Lakes discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet

From the University of Cambridge The subglacial lakes are the first to be identified in Greenland The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, discovered two subglacial lakes 800 metres below the Greenland Ice Sheet. The two lakes are each roughly 8-10 km2, and at one point may have been up to three times larger than…

Advertisements

Oh, what a difference a year makes in Greenland melting

ARCTIC SUMMER SNOWSTORM By Joseph D’Aleo CCM Remember a year ago when few days of July ‘warmth’ with strong blocking over Greenland had the media abuzz over some melting? Last July a brief spell of temperatures in the mid 30s had caused some surface slush formation on top of the 1 to 1.5 mile thick…

New study: Antarctic and Greenland ice sheet melt may be natural event, no consensus on cause

Ice sheets are the largest potential source of future sea level rise – and they also possess the largest uncertainty over their future behaviour From the University of Bristol Continuous satellite monitoring of ice sheets needed to better predict sea-level rise The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, underscore the need for continuous satellite monitoring of…

Why ice loss and sea level measurements via satellite and the new Shepherd et al paper are highly uncertain at the moment

There’s a paper (Shepherd et al) on ice loss and sea level rise that has been making the rounds in media (such as this article in Science Recorder, claiming it validates global warming) that is causing some stir, mainly because it has a powerfully written press release combined with a volume of researchers (47 scientists),…

'Counterintuitive finding suggests that unexpected factors may govern a glacier's response to climate change'

From the University at Buffalo, new evidence that large ice sheets can grow/disappear quickly on decadal scales in response to regional temperature changes. A descriptive video follows. How fast can ice sheets respond to climate change? Scientists report that prehistoric glaciers reacted rapidly to a brief cold snap, providing a rare glimpse of glaciers’ response…

Greenland Ice Melt every 150 years is 'right on time'

UPDATE: see this new article on the issue, “Ice cores from Summit show that melting events of this type occur about once every 150 years on average. With the last one happening in 1889, this event is right on time,” says Lora Koenig, a Goddard glaciologist and a member of the research team analyzing the…

Historical Imagery of Greenland Glaciers Lessens Sea Level Rise Alarm

By Pat Michaels via World Climate Report A new study using historical images of glaciers in southeast Greenland to investigate glacier response to climate changes suggests that the recently observed acceleration of ice loss from Greenland may not be a long-term phenomenon. Instead, as marine terminating glaciers reach their grounding line and as the termini…