ARGO—Fit for Purpose?

By Rud Istvan This is the second of two guest posts on whether ‘big’ climate science missions are fit for purpose, inspired by ctm as seaside lunch speculations. The first post dealt with whether satellite altimetry, specifically NASA’s newest Jason3 ‘bird’, was fit for sea level rise (SLR) ‘acceleration’ purpose. It found using NASA’s own…

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A Small Margin Of Error

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I see that Zeke Hausfather and others are claiming that 2018 is the warmest year on record for the ocean down to a depth of 2,000 metres. Here’s Zeke’s claim: Figure 1. Change in ocean heat content, 1955 – 2018. Data available from Institute for Applied Physics (IAP).  When I…

Learning From The Argonauts

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach The best thing about doing climate science the way I do it is that I can study anything I want, and there is always so much more to learn … in the present instance, there’s another year of Argo data, so I thought I’d take another stroll through the world…

Argo, Temperature, and OHC

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I’ve been thinking about the Argo floats and the data they’ve collected. There are about 4,000 Argo floats in the ocean. Most of the time they are asleep, a thousand metres below the surface. Every 10 days they wake up and slowly rise to the surface, taking temperature measurements as…

An Ocean of Overconfidence

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach I previously discussed the question of error bars in oceanic heat content measurements in “Decimals of Precision“. There’s a new study of changes in oceanic heat content, by Levitus et al., called “World Ocean Heat Content And Thermosteric Sea Level Change (0-2000), 1955-2010” (paywalled here). [UPDATE: Available here, h/t Leif…

Argo, Latitude, Day, and Reynolds Interpolation

Guest post by Willis Eschenbach This is another of my occasional reports from my peripatetic travels through the Argo data (see the Appendix for my other dispatches from the front lines). In the comments to my previous post, I had put up a graphic showing how the January/February/March data for one gridcell varied by latitude…