Brave Man standing up to a Tank in Tiananmen Square. By Published by The Associated Press, originally photographed by Jeff Widener, Fair use, Link

The Hill: Disintegrating Western Democracies Must Accept Climate Advice

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

According to Professor Emeritus David Shearman, some problems are beyond the comprehension of elected politicians, and should not be entrusted to their authority. The only way to halt the disintegration of Western democracy is for politicians to surrender power to independent peer appointed panels of scientists.

Climate change emergency cannot be solved by disintegrating democracies

BY DAVID SHEARMAN, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR —  01/03/22 07:30 PM EST 1,097
THE VIEWS EXPRESSED BY CONTRIBUTORS ARE THEIR OWN AND NOT THE VIEW OF THE HILL

President Biden’s climate agenda was launched with hopes, prayers and the expectation of leadership to all world democracies, like a glorious ship set on a maiden voyage: the SS Biden. There is now deep concern that in stormy seas it has been driven onto rocks, still intact but in need of a high tide to free it.

Clearly, President Biden placed great reliance on reducing domestic emissions by a range of measures in a Build Back Better initiative, which was grounded on the rocks of a democratic congressman who appears to accept climate change and yet opposes constraints on fossil fuel production. The president now has to resort to executive orders and to a range of other measures, which do not require legislation.

This brings us to the crux of the problem. Our western democracies can no longer deliver consensus and action on issues that threaten the continued existence of humanity, not least the most powerful democracy in the world.

In the U.S., there are 109 members of the House of Representatives and 30 senators who refuse to acknowledge the scientific evidence of human-caused climate change. These members have received more than $61 million in lifetime contributions from the oil, gas and coal industries.

The U.S. is not alone in democratic disintegration. Climate denial and anti-vaccination sentiment exist in many countries but have not become as debilitating as they appear to have done in the United States.

Over the past four decades, the failures of liberal democracies to address environmental issues and particularly climate change have become increasingly apparent. In 2007, these failures were detailed and today we find they remain unaddressed. Indeed, one failure has become the salient problem, the need to separate governance from corporate capitalism. 

The common denominator in current democratic failure is government unwillingness to accept that many of the problems we now confront are so complex and urgent as to be beyond the comprehension and abilities of elected officials. The issue of climate emergency is compounded by two additional interrelated issues: Elected officials place their political survival before collective needs and many defer to an overwhelmingly powerful fossil fuel industry for personal gain. 

To become relevant today, elected governments have to be prepared to accept advice and guidance from independent commissions of scientists and other relevant experts selected by their peers — and not by political appointment. The details of this guidance need to be available to all parties and to the public. A starting model for the U.S. and many other countries might be a strengthened U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with appointees selected by peers and not politically appointed. 

David Shearman (AM, Ph.D., FRACP, FRCPE) is a professor of medicine at the University of Adelaide, South Australia and co-founder of Doctors for the Environment Australia. He is co-author of “The Climate Change Challenge and the Failure of Democracy” (2007) commissioned by the Pell Centre for International Relations and Public Policy.

Read more: https://thehill.com/opinion/energy-environment/588091-climate-change-emergency-cannot-be-solved-by-disintegrating

If you want to see what an Expertocracy or Technocracy looks like, a place where a significant portion of daily decision making is genuinely dominated by appointed panels of alleged experts, take a look at Communist China.

The following academic wet dream of how wonderful life is in China for educated people was published a few years ago in an engineering industry magazine.

The Chinese Government Is Dominated by Scientists and Engineers Their political elite are largely technocrats.

By Patricia Eldridge 3 years ago

When Chinese Government comes to mind, what things do you generally think of?

Most of you would say The Great Wall, feng shui, their food, pandas, cheap products, communism, and martial arts, among others. All of these are valid observations, as China is indeed famous for such. But I’d like to add something to that list, a thing that is so rare that China has to be remembered for it: most of the political leaders in China are scientists and engineers.

To prove that fact, let us play a quick game. Name a scientist or an engineer from your country’s top government officials. Don’t cheat with Google, just think of someone that you already know.

Now I doubt that you have thought one especially if you’re in the U.S.

Nowhere in the world can you see the same admiration and respect from the public to their scientists and engineers other than in China. This is a little known fact. They admire such professionals so much to the point that they qualify these people to be worthy and capable in handling political affairs.

The Chinese people believe that scientists and engineers, who eventually become technocrats, have a highly disciplined mind fit for public office.

Read more: https://gineersnow.com/leadership/chinese-government-dominated-scientists-engineers

In my opinion this seductive offer of power is the real pulling power China has over Western academia. It is not just the shadowy grant money Chinese Communists provide to our elites, it is the promise of a future in which Western academics have greater say over government policy; the promise that if Western governments become more like China’s Communist Technocracy, academics will play a far greater role in civil government.

Those who are tempted by China’s seductive offer somehow overlook the fact that the offer of power is conditional on total obedience to the central authority. China did not hesitate to punish expert doctors who tried to warn the world about Covid. The local CCP leaders were upset when the doctors tried to speak out, because did not want anyone to know they had a problem.

To be fair, Professor Shearman does not mention China directly, and glancing through his writing, he is not a fan of China’s greenhouse gas emissions and reliance on coal. But in my opinion, a Chinese style Technocracy is effectively what Professor Shearman is describing, whether or not he is self aware enough to realise what he is saying.

Professor Shearman does not explain what he would want to happen, when ordinary people rebel against and refuse to follow “expert” directives, like the massive ongoing protests against vaccine mandates, or the yellow vest riots against carbon tax fuel hikes in France. I’m guessing Professor Shearman would want the views of his panels of peer appointed experts to prevail over the short sighted desires of the uneducated masses.

We’ve seen what happens in China when ordinary people object to government directives, or to ordinary people in China who demand a greater say over government policy.

Frankly I don’t want to live under such a system. We’ve all seen the bullying, pettiness and mindless cruelty of Western academic elites, like the mistreatment of Peter Ridd, and countless other cases.

Imagine if these people had a bigger say over your life? Imagine if the vicious internal politics of academia spilled out of universities and was inflicted on the whole of society? Imagine if these people were permanently put in charge of major levers of government like the EPA. Imagine if elected politicians were stripped of the power to remove them? Imagine if say the next US government was stripped of the power to remove people like Dr. Fauci from office?

Because that is what life is like in Communist China. That is effectively what Professor Shearman is calling for.

Thanks but no thanks, Professor Shearman.

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January 4, 2022 10:21 pm

This has always been the way in China – except that now they select their ‘crats partially on technical ability, rather than their deep knowledge of Confucian philosophy. (Partially, as the major criteria has always been their absolute adherence to the regime, whether it is led by an Emperor or a General Secretary.)

One doesn’t have to particularly look at Red China, though. The Soviets had the same problem. Right at home, the engineer Hoover did some good things before being elected President – but the blame for the start of the Great Depression can be laid squarely at his feet. (Deepened and lengthened by FDR’s “experts,” of course, but Hoover’s reaction turned what would have been a normal short panic into a major crisis.)

Jay Willis
Reply to  writing observer
January 5, 2022 8:11 am

Yeah, great vacuum cleaners though.

Bryan A
Reply to  Jay Willis
January 5, 2022 9:35 am

Now that really sucks

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  writing observer
January 5, 2022 10:28 am

(Deepened and lengthened by FDR’s “experts,” of course, but Hoover’s reaction turned what would have been a normal short panic into a major crisis.)

Where did you get your crystal ball? I’d like to buy one for myself.

MarkW
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
January 5, 2022 10:46 am

No crystal ball needed. Just hind sight.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  MarkW
January 5, 2022 7:46 pm

Hoover’s reaction turned what would have been a normal short panic into a major crisis.

He is speculating on what would have happened had Hoover not done what he did. There is no control on the ‘experiment.’ That is, he is offering a personal opinion as though it were fact. That is why I inferred that it was ‘crystal balling.’

Devils Tower
January 4, 2022 10:26 pm

In the US Eisenhower was right. After the military complex, then comes academia.

It is time to pull tax exemptions and plain out start shutting down useless government agency’s.

This country is broke. A bunch of unemployed academia and goverment workers might solve the labour shortage, the Mac Donald career track any way.

On the other side of the atlantic, the English can burn Oxford’s furniture to heat their homes.

How far will this all go…..

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Devils Tower
January 4, 2022 10:49 pm

start shutting down useless government agency’s

I’d prefer to shut down useless grocer’s apostrophes in the short term

Last edited 15 days ago by Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Devils Tower
January 5, 2022 5:16 am

The English can burn Oxford’s furniture to heat their homes.

They consider wood pellets to be “green”
for England’s Drax power plant
So I guess burning wood furniture would be “green” too.
Maybe they will paint coal green next, and say they
are burning “green coal”.

jorgekafkazar
Reply to  Richard Greene
January 5, 2022 3:54 pm

No act of insanity can be ruled out. In June of 2008, after the Second Reading of the Climate Act Bill, only five House of Commons members voted nay: Christopher Chope, Philip Davies, Peter Lilley, Andrew Tyrie, and Ann Widdecombe.That’s five sane people in the House of Commons out of a total 650 members. In other words, 645 MPs were barmy in the crumpet.

Mr.
Reply to  Devils Tower
January 5, 2022 9:44 am

Thanks for this observation DT.
I had exactly the same thoughts as I read Eric’s article.

Post WW2, Eisenhower had become increasingly alarmed at how academics & scientists were being installed as the font of all knowledge by politicians and their bureaucrats, eager to delegate policy to “experts”, so that the politicians & bureaucrats could not be blamed for stuff-ups. Abdication of leadership and responsibility by elected representatives was becoming endemic.

As is human nature, when someone in authority delegates total power to an underling, that underling comes to conclude that the boss is an idiot who knows sfa, and therefore his authority ought to be usurped. By the underling of course.

Don’t agree with me?
Just take a look around the world today and see who are calling the shots on just about every aspect of modern society.

And who do the media automatically call for a comment on anything?
Not the person who has has delivered outstandingly successful lifetime achievements in that particular field, but instead Professor So&so from Buttcrack University who is always good for a few sentences supporting the media narrative.

Qapitalist
January 4, 2022 10:26 pm

Shearman should get another jab.
Problem solved.
Next.

jorgekafkazar
Reply to  Qapitalist
January 5, 2022 3:55 pm

Shearing sheep?

Retired_Engineer_Jim
January 4, 2022 10:41 pm

We are now expected to respect the advice of an :expert” on climate science matters, even though he is a medical doctor and not a trained and published climate scientist.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
January 5, 2022 6:15 am

Apparently. Everybody is a climate expert.

Reply to  Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 7:09 am

I guess being ‘on the right side of history’ is central in making one an expert

DonM
Reply to  Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 9:31 am

I only accept the expert advice of those that agree with me.

If they don’t agree with me how can they be experts; how can they be experts if they don’t agree with me?

either way … no pudding.

Bryan A
Reply to  Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 9:38 am

Unless they’re a Republican

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 10:31 am

Everyone has a belly button and an opinion about the climate. They are both equally valuable. About the only real use is for both to be pierced.

Jules Guidry
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
January 5, 2022 7:34 am

Two words, that I can think of right off the bat, which I immediately assign to the trash file in my mind…”expert and scientist”. Oh, then there is “politician”, doctor is headed that way as well.

MarkW
Reply to  Jules Guidry
January 5, 2022 10:49 am

9 out of 10 doctor’s recommend whatever the adman is selling today.

DD More
Reply to  Jules Guidry
January 5, 2022 1:27 pm

Pierre F. Goodrich often gave a copy of Rudyard Kipling’s poem “The Gods of the Copybook Headings” to friends and associates, also included the following introduction.

What are the foundations of our beliefs and actions? History has built the civilization we enjoy by accumulating small pebbles of wisdom based upon experience. Every once in a while, some misguided action tears down years or centuries of progress by ignoring or misunderstanding the basic truths that underlie all that has gone before.

Last stanza –

  • As it will be in the future, it was at the birth of Man—
  • There are only four things certain since Social Progress began:—
  • That the Dog returns to his Vomit and the Sow returns to her Mire,
  • And the burnt Fool’s bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the Fire;
  • And that after this is accomplished, and the brave new world begins
  • When all men are paid for existing and no man must pay for his sins,
  • As surely as Water will wet us, as surely as Fire will burn,
  • The Gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return!
jorgekafkazar
Reply to  Jules Guidry
January 5, 2022 4:11 pm

A flock of geese is a gaggle. A collection of crows, a murder. Lions, a pride. But a collection of experts make up a fiasco.

dilbertwyoming
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
January 5, 2022 9:00 am

Spot on. I don’t believe thermodynamics or heat transfer courses were a pre-requisite for medical study. After a quick review of his website, I certainly hope he is a better physician than artist, though I have my doubts.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  dilbertwyoming
January 5, 2022 10:35 am

About as close as he got was being required to remember the number “98.6,” or “37.0” in Australia.

MarkW
Reply to  dilbertwyoming
January 5, 2022 10:50 am

If he’s as good an artist as Hunter Biden, he should be able to sell his art for 100’s of thousands of dollars.

jorgekafkazar
Reply to  MarkW
January 5, 2022 4:17 pm

Hunter will invest those $100Ks in a hot dog and some fries.

MarkW
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
January 5, 2022 10:48 am

Lack of credentials only matters when one is disagreeing with the self anointed elite.

Zig Zag Wanderer
January 4, 2022 10:47 pm

Mann for President!

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
January 5, 2022 6:16 am

Mann for Worst Climate Liar in the World.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 9:41 am

Those lies and his unwavering consistency are the making of his career.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
January 5, 2022 9:39 am

I’m sure that moron is fully convinced that he is the best Mann for the job.

Zig Zag Wanderer
January 4, 2022 10:51 pm

What could possibly go wrong? It worked perfectly well for Stalin.

Ed Zuiderwijk
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
January 5, 2022 1:43 am

The Gulags were full of them, people who new what they were talking about, I mean.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Ed Zuiderwijk
January 5, 2022 4:07 am

Not enough of them were sent to the gulags. Some were actually listened to. Millions died as a result. My grandfather documented and published it, and spent 16 years in Lubyanka for his troubles.

Sara
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
January 5, 2022 5:38 am

Yes, it did. Lysenkoism was responsible for the starvation deaths of up to 45 million Chinese people between 1959 and 1961, and in the process of destroying Russian agriculture, he caused the deaths of over 7 million Russians. A mere nothing, you know. Fewer mouths to feed. y’see.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Sara
January 5, 2022 6:21 am

Biden may not be able to break that 45 million mark, but he’s working on starving 25 million Afghans, so he’s in the ball park.

Afghanistan needs $220 million a month to be able to feed the starving, after the abrupt withdrawal of the U.S. under Biden, which has caused the Afghan economy to collapse. Biden should be paying this money. The Taliban say they will allow private groups complete freedom to distribute this food.

Are you going to let them starve, Joe? Answer: Yes.

Last edited 15 days ago by Tom Abbott
DMacKenzie
Reply to  Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 8:34 am

So how would not going there to start with have worked out ?

meab
Reply to  Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 10:43 am

Don’t get me wrong as I’m the first to say that Brandon’s Afghanistan exit was horribly mismanaged, but the reason that the Afghan economy has collapsed has more to do with outside investment drying up as outside investors and wealthy returning expats are no longer willing to invest in Afghanistan as their government is not providing stability and protection of ownership. That’s their fault, no country has been able to do nation building in Afghanistan. It’s a humanitarian disaster, but no outside country can prop them up indefinitely.

MarkW
Reply to  meab
January 5, 2022 11:52 am

The collapse of the Afghan government is also a direct result of how Brandon abandoned the country.

gringojay
January 4, 2022 11:02 pm

Guidance from experts instead of elected officials in the USA at least isn’t a pretty sight. David Sherman in Australia has become inured to it apparently.

CE32F6FC-7A5C-47B0-8A85-76BCD807DDBD.jpeg
Mike Dubrasich
January 4, 2022 11:17 pm

“… many of the problems we now confront are so complex and urgent as to be beyond the comprehension and abilities of elected officials.”

Indeed, and it has been ever thus. It is also true, however, that the urgent problems are beyond the ken of supercilious self-proclaimed “experts” like Professor Emeritus David Shearman, a political hack if there ever was one.

I challenge the “expert” doctor to a debate on the “climate change emergency”. Let’s test his comprehension and abilities. Display your alleged wisdom first, Doc, before we turn over the reins of government to you and your ilk.

Democracy may be flawed. Oafs and dunces are frequently elected. They can be peacefully recalled and replaced, though. A dictatorship of prats would require a non-peaceful resolution, as history so amply demonstrates.

Observer
Reply to  Mike Dubrasich
January 5, 2022 6:11 am

What these plonkers fail to understand is that when scientists vote, their voting decisions are no less political – ie, driven by self interest – than anyone else’s.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Mike Dubrasich
January 5, 2022 6:26 am

“Display your alleged wisdom first, Doc, before we turn over the reins of government to you and your ilk.”

Good idea!

Thomas
Reply to  Mike Dubrasich
January 5, 2022 10:22 am

I can think of at least one oaf/dunce who made a good president. Politics, like business, is more about common sense, hard work, and perseverance than it is about book smarts.

MarkW
Reply to  Mike Dubrasich
January 5, 2022 10:52 am

You don’t understand, the experts have spoken, so debate is meaningless.
At least that’s what he has been taught to believe.

Redge
January 4, 2022 11:18 pm

SS Biden

Does he get a uniform? I understand there’s an Aussie cartoonist with a few in his closet

Iain Reid
January 4, 2022 11:18 pm

A real weakness of Dr Shearman’s idea is who selects the ‘peers’ to decide which scientist or engineers make the decisions?

Redge
Reply to  Iain Reid
January 4, 2022 11:25 pm

The elite, who else?

Ed Zuiderwijk
Reply to  Iain Reid
January 5, 2022 1:46 am

No, worse, not the ‘elite’, they themselves. An autoselectocracy.

Redge
January 4, 2022 11:23 pm

David Shearman (AM, Ph.D., FRACP, FRCPE) is a professor of medicine

Pompous twonk likely knows nothing about climate except how it can be used to push the watermelons agenda

another ian
Reply to  Redge
January 5, 2022 1:08 am

Gawd! Don’t ask his opinion on the Peking Pox

Observer
Reply to  Redge
January 5, 2022 6:13 am

I doubt he knows anything about politics or economics, either.

Or engineering. Or the history of countries without democratic representation.

Ben Vorlich
January 4, 2022 11:29 pm

He’s right about some things being beyond the comprehension of some of our politicians. They are regularly fooled by panels of unelected scientists and activists

Patrick Peake
January 4, 2022 11:32 pm

As an engineer I must say that the concept of government by engineers is the stuff if nightmares. Unless, of course, it’s me in charge … But that should give the rest of you nightmares.

PCman999
Reply to  Patrick Peake
January 4, 2022 11:43 pm

It’s this engineer’s dream!

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Patrick Peake
January 5, 2022 12:24 am

As an engineer I must say that the concept of government by engineers is the stuff if nightmares.

I don’t think he’s talking about engineers, you know, people who actually do things. I think he’s talking about academic ‘experts’, you know, people who waffle on endlessly about things they don’t understand, and expect engineers to implement their idiotic ideas.

People like Mann, Lewinsky and Cook, for example… Now that’s the real nightmare he’s describing.

Last edited 15 days ago by Zig Zag Wanderer
Mr.
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
January 5, 2022 10:01 am

Lewinsky was Bill Clinton’s associate who “smoked” Bill’s cigar.
Lewandowski is Cook’s associate.
You’re not suggesting that Lewandowski has “smoked” Cook’s cigar, are you Ziggy?

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Mr.
January 5, 2022 1:14 pm

Ooooops!

Close enough for Climate Scientology, though…

commieBob
Reply to  Patrick Peake
January 5, 2022 1:03 am

Iain McGilchrist shows that people who think mostly with their left brains are unable to apply context. They will believe any old crap as long as it is logically self consistent. You could look at the Wikipedia page about him, or here’s a link to a TED Talk. It’s less than twelve minutes long and well worth watching.

Somewhere in his writings or many hours of youtube talks, he points out that engineers are over-represented in the ranks of religious fanatics. (I would nuance that as people with engineering training but with little experience. I would say that experienced engineers are rather good at context.)

People who live excessively in their left brains lack the insight to realize that their brilliant plans are likely to have unintended consequences and those would be much worse than the problem the brilliant plan was trying to fix.

A government run by experts is almost guaranteed to fail.

MarkW
Reply to  commieBob
January 5, 2022 10:56 am

I would love to know how he defines a “religious fanactic” and whether that definition excludes himself.

For many people I’ve known a religious fanatic is anyone who fails to stop believing in God, when the self described elite tells them that there is no God.

commieBob
Reply to  MarkW
January 5, 2022 12:17 pm

I’ve made the same observation myself about Islamic terrorists.

McGilchrist is definitely pro-religion.

Once you understand McGilchrist, it’s obvious that the Democrats are the party of whacko ideas that can’t possibly work along with the unintended consequences that are way worse than whatever they were trying to fix in the first place.

DMacKenzie
Reply to  Patrick Peake
January 5, 2022 8:58 am

Engineers are normally too pragmatic and rational to be part of the celebrity election process. Politicians don’t want an engineering analysis of their campaign promises…but they do want engineer’s reports after the election, to explain to the populace why the campaign promises aren’t feasible…to a politician, engineers and economists have the same mentality, while engineers and economists look at each other and say “you have no idea what I’m talking about”. They both consider politicians to be voter-popular used-car salesmen…..
China has 9 out of 10 of their leadership with technical degrees. This doesn’t mean they are experienced, just good at science subjects and couldn’t find a tech job…although it should mean they were good in school. Here, running for office doesn’t require “smart in school”…”dreamy TV eyes” are good enough….

MarkW
Reply to  DMacKenzie
January 5, 2022 10:59 am

In China like most autocracies, getting into a “good” school has more to do with who you know, than what you know. The same with the grades you receive while in that “good” school. Most of them never expected to get a job in their field of study and expected to go directly into management or government right out of school.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Patrick Peake
January 5, 2022 10:45 am

Strangely, no one has mentioned the ‘success’ of Jimmy Carter.

I once held to the opinion that we needed technocrats to govern a technologically advanced society. Carter changed my mind. I think a better choice is someone like Reagan, who knew his limitations, and reportedly surrounded himself with competent advisors. Wisdom is more valuable in a leader than technical knowledge.

January 4, 2022 11:59 pm

Professor Emeritus David Shearman wrote: 
“In the U.S., there are 109 members of the House of Representatives and 30 senators who refuse to acknowledge the scientific evidence of human-caused climate change.”

My response:
There is NO real global warming crisis. Anti-CO2 mania is utterly false – the prattling of scoundrels and imbeciles.

Selected political and scientific papers
 
SCIENTIFIC COMPETENCE – THE ABILITY TO CORRECTLY PREDICT
by Allan M.R. MacRae, B.A.Sc., M.Eng., October 20, 2021, Update November 8, 2021
http://correctpredictions.ca/
 
CLIMATE CHANGE, COVID-19, AND THE GREAT RESET
A Climate, Energy and Covid Primer for Politicians and Media
By Allan M.R. MacRae, Published March 21, 2021, Update 1e published May 8, 2021
https://thsresearch.files.wordpress.com/2021/05/climate-change-covid-19-and-the-great-reset-update-1e-readonly.docx
 
THE CATASTROPHIC ANTHROPOGENIC GLOBAL WARMING (CAGW) AND THE HUMANMADE CLIMATE CHANGE CRISES ARE PROVED FALSE
By Allan M.R. MacRae, B.A.Sc., M.Eng., January 10, 2020
https://thsresearch.files.wordpress.com/2020/01/the-catastrophic-anthropogenic-global-warming-cagw-and-the-humanmade-climate-change-crises-are-proved-false.pdf

Jtom
Reply to  ALLAN MACRAE
January 5, 2022 8:23 pm

I wonder how many doctors refused to believe the consensus of the medical community that ulcers were caused by stress, and instead thought it may have something to do with a bacterial infection. Clearly, those ‘stress deniers’ should have had their funding cut. Obvious waste of money.

Mike Jonas(@egrey1)
Editor
January 5, 2022 12:38 am

Professor Emeritus David Shearman: Prove your case. Present us with the overwhelming evidence which you claim supports your position. Without such evidence your position has no greater value than any other. It’s no good asserting that the evidence is overwhelming, you have to present the evidence and demonstrate that it is indeed overwhelming. That’s how science works in the end. Science does not work by consensus or popular opinion, it always works eventually by evidence.

In the case of global warming, it is not sufficient to show that the planet is warming because the planet has warmed countless times before. You have to show that the warming is caused predominantly by man-made greenhouse gases, and you have to show that its effects really are seriously dangerous for humanity.

If you wish to present your case here, then most readers here will give it full and proper attention. If you cannot present your case then by definition you have no case. It’s up to you.

Alan M
Reply to  Mike Jonas
January 5, 2022 4:58 am

Doctors for the Environment Australia is just another wacko Green group here in Aus, just ignore. You wouldn’t want one as you medico

Last edited 15 days ago by Alan M
wolf at the door
Reply to  Alan M
January 8, 2022 4:07 am

Yes.This idiot is not worth the time of day.
Shearman- sheermoron

Reply to  Mike Jonas
January 5, 2022 5:24 am

” You have to show that the warming is caused predominantly by man-made greenhouse gases, and you have to show that its effects really are seriously dangerous for humanity.’

You don’t have to show the cause of warming.
That can remain as “we don’t know”
You have to accurately describe the actual warming in the past 100 years.
Which means showing it was beneficial not harmful to anyone
You have to honestly discuss wrong predictions
of future climate change doom
that i trace back to the late 1950s
Then you have to compare climate reality (real good news)
with climate predictions (imaginary bad news).

There are no experts on the future climate
There are no data for the future climate (or future anything else)
Just unproven theories and always wrong predictions of doom.
There is no real science when there are no data( for the future), and
a history of wrong climate predictions. That’s climate astrology..

Observer
Reply to  Richard Greene
January 5, 2022 6:16 am

To be fair to the good doctor, Australia probably won’t be improved much by getting any warmer.

January 5, 2022 12:49 am

“Climate denial”! Ha ha ha

BCBill
January 5, 2022 12:52 am

I wonder if this guy is a useful idiot regurgitating woke propaganda or is he flying a trial balloon to see if people in Western democracies have been sufficiently conditioned to turn over authority to the elite Kleptocrats and their technocrat minions waiting in the wings. One sad human traits which has been heavily favoured by unnatural selection over the few thousand years of civilisation is a willingness to say and do whatever authority expects (as per Stanley Milgren). Obeisance to authority is much, much more common than commitment to the scientific method.

Jules Guidry
Reply to  Eric Worrall
January 5, 2022 7:47 am

His obsession then deserves a diagnosis. I suggest that a new one be coined, “CCDS…Climate Change Delusion Syndrome”. Hey, it worked for the Trump thing by identifying those who are truly delusional re: PDJT.

January 5, 2022 12:55 am

Chinese technocrats appear not to consider that human caused global warming is a sufficient threat to take the measures proposed by western governments.

AndyHce
Reply to  Stephen Wilde
January 5, 2022 2:24 am

No need to. They’ve already got what they want.

Reply to  Stephen Wilde
January 5, 2022 5:34 am

China, India, Africa and every undeveloped nation
could not care less about Nut Zero and the Green New Ordeal.
A few nations have their hands out
asking for green slush fund money.
I’ve requested one million dollars for myself
Although I’d be willing to settle for $50,000,
or even $89 of free green money

China makes some meaningless CO2 virtue signalling
so they can keep selling their solar panels to the West,
built by slave labor, using cheap coal energy
for the electricity, that other nations can’t
compete with.

Western fools, I mean politicians,
are afraid to question China,
fearing China will stop
promising to stop increasing
CO2 emissions after 2030,
which they were never
going to do anyway.

January 5, 2022 1:00 am

The Road to Serfdom.

bonbon
January 5, 2022 1:03 am

The good Prof. did not mention China, as China and Russia did not make fools of themselves at COP26. There paraded Prince Charles, organizer, and Marc Carney who made it perfectly clear who’s in charge. Not scientists, not China, but the banking system.
GFANZ, the Glasgow Finance Alliance for NetZero made explicitly clear who decides what to invest in.
China and Russia are not submitting to this bankers dictatorship and are standing in the way of this Club of Democracies (Biden’s gig).
Time for the EU and USA to stand together with China, Russia and India and derail this bankers train-wreck.

Observer
Reply to  bonbon
January 5, 2022 6:18 am

You can see why bankers like Net Zero. They make their money issuing debt, and paying to replace fossil fuels will require unfeasible amounts of it.

RickWill
January 5, 2022 1:10 am

Great progress has been made under SS Biden. LNG is now green and USA will surpass Australia as the largest LNG exporter in 2022.

Nuclear power is now declared green as well.

I expect we are not far off seeing green coal being declared such. Probably need a few people to freeze to death for that to happen but that could be within a few days. In fact may already be happening now as the big freeze in the NH sets in.

When climate scientists can label any weather event evidence of Climate Change, it is no challenge to label any carbon based fuel green. It will be whatever they want it to be.

Vincent Causey
January 5, 2022 1:17 am

Linking climate change with covid is a risky move in my opinion. If the covid “science” goes down as a public health catastrophe, then climate science will be tarnished as a result.

Reply to  Vincent Causey
January 5, 2022 5:35 am

No need to link:
two boogeymen scare more people than one

Observer
Reply to  Vincent Causey
January 5, 2022 6:20 am

I think it’s no coincidence that the same people pushing climate hysteria are also telling everyone to lose their minds over Covid.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Vincent Causey
January 5, 2022 7:22 am

“If the covid “science” goes down as a public health catastrophe, then climate science will be tarnished as a result.”

I think that has already happened. The public is seeing that science isn’t as certain as some people want to make it out to be, and they start off questioning the remedies for the Wuhan virus because this imposes restrictions on their lives, and along comes climate change to impose more restrictions on their lives based on what is now questionable science.

TonyG
Reply to  Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 12:24 pm

“The public is seeing that science isn’t as certain as some people want to make it out to be”

Possibly the one good thing to come out of the last couple years.

MarkW
Reply to  Vincent Causey
January 5, 2022 11:16 am

If the hundreds of failed predictions hasn’t tarnished the reputation of climate science, then nothing will.

Miso Alkalaj
January 5, 2022 1:30 am

You have missed a really big one, prof. Let us assume that the Chinese leadership are really technocrats. This would mean that they value results of natural sciences above speculations of humanists that actually govern over the climate change debate in the West. It therefore follows that they know that US and EU climate change mania has no basis in science, it is just ideology. Therefore, they know that they need not do anything radical about it. And they aren’t. Oh, they occasionally make polite noises about reducing their emissions – with stated goals (as relative as the are) so far in the future that all these technocrats will be dead before the time comes. However, these statements of virtue signaling for Western audiences (which are always touted as revolutionary by the same professors) “encourage” the West to continue buying PF panels, light rare earth electric motors, etc. from the same Chinese.
 
To wit, professor, if the Chinese really are governed by technocrats, enacting suicidal “net zero” policies will be the last thing they do.
 
Come to think of it, I really would not mind if the ruling elites of EU were a bit technocratic.
 
miso

Ed Zuiderwijk
January 5, 2022 1:42 am

Just think of Mickey Mann as secretary for energy and be cured of such a ludicrous idea forever.

January 5, 2022 1:45 am

Never confuse a practising engineer with an academic.
Academics do not pay for their mistakes with the collapse of their unversuities.

MarkW
Reply to  Leo Smith
January 5, 2022 11:18 am

Whether the universities collapse or not will depend on whether they can convince the politicians to keep sending lots of Other People’s Money (OPM).

Climate believer
January 5, 2022 1:48 am

That would be a nightmare scenario, and if that quack thinks “scientists” are somehow immune to lobbying he’s seriously deluded.

Laertes
January 5, 2022 2:01 am

We don’t have to imagine – New York has already declired racism as ‘health emergency’.

They were transparent as to why they have done this – “Framing racism as a public health issue compels organizations and governmental agencies to address the crisis in the systemic ways that other threats to public health have been addressed,” state Sen. Kevin Parker said in the release.

That’s right, anti-racism lockdowns can be coming in the future. What about anti-racist passports for racists? Preventing racists from work or shopping. Isolating racists forcefully in camps. Army on the streets to fight racism. All the wonderful things we have seen with Covid.

The panels of experts can declare an “emergency” and… who knows. To fight an emergency, everything can be done. Wait, didn’t many governments pass laws already, that for health emergencies they can detain anyone, anytime? How convenient.

Observer
Reply to  Laertes
January 5, 2022 6:25 am

This is genius. Yes! Anti-racism passports! If you can’t show that you’ve been vaccinated against racism – say, by completing a degree in humanities at an Ivy-League university – you have to pass regular “racism” tests to show you’re not carrying any recently-acquired racism before being allowed out in public.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Observer
January 5, 2022 11:05 am

Invest now in re-education camps, before the stock price goes up.

Jules Guidry
Reply to  Laertes
January 5, 2022 7:56 am

NY is quickly goose-stepping its way to a ghost town. If they take measures re: racism as a health emergency, they are lighting a fire they may not be able to extinguish.
Are the folks in NY particularly ignorant or, perhaps, stupid. There is a difference. From their voting in the commies, its baffling. Definition of insanity comes to mind.

MarkW
Reply to  Jules Guidry
January 5, 2022 11:27 am

The new DA in NYC has all but declared that he is not going to prosecute anyone for minor crimes. For example, he will not prosecute anyone who shoplifts less than $250 dollars at a time.
He is also going to set the maximum jail time as 20 years for any crime that doesn’t have an already declared mandatory penalty.
He will also take race into account when determining whether to charge.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/manhattan-district-attorney-alvin-bragg-bloodbath

MarkW
Reply to  Laertes
January 5, 2022 11:19 am

New York has also declared that COVID treatments will be prioritized by race, with white males being the last to get treatment.

gbaikie
January 5, 2022 2:18 am

It seems we can afford, to hang a lot of politicians from lamp posts, but there a cost
to it, if hang a bunch of scientists.

Bruce Cobb
January 5, 2022 2:28 am

In order to “save democracy” we first need to destroy it. We’ll put it back again.
We plomise.

MarkW
Reply to  Bruce Cobb
January 5, 2022 11:27 am

Build it Back Better

fretslider
January 5, 2022 2:33 am

“ the disintegration of Western democracy”

Wishful thinking

Alba
January 5, 2022 3:26 am

He is co-author of “The Climate Change Challenge and the Failure of Democracy” (2007) commissioned by the Pell Centre for International Relations and Public Policy.
How come the Pell Centre asked a Professor of Medicine to co-author something on climate and politics? It’s like asking a Professor of Medicine to design a bridge. And how much attention was he giving to his job as a professor of medicine when he was co-authoring it?

H.R.
Reply to  Alba
January 5, 2022 10:26 am

They needed an MD because the climate data is doctored.

MarkW
Reply to  Alba
January 5, 2022 11:30 am

Back in the 80’s or so, the Council of Bishops put out a paper on how we needed a kinder form of capitalism. There solution was also indistinguishable from socialism.
A friend of mine stated that he was waiting for the Council of Economic Advisers to come out with a paper on the theology of the Virgin Birth.

Last edited 15 days ago by MarkW
H.R.
January 5, 2022 3:47 am

Is the Wizard of Oz still available? He seemed to have the Emerald City running along nicely. Had the backing of the Lollipop Guild, too.

If he’s not available, then I’m against the idea.

Michael in Dublin
January 5, 2022 4:02 am

According to Professor Shearman, “some problems are beyond the comprehension of elected politicians experts and should not be entrusted to their authority.” They should be left in the hands of engineers who have a much better idea about how to get things done. 

Last edited 15 days ago by Michael in Dublin
Jim Clarke
January 5, 2022 4:32 am

Of course, climate change is not a problem, so the argument that Professor Shearman is making is invalid from the beginning. Secondly, academia was the first institution to fall to the machinations of those seeking a one world order dictatorship similar to Orwell’s ‘1984’, or Rand’s ‘Atlas Shrugged’ which featured such panels of experts wielding tyranny over the population and destroying the civilization. Anyone reading Prof. Shearman’s words and thinking they have any merit at all, is simply not paying attention!

Tim Gorman
January 5, 2022 4:37 am

The main problem with this entire diatribe is the assumption that *government* is the proper path to use in creating solutions to problems. A secondary problem in the US is that we are actually governed by an unelected Bureaucratic Hegemony (BH), not by elected politicians. This is true today from local to federal government. You will *never* get the BH staffed with people who actually understand the problems the “experts” identify and so no government solution will ever work.

The *real* answer is to let the private sector work it out. What the government can do is incentivize the private sector to look to the long-term instead of short-term profit. But that would mean cutting down the money tree the government wants to use to fund social programs. The US financial regulations *used* to fund large, productive private sector innovation centers focused on fundamental progress like Bell Labs, PARC, etc. No more.

No nation with a large, overweening national government like we have today has ever lasted. Not the Roman Empire, not Maoist China, not the Soviet Union, etc. Those nations eventually topple by crushing the base. The US is headed down that path. The Founding Fathers understood this and it’s why they put the federal government in charge of only interstate functions with the states maintaining sovereignty within their borders. The erosion of that idea continues apace every day.

Let the private sector solve the issue, not politicians.

HotScot
Reply to  Tim Gorman
January 5, 2022 5:30 am

You think you have problems in the US?

I read somewhere that the UK has a bigger parliamentary membership between all the MP’s in the House of Commons and the unelected peers in the House of Lords than America, and the UK can fit in the footprint of Lake Superior!

I’m not sure if the comparison was literal or per capita but it’s utterly ridiculous. We also have more BH’s than we can shake a stick at, including charities which have been co-opted by government to fill lobbying duties in return for money to prop up most which would otherwise fail.

Edit: I have stopped giving to any charity. I’m quite capable of buying someone sleeping rough a sandwich or even point him/her in the right direction for a job, but I refuse to fund the six figure salaries of charity CEO’s.

Last edited 15 days ago by HotScot
MarkW
Reply to  HotScot
January 5, 2022 11:39 am

I do all of giving through my local church. I know most of the leadership of the church and keep an eye on who they are using church funds to help.
Most of the time, the church just sends out a notice that there is a family in need, and then the rest of us organize a group to help them.

MarkW
Reply to  Tim Gorman
January 5, 2022 11:36 am

The private sector already does a better job of looking to the long term than any politician is capable of doing.
Any company that fails to plan for several years into the future, in several years, won’t be a company anymore. Any company that hopes to stay in business is already working not only on next year’s products, but the ones for the year after as well. That planning includes not just designing your next product, but figuring out how you are going to build it, which includes how they are going to acquire all the things needed to build it.

The only thing business needs from government is for government to set the basic rules and not constantly change those rules. Other than that, the best thing government can do is get the heck out of the way.

TonyG
Reply to  MarkW
January 6, 2022 9:03 am

The private sector already does a better job of looking to the long term than any politician is capable of doing.

If you want some examples of real long-term thinking, take a look a cognac makers.

Steve4192
January 5, 2022 4:49 am

“Those who are tempted by China’s seductive offer somehow overlook the fact that the offer of power is conditional on total obedience to the central authority.”

They also ignore what happens to opinionated bourgeois academics who trained under the previous regime after the revolution is won. They are the first to get thrown in the gulag. It’s only once the next generation that has been trained in an academy that is completely subservient to the state and the dialectic that scientists and engineers can begin to ascend into leadership positions.

Bruce Cobb
January 5, 2022 4:59 am

The SS Biden has struck an iceberg called Reality, and is rapidly taking on water. Oops, there goes Mikey over the side. Mann overboard!

Andrew Lale
January 5, 2022 5:12 am

‘Those who are tempted by China’s seductive offer somehow overlook the fact that the offer of power is conditional on total obedience to the central authority.’ They do? I thought they had orgasms over the thought.

January 5, 2022 5:12 am

Breaking News
WUWT to be renamed
“What’s Up With Eric Worrall”
Either you have a team of writers, Worrall,
or you are a “writing machine”
All good articles too.

I’d never thought about EVs
in the Virginia winter storm traffic gridlock,
before you wrote an article on the subject..

I noticed some Dumbocrats blaming
climate change for the snow, as expected.

One Dumbocrat blamed
Republican Governor Glenn Youngkin.
Didn’t realize he takes office January 15, 2022,
so he’s NOT yet the Virginia Governor !

Keep up the good writing, Worrall, but maybe
slow down a little – your’re making the rest of us
look like lazy bums.

HotScot
January 5, 2022 5:20 am

Democratic parliaments need to represent the broad social and cultural values of the communities they serve.

In which case ‘scientists’ make up something less than 10% of most communities. I can think of one prominent scientist within the incumbent Conservative party in the UK, David Davis.

Davis also came from a deprived background so knows what it’s like to be grubbing around for food and clothes as part of a single parent family.

I learned that early on in the covid pandemic he was desperately trying to persuade parliamentarians to take vitamin D to help resist the worst effects of covid. Perhaps that fell on deaf ears, perhaps it didn’t, but no word of it leaked out to the public.

He has also written articles for the Telegraph scathing of Boris’ NetZero policy and how much damage it will do to the country so, whilst he’s unlikely to come straight out and say he’s a ‘denier’ I think the clues are that his scientific qualifications make him constructively critical of ‘climate science’.

What no one needs are ranks of lawyers and PPE graduates filling parliamentary seats. How many PPE qualified friends do any of us have in our circle of friends. I offer to suggest almost none, even fewer that there are scientists.

A qualification designed for a working lifetime in politics should be the very reason for disqualification from ever entering politics.

Observer
Reply to  HotScot
January 5, 2022 11:44 am

I know some PPE types. Smart people but inclined to scientism and hubris.

Sara
January 5, 2022 5:26 am

So Shearman has never had even a glance at Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World”, and all the fallacies that it pointed to? Never spent a moment with “Soylent Green” or any of the other closed society stories, which aren’t too far off China’s growth pattern?

“…is for politicians to surrender power to independent peer appointed panels of scientists.” – article

I sincerely doubt that he really understands what that means: that you have to go along with the “meme” (whatever is held as The Rule) to get any kind of support to develop something new. We’ve sent our techno-engineering stuff over to China for manufacturing. They’ve made leaps and bounds in upgrading everything, as a result, and NOT because they’re so very brilliant at inventing anything. If the US and other countries shut off that supply line, China will stagnate, period.

Whatever – it will all balance out in the end. Yeah, I do see a “crash” coming down the road. I wonder if Shearman could survive without his microwave and iPhone.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Sara
January 5, 2022 11:26 am

There seems to be something about the ‘woke’ mind set that they only see the things that are wrong with society, and are blind to the things that are good. This, compounded with the seriously inflated self view of their intelligence, they feel gives them the license, even responsibility, to correct the evils of the world, whether the lesser people want it or not. Further, they seem utterly unable to anticipate unintended consequences. Perhaps this arises because they think that they are so smart that their ideas for utopia are perfect, with no downside or problems possible.

TonyG
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
January 6, 2022 8:56 am

Minor correction, Clyde
“There seems to be something about the ‘woke’ mind set that they only see the things that they imagine are wrong with society”

Quelgeek
January 5, 2022 5:35 am

Professor Shearman assumes domain expertise will naturally lead to consensus and correct policy solutions.That is a widely held misconception. Dan Kahan has shown that expertise in fact leads to greater divergence; people are better able to defend a position motivated by their beliefs. A well-educated liberal will disagree vehemently with an equally well-educated conservative.

If Professor Shearman has ever seen policy concensus amongst experts he has probably been looking at some kind of self-selecting clique.

HotScot
January 5, 2022 5:36 am

Slightly off topic, but I would be interested to hear from Anthony on the level of interest in WUWT over the last couple of years now covid seems to have produced a level of community scientific scepticism, and COP26/Biden’s/Boris’ crumbling Build Back Better and NetZero policies are falling apart at the seams.

Tom Abbott
January 5, 2022 5:56 am

From the article: “To become relevant today, elected governments have to be prepared to accept advice and guidance from independent commissions of scientists and other relevant experts selected by their peers — and not by political appointment.”

These elected governments need to come to WUWT to get their guidance. They need to expose themselves to the real world in order to deal with real world problems and the real world is laid out for them right here at WUWT.

Come one, come all.

glenn holdcroft
January 5, 2022 6:12 am

Any government must have control over the people , but all people must be able to decide who will govern them and for how long .

Duane
January 5, 2022 6:16 am

Well, I suppose that academic geniuses think they can run the world better than anybody, given that self-proclaimed business geniuses like Trump thought he and they could run the world better than anybody, and we all know how that turned out. The same laments have been uttered by men about the time when women got the vote a century ago, and then promptly enacted Prohibition, which proved to be the most colossal government failure of all time in US history. And now women think they oughta run the world because men have effed it up so bad, but to date there is no evidence that women are doing a bang up job either.

The bottom line is that democratic self determination is the only way to provide the maximum well being to the maximum number of citizens.

I believe it was Winston Churchill, the great defender of democracy in an era dominated by dictators in Germany, Italy, Spain, Russia, Japan, and most of Asia and South America – who quipped:

Democracy is the worst form of government … except for all the others.

Regardless of one’s personal expertise or perspective, you only represent yourself, not everybody and everybody’s interest, both individually and collectively. Only we acting in our own self interest, and collectively in democratic representative government, can make sure that OUR interests are considered.

The other way to put things is the way Lord Acton put it in 1887:

Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.

Our government in the United States is not just based upon democracy alone … our Constitution is predicated upon the separation of powers, such that no individual person or group ever has absolute power to run things. The best outcomes result when competing interests compete, and compromise.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Duane
January 5, 2022 11:33 am

… given that self-proclaimed business geniuses like Trump thought he and they could run the world better than anybody, and we all know how that turned out.

To give the Devil his due, the economy and supply lines were doing a Hell of a lot better under Trump than currently!

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
January 5, 2022 5:33 pm

Everything was doing a lot better under Trump.

MarkW
Reply to  Duane
January 5, 2022 11:44 am

The Trump Derangement Syndrome continues strong with this one.
Where did this delusion that Trump tried to run the world come from?
As to how Trump did, he did very, very well. Much better than anyone since Reagan. Trump’s predecessor is making even Trump haters wish they had voted for Trump.

Last edited 15 days ago by MarkW
Nick Schroeder
January 5, 2022 6:29 am

Imagine if truly skeptical voices were harassed, bullied, marginalized, and censored?
Oh, wait?
On WUWT no imagination needed.

The atmosphere’s albedo makes the Earth cooler not warmer. Remove the atmosphere or just the GreenHouse Gases and the Earth’s albedo would become much like the Moon’s. That is NOT what the Radiative GreenHouse Effect theory says.
If this is correct RGHE is not.
According to the K-T atmospheric power flux balance (TFK_bams09.pdf (ucar.edu)) and numerous clones the GHGs must absorb “extra” LWIR energy upwelling from the surface allegedly radiating as a black body.
The kinetic energy heat transfer processes of the contiguous atmospheric molecules render such upwelling LWIR BB energy impossible as also demonstrated by experiment.
For the experimental write up see:
https://principia-scientific.org/debunking-the-greenhouse-gas-theory-with-a-boiling-water-pot/
If this is correct RGHE is not.
No RGHE, no GHG warming, no man/CO2 driven global warming or climate change.

AS WE et. al. frequently requests of commentors: address the correct/incorrect-ness of these specific points, don’t change the subject and wander off to unrelated esoteric topics, appeal to the consensus authorities or close with ad hominem insults.

K-T simplified.jpg
MarkW
Reply to  Nick Schroeder
January 5, 2022 11:45 am

So much paranoia, so little actual science.
Yet again.
When you post the same post to every single thread, you can expect that the editors will eventually get tired of your nonsense.

Last edited 15 days ago by MarkW
Tom
January 5, 2022 6:43 am

These members have received more than $61 million in lifetime contributions from the oil, gas and coal industries”

These millions are but a pittance compared with the billions per year given to the so-called climate ‘scientists’. These are given more than a $billion per year by the US government alone. These $billions are given only to the technocrats who drink the CAGW kool-aid. I would trust the decisions of randomly selected properly informed citizens long before I trust those drinking from the troughs of government largess.

John Kelly
January 5, 2022 7:12 am

When I read Comrade Professor Shearman’s short note my mind was flashing CCP, CCP, CCP. He is clearly a CCP plant/sympathiser.

Insufficiently Sensitive
January 5, 2022 7:38 am

for politicians to surrender power to independent peer appointed panels of scientists.

Oh, sure. ‘Peer’ in the last couple decades of ‘science’ is restricted to a like-minded political hierarchy, which lives on the funding of their grants by like-minded politicians with other people’s money to dole out. This proposition is nothing but incestuous.

Olen
January 5, 2022 7:42 am

China with all it’s technical leadership has no scientific credits of accomplishments. They have advanced to where they are today by stealing and bribing.

A degree does not guarantee good judgement or honesty. The professor is more interested in convenience than progress.

Curious George(@moudryj)
Reply to  Olen
January 5, 2022 8:15 am

History is repeating itself. The book “100 German scientists against Einstein” comes to mind.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Curious George
January 5, 2022 10:10 am

Just yesterday I reminded someone off that book and Einstein’s response.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Olen
January 5, 2022 10:15 am

Few people understand that about the Chinese. They have a ‘go along to get along’ society that suppresses innovation. They tend to prevail in rote learning and gaining expertise through endless repetition … never interrupting their practice regimen to wonder if maybe there is a better way.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Olen
January 5, 2022 11:39 am

China with all it’s technical leadership has no scientific credits of accomplishments.

You apparently haven’t been following the space efforts of China! Moon landings, asteroid sample returns, space station construction, scientific satellites in orbit such as Tansat. Unlike the US, they have ambitious scientific moon plans. The US is struggling with a timeline of putting a uterus on the moon.

MarkW
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
January 5, 2022 11:55 am

And how much of that technology was actually developed by the Chinese?
The Chinese space program is a lot like the US space program back in the 60’s. It’s mostly a propaganda program to convince the world that China is a dominant country.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  MarkW
January 5, 2022 7:59 pm

Well, to be fair, they have an easier task because we had already done it. However, we didn’t have the ability to return samples remotely in the ’70s.

I think that it would be a mistake to think that our technology is so much superior to the Chinese. And, they are doing it for the right reason – doing science, even if it is ultimately propaganda. They are not catering to the ‘woke’ elitists who think it is appropriate to spend billions on making a social statement.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/techandscience/chinas-artificial-sun-just-broke-a-major-world-record-for-plasma-fusion/ar-AAStH7S?pfr=1

Shoki Kaneda
January 5, 2022 8:12 am

A big GFY to those folks.

TEWS_Pilot
January 5, 2022 8:19 am

Eric, GMTA…

Joanne Nova has written an excellent companion article to this one on her blog. I left a comment and took the liberty to post a link back to your WUWT article.

https://joannenova.com.au/2022/01/2022-the-year-of-inflation/#comment-2506098

The incomparable Joanne Nova has once again demonstrated her uncanny knack of seeing the entire playing field at once and pointing out all of the key adversaries and exposing their nefarious plans to orchestrate a paradigm shift from a world of free sovereign nations to a global gulag lorded over by Communist/Statist elites as they depopulate the Earth through a “SCAMDEMIC” to a manageable number of servants for their Utopia. I believe the newest COVID “variant” is named “IHU,” I HAVE U.

Back in 2009, Beagle-Butcher, “Dr.” Anthony “Josef Mengele” Fauci described the plan to use a virus-based pandemic to take control of the world.

Summary: A flu-like pandemic is the best thing because then you can make and require a universal vaccine, which is even good for the pharmaceutical companies who can then count on annual income.

.

https://twitter.com/hansmahncke/status/1478574274998898688?s=11

Now, this latest WUWT article adds more validation to the argument that the “Global Elites’ Reset Agenda 2030” is well underway.

The Hill: Disintegrating Western Democracies Must Accept Climate Advice
by Eric Worrall

According to Professor Emeritus David Shearman, some problems are beyond the comprehension of elected politicians, and should not be entrusted to their authority. The only way to halt the disintegration of Western democracy is for politicians to surrender power to independent peer appointed panels of scientists.

Read more of this post
https://wp.me/p9SOJY-GGlY

Happy New Year.

Ed Zuiderwijk
January 5, 2022 9:14 am

A man has to know his limitations – Dirty Harry, if I’m not mistaken – in particular those who consider themselves ‘experts’.

Based on a life-long working experience in the scientific enterprise (with some 50 publications to my name).

Michael Jackson
January 5, 2022 9:51 am

Thank God for President Manchin.

Clyde Spencer
January 5, 2022 10:23 am

These members have received more than $61 million in lifetime contributions from the oil, gas and coal industries.

The good doctor cites an article for his claim, which does not give its source for the claim! Is that all we have to do is cite a tinfoil-hat claim, one article removed, to consider it to be reliable and authenticated?

Andy Pattullo
January 5, 2022 10:32 am

Sure: the only way to save democracy is to destroy it. “Professor Emeritus”is presumably a title one gives oneself for going a whole ten minutes without saying something utterly stupid. Problem is that doesn’t ensure the person with the title actually recognizes the intellectual desert that is their own cranium.

Ted
Reply to  Andy Pattullo
January 6, 2022 3:43 am

I disagree. “Professor Emiritus” is a titled usually bestowed by the leadership of higher academic institutions after a career full of saying stupid things with a straight face.

whatlanguageisthis
January 5, 2022 10:36 am

What a wonderful exposition on the dangers of democracy as a form of government provided by Professor Shearman! I appreciate the way he lauds those 139 elected members of Congress for using the checks and balances of our Constitutional Republic to limit the tyranny of academic elites and avarice of the liberal progressive politicians.

It would be better if he saw the danger in his call for an un-elected body of elites (academic or otherwise is irrelevant to the danger) to force their will on the unwashed masses he so obviously despises. Is he aware of his hypocrisy calling for saving democracy by use of tyranny?

Last edited 15 days ago by whatlanguageisthis
MarkW
January 5, 2022 10:37 am

“Western democracies must accept climate advice”

Advice??? Is that what they are calling it these days?

The only way to halt the disintegration of Western democracy is for politicians to surrender power to independent peer appointed panels of scientists.”

We had to destroy democracy in order to save it.

Last edited 15 days ago by MarkW
Richard S Courtney
January 5, 2022 11:04 am

Eric Worral,

I am so old that I remember the 1966 movie In Like Flint which was the first the Flint trilogy starring James Coburn.

All three movies can be obtained from
https://www.themoviedb.org/collection/167456
and the official description of In Like Flint says

When scientists use eco-terrorism to impose their will on the world by affecting extremes in the weather, Intelligence Chief Cramden calls in top agent Derek Flint.

I wonder who will be the ‘Derek Flint’ who saves the world if Professor Shearman gets his way.

Richard

Jim Veenbaas
January 5, 2022 12:03 pm

The cognitive dissonance is staggering.

Doonman
January 5, 2022 1:13 pm

Being from Australia, Professor David Shearman probably doesn’t realize that the “Most powerful western Democracy” is actually a guaranteed constitutional republic.

It says so right here in the constitution that formed it.

Article IV section 4:
The United States shall guarantee to every state in this union a republican form of government.

If the quality of opinion from retired professors from Australia is this poor, imagine what critical thinking their former students must have.

Dan M
January 5, 2022 2:02 pm

Our democratic republic doesn’t do what he wants it to do, so it is “dead” and we should submit our collective wills to a panel of unelected experts.

How do you get a PhD without understanding the basic laws of logic?

Posa
January 5, 2022 10:09 pm

So let me get this straight: China is building 400+ coal fired plants and 150 nuclear plants. Somehow loonies like Eric Worrall thinks this makes China a demented totalitarian state. Yet WUWT denounces the Western “democracies” for destroying their domestic energy grid and propagating Climate Change hoaxes, the exact opposite of Chinese policy.

So what is it that you yokels want?

Old Cocky
Reply to  Posa
January 6, 2022 1:44 pm

Cause and effect reversal?

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