New 80-Year Deep-Ocean Temperature Dataset Compared to a 1D Climate Model

Reposted from Dr. Roy Spencer’s site January 15th, 2020 by Roy W. Spencer, Ph. D. The increasing global ocean heat content (OHC) is often pointed to as the most quantitative way to monitor long-term changes in the global energy balance, which is believed to have been altered by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The challenge is…

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Can We Tell If The Oceans Are Warming?

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Well, I was going to write about hourly albedo changes, honest I was, but as is often the case I got sidetractored. My great thanks to Joanne Nova for highlighting a mostly unknown paper on the error estimate for the Argo dataset entitled On the accuracy of North Atlantic temperature and…

Argo And Ocean Heat Content

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Today I ran across an interesting presentation from 2013 regarding the Argo floats. These are a large number of independent floats spread all across the world oceans. They spend most of their time sleeping at a depth of 1,000 metres (3,300 feet) below the surface of the ocean. Then they drop…

Argo, Temperature, and OHC

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I’ve been thinking about the Argo floats and the data they’ve collected. There are about 4,000 Argo floats in the ocean. Most of the time they are asleep, a thousand metres below the surface. Every 10 days they wake up and slowly rise to the surface, taking temperature measurements as…

New CERES Data and Ocean Heat Content

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach We have gotten three more years of data for the CERES dataset, which is good, more data is always welcome. However, one of the sad things about the CERES dataset is that we can’t use it for net top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation trends. Net TOA radiation is what comes in (downwelling…

Why Reanalysis Data Isn't …

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I was reading through the recent Trenberth paper on ocean heat content that’s been discussed at various locations around the web. It’s called “Distinctive climate signals in reanalysis of global ocean heat content”,  paywalled, of course. [UPDATE: my thanks to Nick Stokes for locating the paper here.] Among the “distinctive climate…

The Layers of Meaning in Levitus

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach There have been a lot of electrons sacrificed on the altar of the discussion of the Levitus ocean heat content data. The oddity seems to be that the deep ocean is gaining heat faster than the upper ocean. Here’s a typical graphic showing the issue: Figure 1. Changes in the…