Irish climate plans fall short of urgent action needed

From Green News (.ie)

Greens and the EU are fretting that Ireland just doesn’t do enough.

The Commission’s 2019 Country Report for Ireland states that we are “falling further behind” our EU compatriots in decarbonising the economy, raising “health, climate and environmental concerns”.

The report points to “severe challenges” in tackling rising emissions in transport, agriculture, energy and the built environment.

In 2016, emissions increased by over 2.5 per cent in agriculture, four per cent in transport and six per cent in the energy sector – primarily due to an increase in the use of gas for electricity generation.

Yeah not so good.

The Commission’s analysis, however, indicates that there is “no signs yet that a reversal in trends is to be expected” with both our 2020 and 2030 targets set to be missed.

The Government has accepted that we will fail to meet our 2020 target, with the Minister for Climate Action, Richard Bruton TD stating that current projections put us 95 per cent off target.

Dum dum dum

Without further action now, compliance with EU commitments will become “increasingly challenging and could become costly”, the report finds, due to a “lack of early action” to meet our targets.

In order to try and meet our 2030 emissions reduction target, Ireland will need to purchase carbon credits “on a large scale during 2021-2030” from other EU members that have exceeded their targets.

“The lack of progress will make the challenge of meeting Ireland’s EU obligations that more difficult, while also increasing the cost of future action,” the Commission report states.

Mr Bruton has previously said that Ireland will need to spend between €6m and €13m on carbon credits to try and bridge the gap to our 2020 target. This will bring total State spending on emissions allowances and renewable credits to €120m since 2007.

This is an interesting twist.

With Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google all now committed to source 100 per cent of their energy from renewable sources, the Commission said that Ireland’s lack of progress may also be “raising concerns for some key multinational companies”.

And of course, just make ‘em pay.

Despite the addition of a one per cent vehicle registration tax surcharge for diesel cars in Budget 2019, diesel is still taxed at a lower rate than petrol “even though it emits more air pollutants”, the report adds.

A recent Economic and Social Research Institute study found that bringing the diesel levy in line with the rate of petrol could reduce Ireland’s emissions and bring in €500 million for the exchequer.

The proposed increase in the carbon tax in Budget 2019 would have been an “important and much-needed signal to economic agents”, the Commission said.

Circular! That ought to do it.

The Commission also said that Ireland would benefit from a national strategy for the transition to a more circular economy, with progress toward mandatory recycling targets slowing in recent years.

Read the full article here.

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67 thoughts on “Irish climate plans fall short of urgent action needed

  1. The Irish will just have to do what they have always done – burn peat. Yeah, it’s “carbon neutral” (so the idiots would have you believe)

    • Outline the specific affect on future global warming scenarios up to 2100 in actual °C as a result of Ireland going fossil fuel free by 2030 or 2050?

      I ask as you seem to be suggesting this is the path that the “idiots” should go down.

  2. Why do they use diesel? They have horses – don’t they?
    As long as they don’t tax their lovely Irish beer, all is fine.
    And, by the way, they have a lovely, but slightly raining climate in Ireland and could buy some nuclear powered “clean” electricity from France – although not sure if they have a direct interconnection to France.

  3. I think soon AOC’s public admission that the GND – the Green New Death – is all about population reduction, no children for the up and coming generation, will hit the Irish headlines, or be censored.

    After all Ireland had all that before – in 1846 when the population dropped suddenly by half, imposed by the very same globalists of today who said then there were too many Irish, it is their own fault for having children. A version of Marie Antoinette’s : let them eat spuds.

    Same as the infamous economist in 1971 where Keynesian Abba Lerner said if the Germans had imposed Schachtian austerity Hitler “would not have been necessary”.

    Lerner blurted out the truth just as AOC has.

    So thank Ocasio-Cortez for letting genocide all hang out on Twitter.

    There is nothing new or green about the GND.

    • bon bon is correct and has tied it all together with, “There is nothing new or green about the GND.”

      GND is actually Soylent GND, and, as in the eponymous movie, “Soylent Green is people!”

    • It shouldn’t be a problem for the Irish. In fact, they have already figured out the solution. Being a Catholic nation, buying carbon credits fits right in with the tradition of buying indulgences to avoid punishment for one’s sins. The fact that is just as stupid goes right over the heads of their political elite.

      • Luther was supposed to fix all that – just look what Germany did! Shut down the most advanced nuclear, covered the landscape with rotating crucifixes of a different church altogether.

  4. No Carl they/we don’t. But I am sure there must be a way for Macaroon to send some via Mrs Maybes UK to his Marxist friends in the Emerald Isle. After all they are kindred spirits.
    As far as the peat goes – well it’s nearly gone – with whatever bit of common sense my fellow country men ever possessed.

  5. We should point out they met their 2020 renewable energy target -this is about meeting the next one… also they currently get 28% of their electricity from wind.

  6. EU is just a nice abbreviation from EUSR ( European Union of Socialistic Rebublics ).

    Its target is to greate imaginary taxes to exhaust its citizens. Wellcome to brave new world. We have thougt control, very pure newspeak and all those things straight from 1984. Our governments have taken Orwells book as a guide to power. And he was only trying to warn us. Obviously reading is not in fashion anymore. We have “smartphones” which are sucking brains out from our millennial generation.

    • Putin put it much better last month saying Brussels has taken more control of decisions than the Supreme Soviet of the cold war.
      And he should know.

      • Oh yes, Putin knows, and he´s not afraid to throw the truth to our leaders faces. And they take it as a compliment.

        I really would like to see a leader like Donald Trump here.

  7. Dublin ought to beware : ‘Decarbonization’ of Germany Will Cost between EU818 and EU1,442 Billion – report from 2018 by the German Research Association for Combustion Engines (FVV).
    Does Dublin have even an inkling of what that means for EU finances?

  8. Strange business this :
    5000 years ago Ireland was at the forefront of European civilisation (Newgrange and Cielde fields )
    1500 years ago the Irish monks helped keep literacy and the Latin literature alive
    1000 years ago they expelled the Vikings who had invaded and tried to settle.
    For most of the period since , until the Irish Free State, they fought the Normans and the English , with
    sometimes savage brutality on both sides.
    But threaten them with a fine from the appalling EU for not adhering to meaningless (globally speaking) objectives and they collapse in a gibbering heap, no more backbone than the present British Govt (and I cannot conceive a worse insult).
    In Altrincham there was a street known as the” street of heroes”, It is gone now , but there is a permanent collection of red wreaths there to commemorate the fact that most of the men in this very poor street volunteered to fight in the British Army in the Great War and 1/3 never returned . Most of the families were of Irish extraction.
    So, what happened to that Irish sense of independence and courage?

    • As Arthur Griffith said if they had signed up in Dublin in 1916 instead of the WWI slaughterhouse, they would have settled the issue then quickly and decisively.

  9. Is this the first time this “circular economy” idea has been rolled out? What a farce. Yeah, recycling and repairing things, that’s the ticket. The stupid burns hotter than the sun.

    • If recycled material was cheaper than new material manufacturers would use it, but it isn’t, so they don’t. But then they don’t understand economics.

      • In my experience recycled material usually requires more energy to prepare for use than a raw material.
        But then, that is usually reflected in the price of the finished product. If you don’t mind paying more (as a customer) or making lower profits, this isn’t a problem.

  10. OMG – the Commission has squared the circle! Quadrature economics! Deserves a Nobel Prize, I’d say!

  11. “Minister for Climate Action … ”

    This Minister can’t do anything without a Minister of Truth.

  12. I’m harking back to that scene in ‘Ghostbusters’. Is it becoming a disaster of biblical proportions yet?

    • Well of course it is…haven’t you been paying attention to the headlines in the Lamestream Media???
      Just not to certain exactly which bible proportions they are comparing to

  13. In 2016, emissions increased by over … six per cent in the energy sector – primarily due to an increase in the use of gas for electricity generation.

    Ireland is a net energy importer. It gets about 8% of its electricity over the interconnector. I’m guessing that the imported electricity doesn’t count against the CO2 budget. If Ireland replaced some of that imported electricity with gas generated electricity, its CO2 budget would suffer. Global emissions probably wouldn’t change. Irish emissions would go up and British emissions would go down.

    If Ireland really wants to solve its CO2 problem then it should import all its electricity from Britain.

    • They’ll have to install an EU/British Transformer.
      Not to carry AC, but Fidget Power.
      Not invented yet, but hey, why wait?

    • CB Better yet, Ireland should disconnect from the grid and go all “renewables”. The tech giants are going there anyway (virtue signalling- it didn’t work in Silicon Valley). This would be a double plus because Trump could then get all the tech giants to return to the USA. If that didn’t happen, it might be better yet if the current tech giants folded and we start over. Funny how they moved there to get tax breaks and now may face EU carbon taxes.

  14. Ireland has less than 5 Million people and would have less in 80 years if they weren’t importing people from Africa and Asia.

    Ireland has ZERO effect on the Earth’s climate and no matter what they do, 80 years from now they will have EVEN LESS effect on the earth’s climate.

    In 30-50 years, when their country is 50% “non-Irish”, climate change will be the least of their worries.

  15. Since the EPA browbeated us into thinking Co2 is a pollutant it means alarmists can mention pollutants in general, while talking about CO2 reduction, and we’ll think they mean carbon dioxide. As in this quote from the article:

    “Despite the addition of a one per cent vehicle registration tax surcharge for diesel cars in Budget 2019, diesel is still taxed at a lower rate than petrol “even though it emits more air pollutants”, the report adds.”

    We all know diesel was taxed less because it emits less CO2 (per mile driven) and would therefore be supposedly ‘cleaner’ for the planet. The other, fully known pollutants (i.e. particulates) were ignored in the march to rid the world of CO2. Now they’re using the “pollutants” argument, in a discussion about CO2 reduction, to argue that diesel should be taxed more even though it produces less CO2

  16. Ireland is a corrupt racketeering operation, I know, I lived there most of my life.
    The politicians have been completely bought out by the European Union

    The country is now historically liberal, mostly because of the church legacy in Ireland

    Politicians in Ireland will do nothing unless it benefits them, that is a truth that has been known for decades.

    Example, at the behest of the EU, Irish politicians nationalised private debt and put it on the heads of Irish citizens, 42% of the Eurozone debt to be exact, and it was illegal by Irish law, but the Irish gov don’t let law get in the way of their utterly bend ways, Ireland is a banana republic, which is why I left and moved to Finland, Ireland’s future is carbon tax, mass immigration and all the SJW nonsense that comes from a loony liberal population in a country where education has bee n intentionally made garbage, our edu used to be fantastic, now its utter bollox, most Irish kids dont even know basic history, and no Irish history, they are not taught it.

    Simply put, there is less in it for Irish politicians to meet climate targets, as they get more bribes and kickbacks from business that requires more emissions

    Also sure emissions went up in 2016, Ireland is STILL rercovering from the Financial sacking and occupation by the EU and Troika, after the 2008 crash where the EU had Irish politicians had a working population of 2 million people or less, saddled with the debt of risk taking German banks

    Ireland is a hole, I left out the 4 letter word before hole.

    • I’m not sure if dissing your own country is a particularly Irish phenomenon. But, I haven’t noticed it among other nationals. I have never heard a German, French, English or American speak about their own country in the way you have spoken about Ireland. There’s a lot that’s great about Ireland. I have lived abroad in the Middle East for about 5 years and travel a lot for work so I can compare meaningfully. Of course, there’s also a lot in Ireland that’s a pain – but Ireland is not different to any of the countries I mentioned above in that respect.

    • I have to agree with you there to a point. Ireland in the late 70’s and early 80’s was a horrible place. Waterford, where I lived, if you didn’t work for CIE, the docks or the crystal factory or were in the church, you didn’t work. Theft was rife. It was ok as every Sunday you were forgiven. The Christian Brothers schools I went to were harsh. I left for Belgium in 1981. The late 80’s early 90’s saw massive injection of EU money and tax changes made it attractive for multinationals to setup HQ’s in Dublin. House prices soared. And now it sounds like what it was like in the late 70’s.

    • It isn’t obvious why comments go into moderation. The most brilliant student I ever had used to exclaim, “Stupid computer!”, and he was right. He always tripped over bugs or just plain bad programming. If one of my comments ends up in moderation for a mysterious reason, I just assume that it’s the stupid computer (ie. the WordPress server).

      Your previous comment was very enlightening to me. Please reconsider.

      I don’t know enough to be able to compare Ireland with Iceland but Iceland suffered badly after the 2008 crash. In response, Iceland fingered the guilty and charged them with crimes. link The kind of socialism I really hate is privatizing profits and socializing losses. Passing laws that do that should get politicians thrown in jail.

  17. Understandably this is the only problem of Ireland. Someone must have smoked quite a lot of dried brake fluid residues there.

  18. Good Morning from the guitar town. This tale is why we pulled out of Paris. We do not want to be economic flagellants to unnecessary imaginary climate goals.

    “It’s going to be costly” is easily fixed by getting out of these agreements. Our 2020 election campaign is already brewing up and we will dose it heavily with this green rubbish. The Irish people are tough fighters. The vests will likely be green.

  19. “important and much-needed signal to economic agents”, the Commission said.

    And what is more important than sending signals to economic agents? Do you suppose they mean the economic agents of the EU or someone else? It seems no one else is interested.

    There was some interest in green loon legislation when people made money by heating empty sheds by burning wood pellets 24/7.

    The EU should make them an offer based on insurance. Either pay some vast fortune now to signal their virtue, or be virtuous later by paying their global fraction of the insurance payouts for climate-related harm.

    This whole thing is based on risk, right? Future climate risk measured against present cost is the choice. If Ireland’s minuscule reduction in CO2 is not “achieved”, they can instead pay their minuscule fraction of ” damages” claimed in, say, 2090.

    If the damage attributable to “excess CO2” doesn’t materialize, because the ECS turns out to be very low, or if the warming is net beneficial, they could save a lot of money. What can Brussels say? If you don’t pay now, you are taking a chance on paying more later? Then it is really just a big insurance scheme – everyone becomes one of Lloyd’s Names. Deal!

    If some sober Irish CA’s sharpen their pencils (as Irish CA”s are wont to do) they can work out that a beer in the hand is worth two in the hogshead. They are far better off to face long term risks than to screw their economy now.

  20. “I guess WSJ Editorial Page takes pride in their ignorance of our nation’s history of slavery, Jim Crow, & mass incarceration; willful doubt on the decades of science on climate change; targeting of indigenous peoples, and the classist, punitive agenda targeting working families.Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez added,” AOC Twitter

    And here’s the crux of why her type will not win out. This is her message. How sad and depressing particularly coming from someone with recent immigrant roots. Do people in the USA struggle? You bet they do. Does everyone have an opportunity to better themselves. You bet they do. The American dream isn’t a material possession. It is an opportunity. Look how well the bartender has done. Depression doesn’t sell.

    • Why not the full quote from AOC ?
      “Our planet is going to face disaster if we don’t turn this ship
      around. And so it’s basically like, there is a scientific
      consensus that the lives of children are going to be very
      difficult and it does lead, I think young people, to have a
      legitimate question. Ya know, should… is it okay to still have
      children? Not just financially because people are graduating with
      20, 30, 100 thousand dollars of student loan debt so they can’t
      even afford to have kids in the house, but there’s also just this
      basic moral question, like, what do we do? And even if you don’t
      have kids, there are still children here in the world and we have
      a moral obligation to them to leave a better world to them.”

      She is promoting eugenics, population reduction, the core green agenda, all public on Twitter. Should make Prince Philip proud.

  21. ‘This will bring total State spending on emissions allowances and renewable credits to €120m since 2007.’

    The price of intangibles has gone way up.

  22. Cut to the chase and ban beer and raise the income tax rate in Ireland. That will show them who they are dealing with.

  23. They should finally put some teeth in the Paris accords by adopting the nuclear option. Yes, the REAL nuclear option – nuke em if they don’t comply. This will leave more energy for the rest of us.

  24. I’d be interested in people’s thoughts here on the following presentation I prepared last year on 200 years of climate change in Ireland. It is a quick and easy read with colourful graphs and the minimum of statisitcs so all can understand it readily. I’ve tried to advertise it as much as I can online and it generally gets a good reaction from people and climate catastrophe enthusiasts get quite annoyed about it.

    https://www.scribd.com/document/382781490/Climate-Change-in-Ireland-Over-the-Last-Two-Centuries

    I prepared because Ireland has one of the longest climate records for a single site in the world back to 1796. As you can see in the presentation the longterm trend in Ireland follows the global trend very closely (slide 13).

    • I’d like to copy it and use it locally (Isle of Man) as we have greenies here making a fuss but it is behind a paywall. Shame.

      • John, it is not behind a paywall. You can download it from scribd as far as I know (I see a button for that).

  25. I’d be interested in people’s thoughts here on the following presentation I prepared last year on 200 years of climate change in Ireland. It is a quick and easy read with colourful graphs and the minimum of statisitcs so all can understand it readily. I’ve tried to advertise it as much as I can online and it generally gets a good reaction from people and climate catastrophe enthusiasts get quite annoyed about it.

    (it won’t post the comment – google Climate-Change-in-Ireland-Over-the-Last-Two-Centuries & scribd)

    I prepared because Ireland has one of the longest climate records for a single site in the world back to 1796. As you can see in the presentation the longterm trend in Ireland follows the global trend very closely (slide 13).

  26. “In order to try and meet our 2030 emissions reduction target, Ireland will need to purchase carbon credits “on a large scale during 2021-2030” from other EU members that have exceeded their targets.”
    ————————————————————–
    How likely are other EU members to exceed their targets? From what I have heard, not very.

    And if no country exceeds their targets, who will they buy carbon credits from? Uhm…I’ll volunteer for that. Get your carbon credits here, discount coupons apply for the first 20 countries. US dollars only. Pay through the nose and together we will save the planet!

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