The Picasso Problem

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Let me start explaining the link from Picasso to climate science by looking at what Dr. Nir Shaviv called “the most boring graph I have ever plotted in my life”. This is the graph of the changes in the best estimate of the range of what is called “climate sensitivity”…

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Clouds and El Nino

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach After the turn of the century, I became interested in climate science. But unlike almost everyone else, I wasn’t surprised by how much the global temperature was changing. As someone with experience with heat engines and engine governors, I know how hard it is to keep a heat engine stable…

Where The Warmth Is

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I got to thinking about the “hiatus” in warming in the 21st Century, and I realized that the CERES satellite dataset covers the period since the year 2000. So I’ve graphed up a few views of the temperature changes over the period of the CERES record, which at present is…

Glimpsed Through The Clouds

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach [See Update at the end.] [See Second Update at the end.] In a recent post, I discussed the new CERES Edition 4.0 dataset. See that post for a discussion of the CERES satellite-based radiation data, along with links to the data itself. In that post I’d said: I bring all of…

Into The Vortex

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I came across a lovely photograph of a “fire devil”, also called a “fire whirl”. I liked it because the photo perfectly exemplified what is wrong with the current generation of climate models. What is wrong with the models is that they don’t include any of the vortex-based emergent atmospheric…

How Thunderstorms Beat The Heat

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I got to thinking again about the thunderstorms, and how much heat they remove from the surface by means of evaporation. We have good data on this from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellites. Here is the distribution and strength of rainfall, and thus evaporation, around the middle of…

Tropical Evaporative Cooling

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I’ve been looking again into the satellite rainfall measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). I discussed my first look at this rainfall data in a post called Cooling and Warming, Clouds and Thunderstorms. There I showed that the cooling from thunderstorm-driven evaporation is a major heat-regulating mechanism in…

Cooling and Warming, Clouds and Thunderstorms

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Following up on a suggestion made to me by one of my long-time scientific heroes, Dr. Fred Singer, I’ve been looking at the rainfall dataset from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Here’s s the TRMM average rainfall data for the entire mission to date: Figure 1. Average annual…

TAO Buoys Go Hot And Cold

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I got to thinking about how I could gain more understanding of the daily air temperature cycles in the tropics. I decided to look at what happens when the early morning (midnight to 5:00 AM) of a given day is cooler than usual, versus what happens when the early morning…