is an oxymoron!

DonM
Reply to  On the outer Barcoo
April 5, 2021 4:11 pm

Here, a few years back, a county dept manager told a couple of maintenance guys to dispose of a large piece of equipment (maybe heating/AC). They saw it, took their private assessment, loaded it up, and sold it and kept the money.

That’s the extent of the entrepreneurial spirit that you will find in govt employees.

Pat Frank
April 5, 2021 3:45 pm

Mariana Mazzucato’s website says, “History tells us that innovation is an outcome of a massive collective effort…

Dead wrong. Probably also perversely wrong.

History tells us that innovation comes form curiosity-based research, and from nowhere else. Curiosity-based research is the invariable province of the individual.

Massive collective effort is the holy grail of the progressive tyrant and of the bureaucrat in search of a sinecure.

Given Prof. Mariana Mazzucato’s obsession with reforming Capitalism, I’d surmise she is of the former persuasion. The attack on Capitalism is merely a stalking horse for the attack on individualism. Collectivists cannot live in peace with individualists. Social slavers cannot live in peace with personal freedom.

Isn’t it fatuous that those who call for reform of independent corporatism wish to do so by turning all of society into a corporation. Of course, it’s the corporation they, the progressives, control. And that, of course, can only be to the good.

Rud Istvan
Reply to  Pat Frank
April 5, 2021 4:22 pm

‘Massive collective effort’. Tell that to Einstein, Tesla, Edison, Ford…

Pat Frank
Reply to  Rud Istvan
April 5, 2021 5:09 pm

Exactly. And Galileo and Volta, and Rutherford and Gilbert, and even all the way back to Thales of Miletus.

ripshin
Editor
Reply to  Pat Frank
April 6, 2021 10:58 am

Even in the corporate world, I can tell you that true innovation is normally* the product of an individual’s creativity. Certainly the corporation can bring resources to bear in order to optimize the innovation, but the heart of it is invariably from an individual.

rip

*I am not precluding the possibility of a group of people collectively coming up with an innovation…I’ve just never really seen a collective innovation comparing with an individual one.

Reply to  ripshin
April 6, 2021 1:20 pm

Carbon taxes!!! Gender diaspora (Tavistock). The Beatles (Tavistock).
There you have three innovations by committee. Gods I hate the Beatles!
P.S. Turns out the girlies throwing panties onto the stage, were paid beforehand.

Reply to  Rud Istvan
April 6, 2021 12:44 am

Gave you a plus, but get Edison off your list, he was a “collective genius”, in that he admitted to never inventing nothing, instead employing inventors and patenting their work for himself. Einstein as well, unless you give credit to his wife for doing the actual heavy carrying.

Pat Frank
Reply to  paranoid goy
April 6, 2021 9:55 am

never inventing nothing” is a double negative, meaning Edison was always inventing everything. Grammer is so important, wouldn’t you agree?

Some of Edison’s greatest inventions.

That Mileva Einstein-Maric did the work on Relativistic Mechanics is a large theory based on thin evidence. Also here.

Albert Einstein’s Nobel was for showing that QM explains the photoelectric effect. Not for Relativity Theory.

Reply to  Pat Frank
April 6, 2021 1:29 pm

Grammer is so important, wouldn’t you agree?

Know what I dig even more? Grammar! You know what’s even betterer? A sense of humour…
As for ole Albertus? Never a fan, I prefer Tesla, his universe makes better sense, the little we know. Not that it is relevant to this …er … anyway, Edison is on record, as far as we can trust records, for owning patents, not inventing the stuff his paid staff came up with, or bought from other inventors, and more than one whisper of outright… copyright disrespect, shall we say?
But I forgive you, as I see below you posted one of my most bestest favourite diagrammes; the Corporate Selfgratification, albeit with millennial captions.

Pat Frank
Reply to  paranoid goy
April 6, 2021 3:31 pm

Good catch. I posted a typo.

Preferring Tesla over Einstein is no reason for slander.

As for Edison’s inventions:

The Edison effect and its modern applications
Abstract: We are so accustomed to thinking of Thomas A. Edison as the father of the incandescent lamp and of the electric lighting industry that we sometimes forget that his first achievements were in the field of the electrical communication of intelligence, and that in this field he is no less distinguished. To say nothing of his inventions in multiplex and automatic telegraphy, it is well to recall that the field of telephony owes no less to the fundamental inventions of Mr. Edison than to those of Alexander Graham Bell. Bell, it is true, invented the telephone receiver of today, but Edison invented the transmitter, and afterwards invented a highly efficient receiver on a principle entirely different from that of Dr. Bell’s.
Published in: Journal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers ( Volume: 41, Issue: 1, Jan. 1922)

1922: well before the revisionist disparagerie turned their sights on accomplished men.

Reply to  Pat Frank
April 6, 2021 11:58 pm

American Journal 1922? That’s like quoting the New York Times 2021. Or any liberal rag on St. Obama. Or Google on Hillary Clinton. Or Baal Gates on vaccines. Or Michael Mann on carbon dioxide. Or yourself on slander?

Pat Frank
Reply to  paranoid goy
April 7, 2021 8:05 am

And your fact-and-reason-free rejection is based upon mere personal disparagement.

The Journal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers still has standing at IEEE.

The journal has a continuous publication record since 1905, and after some name changes is now IEEE Spectrum.

You accused Einstein, without evidence, of taking credit for his wife’s work. That’s slander.

Photios
Reply to  Pat Frank
April 5, 2021 5:22 pm

Social slavers?
The perfect description.
Thank you

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Pat Frank
April 5, 2021 5:56 pm

And then there is the image of the animal designed by a committee: a camel!

Pat Frank
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
April 6, 2021 9:58 am

And then there’s the swing designed by a committee. 🙂

25a.jpg
Frank from NoVA
Reply to  Pat Frank
April 5, 2021 6:24 pm

Pat,

Ms. Mazzucato, like all Keynesian Klowns, suffers from the Fatal Conceit that an economy can be centrally planned. We have a century of experience that such efforts always end in death and misery.

Pat Frank
Reply to  Frank from NoVA
April 5, 2021 8:42 pm

Frank, it’s a sign of their pathology that such people never see the tragically obvious.

Jim G.
Reply to  Frank from NoVA
April 5, 2021 9:36 pm

The irony is that they don’t even apply Keynes they way he intended.

They heard the “spend during deficits” part, but misinterpreted the “save during plenty” as “spend even more”.

Frank from NoVA
Reply to  Jim G.
April 6, 2021 10:07 am

That too, Jim. Besides the cover they provide to government central planning, the other issue is aggregation, or how they treat capital, which they have to assume so they can “math up” their analyses. From their viewpoint an equal dollar amount of CCGTs, wind turbines or ex-nihlo bank deposits are all equivalent amounts of capital.

DMA
Reply to  Pat Frank
April 5, 2021 6:48 pm

She needs to be told that part of the Apollo team decided, out of curiosity, to tackel the climate emergency and has already succeeded. Hal Doiron and The Right Climate Stuff team clearly demonstrated there is no climate crisis caused by burning fossil fuels. Now that is news worth noting.

April 5, 2021 3:48 pm

“If humans can land on the Moon, why can’t they also solve some of the huge challenges here on Earth” Possibly because they didn’t.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  nicholas tesdorf
April 5, 2021 5:58 pm

The reason is because government gets in the way. People, and bureaucrats, are often their own worst enemy.

Pat Frank
Reply to  nicholas tesdorf
April 5, 2021 8:45 pm

The moon landing was watched in real time by thousands of amateur astronomers world-wide, nicholas.

ResourceGuy
April 5, 2021 3:54 pm

Which country and group of taxpayers is she directing this to? If it’s the US, it will need to get in line at spending surge bill number 32 at least.

DonM
April 5, 2021 3:56 pm

The analogy to “fixing climate change” IS NOT the Apollo Moonshot endevour.

The correct analogy is to “fixing climate change” is ‘parking Rastafarian medley soup’.

The term “Fixing climate change” non-nonsensical.

Robert of Texas
April 5, 2021 4:18 pm

“Renewable Energy Moonshot”
I am in complete agreement. Everyone who supports intermittent wind and solar energy in place of stable reliable energy should be herded into a rocket ship and sent to the Moon to live.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Robert of Texas
April 5, 2021 6:00 pm

I vote for the “B Ark.”

philincalifornia
April 5, 2021 4:29 pm

Pro Big Government Economist Calls For blah blah blah
Big Pro Government Economist should spend more time catching up with the empirical findings and that the thing she calls climate change doesn’t actually exist.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  philincalifornia
April 6, 2021 4:17 am

Yes, establishing that the Earth’s climate is a problem and that humans can do something to fix it, ought to be the first thing done before mounting an “all hands on deck” effort to fix something that may not need fixing.

Obviously, this woman has bought into the Human-caused Climate Change narrative without any real understanding of the issues. She is not alone, unfortunately.

Alex
April 5, 2021 4:47 pm

“the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees”. A classic oxymoron.

J N
April 5, 2021 4:48 pm

Off topic. I think that this is in need for a post.
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/04/05/asia/japan-cherry-blossoms-climate-change-intl-hnk-scn/index.html

In this case the claim in the title is completly contradicted by the graphic of the publication itself, which I find hilarious. There are at least 4 or five points below the present one in the graphic.
Do journalists know how to read graphs?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  J N
April 5, 2021 6:01 pm

Why not post it in the recent article about cherry picking blossoms?

J N
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
April 5, 2021 10:34 pm

Exactly! kkkkk

Shoki Kaneda
April 5, 2021 5:02 pm

“College of London Economist Mariana Mazzucato thinks the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees should be harnessed, to solve big problems like plastics pollution and climate change.”

Memo to Mariana:
They don’t have any entrepreneurial spirit. If they did, they would be — wait for it — entrepreneurs, not bureaucrat drones.

April 5, 2021 5:05 pm

When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Leave it to an economist to perceive that a solution can be achieved by adding enough money.

A solution presumes that there is a problem. The only place a problem is identified is in bogus monstrous computer models. The solution to that is simple: Stop fiddling with the bogus models.

For starters, use the measured water vapor (TPW) instead of calculating it assuming constant relative humidity (which is about 2/3 measured. RH is a dopy way of doing it but that is another story).

Walter Sobchak
April 5, 2021 5:23 pm

“entrepreneurial spirit of government employees”

That is what you call an oxymoron.

Clyde Spencer
April 5, 2021 5:32 pm

“entrepreneurial spirit of government employees”

That looks like a candidate for a list of oxymorons.

George Daddis
April 5, 2021 5:48 pm

“..Leading economist Mariana Mazzucato isn’t the first to ask why, if humans can land on the Moon, they can’t also solve some of the huge challenges here on Earth such as climate change, poverty or a plastic-free ocean.

Mariana is also not the first to articulate non sequiturs.

Gordon A. Dressler
April 5, 2021 5:56 pm

One simple question for economist Mariana Mazzucato: What, specifically, is the big problem of “climate change”?

philincalifornia
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
April 5, 2021 6:37 pm

I’ll give her a suggested answer:

“The big problem of climate change for me, is how much longer can I keep lying about it and still have positive cash flow into my bank account”

Olen
April 5, 2021 6:49 pm

Latch on to NASA’s Apollo program give the impression of prestige in selling the unknown. NASA was confident because they were skilled and competent.

Willem post
April 5, 2021 6:55 pm

This is off-the-charts hilarious.

The ENTREPRENEURIAL spirit of government employees?

It took a Bill Gates to create Microsoft, a Steve Jobs to create Apple, a Jeff Bezos to create Amazon.

There are no such people in government

Government employees are functionaries.
They do things by the book
They are afraid of their own shadow

Give them power, and they will spend way out of proportion to reality.

Give them one or two $TRILLION for infrastructure to play with, and guaranteed, they will waste 50% of it.

If GW is to tackled, only private enterprise can do it, by means of ingenuity.

Government command/control, a la Communism, Socialism, etc., will never do it.

Art
April 5, 2021 7:01 pm

The “entrepreneurial spirit of government employees”….Comedy GOLD!

Joel O'Bryan
April 5, 2021 7:34 pm

In 1961, after JFK became US President, there was widespread belief among Americans that the US was losing the space race to the Soviets. President Kennedy asked NASA with all its Mercury Program engineers working on manned space flight if it was possible to go to the Moon within a decade.
They came back after study and said,”Yes, Mr President it was.”
JFK gave his famous “We choose to go the Moon…” speech at Rice Stadium in Houston, Texas, on September 12, 1962.
And so the “Moon shot” program began that saw Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin step foot on the Moon in July 1969.

This economist idiot, College of London Economist Mariana Mazzucato, not even an engineer or understanding the engineering impossibility of going 100% Wind and Solar, is advocating for that nonsense. It is impossible for any industrial-technical nation without significant hydro-electric resources or willingness to build lots of nuclear power to become so reliant on Wind and Solar and have anything remotely resembling a reliable electricity grid service.

My only conclusion is Ms Mazzucto must be feeling like the Climate Fanatics are losing the Climate Scam game, like Americans felt they were losing the Space Race in 1962. The difference being then in 1962 we wanted to beat the Communists, not become like them.

Last edited 16 days ago by joelobryan
Tom Abbott
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
April 6, 2021 4:25 am

“My only conclusion is Ms Mazzucto must be feeling like the Climate Fanatics are losing the Climate Scam game”

I think that is correct. All these years and the alarmists still can’t get traction with the public about Human-caused Climate Change.

The alarmists are losing because they can’t prove what they claim and this is becoming more obvious every day.

The Climategate Charlatans made a good run of it, but now the scam is about to run up against reality. CO2 is increasing, yet the temperatures are not. Nothing unprecedented to see here.

Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
April 5, 2021 7:35 pm
College of London Economist Mariana Mazzucato thinks the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees should be harnessed, to solve big problems like plastics pollution and climate change.

“government employees” and “entrepreneurial spirit” are mutually exclusive.

April 5, 2021 7:38 pm

A renewable Energy Moonshot, eh!

Well, who would have thought?

I wrote two articles about just that thing at my home site, titled A Moonshot Too Far, Parts one and two.

I detailed roughly what it might take to replace coal fired power in the U.S. with renewable power.

If any of you wish to read those articles here are the links to them.

A Moonshot Too Far – Part One

A Moonshot Too Far – Part Two

Just out of interest go and have a look. And after you read a few lines, the whole article, whatever, then go right back to the top, and look at the date I wrote them, in July of 2008, thirteen years ago. (and all the data and maths involved in those two Posts are based on 2008 data from the EIA)

The first article has a link to a story on the ABC website (the Australian ABC media network that is) that prompted me to write them, and it details Al Gore calling for the U.S. to move completely to renewable within ten years. (hence by 2018) Good to see that worked out so well, eh!

Sometimes, history repeats.

Same call, same no result.

Tony.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  TonyfromOz
April 6, 2021 4:39 am

So the author should have known what she proposes is completely unrealistic, if she had bothered to do a little research.

The author is a typical clueless alarmist. They don’t question the basic assumption that humans are causing the Earth’s climate to change in some observable way, and that is their first mistake. There is no evidence for this, yet they assume there is. They start out believing a false premise, and get farther from the truth as they go down this path.

Of course, the author has a lot of special interests feeding her these climate change lies. The Earth’s climate is a complicated subject very easily distorted by promoters of the Human-caused Climate Change narrative. They have managed to fool this author into believing something for which there is no evidence.

The author needs to start reading WUWT ASAP.

Charlie
Reply to  TonyfromOz
April 6, 2021 7:08 am

Thanks for that. Whenever this moonshot comparison comes up, like to point out that the cost of the Apollo programme was trivial compared to what the global warming lunatics hav planned.

observa
April 5, 2021 8:35 pm

“Is solving the alleged climate crisis a project which fires people’s imagination like the moon landing?”
Not a snowball’s chance in Hell with the public circus-
ROSS CLARK: How absurd you may be banned from selling your own home (msn.com)

gbaikie
April 5, 2021 8:36 pm

College of London Economist Mariana Mazzucato thinks the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees should be harnessed, to solve big problems like plastics pollution and climate change.”
That is so dumb.
And, why is there no expression of “governmental spirit”?
What would that convey?
A permanent detachment from reality?

Mark Smith
April 5, 2021 8:46 pm

The moinshot was self interest- it is space agenvy- without doing big achievements they have no jobs. The American public wasnt enthused by sending people to the moon even after it landed on the moon.The greater good would have been shut yourselves down as many thought it was a waste of money. There was no real space race.

Charles Fairbairn
April 5, 2021 9:48 pm

It is not the government’s job to indulge in entrepreneurial activity. Government’s job is to provide the soft and hard infrastructure scaffolding upon which entrepreneurs can thrive.

mikebartnz
April 5, 2021 11:01 pm

Quote “the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees”
I can’t believe anyone could be stupid enough to say something like that as if they had an entrepreneurial spirit they wouldn’t be working for Govt.

Gordon
April 5, 2021 11:07 pm

1st Fire all the Lawyers in Government.
2nd step have the EPA count off 1 through 10, fire all but the 10’s since the 1’s probably tried to fix it.
Then hire some engineers who know what it takes to make a power system run. Fire all those that oppose them.
Follow their directions to repair the grid and restore a sensible power generation system.
How’s that for an entrepreneurial spirit!

RoHa
April 5, 2021 11:15 pm

Misunderstood the title for a minute. I thought she was calling for a rocket with a wind turbine to power it.

April 6, 2021 12:03 am

So,

The Moon Shot, we knew there were rocket engines. From quite a while back.

So, the Manhattan Project, we knew there were self-sustaining nuclear fission reactions, from quite a while back.

A Moon Shot based on nothing at all is not a moon shot, it is virtue signalling based on no scientific principles. What we DO know is, both solar and wind are very low-density energy and also extremely random, clouds, deadspells for the wind, never going to change.

But We Must Try Harder!!!

Goodness Gracious me, Sense-Free

Moon

Steve Richards
April 6, 2021 1:39 am

Entrepreneurial spirit includes the concept of failure. You try something, sometimes expensive. If you get it wrong, you lose money. If you lose enough you go bust.
This concept is unknown in government because you can always get more ‘other peoples money’ (OPM).
To the dedicated government employee, this is a wonderful concept. OPM allows you to exceed you best/worst possible dreams.
To the tax payer, it is scary.

Rod Evans
April 6, 2021 1:49 am

“The entrepreneurial spirit of government employees should be harnessed?”
Well if that sentence doesn’t make you laugh nothing will.,,,,😄

Tom
April 6, 2021 2:09 am

Funny that she wouldn’t notice that the “moon shot” was not based on economics.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Tom
April 6, 2021 4:42 am

Good point.

April 6, 2021 2:29 am

“….the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees” – the original oxymoron!

ozspeaksup
April 6, 2021 4:01 am

maybe she should stop and listen to them??
[. Climate action consistently appears at the bottom of people’s lists of priorities. Most serious engineers I’ve met think the climate crisis is a joke.]

Bruce Cobb
April 6, 2021 4:30 am

Ha ha, I thought it said Pro Big Government Economist Calls for a Renewable Energy Loonshot.

Petit_Barde
April 6, 2021 4:47 am

College of London Economist Mariana Mazzucato thinks the entrepreneurial spirit of government employees should be harnessed, to solve big problems like … climate change.”

An economist promoting the most ineffective and costly method to solve a non existent problem …

Monty Pythonian !

Nick Werner
Reply to  Petit_Barde
April 6, 2021 8:15 am

… and next week boys and girls we will show you how to harness cats to pull a three-furrow plow…

Jan de Jong
April 6, 2021 4:54 am

I’m sure there’s an appropriate Mencken quote….

Loren C. Wilson
April 6, 2021 5:08 am

If we compare the budgets of the privately-funded space programs in the US and their results, the only one that has made little progress with six times the money is NASA. Governments are really bad at research and problem-solving, partly because they aren’t spending their own money. If our members of Congress were paid based on how balanced the budget was, it would look pretty good, instead of the current situation.

Brian
April 6, 2021 5:58 am

Most people overlook that one reason the Apollo program was a success is that the key leaders in charge were veterans of World War II and had learned both command and control and a “get things done” attitude. In addition, they had many bright scientists and engineers working for them. A surprisingly many were very young. These were the generation brought up in the economic boom after World War II, when science, engineering, and progress were at the forefront of American culture. The science and technology of the atom bomb had won the war, we were breaking the sound barrier, and many people, particularly young men, were inspired to study engineering and science — REAL science, not tree-hugging stuff like environmental science.

Frankly, even if I thought this was a good idea, we simply don’t have the right type of people to do it.

mike macray
Reply to  Brian
April 6, 2021 6:24 am

There’s another reason why the Apollo project worked, Brian, it’s called Coaches Law which states:
“In order to win the High School high jump meet it is better to have one six foot jumper than six one foot jumpers”
We had Werner Von Braun to head up the project. When asked during his confirmation hearings why he was so sure (that confidence thing again!) that we could beat the Russians to the moon he replied ” Because Our Germans are better zan zeir Germans, I know zem all.
I rest my case
Cheers
Mike

D Boss
April 6, 2021 6:08 am

“Calling for a renewable energy Apollo project to make renewable energy viable, with current technology, is like calling for the world to be powered by magic”

Or unicorn farts; or unobtainium fueled reactors….

Apollo was NOT a government project. It was accomplished with the private sector.

My mother worked for a gov (welfare) agency for a time. Their department was charged with distributing some 1.5 million $ in a small jurisdiction. The budget for the innane – no insane number of bureaucrats to administer that paltry sum was close to $3 million! And 95% of the staff would spend 75% of their time to make more work for themselves to justify increases in budgets. The people supposedly served rarely benefited from the self perpetuating hydra headed serpent that is the nature of all bureaucratic monsters!

TonyG
April 6, 2021 7:01 am

“entrepreneurial spirit of government employees”

In what parallel universe does this exist?

TonyG
April 6, 2021 7:57 am

OT: For some weird reason, I keep getting a “subscription fault” on THIS post only. No others…

TonyG
Reply to  TonyG
April 6, 2021 8:15 am

multiple browsers too

TonyG
Reply to  Eric Worrall
April 6, 2021 4:54 pm

Tried again just now on a different computer, still getting “Subscription Fault”. Weird. Guess I’ll have to miss the conversation on this one.

Thanks for checking!

beng135
April 6, 2021 8:36 am

College of London EconomCommunist Mariana Mazzucato

Fixed.

Dan M
April 6, 2021 2:01 pm

The only moonshot that should be done with respect to energy policy is more funding of next generation nuclear power, which already has at least half a dozen companies with designs and build plans. In the US we’ve, given a couple of companies 50M a piece seed money to get reactors built by 2028, and they’ve raised a lot of private sector money as well. Probably for a paltry $ 2B, we could accelerate these plans. See, we just save 9.998T by not having to do a Green New Deal.

MM from Canada
April 6, 2021 7:59 pm

“But nobody fixes problems in government service, and nobody wants to fix problems, because fixing problems is a threat to job security. Fixing problems reduces the number of work hours required to fulfil the department’s responsibilities.”

Absolutely 100% true. I used to be a government worker too.

And yes, there are exceptions, but most people don’t like it when you rock the boat – especially if it means they might have to put in some extra effort.

Last edited 15 days ago by MM from Canada
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