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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #185

The Week That Was: 2015-06-27 (June 27, 2015) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)   Delayed Offensive: On June 22, the White House and the EPA announced a new offensive on global warming, now called climate change. “The…

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Climate Model Inadequacies for Sea Ice

Via CO2science.org Near the start of the current century, Holland (2001) wrote that with respect to contemporary state-of-the-art global climate models, “some physical processes are absent from the models,” while noting that in light of the coarse-resolution grids employed by the models, “some physical processes are ill resolved” and that others are actually “missing from…

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New transparency and reproducibility initiative for science

Group calls for more transparency in science research, announces guidelines From Rice University: An international group of academic leaders, journal editors and funding-agency representatives and disciplinary leaders, including Rick Wilson, the Herbert S. Autrey Chair of Political Science and professor of statistics and psychology at Rice University, has announced guidelines to further strengthen transparency and…

A three-dimensional spatial structure of mixing in an idealized ocean simulation, computed using Lagrangian particle statistics. CREDIT Los Alamos National Laboratory

Analyzing ocean mixing reveals insight on climate

Eddies pull carbon emissions into deep ocean, new model simulates complex process From DOE/LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 24, 2015–Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a computer model that clarifies the complex processes driving ocean mixing in the vast eddies that swirl across hundreds of miles of open ocean. “The…

Arctic seafloor at 500 meters water depth. Carbonate blocks are colonized by anemones and sponges. Tube worms are abundant at the seafloor. In the upper part of the image, we see patches of bacterial mats. All of these features are indigenous to sites of methane release. Schools of codfish appeared to be following the laser beams from the camera system. Fish were often observed in big quantities during the cruise. CREDIT Courtesy of CAGE/UiT

More methane seeps discovered in the deep ocean

Over a course of 12 days Dr. Giuliana Panieri and her colleagues from Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE) collected images from seven areas of known methane release in the Arctic Ocean. One of them was Vestnesa Ridge, with over 1000 active seep sites at the depth of over 1000 m. Methane…

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Can heat be controlled as waves?

From the GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY: A growing interest in thermoelectric materials — which convert waste heat to electricity — and pressure to improve heat transfer from increasingly powerful microelectronic devices have led to improved theoretical and experimental understanding of how heat is transported through nanometer-scale materials. Recent research has focused on the possibility of…