Texas frozen wind power – outages ensue, electricity now at unheard of $9000 per megawatt-hour

There’s a saying in the lone star state “Don’t Mess with Texas” which actually started out as an anti-littering campaign but has become sort of a slogan for the rugged, no-nonsense way of life that people have there. Now with dead wind turbines littering the state, the focus on deploying unreliable renewable energy in the name of “saving the planet” has literally “messed with Texas” in a huge way.

Ice storms knocked out nearly half the wind-power generating capacity of Texas on Sunday as a massive deep freeze across the state locked up wind turbine generators, creating an electricity generation crisis.

Wind generation ranks as the second-largest source of energy in Texas, accounting for 23% of state power supplies last year, behind natural gas, which represented 45%, according to Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) figures.

ERCOT reports today the spot price for electricity in Texas is currently a stunning $9000 per MegaWatt-hour. Even in the high demand summer months, $100 per MW-hr would be high.

Source: http://www.ercot.com/content/cdr/contours/rtmLmp.html

At the same time the freezing temperatures were driving electricity demand to record levels, ERCOT reported while calling on consumers and businesses to reduce their electricity use as much as possible Sunday, Feb. 14 through Tuesday, Feb. 16.

“We are experiencing record-breaking electric demand due to the extreme cold temperatures that have gripped Texas,” said ERCOT President and CEO Bill Magness. “At the same time, we are dealing with higher-than-normal generation outages due to frozen wind turbines and limited natural gas supplies available to generating units. We are asking Texans to take some simple, safe steps to lower their energy use during this time.”

Source: http://www.ercot.com/news/releases/show/225151

graphic provided by ERCOT shows the huge gap between electricity supply and demand today:

Texas electricity demand vs. supply forecast. Source: ERCOT

Capacity is expected to fall short of demand by as much as 20,000 megawatts today, while the National Weather Service in Dallas predicts record low temperatures between -6° F to 3° F for Monday night.

A map from poweroutage.us is showing the scope of power outages in Texas shows that about 75% of the state is experiencing power outages in varying percentages with a significant portion having no power at all:

Approximately 75% of Texas has some level of power outage – source: poweroutage.us

At the moment, ERCOT is placing rolling power outages in effect to prevent a complete collapse of the power grid saying:

“ERCOT has issued an EEA level 3 because electric demand is very high right now, and supplies can’t keep up. Reserves have dropped below 1,000 MW and are not expected to recover within 30 minutes; as a result, ERCOT has ordered transmission companies to reduce demand on the system.

This is typically done through rotating outages, which are controlled, temporary interruptions of electric service. This type of demand reduction is only used as a last resort to preserve the reliability of the electric system as a whole.”

Source: http://www.ercot.com/eea_info/show/26464

It is sad and ironic that in a state known for its huge petroleum and natural gas resources, the lack of reliability of wind power has brought the state to its knees in a time of crisis, not unlike that which California experienced in 2020 during record heat where wind and solar power could not keep up with demand and was near collapse.

The folly of chasing renewable energy as a means of mitigating “climate change” is making itself abundantly clear today in Texas. When will politicians wake up and realize that renewable energy almost always equates to unreliable energy?

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Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 8:45 am

Its all DJT ‘s fault

Ed Reid
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 8:53 am

😉

Bryan A
Reply to  Ed Reid
February 16, 2021 8:53 am

How many times have I told you, we need heating mechanisms on the bearings and in the blades
/sarc

Roger
Reply to  Bryan A
February 16, 2021 2:18 pm

What kind of inspection will have to occur on all of those turbines? Freezing will break wires, bearings, switches…etc. Yow !!!

Charlie
Reply to  Roger
February 16, 2021 4:03 pm

What? This question is part of the problem with the Internet. The temperatures Texas is experiencing are not that cold, just cold for Texas. Most homes in southern states like Florida, Texas, Alabama don’t have central heating but instead rely on electric heat. When a cold snap comes in electricity use goes up. Freezing will not break wires, bearings or switches in the turbines. This is just poor power management. Power companies shut down coal power plants because of politics when they should have kept them operational as a back up plan. California did the same thing with their natural gas peak power plants and now they are paying the price.

Reply to  Charlie
February 16, 2021 6:58 pm

Charlie, that’s some VERY interesting revisionist history ya got there. Were you in the U.S. when emperor Obozo pushed his EPA to decree (yep) that CO2 was a pollutant, and ORDERED all electric utilities in the country either undertake a massive program to make coal plants comply with the new ultra-low CO2 emission standards or **shut them down.**?
. . .You claim electrical shortages are just due to “poor power management,” cunningly ignoring the fact that it’s the idiot politicians pandering to sociology majors who demand we cut CO2 emissions because supposedly “95% of all scientists agree” that a) the planet is warming; b) at an unprecedented and dangerous rate; c) that the primary or overriding cause is CO2; and d) not just any CO2, but CO2 produced by human activity.
. . .Fire the idiot politicians and staffers and we’ll have plenty of electricity, and the planet will be just fine, thanks.

Kpar
Reply to  sf44
February 17, 2021 8:51 am

sf44, I agree with most of what you said, except it wasn’t Obozo who made CO2 a “pollutant”, it was George W. Bush.

You know, I used to think that GWB was a pretty good president until DJT came along and showed what a REAL leader could do…

Trying to Play Nice
Reply to  Kpar
February 17, 2021 11:02 am

You youngsters missed out on Reagan. Reagan was Trump with a magic way of making libtards understand the truth.

czechlist
Reply to  Kpar
February 17, 2021 11:27 am

I didn’t realize W was still in office in Dec 2009 when the EPA declared CO2 A pollutant. I learn something every day. 0 said he was going to bankrupt the coal industry while campaigning in 2008.

Colin
Reply to  Charlie
February 16, 2021 9:01 pm

You are an apologist for the id10t politicians who have pushed the “green renewable” philosophy.

garboard
Reply to  Charlie
February 17, 2021 5:32 am

just wondering why all the media are reporting that coal and nuclear shut down ? is there any reason why they would be unable to operate because of the cold ? what is the reality ?

czechlist
Reply to  garboard
February 17, 2021 11:30 am

The reality is politics. DFW local news is reporting wind generation failure is a very small part of the problem and at the same time reporting it provides 25% of our power.

Dave
Reply to  Charlie
February 17, 2021 7:37 am

During the cold snaps, you have people who have non electric primary heat – Not so much oil in Texas, but lots of propane and natural gas. The only electricity needed for these sources of heat is the igniter.
OTOH, during the summer months, there is no alternative to A/C except doing without. Non Texans don’t understand the scale of the 1-2 months of 100+ heat, and sure, it’s a dry heat, but it’s a dehydrating heat too.

So power consumption in warmer and hotter months should be significantly higher.

rah
Reply to  Dave
February 17, 2021 10:48 am

Longer hours of darkness during the winter thus increased power usage for lighting across the board, Residential, Commercial, Civil.

Larry
Reply to  Dave
February 17, 2021 11:37 am

It’s not a dry heat unless you’re west of the panhandle. So 100° + heat with humidity is insufferable without some form of cooling.

Greg green
Reply to  Charlie
February 18, 2021 6:37 am

As a new arrival to the south, having grown up in Minnesota where everyone had a gas furnace, I’m amazed at the number of people here who reject gas furnaces and water heaters. They’re apparently afraid of gas explosions or exhaust poisoning.

Patty
Reply to  Charlie
February 18, 2021 10:58 am

What , obviously you don’t live in Florida , homes that have central air have central heating,

Luke
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 9:19 am

When, in reality, it’s mostly George Bush’s and junior’s fault.

Reply to  Luke
February 15, 2021 10:32 am

Sr. was a true Establishment RINO. Both men’s fault’s were wanting to be liked by Democrats who had nothing but poorly hidden contempt for them. That craven abdication of moral duty led them to cave to Democrat’s specious demands.

The media and Democrats hated Trump because he never caved to them.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
February 15, 2021 10:39 am

They also hated him because he was the only public figure to openly question Barry Sotero’s life story.

fourpmfox@aol.com
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
February 16, 2021 2:40 pm

Hillary Clinton STARTED all of that skepticism, then the tan fool made it much more topical with his secretiveness and insufferable arrogance !!!

Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
February 15, 2021 11:14 am

The very definition of Cuckservative; looking left for approval.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
February 15, 2021 11:38 am

“Both men’s fault’s were wanting to be liked by Democrats who had nothing but poorly hidden contempt for them.”

That is correct and it is a problem that many Washington DC Beltway politicians have.

It’s understandable: The Leftwing Media controls the national narrative and sets the premise, so they can hurt politicians very badly if they so desire. Look at what they did to Trump.

So Republican Beltway politicians start out at a disadvatage since the Leftwing Media is opposed to them, so these Republicans try to do things that will get them in the good graces of the Leftwing Media which is basically to agree with the Leftwing Media narrative. This is a tactic Republican politicians use to try to fly under the radar of the Leftwing Media.

Mitt Romney would be a good example of a Republican who defers to the Leftwing Media narrative.

It used to irritate the heck out of me when the Leftwing Media would lie about George W. Bush, and make him look bad, and Bush would never push back on them. He just let their lies stand.

Of course, if he had fought back, they would have treated him just as harshly as they treated Trump, and Bush knew that and wanted no part of it even if it mean letting leftwing liars tell their lies without rebuting them.

That’s one reason I like Trump so much. He showed the Leftwing Media for what they are: A bunch of partisan, political, dangerous liars. So dangerous they have managed to put a traitor and a criminal back in the Oval Office.

Luke
Reply to  Tom Abbott
February 16, 2021 9:14 am

The single best line ever: fake news. We should be calling Wind fake energy.

Robert W Turner
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
February 15, 2021 3:00 pm

I’m pretty sure that wanting to be like by Dems has nothing to do with RINOs. There is no Democrat and Republican Party for the most part, there are people that want to do what is best for the nation and then there are Globalists, the Bushes fall into the later.

hunterson7
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
February 15, 2021 5:30 pm

Democrats do whatever they want, and Republicans do whatever democrats tell them to do.

n.n
Reply to  Luke
February 15, 2021 11:57 am

Yes, if Bush, Jr. was smart, he would have followed Clinton’s policy to profit and sustain Iraq War 1.0. Instead, he ended the war, brought those culpable to justice. Then Obama opened Iraq War 2.0 (from Tripoli to Kiev), wars without borders, transnational terrorism, and [catastrophic] [anthropogenic] immigration reform, and, of course, normalized the Green Blight, an unreliable solution, an environmental hazard in laundered, renewable greenbacks.

Derge
Reply to  n.n
February 15, 2021 2:32 pm

“Instead, he ended the war, brought those culpable to justice”

Oahhhwhuuutt history have you been following??!??

Reply to  Derge
February 15, 2021 10:41 pm

Bush Jr ended the tyranny on the Iraqi civilians called “Saddam Hussein.” He swung from a rope. While too many US and allies lives died to make that happen… it did need to happen.

I have this conjecture about human history…. in the US old West of the 19th Century, and of in general human history, … many men who needed to die die by the hand of another man with a Colt, they did and the world was a better place.
Just like today we enjoy the benefits of coyote, wolf, and cougar elimination in the wild by men with rifles 100-60 years ago. Sadly, IMO… not enough of that happens today. Both man and beast.
The imbalance that today’s mores have created cannot last.

Mike Wallens
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
February 16, 2021 5:26 am

Saddam Hussein never did anything to me. He could have ruled in Iraq for one years and I would not have given a damn. George W, aka the idiot, took us into that disaster that cost 5000 American lives and 2 trillion of my USA tax dollars. For nothing. You can be the world’s hero with your own money and blood.

Crispin Pemberton-Pigott
Reply to  Mike Wallens
February 16, 2021 6:23 pm

But Halliburton made out like bandits. That makes it OK, right?

rah
Reply to  Luke
February 16, 2021 2:15 pm

I;ll bet his Ranch isn’t without power and BTW where are the Feds. Where is FEMA? The governor declared a state of emergency and then followed that with a declaration of disaster. Bitme declared Texas a Federal disaster area, Yet I have heard nothing about any Federal assistance going into the state. Not even machinery for clearing the roads, NOTHING

Matthew Bergin
Reply to  rah
February 17, 2021 10:18 am

The Bush’s will have a big beautiful fossil fuel gobbling generator in an outbuilding with a substantial supply of fuel nearby.👍😎

ken roberts
Reply to  Luke
February 16, 2021 5:19 pm

Warren Buffet

Neo
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 9:45 am

I blame Elon Musk

John Tillman
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 10:04 am

Yup. Temperatures cold enough to freeze turbine lubricating oil and snow covering solar panels clearly result from Trump’s dumping the Paris accords, since we all know that global warming causes frigid and icy conditions in Texas.

John Tillman
Reply to  John Tillman
February 15, 2021 11:50 am

Just as predicted by IPCC since 1990.

Not!

Alastair gray
Reply to  John Tillman
February 15, 2021 1:33 pm

Sorry guys Thought the SARC tag was a given

John Tillman
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 5:34 pm

It was a given. Sure all replies knew you were not serious.

chemman
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 16, 2021 9:58 am

I peruse articles here but don’t always go through the comments.I understood your comment to be sarcasm.

Reply to  John Tillman
February 16, 2021 6:03 am

18 below in NE and the windmills were turning. I think it was the ice in TX.

John Dueker
Reply to  Dennis Topczewski
February 16, 2021 10:35 am

Ice or no the problem was depending on 30,000 mw from wind and getting754. This corrupted long and short term planning.

Lets finally realize for every me of renewable we need on of nuke of fossil.

ken roberts
Reply to  John Dueker
February 16, 2021 5:26 pm

Amen nuclear at the county level. Small reactors that can. Be controlled.

John Tillman
Reply to  Dennis Topczewski
February 18, 2021 9:13 am

Cold, ice and windchill.

Dallas:

Tuesday: High of 18°, low of -2°

  • New record low temperature for Feb. 16 (old record: 12° in 1903)
  • New record cold high temperature for Feb. 16 (old record: 32° in 1979)
  • Coldest temperature since Jan. 31, 1949 (-2°)
  • Fifth time on record below zero
  • Wind chill dropped to -12°
Last edited 7 months ago by John Tillman
MarkW
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 10:06 am

I blame Tony Romo.

John Tillman
Reply to  MarkW
February 15, 2021 10:22 am

He dropped the snowball!

John Tillman
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 10:21 am

Was Al Gore planning on visiting TX?

Frederick Michael
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 10:32 am

Wasn’t it T. Boone Pickens who went nuclear (pardon the pun) pushing wind power in TX?

Marc
Reply to  Frederick Michael
February 15, 2021 10:01 pm

No. The wind power disaster started in the mid 90s with Enron. They wanted to harvest the tax credits. Boone came later.

John Tillman
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 11:11 am

Meanwhile, in OK:

https://news.yahoo.com/oklahoma-activates-national-guard-temperatures-132402487.html

Back to the future!

Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt activated the National Guard to keep people safe, as temperatures in Oklahoma City are expected to plummet to levels not seen in more than 100 years.
The weather system is moving into the Midwest and Northeast, causing major problems on the roads. Texas is now in a state of emergency after some areas saw their first snowfall in almost six years, and the coldest temperatures in decades…

Oklahoma is also breaking records, with temperatures below 20 degrees for five straight days — the third time ever in the history of the state. 

RelPerm
Reply to  John Tillman
February 15, 2021 12:11 pm

Why is it so windy in Texas? Because Oklahoma sucks 🙂

Robert W Turner
Reply to  RelPerm
February 15, 2021 3:02 pm

Only in the southern part of the state. In the northern part OK blows and it is Nebraska that sucks, which is why KS is so windy of course. 😉

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Robert W Turner
February 15, 2021 5:28 pm

Oklahoma, like everyone, loves to be the center of attention. Thanks so much! 🙂

Reply to  John Tillman
February 15, 2021 2:35 pm

Texas Deploys National Guard As ‘Grid Chaos’ Leaves Millions Freezing In Darkness
“The Southwest Power Pool (SSP), which manages the electric grid and wholesale power market for the central US, including Kansas, Oklahoma, portions of New Mexico, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, Missouri, Minnesota, Iowa, Wyoming, and Nebraska, released an update Monday afternoon saying 17 states have “curtailed energy usage to balance supply and demand.”

Purpletoad
Reply to  Krishna Gans
February 15, 2021 8:53 pm

If you want to see what the Southwest power pool is doing, go to this site http://pricecontourmap.spp.org/pricecontourmap/

MarkW
Reply to  Krishna Gans
February 16, 2021 12:31 pm

Large portions of northern Mexico, especially the areas next to the Texas border have been without power since this mess started. They use natural gas for power, and get their gas from Texas.
Homes down there are not as well built as homes in the US.

Alan Robertson
Reply to  John Tillman
February 15, 2021 4:26 pm

It’s forecast to be -15F in OKC, tonight.
Oh, joy.

Posa
Reply to  John Tillman
February 16, 2021 1:19 pm

Did Global Warm and GHG cause record cold in 1921?

John Tillman
Reply to  Posa
February 17, 2021 7:15 am

Same then as now, ie natural cycles.

Ron Long
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 1:26 pm

Excuse me jumping in the middle, but newsmax is now reporting that 14 states, part of an energy pool that includes Texas, are now ordering rolling blackouts due to significant shortfalls in the electric grid. Temperatures below zero, snow piling up, who you gonna call? Try AOC and the Green Weenie crowd just for laughs?

Alastair gray
Reply to  Ron Long
February 15, 2021 1:35 pm

Sorry ron I meant to be SARC

John Tillman
Reply to  Ron Long
February 15, 2021 2:38 pm

Unprecedented!

If CACA were scientific, the hypothesis would yet again be falsified. But it was born falsified, the predictions of Arrhenius and Callendar having been shown false, and falling GASTA for 32 years, 1945-72, having been observed under rising CO2.

Hivemind
Reply to  John Tillman
February 15, 2021 4:14 pm

To be accurate, Arrhenius never predicted global warming. He was concerned about global cooling and conjectured (posh word for guessed) that increasing the CO2 level might prevent the next glacial period from coming. He later worked out that no, it wouldn’t.

John Tillman
Reply to  Hivemind
February 15, 2021 5:42 pm

Nope. He did predict global warming from more CO2, but greatly overestimated climate sensitivity. He later reduced his guess, but it was still too high.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/environment/2005/jun/30/climatechange.climatechangeenvironment2

However, he rightly considered AGW beneficial rather than dangerous.

Roger Higgs
Reply to  John Tillman
February 16, 2021 12:20 am

CO2 greenhouse effect is cancelled by negative feedbacks ignored by IPCC …
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/348369922

Alasdair Fairbairn
Reply to  Roger Higgs
February 16, 2021 5:15 am

Yes indeed. Water provides the best negative feedback and is ignored. In fact the IPCC reckons it provides a positive feedback!!🤯😱
There is a magic figure of around 30C temperature which stems from the Antoine temperature V vapour pressure graph. This coupled with the Latent Heat generated at constant temperature and the buoyancy of the resulting vapor/gas ensures that the oceans never get much above this 30C in spite of millions of years of relentless solar radiation.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  John Tillman
February 16, 2021 1:04 pm

I want to know who threw the “C” into the mix, making AGW only about “catastrophic” warming. I believe that alone has equivocated the argument tremendously, offering up some validity to AGW. Personally, I believe the human contribution to climate is not only unmeasurable, it’s insignificant. We’re the proverbial mouse apologizing for stepping on the elephant’s toe.

David A
Reply to  Rory Forbes
February 16, 2021 4:56 pm

CAGW is the theory, or hypothesis.
Alarmists hate for it to be called CAGW.
When the catastrophic predictions failed and continue to fail, their theory fails. And that is what has happened and is happening. That is why they hate to call it CAGW.

So they make up a non scientific term for their hypothesis and call it ” Climate Change”
This completely avoids their failed theory. The warming is at best 1/3 of their predictions, and the C is MIA. All they really have is AG something. So they insist on CC, which for the 5 billion years of planet earth has always happened. They now claim every storm, every drought, every heat wave, every tide surge, proof of Climate Change.

Insist that they call it CAGW, and prove a global increase in tornadoes hurricanes cyclones, droughts, floods, etc… They can’t, because it is not happening. The W is weak and likely to vanish, and the C is completely missing. Without the C there is no cause to political action.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  David A
February 16, 2021 5:28 pm

Yes, I know all of that and much, much more, having followed the ever bouncing ball since the majority (consensus) firmly held that we were causing an acceleration back to the ice age. I understand why they’re now equivocating with the use of “climate change”, rather than AGW because an appeal to ambiguity is unfalsifiable.

Yes, I agree that using CAGW was a good and perhaps necessary rebuttal to AGW, when they insisted on including unsupportable “catastrophist” claims. They did an end run around AGW completely with “climate change”. They use it in the same way Miss. America always included “world peace”. It’s a war of language usage. Science hasn’t had anything to do with the discussion for over a decade.

We must win using the same method the Left use … language. They’ve been relying on nonexistent science, imagined data, silly models, lying. fraud and liberal use of logical fallacies. There IS no “global climate”. Average temperatures are nonsense, especially when the areas warming the fastest [sic] also have the least data … (more interpolation). We’ve been trying to beat fantasy with science and failing badly. We’re trying to apply logic to their irrationality.

Of course there’s “climate change”. Change is the default condition of a coupled, non-linear chaotic system. We may even be contributing some small unmeasurable component, but we’re one of hundreds of variables all working together, buffering each other to produce a remarkably stable system, in geological terms.

It’s time to change the message and stop being luke warm.

rbabcock
Reply to  Ron Long
February 15, 2021 2:58 pm

30 GW offline in TX due to frequency issues

WonkotheSane
Reply to  Ron Long
February 15, 2021 3:27 pm

There is no energy pool that includes Texas. Texas has a separate grid. I do agree that AOC and the Green New Deal crowd are likely to propose a solution that is hilariously stupid.

Ron Long
Reply to  WonkotheSane
February 15, 2021 4:32 pm

WonkotheSane, Newsmax refers to the 14 states, including Texas, as the “Southwest Power Pool”.. I personally have no idea, other than it’s very cold tonight and 14 states have rolling blackouts.

Reply to  WonkotheSane
February 15, 2021 9:48 pm

The key word is “portions,’ @WonkotheSane. SPP does include a chunk of the Texas Panhandle and another chunk over on the northeast side of the State. (Another chunk on the east is under the MISO pool.)

Bob Davis
Reply to  WonkotheSane
February 15, 2021 10:05 pm

Approximately 90% of Texas population is served by our own power grid that is not connected to the rest of the US. It is the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). In far west Texas and in some of east Texas the population is served by utilities connected to the rest of the country. ERCOT exists in part to avoid burdensome federal regulations imposed under the pretext of interstate commerce.

Loren C. Wilson
Reply to  WonkotheSane
February 17, 2021 12:20 pm

90% of Texas is its own grid. I think this is by population, but it could be by electrical usage.

Wharfplank
Reply to  Ron Long
February 16, 2021 7:46 am

People are moving into their cars!

Patrice
Reply to  Wharfplank
February 16, 2021 4:30 pm

Now what will happen when we have to have electric cars….and…this happens.

SparkyMcBiff
Reply to  Wharfplank
February 17, 2021 7:04 am

If people were smart they would have already had a 12V inverter in their car’s trunk. That way they can connect it to their car’s battery and use it to power an extension cord that can power some LED lights and even a small heater.

I have two cars and in one trunk I have a 600W inverter and in the other trunk I have an 800W inverter. You just have to start up your car every hour or so depending on the load, or just keep it idling. You can use your car like a generator.

I’ve also got a back up gas generator and I make sure to store several big jerry cans of gas.

But then again I’m a prepper and I’ve been doing this for years, but it still pisses me off seeing people die for something that is so easily dealt with by a tiny bit of foresight.

Med Bennett
Reply to  Ron Long
February 17, 2021 9:06 am

AOC thinks that the Green New Deal will prevent problems like Texas is experiencing. Unbelievable. https://twitter.com/AOC/status/1361903282667589634?s=20

Jeff Labute
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 2:25 pm

I think someone shot JR.

Steve Case
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 15, 2021 6:27 pm

When George Orwell wrote “Animal Farm” he chose the windmill to represent the boondoggles that oppressive governments promote in order to create an appearance of progress

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Steve Case
February 16, 2021 1:11 pm

Everyone seems to look at Orwell’s ‘1984’, yet in many ways ‘Animal Farm’ is a far better model for non socialist governments toying with collectivism, globalism and progressivism. It’s the precursor to full socialist collapse.

Snowball
Reply to  Rory Forbes
February 17, 2021 5:42 am

“All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.”

Dennis
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 16, 2021 3:08 am

He should be impeached.

lol

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 16, 2021 3:49 am

only because he didnt halt ALL of the greenpowerscams

SoCalMike
Reply to  Alastair gray
February 16, 2021 3:33 pm

Such a deep thinker you are.
AS deep as any brainwashed closet dwelling mushroom eating media dung while sitting in the dark.

Reply to  Alastair gray
February 17, 2021 8:51 pm

TOLD YOU SO 19 YEARS AGO.

In 2002, co-authors Dr Sallie Baliunas, Astrophysicist, Harvard-Smithsonian, Dr Tim Patterson, Paleoclimatologist, Carleton U, Ottawa and Allan MacRae, P.Eng. (now retired), McGill, Queens, U of Alberta, wrote:
http://www.friendsofscience.org/assets/documents/KyotoAPEGA2002REV1.pdf
 
1. “Climate science does not support the theory of catastrophic human-made global warming – the alleged warming crisis does not exist.”
 
2. “The ultimate agenda of pro-Kyoto advocates is to eliminate fossil fuels, but this would result in a catastrophic shortfall in global energy supply – the wasteful, inefficient energy solutions proposed by Kyoto advocates simply cannot replace fossil fuels.”
 
Allan MacRae published in the Calgary Herald on September 1, 2002:
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2009/01/10/polar-sea-ice-changes-are-having-a-net-cooling-effect-on-the-climate/#comment-63579
 
3. “If [as we believe] solar activity is the main driver of surface temperature rather than CO2, we should begin the next cooling period by 2020 to 2030.”
 
Allan MacRae modified his global cooling prediction in 2013:
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/12/02/study-predicts-the-sun-is-headed-for-a-dalton-like-solar-minimum-around-2050/#comment-1147149
 
3a. “I suggest global cooling starts by 2020 or sooner. Bundle up.”
_____________________________________

Reply to  ALLAN MACRAE
February 18, 2021 1:50 am

This open letter was written in 2013, after Britain invested in too much wind power, but before Texans “blew their brains out”. SSDD.

“Wind power – it doesn’t just blow, it sucks!”

AN OPEN LETTER TO BARONESS VERMA
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/10/31/blind-faith-in-climate-models/#comment-1130954[excerpt]

So here is my real concern:
IF THE SUN DOES INDEED DRIVE TEMPERATURE, AS I SUSPECT, BARONESS VERMA, THEN YOU AND YOUR COLLEAGUES ON BOTH SIDES OF THE HOUSE MAY HAVE BREWED THE PERFECT STORM.

You are claiming that global cooling will NOT happen, AND you have crippled your energy systems with excessive reliance on ineffective grid-connected “green energy” schemes.

I suggest that global cooling probably WILL happen within the next decade or sooner, and Britain will get colder.

I also suggest that the IPCC and the Met Office have NO track record of successful prediction (or “projection”) of global temperature and thus have no scientific credibility.

I suggest that Winter deaths will increase in the UK as cooling progresses.

I suggest that Excess Winter Mortality, the British rate of which is about double the rate in the Scandinavian countries, should provide an estimate of this unfolding tragedy.

As always in these matters, I hope to be wrong. These are not numbers, they are real people, who “loved and were loved”.

Best regards to all, Allan MacRae

Turning and tuning in the widening gyre,
the falcon cannot hear the falconer…
– Yeats

ResourceGuy
February 15, 2021 8:50 am

When do they seek federal bailout? Send Gina McCarthy up the pole.

ResourceGuy
February 15, 2021 8:52 am

Where is Griff to explain this for us?

Meab
Reply to  ResourceGuy
February 15, 2021 9:42 am

When intelligent people predicted this would happen, griff claimed it wouldn’t. After it did happen, griff seems to be cowering in his mum’s basement. Don’t fret, griff will be back spewing his same misinformation and outright lies after he (incorrectly) comes to believe that we all forgot how very wrong he has been.

Komerade Cube
Reply to  Meab
February 15, 2021 2:37 pm

Griff is a paid troll for the CCP, he will surely pipe up at some point.

TonyG
Reply to  Komerade Cube
February 15, 2021 5:07 pm

Maybe his pipes are frozen?

twobob
Reply to  Meab
February 15, 2021 4:17 pm

Griff! He got blacked out.Lol.

Reply to  Meab
February 15, 2021 8:33 pm

Griff will return to claim the blackouts never happened.

Marc
Reply to  Ferdberple
February 15, 2021 10:05 pm

Bloomberg is reporting that the wind freeze up was only a “small part” of the problem. Got to defend the company line somehow. Griff most likely adopts that company line.

jtom
Reply to  Marc
February 16, 2021 11:14 am

Well, it could be considered a small part of the problem. The big part of the problem is they did not build back-up ng power plants to ensure reliability. Of course, the economics of building both wind turbines and ng power plants would be insane – which means they should have simply built ng plants and avoided all the problems.

Posa
Reply to  jtom
February 16, 2021 1:30 pm

Correct jtom… build one system that works 24-7-365 instead of two part-time systems that are both maximally inefficient

MarkW
Reply to  Marc
February 16, 2021 12:33 pm

Most of the rest of the media is ignoring the roll played by wind and solar altogether.

Posa
Reply to  MarkW
February 16, 2021 1:33 pm

Yup. The media are blaming natural gas for failing to meet the demand gap led by collapse of renewable energy… and the cold itself is caused by Global Warming from CO2…

The House always wins.

Posa
Reply to  Marc
February 16, 2021 1:29 pm

The NYTimes also claims that the wind power freeze up amounts to only a 5GW loss of power… otherwise they’re blaming fossil fuels (natural gas) for failing to meet demand; and also global warming for causing cold temperature records set a century ago (when CO2 levels were barely higher than pre-idustrial levels)

Last edited 7 months ago by Posa
Rory Forbes
Reply to  Ferdberple
February 16, 2021 1:13 pm

He’s likely hors do combat due to a power blackout. He’ll return to explain our errors when his power comes back on.

MarkW
Reply to  ResourceGuy
February 15, 2021 10:08 am

On the other Texas power thread, he’s busy pretending that there is nothing unusual about rolling blackouts, so you can’t blame renewable power for this mess.

Oldseadog
Reply to  MarkW
February 15, 2021 10:34 am

Now now, Resource Guy, you can’t use that word. You have to say controlled, temporary interruption of electric service.

MarkW
Reply to  Oldseadog
February 15, 2021 11:31 am

Who?

Abolition Man
Reply to  MarkW
February 16, 2021 9:04 am

…so you can’t blame unreliable, intermittent energy for this mess.
There, fixed it for you!

jtom
Reply to  MarkW
February 16, 2021 11:17 am

For sane people, rolling blackouts means a flaw in the network. For Grifters and supporters of renewables (but I repeat myself), it’s a feature.

geo
Reply to  ResourceGuy
February 15, 2021 11:27 am

Griff would say Berkeley Earth has proven this wrong.

fred250
Reply to  geo
February 15, 2021 12:48 pm

Basically EVERYTHING griff “says”

is provably WRONG.

Abolition Man
Reply to  ResourceGuy
February 16, 2021 9:01 am

The Griffter? Isn’t he working for the Lincoln Project now!? If not, he should be!

Nick Schroeder
February 15, 2021 8:54 am

Was -18 F for four hours this morning and -16 for two.
When the 45 F thaw arrives on Friday damage will manifest.

commieBob
Reply to  Nick Schroeder
February 15, 2021 10:41 am

How deep do they bury water mains in Texas? If your water pipes are only a foot or so deep, they could freeze after a week of sub zero F temperatures.

Folks in Texas probably aren’t used to frost heaving. That’s a treat. Depending on how Texans do building foundations that could be a problem.

There’s all kinds of fun a prolonged sub zero F freezing spell can cause if you aren’t ready for it.

Robert W Turner
Reply to  commieBob
February 15, 2021 3:05 pm

I haven’t heard of any exploding trees yet, which is actually surprising.

Derge
Reply to  commieBob
February 15, 2021 3:15 pm

Not very deep: “(2) Depth of cover. The minimum depth of cover shall be 30 inches, but not less than 18 inches below the pavement structure for crossings.”

https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=T&app=9&p_dir=F&p_rloc=169413&p_tloc=14995&p_ploc=1&pg=2&p_tac=&ti=43&pt=1&ch=21&rl=40

SDN
Reply to  commieBob
February 16, 2021 3:53 am

Actually, given how much of TX is on prairie soil which expands and contracts when it rains, we’re familiar.

commieBob
Reply to  SDN
February 16, 2021 7:06 am

You mean like this?

Rich Lambert
Reply to  Nick Schroeder
February 15, 2021 10:52 am

Years ago I lived about 50 miles north of Houston. A house was built next to me. All they did was scrape off the grass and some of the topsoil and pour a slab. No foundation and no stem wall. Water supply line came out of the ground outside before going into the house. Houston’s low last night was 16 degrees F. Not good.

Sparko
Reply to  Rich Lambert
February 15, 2021 11:22 am

Slab foundations are good. If it’s about 18 inches deep and reinforced on clay, it has more concrete than most foundations

Derge
Reply to  Sparko
February 15, 2021 3:30 pm

Well, yes and no. Conventionally reinforced slab foundations are much thicker than post-tensioned slab foundations. It is in fact the thinner p-t slabs that are better for clay locations.

And clay is terrible. It is an expansive soil, so you’re not getting any reinforcement from clay strata.

Streetcred
Reply to  Rich Lambert
February 15, 2021 2:21 pm

A raft foundation is perfect for these conditions as it will homogeneously move with the ground heave and the building won’t crack. So long as there is a expansion / contraction connection of water and sewer all will be fine.

DaveK
Reply to  Streetcred
February 15, 2021 2:52 pm

The “raft” foundation is perfectly good as long as soil movement is homogeneous. I’ve seen too many structures where soil characteristics were not sufficiently uniform, and within 10 years there were serious, irreparable structural problems.

Rich Lambert
Reply to  Streetcred
February 15, 2021 3:29 pm

I did notice that many house slabs were post tensioned with cables after the pouring of the slab.

twobob
Reply to  Rich Lambert
February 15, 2021 4:22 pm

The water services. Are still out side Though?

Rich Lambert
Reply to  twobob
February 16, 2021 7:55 am

They used to be. I don’t know about current practices.

Abolition Man
Reply to  Rich Lambert
February 16, 2021 9:10 am

An easy fix is an insulated doghouse with an incandescent bulb inside. Or if it gets really cold you can put a halogen bulb in, but be careful!

SMC
February 15, 2021 8:55 am

I wonder if this will become more common with the PDO and AMO cooling at the same time.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  SMC
February 15, 2021 9:02 am

Bingo! and with multi-cycle solar minimum

Abolition Man
Reply to  SMC
February 16, 2021 9:13 am

That really is the $60 trillion question! One can always hope that Mother Nature will slap the idiots upside the head, but I doubt their religious dogma equips them to deal with reality!

Danley Wolfe
February 15, 2021 8:56 am

U.S; Congress will have a rationalization and solution to this. Somebody ask them. Oh by the way skies are also heavily clouded over.

Duker
Reply to  Danley Wolfe
February 15, 2021 11:12 am

The ERCOT being entirely within Texas means its outside Federal regulation, its for Texas to sort out. The answer for wind turbines not being reliable enough is straightforward

Peter W
Reply to  Danley Wolfe
February 15, 2021 2:13 pm

Skies are heavily clouded over? Shades of S. Frederick Singer!

john
February 15, 2021 8:58 am

Granddaughter made this snow angel in San Antonio this morning.

E18C0C93-4C1E-44EA-872F-616746C4D5ED.jpeg
Nick Werner
Reply to  john
February 15, 2021 9:33 am

Another success story.
Just weeks into Obama’s presidency he had already stopped sea levels from rising.
Just weeks into Biden’s presidency he has already stopped global warming.
If making the lights go out in Texas doesn’t deserve a Nobel Peace Prize nowadays, I don’t know what does.

beng135
Reply to  Nick Werner
February 15, 2021 10:12 am

Just substitute Texas for Georgia:

https://youtu.be/K-qK7oVXVRQ

ht/ Vicki Lawrence

ResourceGuy
February 15, 2021 9:00 am

It’s not great for drilling either.

CL=F 60.20 0.73 1.23% : Crude Oil – Yahoo Finance

Chris Bright
February 15, 2021 9:05 am

The evolution of the energy market. Evolution? I prefer intelligent design!

Alastair gray
Reply to  Chris Bright
February 15, 2021 1:38 pm

Clever and a Darwin award for the turkeys who done it

February 15, 2021 9:07 am

ERCOT = Electric Reliability Council of Texas. They’re currently saying that promised blackouts of 45 minutes will be much longer..

starzmom
Reply to  geoff chambers
February 15, 2021 11:23 am

They need to change their name–they are not reliable.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  geoff chambers
February 15, 2021 11:45 am

They’re going to have to take that “Reliability” out of their name. That does not describe them properly.

Jim Gorman
February 15, 2021 9:08 am

What fo I see? I see the warmist whackos and the federal government setting the stage for a major problem as the states begin closing dispatchable fossil fuel power generation plants. Kalifornia got by last summer by “borrowing” power from other states. That won’t continue as rate payers begin to rebel about paying for investments to “help out” neighboring states. It is going to become a state vs state competition to manage their own state wide grids.

The only way to maintain a reliable grid will be a multi-state compact approved by all state legislator assemblies and governors along with a multi-state PUC whereby all ratepayers in the compact pay the same rate for electricity and the infrastructure to support it.

I hope I live to see the land fights about where solar fields and windmill farms are located in these kinds of compacts. I expect Kalifornia and New Yuk will have a hard time getting partners!

Doonman
Reply to  Jim Gorman
February 15, 2021 9:32 am

Sorry, but multi state compacts are unconstitutional. Refer to Article I section 10.

MarkW
Reply to  Doonman
February 15, 2021 10:10 am

Unless approved by Congress.

John Tillman
Reply to  Doonman
February 15, 2021 10:55 am

See BPA and TVA.

Reply to  John Tillman
February 15, 2021 3:26 pm

Multi-state compacts describes most of the energy utilities.

In New York’s case, it is international compacts as they work with Canada’s utilities.

fred250
Reply to  Doonman
February 15, 2021 4:31 pm

Are “Trade agreements” between multi-states unconstitutional ?

Alan Robertson
Reply to  Jim Gorman
February 15, 2021 9:38 am

“…State- by- state… their own power grids.”
That’s defines a large part of Texas’ problem. The Texas psyche has historically nursed the “we can secede if things don’t go our way” myth, which has led them to build their own grid infrastructure, unconnected to the rest of the world, save for some inadequate interconnects.. There is a very limited amount of power which can be drawn from out of state sources.
Those sources are themselves strained by the same Winter storm as Texas so can offer little help.

Duker
Reply to  Alan Robertson
February 15, 2021 10:52 am

Yes. Because its within Texas its outside the Federal regulation, thats deliberate

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Alan Robertson
February 15, 2021 11:50 am

“The Texas psyche has historically nursed the “we can secede if things don’t go our way” myth”

I would say it’s too early to declare they can’t be successful.

I would also say it is too early for Texas to try to find out. We have a long way to go before we get to the pulling out of the Union stage.

starzmom
Reply to  Jim Gorman
February 15, 2021 2:38 pm

States and their regulated utilities already do that. No need for a multi-state compact.

Alan Robertson
Reply to  Jim Gorman
February 15, 2021 4:24 pm

You’re right. This isn’t just a Texas problem, but will manifest at some point, wherever the same circumstances occur.

starzmom
February 15, 2021 9:09 am

Yikes! Those prices are starting to make the California/Enron/Duke debacle of 20 years ago look cheap. The really bad part for the Texans is a lot of them probably have all electric homes.

February 15, 2021 9:10 am

Ice may be the culprit this time, but there are presumably many periods when it is simply a large High/Low pressure system sitting on top of the wrong part of Texas that does the job.

Don’t let the renewable zealots get away with claiming that this is a rare event.

February 15, 2021 9:11 am

Where are the Clean Coal Power Plants? http://www.SidelGlobal.com

Ron Long
February 15, 2021 9:11 am

What an unfolding disaster in frozen Texas. Don’t look to the federal government for any solution because they are all-in on CAGW and the switch to the Green Weenie. Biden could not even read the teleprompter at his recent Pentagon speech, so the Greenies should be about ready for their next phase. I think the red states need to find ways to take care of themselves, for instance guarantee a company electric sales/consumption at a cost for so many years and the company builds a nuclear power station for free..

Abolition Man
Reply to  Ron Long
February 15, 2021 9:37 am

I hear Disney is rushing the animatronic Beijing Joe Xiden to completion. They need something to tide over the gap while Camellah works on improving her ability to speak to the public without making everyone angry or apathetic. They say she should be ready in about 10 years!

beng135
Reply to  Abolition Man
February 15, 2021 10:30 am

Like Obama & Biden, she’ll be acceptable if she can read and stick to the script. If she can’t, still no problem, just end live appearances & record everything then edit/CGE to acceptability.

Last edited 7 months ago by beng135
Komerade Cube
Reply to  Abolition Man
February 15, 2021 2:42 pm

Reminds me of the movie “The President’s Analyst” with James Coburn. Of course in the late 60s they couldn’t conceive of the Democrats selling us out to the CCP, so the villain in the movies was the phone company.

Abolition Man
Reply to  Komerade Cube
February 16, 2021 9:20 am

Komerade,
Hollywood still won’t admit that they and the DemoKKKrats are owned by the ChiComs; doesn’t mean it isn’t true, though!
Are you related to People’s Cube or is that last name just a coincidence?

Fran
Reply to  Ron Long
February 15, 2021 10:48 am

Better leave some taps dribbling. You never know where there is a pipe outside the insulation.

Many years ago when my husband was new from NZ and UK, we came home from -30C family Christmas to the water not running. It was late, the kids were cranky and the day had begun with the Volvo not starting before an 9h drive. He wanted to go to bed but I made him cut a hole in the wall in the new basement bathroom and blow down with a hair dryer until, thankfully the water ran. A near escape.

Fran
Reply to  Fran
February 15, 2021 10:49 am

The was meant for Robert of Texas below.

Bob Rogers
Reply to  Ron Long
February 16, 2021 7:27 am

Build a power station for free? How’s that supposed to work?

SCANA and Santee Cooper wasted $9b trying to build a pair of new reactors before pulling the plug three years ago. They still haven’t sorted out the mess.

ResourceGuy
February 15, 2021 9:13 am

Don’t call it a blackout. Call it an unintended consequence of federal tax subsidies.

“Who could have known?”

The Gore Effect meets the Ed Markey Effect.

Tom
Reply to  ResourceGuy
February 15, 2021 10:20 am

As a JP Morgan analyst put it (as one of the triggers for a new commodities supercycle starting this year)

“Unintended consequences of environmental policies and their friction with physical constraints related to energy consumption and production.”

The great irony for the foolish greenies is that all their restrictions on pipelines + fossil fuel production, investment, and financing will be making their enemies (Big Oil, OPEC+) very rich over the next 10-15 years. Existing assets will essentially have a monopoly.

Last edited 7 months ago by Tom
Jon R
Reply to  Tom
February 15, 2021 8:03 pm

Big Hydrocarbon + CCP = Demise of western democratic republics.

MarkW
Reply to  ResourceGuy
February 16, 2021 7:20 am

“blackout” is racist.

LdB
Reply to  MarkW
February 16, 2021 7:57 pm

ROFL yes we probably need to call it “shortage of electrons in transmission lines” in future.

Robert of Texas
February 15, 2021 9:13 am

Wheee,,,it is so much fun to live under the consequences of STUPID decisions made by AGW believing bureaucrats. But they have their favorite green engineers to listen to who tell them everything is fine…

My daughter’s house was hit by a rolling blackout early this morning – only going to last 15 to 40 minutes they aid. 3+ hours later she is still without power and now packing to come over here. I still have power and have an emergency heater stove that run’s on propane.

Somewhere around half of the wind turbines are frozen. The others are producing at somewhere around half their capacity. So while their nameplate capacity looks impressive, when it came time to deliver we are getting about 25% of that.

Completely predictable, they have been warned over and over we need to be building more base-load capacity, but there just isn’t enough free-money in doing that. Instead, they are telling us we need to turn everything off and turn down the thermostats some more – so it’s the consumer’s fault, not because of poor planning.

Joseph Campbell
Reply to  Robert of Texas
February 15, 2021 10:58 am

Robert – Great response. ERCOT is nothing more than a normal bureaucracy which thinks it knows more than it does…

Alan Robertson
Reply to  Robert of Texas
February 15, 2021 3:19 pm

Actually, Texas total nameplate capacity is 30,000 MW, which means they are getting less than 10% of what they paid a lot for.

Last edited 7 months ago by Alan Robertson
Robert of Texas
Reply to  Robert of Texas
February 16, 2021 11:46 am

Update: Daughter has now been without power for almost two days – they got it on once for almost two hours and then for less than 5 minutes. It got down to -1F at my house last night. They are keeping their animals as warm as possible near the good old wood burning fireplace. I am donating all the wood I have to the cause but wood is getting scarce around here.

Meanwhile ERCOT is announcing they have no real idea of how long these outages will continue. At least they have stopped calling them “rolling blackouts”. They are trying desperately to blame everything they can except themselves for allowing 23% of our electric power to be intermittent, unreliable, and fragile. People also forget the hundreds of miles of new electric grid needed to reach these wind turbines, also making the entire grid more likely to fail in an ice or wind storm.

Town water systems are starting have failures where they have no power to keep water moving through pipes. People have been advised to store emergency water in case the water system fails. I am beginning to feel like I moved to California and no one told me.

This is all so incredible seeing as how hundreds if not thousands of people on this very site were not warning the public about unreliable energy sources during an emergency event. Government is promising to look into things “once the crisis is over” but they won’t. Too much money being made by Wind companies getting subsidies and promised they can sell all the energy they produce even when it isn’t needed (they just shut down fossil fuel driven energy production raising the costs for those).

LdB
Reply to  Robert of Texas
February 16, 2021 7:58 pm

But you are saving the planet 🙂

February 15, 2021 9:18 am
Vuk
February 15, 2021 9:29 am

Occasional shock is good to the system, at least people who run it might learn the lesson. If they don’t do, well you are Texans and know what to do.
Many years ago in the town of Lubbock I threw a cola can in a wrong trash bin. A polite law officer with his hand on his gun made me fish it out and correct my error. Or, has Texas gone woke since?

Last edited 7 months ago by Vuk
Paul Penrose
Reply to  Vuk
February 15, 2021 10:40 am

The “hand on the gun” was a bit over the top, even for Texas. But unfortunately, even Texas has gone a bit soft these days.

Vuk
Reply to  Paul Penrose
February 15, 2021 11:09 am

Coming from the UK certainly it was, but afterwards I thought might be because I was physically larger and a bit younger.than the police officer. Suffice to say, I did apologise both before and after I followed his order. In the UK police officers whatever size, are smartly turned out, but this one certainly was not. It crossed my mind to take a photo (since camera was hanging from my neck) but I thought I better not.

SMC
Reply to  Paul Penrose
February 15, 2021 11:21 am

There are still an awful lot of ‘Yes Sir’, ‘Yes Ma’am’ and general polite courtesies when speaking face to face with folks in Texas. And a awful lot of people who actively, if not necessarily openly, carry.

Abolition Man
Reply to  SMC
February 16, 2021 9:32 am

After living almost a decade in an open carry state I feel VERY uncomfortable when I go back to Kommifornia to visit friends and family! There is something unnerving now about being unarmed in high crime regions like the SF Bay Area, but I try to bear up under the pressure!
They won’t even let me carry a Bowie knife of a machete, although I hear the latter is allowable if you are an MS-13 member in good standing!

Abolition Man
Reply to  Paul Penrose
February 15, 2021 12:39 pm

Living in an open carry state where one county sheriff tried to REQUIRE firearm ownership, I can tell you that hand on hilt is often just an exclamation point or emphasis on the conversation. Of course, it also tends to make the convertsation short and VERYpolite!
It’s also a comfortable hand rest when your arm gets tired. I use it all the time when I’m out birding or hiking or varmint hunting!

Vuk
Reply to  Abolition Man
February 15, 2021 12:59 pm

Thanks, number of good points there, I suppose for a longer serving officer it may become habitual whenever addressing a stranger.

Paul Penrose
Reply to  Vuk
February 16, 2021 10:37 am

Those are very good points which I had not thought of. I’ve only been carrying for about 6 months, but mostly concealed, so I’ve not picked up that habit. But I can see that in some circumstances, it might be a good way to send the message that you are not to be taken lightly.

Tom
February 15, 2021 9:30 am

$9/kWh
“Renewables are cheaper than fossil fuels!”

At that price, charging your Tesla would cost up to $900. If you don’t mind the fact that it’s also causing your neighbors to potentially freeze to death.
Sadly, this won’t be enough to change much. Many more trillions will be spent and many more will have to die at the hands of Greta Gore & Co. before the world wakes up to reality.

Paul Penrose
Reply to  Tom
February 15, 2021 10:41 am

I wish what you said was hyperbole, but unfortunately it’s not. I can hardly watch the news these days because it’s so depressing.

peter jones
Reply to  Tom
February 18, 2021 5:16 am

I dont see the world waking up, this is not driven by the populace they are being pulled along by governments on behalf of the banking and multinational corporate elite, like a line of duck, quack quack toys on a string.
The reality does not matter our governments are doing what they are told by the globalist capitalists.
The REAL question is WHY ?

Abolition Man
February 15, 2021 9:30 am

I just hope the number of Commifornians moving to Texas hasn’t reached critical mass yet!
An uncontrolled chain reaction of libtard morons could destroy the great state of Texas and scatter these extreme hazardous particles far and wide! Some of them might even land in MY neighborhood! I wouldn’t want to spend years and years cleaning up the mess, and exposure has been shown to lead to imbecility and insanity!

Doonman
February 15, 2021 9:34 am

At some point, people refuse to freeze.

February 15, 2021 9:36 am

Funny how cold is always a “snap” while heat is a “wave”.

Dave O.
February 15, 2021 9:38 am

Being off the grid is probably more reliable than being on the grid.

February 15, 2021 9:40 am

Cold tongue from La Nina now extends across the whole Pacific ocean

https://www.ospo.noaa.gov/Products/ocean/sst/anomaly/

Russ R.
Reply to  Hatter Eggburn
February 15, 2021 10:35 am

La Nina is sticking her cold tongue directly at Washington DC!
What could that mean?

William Astley
February 15, 2021 9:46 am

This massive snow/ice storm has shutdown large sections of the US.

This is bad PR for the CAGW crowd. Record cold and winter snow/ice storms Europe/UK/Canada/US this winter.

And rotating blackouts because wind farms can be destroyed by ice and wind storms.

Sudden appearance of new patterns of weather that lock ot create massive amounts of snow and ice…. that correlate with the change to the sun….. And other stuff that is happening to the earth besides temperature change.

We were living through a Dansgaard-Oeschger event. These are strange event where the Northern Hemisphere warms for 20 or 30 years and then abruptly cools. The sun is driving the show. And then there is a Heinrich event when there is an abrupt change to temperature and other stuff.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-56058372

In a statement on Sunday night, President Joe Biden declared an emergency in Texas, which authorises US agencies to co-ordinate disaster relief in the state.
 
Rotating power outages have been initiated by the state’s power grid operator, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (Ercot), early on Monday, to reduce demand on the electricity system.
 
“Traffic lights and other infrastructure may be temporarily without power,” 

It has also issued a level-three energy emergency alert, urging consumers to reduce electricity use. 
Nearly 120 car accidents were reported on Sunday, Houston Fire Chief Samuel Peña tweeted.
 
Hundreds of flights in and out of the state have also been cancelled.
 
The weather has already proved deadly. On Thursday, icy roads led to a massive crash involving more than 100 vehicles in Fort Worth, killing six people and leaving dozens more needing hospital treatment.

Massive winter storm triggers chaos across the country (US)

https://www.accuweather.com/en/winter-weather/power-outages-approached-1-million-as-storms-swamp-us/899860

The most unrelenting winter weather pattern in decades unleashed brutally unseasonable cold and record snowfall deep into Texas, sparked harrowing scenes on roadways across the middle of the country and left millions of customers without power over the weekend. The coast-to-coast weather system caused particular chaos across Texas, where rolling blackouts left people in the dark and without electricity amid teeth-chattering temperatures.
Heavily populated cities were in the throes of punishing cold on Monday morning. In Dallas, the thermometer read 7 degrees with an AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature of -19. To the north in Oklahoma City, conditions were even more brutal with the mercury at -7 and an AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature of -35. Across the state of Texas, more than 2.6 million customers were without power amid the sub-freezing temps and wintry precipitation.

Fran
Reply to  William Astley
February 15, 2021 10:53 am

But the Greenies have already been grooming the plebs to regard extreme cold as caused by Gorbal Warming.

William Astley
Reply to  Fran
February 15, 2021 12:05 pm

It will be interesting to check monthly satellite global temperature in 2021. A drop, in global temperature, that stays down, kills the ‘Greens’, Climate Emergency, paradigm/reset.

Because the planet did warm 1996/1997, the AGW crowd were able to extrapolate the rise and spin away the pause.

It is not possible to spin away a cooling planet, that has significantly more serious weather events. Canada and the US were covered by 2 mile thick ice sheets 20,000 years ago.

People have no idea what the US is like to live in, when the sun changes so that there is dropping temperatures, and persistent weather patterns that produce, year after year, massive snow storms and ice storms every winter.

A drop in temperature, coupled with a persistent pattern that bring and holds Arctic air deep into the. US …. …….which then produces ice and snow storm when it hits, warm moist Gulf and Atlantic ocean air.

A large driver of the New York city underground transportation was to enable the New York city to operate during snow storms.

During the glacial cycle, New York city is one center of the glacial build-up.

The Greens cannot hide global cooling. The warming in the last 30 years was 100% solar driven. This is not a normal solar cycle. Something else is happening to the sun. Sunspot size and magnetic field strength has dropped year by year.

The sun is now producing tiny short lived spores most of which are not visible using simple optical observations. Sunspot groups use to have a lifetime of roughly 22 days so it was not unusual to see the same sunspot group twice because of solar rotation. Now sunspot groups last for a week or two, if they are visible. Now roughly 70% of new sunspot groups are so weak they are not visible.

rickk
February 15, 2021 9:52 am

But I don’t understand, a temperature 2 degrees less than our Texas average for this time of year is supposed to be a good thing.

The temperature today is 2 degrees less than average – CHECK
Lots of wind generation in place – CHECK

Whew, we dodged a bullet here in Texas

BTW – how many in Texas are going to have a climate related deaths vs covid related deaths over this weather front (you know, CO poisonings, fires, hypothermias)…just wondering.

Now, I’m going to put on my galoshes, scamper up my ladder and pull the snow off my solar panels here in the north east (Western NY)…AGAIN

…Long live the Donald, the most effective President without the comportment of a choirboy FOR America (not the swamp) – notwithstanding Washington

SMC
Reply to  rickk
February 15, 2021 10:08 am

Actually, temps are about 50F below average, not 2, for this time of year in Texas.

Derg
Reply to  SMC
February 16, 2021 5:09 pm

Yep that is less than 2 degrees

Russ R.
Reply to  rickk
February 15, 2021 10:37 am

Tough to swim the Rio Grande for the next few weeks. A coincidence?

SMC
Reply to  Russ R.
February 15, 2021 11:09 am

I would prefer another method to stem the tide of illegal immigration. Of course, freezing cold can be very effective but, having people die of hypothermia seems a bit harsh… Maybe I’m getting soft. 🙂

noaaprogrammer
Reply to  SMC
February 15, 2021 11:46 am

— well, if the Rio freezes over, it will be real easy to get across!

SMC
Reply to  noaaprogrammer
February 15, 2021 1:03 pm

Play some music and get some ice skates. Maybe equip everyone like hockey players and see who wind between CBP and the Illegals. Set up some stands and the Leftists can peacefully protest while the Alt Right holds an insurrection. 🙂

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  noaaprogrammer
February 15, 2021 8:03 pm

I think I saw that in the documentary “The Day after Tomorrow”.

As I recall, they wrote off everyone in canada

Thank a lot Dennis quade

Abolition Man
Reply to  SMC
February 16, 2021 9:37 am

After they get their vaccinations and stimulus checks, I understand that a lot of the illegals are planning on heading home! They say the job prospects in the US are getting limited with the Xiden Regime destroying so many good paying, blue collar jobs!

TEWS_Pilot
February 15, 2021 10:06 am

I received this message from my son in the Houston, Texas area along with photos of a snow-covered parking lot and cars and their apartment house. They have issued a wind chill warning for the first time in their history. Here is his message….and it fits right in with what this article states and what we “Climate REALISTS” have been warning will happen ever since the insanity of installing Bird Choppers and Bird Fryers began.

Just FYI, our power is out from the ice and snow. We had wind generators fail from freezing, plus they may cycle power off and on to save overloading the grid. We will probably have only windows of time here and there to try to check messages, if you send any. We’ll let you know when things are back up. Below is the look from our apartment. When Texas looks like Kansas, lol

RickWill
Reply to  TEWS_Pilot
February 16, 2021 4:37 am

It is not a hurricane but a severe cold snap like this in a place not accustomed to cold brings high risk.

These are the conditions that give rise to actions that make life more secure. I expect there will be questions raised about the need for energy security. Nothing gives energy security like a few million tonnes of coal in a big shed near a power station.

February 15, 2021 10:10 am

Anthony, your article is entirely misleading, if not downright false. I live in Texas again, near my hometown of Houston. The Texas grid has, as frequently shouted by the anti-wind crowd, 100 percent backup for wind-turbine generation capacity. That is a requirement, since wind is somewhat intermittent.

This state has plenty of other power plants, and they run just fine when the wind does not blow. This happens on a regular basis each summer when the load typically peaks.

The problem now, in Texas, is the lack of sufficient natural gas due to the unprecedented deep cold over the entire state. The natural gas suppliers curtailed gas to selected power plants, so that homes, like mine, can still keep the heat on.

Please, understand the facts about renewable power sources, such as wind. They are never meant to run in freezing rain, ice storms, and such. The fact is, as ERCOT also stated today, that only half of the wind turbine generators are out of commission. The operating wind turbines are performing better than expected, and are producing 2,854 MW as I am writing this. Real-Time System Conditions (ercot.com)

By the way, an earlier Texas cold snap, in January 1973, also had power generation issues due to a lack of natural gas supply. I remember it well, as the lack of electricity back then delayed the start of university classes for two weeks in January. State officials closed universities and government buildings for the duration.

Curtailing power plants due to a gas shortage is nothing new in Texas. What IS new is the unprecented cold, the extent and duration during a period of so-called global warming. Cold temperature records are falling this week all across the state.

Please, get the facts straight.

Roger Sowell

SMC
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 10:33 am

How do you heat a house with natural gas without electricity? Don’t modern furnaces have electric igniters? Isn’t electricity required for the blower to distribute the hot air throughout the house?

What about this article: https://www.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN2AF066

or this: https://www.zerohedge.com/energy/energy-emergency-texas-power-provider-warns-rotating-outages-cold-weather-tests-limits-grid

Maybe, as Willis says, you should quote the exact words you have a problem with.

Editor
Reply to  SMC
February 15, 2021 12:53 pm

When I bought my house in Sutton NH, its primary heat had been a wood pellet stove, but humidity in the basement killed it and the owners were relying on two unvented propane space heaters with gas pilot lights. Ran fine without power.

I bought a CO2 meter before the house inspection in January, the house was at 2000 ppm CO2. After I moved in it got up to 3000 in one cold spell.

Now has a mini-split system (that shuts down at -20C – yikes!) and a direct vented Rinnai “wall furnace”. And an electric space heater for the bedroom, but we haven’t gotten that cold yet. Cooking dinner on the propane range can get up to 1500 to 2000 ppm CO2. Closing the bedroom at night (recommended by firemen) makes for 1200 ppm by morning.

SMC
Reply to  Ric Werme
February 15, 2021 1:16 pm

If you have a pilot light, you’re in good shape. Just need some way to circulate the air. Wood stoves can be great, as long as you have wood. We laid in 5 cords, minimum, every winter for the stove. Heated the house great. And when the power went out, we ‘camped out’ near it. But, most modern gas furnaces have electric igniters and the fan needs to run before it’ll light up. So, if you have a modern gas furnace, no electricity can mean no heat.

Peter W
Reply to  Ric Werme
February 15, 2021 2:23 pm

We have a better solution. After studying this climate change business thoroughly, we moved to Florida after selling our NH house back in 2016.

Reply to  SMC
February 15, 2021 2:54 pm

SMC, the homes without electricity are experiencing rolling blackouts, from a few minutes to several hours. Some are without power for longer periods, depending on the cause of the outage.

Heating a home without electricity is addressed elsewhere. My home has a gas fireplace. It also has a gas water heater (no electricity required).

The exact problem, as I stated above, is the wind turbines freezing up had very little to do with the power grid problems, while the deep and prolonged cold air caused a natural gas shortage. That fact was in the quote in the original post.

Alan Robertson
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 10:50 am

The Texas grid infrastructure is inadequate for task, any way you slice it.
This event is not unprecedented, in recent past, not just in 1973, as you mentioned.
How much money spent chasing the Green dream could have been spent on upgrades to infrastructure as needed?
2,854 MWs? That will only supply a tiny fraction of Texans’ needs.

Reply to  Alan Robertson
February 15, 2021 2:58 pm

The Texas grid is more than adequate for the task, excepting for highly unusual situations. We do that in a modern society; spend the money wisely on those problems that have high impact and reasonable probability of occurring.

Alan Robertson
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 3:33 pm

“…excepting for highly unusual situations.”
That’s quite a qualifier, considering the Texas grid can’t deliver reliable energy to customers when it’s needed most, when failure to deliver can mean the deaths of people.
And as far as spending money wisely is concerned, how wise was it to spend over $30 Billion for the wind generators, which now are delivering less than 10% of their promised power?
Could that money have been spent “more wisely” to ensure something like this didn’t happen, since such events are not unprecedented?

fred250
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 17, 2021 1:29 pm

“spend the money wisely”

.

You mean like WASTING BILLIONS on wind and solar to meet a greenie agenda feel-good.. rather than boosting reliable COAL fired energy systems and protecting gas lines from cold ?

Why did the Republicans allow themselves to be CONNED by the AGW farce..

That is the real question that should be asked.

comment image

Last edited 7 months ago by fred250
Paul Penrose
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 10:55 am

Roger,
What is the point of wind and solar farms if they need 100% backup? If you had a car that was unreliable, the answer is not to tow around a reliable backup car that you could use when the primary failed – you would just get rid of the unreliable and keep the reliable backup. Besides, the long term goal is to replace all the fossil fuel (and nuclear) generation and replace them with wind and solar. Can you imagine what trouble Texas would be in today if that had already been done? And don’t reply “battery backup” because that is the equivalent of unicorn farts.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Paul Penrose
February 15, 2021 12:58 pm

“Besides, the long term goal is to replace all the fossil fuel (and nuclear) generation and replace them with wind and solar. Can you imagine what trouble Texas would be in today if that had already been done?”

I can. Texans would be screwed right now if all they had were unreliables to supply their electricity. Texas politicians should wake up and smell the coffee.

Leo Smith
Reply to  Paul Penrose
February 15, 2021 2:47 pm

Unicorn farts very high in methane. Much better than batteries

Reply to  Paul Penrose
February 15, 2021 3:10 pm

What is the point of a nuclear plant, if it needs 100 percent backup? They require such backup on a regular basis, and not just for planned outages for refueling. The fact is that every power plant requires backup.

An additional point in favor of solar and wind, as I have posted before here on WUWT, is the substantial decrease in use of natural gas. Reduced demand for gas produces a lower price for natural gas. Many diverse economic sectors benefit from lower gas prices. For countries that rely on expensive imported LNG, renewables give an improved balance sheet. For countries that rely on gas pipelines from hostile countries, renewables give security of supply. All of this is well-known and discussed in the literature.

I disagree that wind and solar are the long-term goal. In my view, ultimately, ocean-current generating systems will be developed and optimized. Until those fill the world’s energy needs, the ocean-current turbines will serve to follow the load.

All intermittent generating sources require some fill-in supply, the only questions are economic. Pumped storage hydroelectric is a popular but scarce technology, Grid-scale storage via batteries is not “unicorn farts” as you so in-elegantly put it, but is serious and sound strategy. I commend to your reading the many factual articles on grid-scale energy storage. For example, NREL has a recent publication that has substantial points in its favor. Also, MIT has a patented pumped storage system for the ocean.

commieBob
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 3:33 pm

The fact is that every power plant requires backup.

Yes but not on a 1:1 basis like wind and solar. If I absolutely need a minimum of ten nuclear generators, I should build eleven so I have backup. Wind and solar have to be matched watt for watt with backup.

David A
Reply to  commieBob
February 15, 2021 4:00 pm

I don’t see how Rogers missed this distinction, as well as several other reasons that vwind is of little use.

MarkW
Reply to  David A
February 16, 2021 7:25 am

He didn’t miss it.
His purpose is to defend wind.
Like a good lawyer, he will only present those “facts” that support his case.

MarkW
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 4:08 pm

Patents are cheap. Call me when someone actually spends their own money to build one of those things.

Tsk Tsk
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 16, 2021 8:54 pm

“Cheaper natural gas” at the expense of practically stranded capital assets. Economics really isn’t your thing. Then again you claim that every nuke plant nearly melts down every year.

fred250
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 17, 2021 1:33 pm

“They require such backup on a regular basis,”

.

WOW we have another inveterate leftist LIAR

Modules are refueled on a rotation basis, they KNOW when this is going to happen

The REAL ISSUE is bowing to the anti-science, anti-CO2 greenie agenda, ..

wasting huge amounts of money on unreliable wind and solar…

… while actually shutting-down rather than boosting the RELIABLE infrastructure of COAL FIRED POWER

Reply to  fred250
February 22, 2021 5:35 pm

Apparently, you are blissfully ignorant of just how frequently US nuclear power plant reactors go offline, unplanned. Their record is dismal, with one reactor every three weeks.

You could look it up.

GregB
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 11:04 am

You’re right. It is the fact that the gas production infrastructure can’t handle the cold very well. But instead of throwing billions of dollars preparing for a warmer world, we should be investing billions in preparing for a colder world.

Peter W
Reply to  GregB
February 15, 2021 2:24 pm

Exactly right, because a colder world is what we are heading for!

Reply to  GregB
February 15, 2021 3:12 pm

Exactly. Only the stupidest of generals point all their heavy guns in the same direction. For the Earth’s political class to do the equivalent with “global warming” is sheer folly.

Reply to  GregB
February 16, 2021 12:09 pm

The whole mission of clime science should be predicting when the Holocene ends. Nothing else matters.

starzmom
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 11:27 am

So are you saying that Texas is NOT having power outages due to limited capacity to supply needed power? Obviously having 100% back up of wind is inadequate if the alternate generation depends on real-time supply of a needed commodity. A coal plant with a coal pile would not be off line for inadequate fuel supplies.

Reply to  starzmom
February 15, 2021 3:21 pm

Actually, coal power has serious limitations, as has been well-documented.

But, my message is that the current grid issues in Texas are due to limited capacity to supply natural gas. There are also other issues, such as a lack of adequate preparation for bitterly cold weather.

Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 4:03 pm

Coal bad. Natural gas bad. Wind good. Solar good. SolarWinds twice good.

Nick Werner
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 9:56 pm

So if my car won’t run, and the fuel tank in my spouse’s car is empty, there’s really no issue with my car. The issue is with a limited capacity to deliver fuel to the engine in my spouse’s car. Got it.

fred250
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 9:57 pm

“due to limited capacity to supply natural gas’

PLUS ERRATIC and UNRELIABLE wind, that FAILED when needed.. FROZEN SOLID.

Increasing gas supply availability can be done

WIND is a non-entity, waiting for the trash heap.

Tsk Tsk
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 16, 2021 8:59 pm

Coal power kept the lights on during the bomb cyclone of 2018 when wind utterly failed.

This report finds: (1) Combined, fossil and nuclear energy plants provided 89% of electricity during peak demand across all the ISOs; (2) Coal provided the most resilient form of generation in PJM; (3) The value of fuel-based power generation resilience in PJM during this event was estimated at $3.5 billion; (4) Natural gas price spikes, increased demand, and pipeline constraints led to significant fuel oil burn in the US Northeast; (5) Renewables imposed a resilience penalty on the system as output decreased as demand increased; (6) Underestimation of coal and nuclear retirements could give rise to reliability concerns and an inability to meet projected electricity demand.

https://www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analysis/details?id=2594

Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 16, 2021 9:26 pm

Roger you are quite a piece of work. They must be paying you really well.

fred250
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 17, 2021 1:37 pm

“current grid issues in Texas are due to limited capacity to supply natural gas.”

.

More deliberate LIES..

Gas was the only thing keeping the grid even partially functional

Coal was flat chat all through the event, there is just TOO LITTLE OF IT.

But don’t let FACT get in the way of your slimy leftist socialist LIES.

comment image

Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 11:34 am

Roger:

What you state is a liability with gas: it’s not economical to store significant fuel on site. When demand exceeds supply or pipeline capacity, natural gas plants drop offline. This is one major advantage of coal, which can store weeks or even months of fuel right at the plant. It’s an even bigger advantage of nuclear, where an entire year’s worth of fuel can be delivered in a couple of truckloads.

It seems that all the disaster models are run exclusively in the “what happens when the world gets 2 degrees warmer?” mode. Not enough time is spent modeling what will happen if a large region used to temperate weather hits an extended spell of 50 degrees colder than normal.

Now we know: demand for electricity and natural gas go up with not enough gas to keep the generating plants running, and half the wind turbines freeze up.

Tim Gorman
Reply to  Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
February 15, 2021 12:25 pm

Alan,

REmember, the models predict a *mid-range* temperature, not an average temp. When the mid-range goes up it is impossible to tell if it from increased Tmax or increased Tmin. Of course the alarmists want you to believe it is Tmax and we are all going to die. It’s really nuts.

wadesworld
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 11:38 am

That’s awesome that wind is producing 2,854 Megawatts. If I read the chart correctly, the state’s current demand is 45,068 Megawatts.

Alan Robertson
Reply to  wadesworld
February 15, 2021 3:05 pm

Yeah, that’s awesome. Texas has a wind power total nameplate capacity of 30,000MW.
Figure roughly $1W. price, that’s $30 Billion cost.
That’s not so awesome, for delivering less than 10% of what was touted, when it’s really needed.

Gunga Din
Reply to  wadesworld
February 15, 2021 3:57 pm

And I wonder just how much those 2,854 Megawatts cost. Including the $ value of the subsidies (those are still paid by somebody).
How do wind and solar cost compare to fossil fuels and nuclear?
(Include the dollar value of subsidies/tax breaks for both. Subtract carbon taxes.)
Hard to put a dollar value on reliability.

bethan456@gmail.com
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 11:59 am
MarkW
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 1:31 pm

All the more reason to ban frakking and new pipelines.

bethan456@gmail.com
Reply to  MarkW
February 15, 2021 2:23 pm

I love it that you are stalking me

fred250
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 3:03 pm

Its you that is constantly seeking attention with dumb idiotic statements.

bethan456@gmail.com
Reply to  fred250
February 15, 2021 4:23 pm

Oh boy, now Fred joins Mark in a tag-team stalk. I love it more!

MarkW
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 7:16 pm

bethan is actually stupid enough to believe that responding to someone’s post, is an example of stalking.
I guess it just goes to show how self centered she is.

John Endicott
Reply to  MarkW
February 16, 2021 6:37 am

Bethan is actually stupid enough to believe that responding to someone’s post, is an example of stalking.

Not surprising, in another thread he/she/it was stupid enough to think posting in a public forum is a private conversation. Clearly poor, deluded Bethan doesn’t understand how public internet forums work.

Last edited 7 months ago by John Endicott
TonyG
Reply to  John Endicott
February 16, 2021 7:39 am

What I don’t understand is why bethan456 thinks it’s a good idea to post using an actual email address. Unless it’s not actually hers, which is just mean to the person it really belongs to.

John Endicott
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 16, 2021 6:35 am

I love it more

Of course you do, trolls always love it when they’re getting attention

MarkW
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 4:16 pm

You keep using that word, but it’s quite obvious you don’t know what it means.

Regardless, I find it interesting how once again, you try to distract rather than deal with the issue at hand. Is it possible that for the nth time, you know that what you have stated is completely wrong, but you can’t admit it.

bethan456@gmail.com
Reply to  MarkW
February 15, 2021 4:26 pm

Obviously you didn’t read the link I posted. It’s clear that Oklahoma is experiencing the same problems as Texas is with it’s electric supply, and they don’t have as much wind in their supply mix. What I posted is far from wrong Mark, the supply of natural gas can’t meet demand in BOTH Texas and Oklahoma.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 5:43 pm

The problem with Oklahoma natural gas is the lines at the wells are freezing up and the processing plants are freezing up so the supply is reduced.

Oklahoma is a member of a 17-State power grid (Southwest something-or-other) and the whole grid is having trouble because of the very high demand which is caused by the very cold temperatures.

The grid is in a little better shape tonight than it was earlier today when 10,000 Tulsa home owners power was cut for about an hour in a temporary blackout.

I believe that is the only deliberate temporary blackout they have imposed, and the authorities said not long ago that the situation had improved, but they wanted everyone to reduce their electrical usage as much as possible for the next two days, as they could not rule out more rolling blackouts.

I don’t know the situation in the other 16 States as far as rolling blackouts are concerned, but I assume some are taking place since we had one here in Oklahoma.

Everyone should cut back as much as possible. It might save you a blackout.

I don’t know what percentage of Oklahoma’s electricty production is windmills, but I’m sure they are all frozen up like the ones in Texas.

The Oklahoma legilature stopped the payment of subsidies for windmills about a year ago saying if the subsidies were to continue, it would bankrupt Oklahoma. So no State subsidies for windmills in Oklahoma. I assume they still get federal subsidies.

Say a little prayer for all the farmers out there. All those animals need care no matter how cold it gets. The cows are having their babies about now. The chickens need to be watered every morning whether you have one, or 500 of them. And on and on.

Last edited 7 months ago by Tom Abbott
Tom Abbott
Reply to  Tom Abbott
February 15, 2021 5:58 pm

Btw, one step Oklahoma has taken is to shut down all the casinos! 🙂 They also are cutting back electricity for other large users in the State.

About one more night of really extreme cold temperatures around this area, and then they will moderate and in about four or five days we will think it is summer time again, it will be so much warmer comparitively.

Yeah, I’m getting a propane whole-house generator. I see the utility of one now. I used to get out and cut and burn wood in this kind of weather and situation, but I think it’s time to improve my survival technology.

I bet whole-house generators and Ford F-150 hybrid pickups will be selling like hotcakes! I may get one of each. 🙂

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  Tom Abbott
February 15, 2021 7:56 pm

-18c in Tulsa tonight

-38 c a few days ago in calgary

No problems here, everyone on gas heat, mostly gas generation

Why do gas lines freeze up down there?

Honest question Tom.

Last edited 7 months ago by Pat from kerbob
ozspeaksup
Reply to  Pat from kerbob
February 16, 2021 4:27 am

not sure if the effect is the same on huge gas units but my beekeeper friend used LPG bottles and even in hot aussie weather theyd go frosty when he was running it on full bore open to run the seperator, theyd go icy all around the outlets n joins to connectors

Last edited 7 months ago by ozspeaksup
rah
Reply to  ozspeaksup
February 16, 2021 7:26 pm

Only a rookie tries to use one of those propane camp stoves in very cold weather. The fuel freezes up and won’t gas, even when your up there in lower pressure well above the tree line. One needs a camp stove that uses white gas. MSR ( Mountain Safety Research) makes the best IMO.

Mine outlasted 8 1/2 years of tough duty when I was an SF soldier on mountain teams. It has been to the three highest peaks in Europe and many others.

Funny thing though, some of it’s toughest duty wasn’t in the Alps, or the Dolomites, or the Rockies, but in the rather smaller mountains of the Green mountain range in Vermont. The cold in that part of the world is more biting, it hurts more for what ever reason, and when one goes 15 days living out of a Rucksack and being chased, constantly moving on skies day after day, with 80 lb on your back and it never gets up to 0 deg. F the whole time and wind chill gets down to -30 Deg. F at night? Well, that kind of duty, though it is not real war, still does an excellent job of separating the men from the boys, and the reliable tough equipment from that which is not.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Pat from kerbob
February 16, 2021 10:43 am

“Why do gas lines freeze up down there?”

That I don’t know, but obviously this problem can be prevented in some way since your gas lines are not freezing and your temperatures are much colder than here.

That will be one of the questions that will need to be answered after this is all over.

And I think someone upthread was hinting that windmills were the equivalent of natural gas power because both were having trouble in Oklahoma and Texas because of the freezing weather, but as Calgary shows, the freezing problems with natural gas can be fixed, whereas the windmills freezing up cannot be fixed. So the reliability is not really equal between natural gas and windmills.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Tom Abbott
February 16, 2021 4:24 am

Say a little prayer for all the farmers out there. All those animals need care no matter how cold it gets. The cows are having their babies about now. The chickens need to be watered every morning whether you have one, or 500 of them. And on and on.

indeed!
the wildlife/ birds etc chances are grim indeed
some farms have onfarm propane for heating etc but even that’d be running low with high use to keep pigs chooks etc even barely warm in this savage weather
Cattle will be dying / in crisis id guess, dairy herds in trouble too.
pretty nasty for many more than humans

MarkW
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 7:14 pm

I agree that the supply of natural gas isn’t enough. Which is why I recommended both more frakking and more pipelines.
Gee, it’s almost as if basic physics is beyond your intellectual capacities.

fred250
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 16, 2021 12:56 am

“and they don’t have as much wind in their supply mix.”

.

Obviously clueless bethy didn’t read its own link

normally SPP has 32% wind, currently down to 12%

A FAILURE TO SUPPLY from wind,

….. as coal and gas have to take up slack of the awol wind..

wind…desertion in time of need..

so often the way.

bethan456@gmail.com
Reply to  MarkW
February 15, 2021 4:27 pm

Where did I mention anything about fracking Mr. Mark?

eyesonu
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 5:36 pm

Do you support fracking?

MarkW
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 7:18 pm

bethan, I know that following more than one conversation at a time is beyond your limited mental capabilities, but I never said that you said anything about frakking.
I said that frakking and more pipelines would be a solution to the problem of their not being enough natural gas to go around.

bethan456@gmail.com
Reply to  MarkW
February 15, 2021 4:29 pm

Educate yourself Mr. MarkW, in weather like this the moisture in a natural gas pipeline FREEZES, and blocks the flow. More pipelines don’t resolve this issue, and neither does fracking.

eyesonu
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 5:39 pm

Please provide links to where you ‘learned’ the issue is with frozen/blocked pipelines.

MarkW
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 7:13 pm

This is funny, bethan telling others to educate themselves.
Where did you get the crazy idea that there are measurable amounts of water in natural gas pipelines.
Beyond that, I’m not surprised to find out that you aren’t aware that most natural gas pipelines are buried, below the frost line.
Anyway, the solution is to have coal power plants, since coal can be stockpiled.
BTW, much of the problem is that consumers are demanding more gas than the system can supply. More pipes and more wells would definitely help with that problem.
bethan, will we ever find a subject in which you aren’t both incredibly ignorant, and unaware of that ignorance?

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 7:58 pm

Low -30s to -40s in Alberta for the last week
Predominately gas generation, mostly home gas heating

No freezing that I have ever heard of

fred250
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 16, 2021 12:59 am

“Educate yourself”

.

Poor bethany, asking others to do what she has NEVER been able to do itself.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 16, 2021 10:51 am

Well, something resolves the issue because as the comments above point out, Calgary Canada is a lot colder than Oklahoma, yet Calgary’s gas lines are currently supplying all the natural gas Calgary needs. No shortages because of freezing pipes there. Calgary is going to have to take Oklahoma to school.

Last edited 7 months ago by Tom Abbott
fred250
Reply to  MarkW
February 15, 2021 4:33 pm

Its what bethany does for a living….

.. attention-seeking and distraction.

MarkW
Reply to  fred250
February 15, 2021 7:19 pm

All the while feeling absolutely certain that she is more educated and smarter than everyone else here.

fred250
Reply to  MarkW
February 15, 2021 9:59 pm

And FAILING UTTERLY and COMPLETELY

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  bethan456@gmail.com
February 15, 2021 7:55 pm

Yes, many states do
Because they failed to plan

Planning means 100% backup of intermittent power

That means having enough gas supply for home heating AND generation in a cold snap.

Elementary exercise
If these states had no wind installed would they now have enough gas supply now?

Yes of course, because it was planned for

DonM
Reply to  Roger Sowell
February 15, 2021 12:04 pm

I ha