Fossil Fool Divestment Fail: BlackRock Edition

Guest Ron White impression by David Middleton

“You can’t fix stupid”…

Activists call on BlackRock to divest from fossil fuels

Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech 5 days ago

Protesters also called for the company to invest its money into clean energy.

Climate change activists blocked the entrance to BlackRock’s midtown headquarters early Tuesday morning during a protest of the investment management company’s ties to fossil fuel corporations responsible for deforestation.

“We are here to send a message to BlackRock to clean up its dirty act,” said Pete Sikora, the climate campaigns director for New York Communities for Change which organized the demonstration of roughly 150 people. “It’s time for them to become the solution and not the problem.”

[…]

“We all know that burning fossil fuels and deforestation causes climate change,” said Krystal Ford from the Sunrise Movement. “But we also know that greed causes climate change. There are people who are profiting right now off of this climate disaster.”

BlackRock has multi-billion dollars worth of investments in some of the world’s largest oil companies like BP, ExxonMobil and Chevron and is the largest investor in the world in coal, according to The Guardian. 

[…]

The protest occurred on the seven-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy’s touchdown in New York City — an event that activists said…

[…]

AM New York
Figure 1. Can you say “greentards”?

Where to start?

How about the first sentence?

Protesters also called for the company to invest its money into clean energy.

Note to New York Communities for Change: It’s not BlackRock’s money.

What we stand for
At BlackRock, we’re guided by our culture and a set of principles that ensure we never forget what we stand for – to help more and more people invest in their financial well-being.

We are a fiduciary to our clients
Put simply, your goals are our goals. We represent your voice, your needs and your investment goals in every decision we make.

BlackRock

BlackRock is a capital management company. They manage other people’s money for the sole purpose of generating returns on their clients’ investments.

We are a global investment manager.

BlackRock

BlackRock is an investment manager.

“We are here to send a message to BlackRock to clean up its dirty act. It’s time for them to become the solution and not the problem.”

Pete Sikora, the climate campaigns director for New York Communities for Change, organizer of 150 person criminal trespassing.

150 protesters? This merited a news article? Well, it certainly merits ridicule.

Peter “Climate change and inequality, mostly” Sikora should know better than this. He has an MBA… Although he’s never had a real job.

“There are people who are profiting right now off of this climate disaster.”

Krystal Ford from the Sunrise Movement

Krystal “Activist and Community Organizer with a demonstrated history of working in the food & beverages industry” Ford has an excuse for being stupid. She has a BS in nutrition and an MA in food studies. The closest thing to a real job in her CV appears to be as a self-employed yoga instructor. Although, Krystal, like a blind squirrel, did manage to find the acorn: “profiting.”

BlackRock wouldn’t be investing its clients’ money in ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP and all of these big “beautiful clean coal” companies, if it wasn’t generating a better return than its competitors…

Figure 2. Too fracking funny! Coal is a black rock! (The Grauniad)

The two largest asset managers in the world (BlackRock and The Vanguard Group) are also ExxonMobil’s largest shareholders

Activists thought BlackRock, Vanguard found religion on climate change. Not anymore
PUBLISHED SUN, OCT 13 2019

Eric Rosenbaum

In the history of the earth’s climate two years is a infinitesimal blip, but in the recent history of investor-led efforts to push for action on climate change from corporations, two years has meant a great deal.

In 2017, the two biggest U.S.-based fund managers, BlackRock and Vanguard — which control a combined $12 trillion in assets — both voted to require Exxon Mobil to produce a report on climate change. It was a seen as watershed moment showing what can occur when the biggest index funds punch their weight at the annual meetings of corporations, and join other shareholders in supporting proxy proposals covering social issues.


Until it wasn’t the watershed everybody thought it was.

Since that 2017 vote, multiple analyses of proxy votes have shown BlackRock and Vanguard to have among the worst voting records when it comes to social issues supported by other shareholders, including many of their peers among the world’s largest asset managers.

[…]

Why does that matter?

BlackRock and Vanguard control the largest blocks of shares in nearly every publicly-traded firm in the U.S., including in the carbon-intensive energy and utility industries.

[…]

CNBC
Figure 3. I see greentards, that’s the green I see. Europa Press News | Europa Press | Getty Images

Caption from CNBC article:

Demonstrators hold banners at the demonstration in Barcelona with the slogan ‘The problem is not the weather, the problem is capitalism’ , in which people are seen protesting in support of the global climate strike demanding solutions for global warming on September 27, 2019.
Europa Press News | Europa Press | Getty Images

CNBC

“The problem is not the weather, the problem is capitalism”

There’s a reason why the two largest asset managers in the world (BlackRock and The Vanguard Group) are also ExxonMobil’s largest shareholders… The reason is capitalism and capitalism isn’t a problem. It’s the solution to most of the world’s problems.

“Well first of all, tell me: Is there some society you know that doesn’t run on greed? You think Russia doesn’t run on greed? You think China doesn’t run on greed? What is greed? Of course, none of us are greedy, it’s only the other fellow who’s greedy. The world runs on individuals pursuing their separate interests. The great achievements of civilization have not come from government bureaus. Einstein didn’t construct his theory under order from a bureaucrat. Henry Ford didn’t revolutionize the automobile industry that way. In the only cases in which the masses have escaped from the kind of grinding poverty you’re talking about, the only cases in recorded history, are where they have had capitalism and largely free trade. If you want to know where the masses are worse off, worst off, it’s exactly in the kinds of societies that depart from that. So that the record of history is absolutely crystal clear, that there is no alternative way so far discovered of improving the lot of the ordinary people that can hold a candle to the productive activities that are unleashed by the free-enterprise system.”

Milton Friedman

The concept is very simple.

“The great virtue of a free market system is that it does not care what color people are; it does not care what their religion is; it only cares whether they can produce something you want to buy. It is the most effective system we have discovered to enable people who hate one another to deal with one another and help one another.”

Milton Friedman
Figure 4. “The great virtue of a free market system is that it does not care what color people are; it does not care what their religion is; it only cares whether they can produce something you want to buy.” Data from BP 2018 Statistical Review of World Energy

“A major source of objection to a free economy is precisely that it … gives people what they want instead of what a particular group thinks they ought to want. Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself.”

Milton Friedman

BlackRock is a major investor in fossil fuel companies because they give “people what they want instead of what a particular group thinks they ought to want” and…

“There is one and only one social responsibility of business–to use it resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game, which is to say, engages in open and free competition without deception or fraud”

Milton Friedman

Which puts the total lie to the NY Attorney General’s fraudulent lawsuit against ExxonMobil. If there was any evidence that ExxonMobil was deceiving shareholders about climate change, BlackRock and The Vanguard Group wouldn’t be their largest shareholders, controlling nearly 15% of the company.

But, as Ron White says…

Figure 5. You really can’t.

And, since you can’t fix stupid, you also can’t prevent…

Figure 6. Really futile and stupid gestures.
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Hubert
November 5, 2019 2:17 am

in 1000 years , even 1 million of years , you’ll still find solar energy but no oil, coal or gas !
renewable energy is the future whatever the present situation !
open your eyes just a little bit !!!

H.R.
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 3:15 am

David Middleton: “Furthermore, Earth’s crust will still contain plenty of oil, gas and coal long after nuclear power has replaced fossil fuels.”

The stone age didn’t end because we ran out of stones.

You’re right, David. We’ll be OK so long as the ‘intelligentsia’ keeps their nose out of it and doesn’t try to dictate their preferred outcome.

chaswarnertoo
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 4:24 am

Spot on. Oil and gas are still being formed, albeit slower than we’re using it.

Scissor
Reply to  chaswarnertoo
November 5, 2019 6:04 am

Synthetic oil and gas are sufficiently easy to make also. It’s just a matter of feedstock, process and energy. It’s difficult to make predictions from one day to the next. But for me, it’s hard to imagine that lubricants will not be needed as long at there are any machines in use and the best lubricants are synthetic.

Robert W Turner
Reply to  Scissor
November 5, 2019 7:20 am

Even synthetic oils are made from natural hydrocarbons.

Johann Wundersamer
Reply to  Scissor
November 17, 2019 7:55 am

Scissor November 5, 2019 at 6:04 am

Synthetic oil and gas are sufficiently easy to make also. It’s just a matter of feedstock, process and energy. It’s difficult to make predictions from one day to the next. But for me, it’s hard to imagine that lubricants will not be needed as long at there are any machines in use and the best lubricants are synthetic.

– make your choice:

https://www.google.com/search?q=lubricants+for+precision+tools+machine+parts&oq=lubricants+for+precision+tools+machine+parts&aqs=chrome.

Philo
Reply to  chaswarnertoo
November 5, 2019 6:05 pm

I think we can’t really say at what rate coal or gas are being formed, much conclude we are using it faster than it forms.

Any coal forming now is probably too deep to mine with present technology.
Old oil fields have a way of refilling themselves, sometimes on purpose from the oil companies.

Farmer Ch E retired
Reply to  chaswarnertoo
November 5, 2019 9:25 pm

Lots of carbonates deep below NA – could future technologies tap into that seemingly endless resource??

Terry Shipman
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 6:11 am

I will not be alive in one thousand or a million years from now but I will be alive this winter needing to stay warm. I will give up natural gas when my cold dead fingers are pried loose from the gas valve of my stove. The US is blessed with sufficient fossil fuels to last centuries. Global warming is a scam and there is no “climate emergency” anywhere because of it. We have weather events that are natural. I’ve got news for you. We will never power a steel mill with wind mills.

AWG
Reply to  David Middleton
November 6, 2019 4:02 am

Furthermore, Earth’s crust will still contain plenty of oil, gas and coal

I thought hydrocarbons are “fossil fuels”. Don’t things still die and bury themselves miles below the Earth’s surface? Or when did that stop?

Whenever I read or hear “fossil fuel” I know all that follows is Marxist Propaganda. Dittos with the hyperbole of “crisis” and more recently “existential crisis” (because there is no longer any such thing as over-the-top rhetoric).

As I understand it, the components for nuclear power have this property called “half-life” associated with it. Which to my simple mind means that whatever is the valuable property it is diminishing over time. It then follows that if this radioactive material is left unused, it will decay all on its own until some day it has no value. Clearly not using nuclear power Right Now is a Use It or Lose It proposition. We have a moral imperative to exploit these materials because not using them is wasteful.

renewable energy is the future

“Fossil Fuels” would seem to be renewable. Burning timber would be “renewable”.

I find it interesting that these Malthusians are so interested in managing someone else’s life thousands of years from now that they will make everyone present’s life as miserable as if life over the millennia is some perverse Zero-Sum game and being miserable now will somehow guarantee human flourishing in the future.

That is just insane.

Patrick MJD
Reply to  Hubert
November 5, 2019 2:57 am

How will you mine/recycle the resources for renewables?

NorwegianSceptic
Reply to  Hubert
November 5, 2019 3:16 am

Hubert: So you mean that the stone age ended due to lack of rocks?

chaswarnertoo
Reply to  NorwegianSceptic
November 5, 2019 4:27 am

Yep, Hubert is that dim.

Sunny
Reply to  Hubert
November 5, 2019 4:11 am

Hubert, do you honestly think that humans will use poor solar energy in 1000 Years time? If solar if so good, then why do we still use fossil fuels to power our cities and countries? Why are britiah people suing solar companies due to poor power output, where will the mega tons of colbart come from to store your solar power? Currently, unisef stated this year, that 40k+ slave children are working in Congolese mines, just so you can feel like you are saving the planet… Or how about the germans who cut done 600 acres of foresr for 7 wind generators 😐

Coach Springer
Reply to  Hubert
November 5, 2019 5:19 am

A lot like investing in the television in 919 A. D. then.

Scissor
Reply to  Hubert
November 5, 2019 6:18 am

I wonder if they’ll have toothpicks and if they’ll be made of wood.

Crispin in Waterloo but really in Nairobi
Reply to  Scissor
November 5, 2019 1:04 pm

Good question. They will need to pick their veggie meals out of their teeth with something.

And being picky, will they learn to speak the language well enough to communicate their wooden message?

“Seven year anniversary”?

Are they aware that the word anno means year?

Paul Penrose
Reply to  Hubert
November 5, 2019 1:39 pm

Hubert,
You are a fool if you are worried about what people will be doing 1,000 or 1,000,000 years from now. We need to manage real issues today. We are responsible for ourselves and our children, and that’s enough. Future generations will take care of themselves. It’s pure hubris to think that can predict what their problems will be, let alone solve them.

ATheoK
Reply to  Hubert
November 5, 2019 1:44 pm

“Hubert November 5, 2019 at 2:17 am
in 1000 years , even 1 million of years , you’ll still find solar energy but no oil, coal or gas !
renewable energy is the future whatever the present situation !
open your eyes just a little bit !!!”

What utter nonsense!

If the idiots manage to fail at destroying the world’s civilizations with their ridiculous anti-fossil fuel nonsense; technology will move forward!

Not renewable nonsense technology currently being used to scam tax payers.
But, technology necessary to harvest the immense abundance of methane throughout our solar system.

Cease fossil fuels and within 10-15 years all alleged renewables will cease for lack of maintenance, spare parts and lack of new construction.

Much before that period, civilizations will plummet back to the dark ages.
No synthetics for shoes, chairs, rugs, walls or clothing.
No mechanized harvesting or processing of natural fibers into clothing.
No mechanized farming, transporting or supermarket of foods.
No metals, whether for transportation, laptops, phones or batteries.
No heat when it’s cold.
No coolness when it’s hot.
No cooked foods, period!
Forget refrigeration, foods will spoil rapidly; unless you know how to prepare, salt, cure, smoke meats and properly dry vegetables, fruit and berries.
No clean sterile water. Much of the world depends upon household catch basins for water.

Erratic unreliable renewables do not supply electricity for industry, mining, manufacturing, computer centers, etc. Electricity generation from highly variable unreliable sources fail to produce electricity of the quality necessary for industry. Even with electricity from high quality generating sources, e.g. Hydro and nuclear, must purchase line conditioners to control the electricity fed to their equipment.

You will quickly be reduced to either raising your own food or knowing exactly whom you buy hand raised foods from.

One can see that most of the people protesting have not made any changes in their lives to acknowledge what they demand of others.
They’re wearing and waving synthetics, colored by pigments and paints made by use of fossil fuels, wearing shoes made with synthetics, keeping warm with synthetic coats, etc. etc.

Quite a few are wearing makeup made by fossil fuels…! If they can’t divest themselves of makeup, why would I believe any of those fools?

Let alone some quack making idiotic remarks about 1,000 year into the future.
1,000 years from now, given civilization manages to pass this bottleneck of fools, your claims will appear akin to some nut back in the year 1,000 telling their fellows they have to stop a critical component of something their families and civilization depends upon; e.g. making steel, breeding better wheat and peas.

jtom
Reply to  ATheoK
November 5, 2019 5:23 pm

Good list, but add no pharmaceuticals; the vast majority is synthesized from oil, even aspirin.

So the response will be, allow oil and gas to be used for those products, but not fuels. So what happens to the price of plastics, et al, when oil producers no longer make profits from fuel? They necessarily skyrocket – run-away inflation throughout the economy.
And taxes will soar as well, to make up for the lost oil revenue governments presently get.

Oil and gas are critical components of the foundation of our civilization. Stop its production, and you bring our civilization to an end.

Johann Wundersamer
Reply to  ATheoK
November 17, 2019 8:14 am
MarkW
Reply to  Hubert
November 5, 2019 3:55 pm

If it’s not going to run out for 1000 years, that means we won’t have to start worrying for another 950 years.

Who knows, maybe they will have fusion working by then?

Mike McMillan
November 5, 2019 2:50 am

I’ll have to consult with my financial advisors at Lehman Bros to see if I have any Black Rock funds. Sell ToysRUs and buy Sears.

Troe
Reply to  Mike McMillan
November 5, 2019 9:18 am

150 idiots agitating outside your door is a sign that you are doing something right. It’s also a good argument for free birth control.

Susan
November 5, 2019 2:57 am

I doubt very much that Blackrock will pay the slightest attention: their job is to make money for investors. If investors don’t want to invest in fossil fuels they will take their money elsewhere but I don’t see that happening anytime soon.

chaswarnertoo
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 4:25 am

I’ll ask Warner Jr., he seems to work long hours there.

Gums
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 6:39 am

Salute!

Now David…… surely, you couldn’t be making a reference to a previous “community organizer” that helped with the U.S. Paris Agreement , huh?

Gums sends…
P.S. This article is one of the best economic lessons I have seen. I wish I had seen this when I was taking Econ 101 years ago.

Schitzree
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 1:16 pm

101 years ago? You must be older then you look, Gums.

^¿^

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 8:29 am

“150 protesters?”

A ‘sea’ of diversity that isn’t really a representative cross-section of Americana. I can’t help but think that these are people without a full-time, good paying job, and are just earning a little quick cash.

Although, their signs suggest that they spent more than 15 minutes getting ready. Or, at least the paymaster handed them out before telling them what they were supposed to do.

Samuel C Cogar
Reply to  Susan
November 5, 2019 7:18 am

BlackRock —————-is the largest investor in the world in coal, according to The Guardian.

Shur makes a body wonder why they chose the company name of “BlackRock”.

Karl
Reply to  Samuel C Cogar
November 5, 2019 9:12 am

Derived from “Blackstone Group,” founded by Peterson and Schwartzman. “Peter/Petra” is Greek for stone or rock, and Scwartz is German for black.

James Schrumpf
Reply to  Karl
November 5, 2019 11:46 am

Maybe they just wanted to be able to say, during a bear market, “It was a Bad Day at Black Rock.”

Chuck in Houston
Reply to  James Schrumpf
November 8, 2019 9:06 am

Good one James. I actually set my Dish DVR to search for that movie about two years ago, and then about a year ago it found and recorded it (TCM eventually). Good movie.

M Courtney
November 5, 2019 3:16 am

If the disastrous expectation of the Green lobby were true it would cost these investment firms a fortune. They would be dis-investing.

The fact that they are not dis-investing is a good sign that they have less confidence in the oncoming apocalypse than the yoga instructor.

It’s a matter of expertise.

Gerald the Mole
November 5, 2019 3:18 am

Do Black Rock have a legal obligation to make the most money for their clients? If they answer is yes then if they knowingly follow lines of action that do not do this are they not guilty of a misdemeanor?

LdB
Reply to  Gerald the Mole
November 5, 2019 7:55 am

Under Australian corporate law the directors would be personally liable if they were not acting in the interest of the shareholders. Under Germany and French law the directors’ duties are owed to a wider range of stakeholders (customers, creditors, the local community in that). There were two reviews to Australian law which both rejected going down the German, French path. I am not sure how the law stands in USA.

So the legality of what is being protested varies from country to country.

John F. Hultquist
Reply to  Gerald the Mole
November 5, 2019 9:32 am

We (retired) do not invest via BlackRock but do have mutual fund investments through another well known firm. If that firm sent a note that they were going to follow the advice of climate activists, we would immediately respond by directing that the money be transferred to a different firm.
I suspect there would be many others that would do the same.

Marc
November 5, 2019 4:37 am

This also tells me that BlackRock feels comfortable that all the state lawsuits against the major oil producers are likely to be unsuccessful. Since the SCOTUS has ruled the oil companies cannot be held liable for damages because the EPA has jurisdiction over CO2 emissions, the states have been forced to argue tangential issues such as failure to inform investors about possible risks from climate change regulations. BTW- if you look at the bond offerings these states have made over the years, none of them that I am aware of have ever included climate change as a risk factor in their offering materials.

LdB
Reply to  Marc
November 5, 2019 7:58 am

You left out the public themselves would be implicated in the damages claim since they did the large portions of the fossil fuel burning. Ignorance is not a valid defense in a damages claim.

KcTaz
November 5, 2019 4:48 am

“Activism is a way for useless people to feel important, even if the consequences of their activism are counterproductive for those they claim to be helping and damaging to the fabric of society as a whole.”

Thomas Sowell

bonbon
November 5, 2019 4:48 am

I am amazed at the WUWT financial blindspot.
At Jackson Hole, Wyoming, on August 23rd 2019, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney proposed that Central Bankers take control of the entire world as a new financial crisis begins, replacing the dollar as a reserve currency with a digital currency controlled by Central Banks. His proposal was seconded by BlackRock, LLP, the world’s largest hedge fund which features many central bankers on its board. They advocate central bankers taking control of all spending, world-wide, ending the reign of nation states.
See Carney’s GFI – http://greenfinanceinitiative.org/governor-of-the-bank-of-england-backs-green-finance/
The problem for BlackRock and its central bankers, they have not made any money since 2015 with even negative interest rates. So they are going whole hog for the GFI. Trillions are at stake.
At the UN Carney then proceeded to lay bare his threat against any business or enterprise that might consider rejecting this change in regime:
Firms that align their business models to the transition to a net zero[-carbon] world will be rewarded handsomely. Those that fail to adapt will cease to exist.

A direct threat. MeFo Bonds, anyone?

John Endicott
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 5:49 am

How Dare you (TM Greta 2019) counter conspiracy with facts.

bonbon
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 6:03 am

Look at the board member bankers below. Come on! These are not geologists!
Carney here :
https://www.kansascityfed.org/~/media/files/publicat/sympos/2019/governor%20carney%20speech%20jackson%20hole.pdf?la=en
Even a cursory check :
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-08-15/blackrock-s-ex-central-bankers-have-bold-vision-to-beat-recession
https://www.kansascityfed.org/publications/research/escp

Do not be blindsided! These bankers are the activists of green finance, not poor Greta’s wannabees. I just cannot believe how highly qualified engineers are so easily fooled.

John Endicott
Reply to  bonbon
November 5, 2019 6:21 am

The kansascityfed link doesn’t mention anything about central bankers in regards to Blackrock (heck, it doesn’t even mention Blackrock so I fail to see where it does anything to back up your assertions).
While the Bloomberg opinion piece does mention “ex-central bankers” being part of the company it does not name a single name nor claims any of them as being on the board of directors.
Here is a link to the board of direcrtors
https://ir.blackrock.com/board-of-directors
please
1) explain what you mean by a “central banker”
and
2) point out by name all the “central bankers” on the board.

bonbon
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 7:12 am

What don’t you understand about “bank”?
These are listed n the Bloomberg link.
Former Swiss central banker Philipp Hildebrand, BlackRock Germany chief economist Elga Bartsch, former Fed vice-chairman Stanley Fischer and former deputy governor of the Bank of Canada Jean Boivin have signed a BlackRock paper calling for a “regime change” in monetary policy, involving the end of central bank “independence.

This “regime change” is exactly what Carney spelled out at Jackson Hole. That paper from BlackRock was forwarded to the FED confab in aug. 2019.
Hey, this is ain’t rocket science, just bankers smoke and mirrors.

bonbon
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 8:10 am

I have posted Mark Carney’s link numerous times, for the keynote at both the FED and the UN. It’s in-your-face “regime change”, the end of the financial world as we know it, as Die Welt wrote. Helicopter money, direct to “markets”. This is radical stuff, but then these are desperate times, for these bankers.
Imagine Carney, and after King, calling for the end of the Dollar? I wonder how that went down at the WH? Pres. Trump said soon after, the future belongs not to the globalists, but to the nationalists. It sure looks like he was referring to that insane gambit.
Carney et. al are hysterical that Trump will not bail them out as the financial mudslide tremors, and break up the banks, quite unlike Obama’s economic looting.

John Endicott
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 8:18 am

What part of board of directors don’t you understand? (remember your claim was “many central bankers on its board”)

Former Swiss central banker Philipp Hildebrand, BlackRock Germany

Not on the board of directors, see: https://ir.blackrock.com/board-of-directors

chief economist Elga Bartsch

Not on the board of directors, see: https://ir.blackrock.com/board-of-directors

former Fed vice-chairman Stanley Fischer

Not on the board of directors, see: https://ir.blackrock.com/board-of-directors

former deputy governor of the Bank of Canada Jean Boivin

Not on the board of directors, see: https://ir.blackrock.com/board-of-directors

so of the “many” you claim is on the board you’ve named a big fat ZERO.

John Endicott
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 8:25 am

Try this again without the multiple links sending it to limbo:

What part of board of directors don’t you understand? (remember your claim was “many central bankers on its board”)

Former Swiss central banker Philipp Hildebrand, BlackRock Germany

Not on the board of directors

chief economist Elga Bartsch

Not on the board of directors

former Fed vice-chairman Stanley Fischer

Not on the board of directors

former deputy governor of the Bank of Canada Jean Boivin

Not on the board of directors

(see: https://ir.blackrock.com/board-of-directors for who is on the board of directors, hint: it’s none of the people you listed)

so of the “many” you claim is on the board you’ve named a big fat ZERO.

John Endicott
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 8:53 am

What don’t you understand about “bank”?

I didn’t ask you to define “bank”. I asked you to what *you* mean by “central banker”. I have an idea what that term means to normal people (to normal people there’s a difference between the terms “bank” and “central banker”), but not what it means to conspiracy addled people (for your reply I take it “bank” and “central banker” and interchangeable. really?). I also asked you to name the “several” that you claim are on the board. You named ZERO, NADA, ZIP that are on the board (despite my helpfully giving you a link that list all the board members)

bonbon
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 9:14 am

You have done a great service listing the Blackrock’s bankers Sandbox.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  bonbon
November 5, 2019 5:36 am

funny how when the bitcoins arent bank owned theyre baaad
when a bank or govt decides theyre perfect for total track/tax/control
theyre suddenly so good?

thats why zuckie wanted to get into it..more power/control
its why we should ALL refuse to accept the paywave cashless meme and use cash and NOT visible transactions to buy what we use
the young sheeple might think its good
wiser heads hopefully realise its not.

bonbon
Reply to  ozspeaksup
November 5, 2019 6:22 am

Carney is stealing Zuck’s Bucks – A Synthetic Hegemonic Currency, SHC to replace the Dollar. And it sure looks like BlackRock is in on the game. Green direct financing outside any gov’t involvement.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  ozspeaksup
November 5, 2019 6:58 am

Yup.

The war on cash is biting me, but I’ll resist it as long as I can. My bank keeps telling me it’s ‘helping’ me by monitoring and analysing my payments. No asking, just doing it without my consent. It then keeps offering to ‘connect’ any other accounts I might have to ‘help’ me more.

The law is no cash transactions ovee $9,999. In Europe it’s over €999. They want to track everything you do. If people can’t see that, they are dumb.

John Endicott
Reply to  bonbon
November 5, 2019 6:15 am

Um, bonbon, that link does say anything like what you describe. care to quote from that link where it says anything about Jackson Hole, anything about taking control of the entire world, anything about central bankers being on the board of Blackrock, anything about central bankers taking control of all spending, world-wide, ending the reign of nation states?

John Endicott
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 6:59 am

that link does not say…

where’s the edit button why you want it?

Phil R
Reply to  bonbon
November 5, 2019 8:48 am

Bonbon,

From your article:

During his speech at the Arthur Burns Memorial Lecture, (Berlin 22 September 2016) Carney said:

” Green finance is a major opportunity. By ensuring that capital flows finance long-term projects in countries where growth is most carbon intensive, financial stability can be promoted. By absorbing excess global saving, equilibrium interest rates can be raised and macroeconomic stability enhanced.”

The part that I don’t understand but that really scares me is the phrase, “By absorbing excess global saving…

bonbon
Reply to  Phil R
November 5, 2019 9:17 am

Carney’s gambit began in 2015, well before Greta. What he said in Aug 2019, shows the full script. It is nothing less than “regime change”, and this time the USA is to get a taste of it, as if the attempted coup against duly elected President Trump wasn’t enough!

bonbon
Reply to  Phil R
November 5, 2019 11:40 am

“excess…” is obviously a reference in 2016 to legendary German savings, a theme of French President Macron’s campaign, rightly roundly rebutted by Berlin.
That looting gambit is now replaced with monetary “regime change”, radical beyond even the wildest nightmares of Extinction Rebellion.

griff
November 5, 2019 4:50 am

Blackrock is also a major investment in green/renewable companies, because many of their clients want that (and there’s a good return).

They already announced they want to be a leader in sustainable investment
https://www.ft.com/content/f66b2a9e-d53d-11e8-a854-33d6f82e62f8

This sums up the BlackRock world view nicely
https://www.greenbiz.com/article/why-larry-fink-isnt-waiting-washington

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 8:36 am

David
I think that your reference to “green schist” is wasted on the likes of griff.

John Endicott
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
November 5, 2019 8:56 am

Clyde, sadly, it’s not just terms like “green schist”, but rather mostly all rational posts in general are wasted on the likes of him.

icisil
Reply to  griff
November 5, 2019 6:30 am

They want to be where any money is. Remove the subsidies for renewables and the money disappears. It’s an entirely artificial economy driven by government fiat.

icisil
November 5, 2019 6:13 am

Kinda dumb… but considering the abysmal stupidity of people who want to get rid of the very thing that under-girds their privileged lives of ease (fossil fuels)…

A libtard, a greentard and a climatard were walking down the road.

Libtard: “Stop diverse persons! That looks like a pile of dog sh!t.”
Greentard [bends down, sniffs]: “Yep, it smells like dog sh!t.”
Climatard [bends down, licks]: “And it tastes like dog sh!t. I’m sure glad we didn’t step in it!”

James Snook
November 5, 2019 6:18 am

This highlights the total ignorance of ‘climate protestors’ around the world of how essential wealth is generated. Wealth that allows them to be housed, fed, kept warm and healthy, educated and then have the luxury of being able to stamp their little feet and shout total nonsense.

Just like the morons that have forced a moratorium on fracking in the U.K. They don’t understand that our shale gas deposits represent a vast store of national wealth that needs to be realised. The economic impact of this will be massive as it will enable all gas imports to be substituted. This includes shale gas for chemical stock imported from the USA. Sorry guys🤡.

Sara
November 5, 2019 6:29 am

How many of those alleged protesters walked to that protest site? I’d guess none of them. IT would take too long and they might get wet or cold.

You want investments in sustainable stuff? How about agriculture? That’s been going on for at least the past 12,000 years, probably longer, depending on where you find tools for it. How about domesticating livestock? That’s been going on for millennia also.

I can come up with more of that kind of thing, if someone can’t get the drift.

Robert W Turner
November 5, 2019 7:13 am

What they need to do is actually teach the writings of Adam Smith and Karl Marx in schools.

These ignoramuses might learn that Marx was the biggest intellectual fraud of the 19th century, that he was a nasty degenerate, had narcissistic personality disorder, and had buffoonish ideas about political economy despite fancying himself as a scientist. Smith on the other hand, very objectively dry but concise and thorough, and clearly discusses how free market Capitalism involves individual liberties and freedom.

bonbon
Reply to  David Middleton
November 5, 2019 8:22 am

Chile, the one country where Milton Friedman’s “theories” were put in place by the fascist Pinochet, is in uproar right now.
Pres. Pinera hat to cancel poor Greta’s COP conference because of the brilliant “success” of Friedman’s Chicago Boys policies.
Friedman was the one who urged Nixon to impose a money-crunch in 1969, which threw the economy into recession, and ultimately set the conditions for taking the dollar off gold in 1971.
Under the Reagan Administration, Friedman accepted a position on the Economic Policy Advisory Board, and vigorously pushed his agenda of reducing the Federal government’s involvement in the economy, in a classic Adam Smith fashion.

John Endicott
Reply to  bonbon
November 5, 2019 8:46 am

Pinochet hasn’t been president of Chile for about 30 years, and has been dead for about half of those. it’s current political upheaval has little to do with Pinochet.

bonbon
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 8:55 am

Tell that to Pinera, or the rioters. The damage the Chicago Boys did is monumental.
Interestingly enough the only one to invite fascist Pinochet to Tea, was Maggie Thatcher.
The riots in Chile may have little to do with that cup of tea….

bonbon
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 9:13 am

Odd logic that, what?
Same for Adam Smith, or Friedman…..

John Endicott
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 10:23 am

Tell that to Pinera, or the rioters

I don’t need to, they already know well enough. Way better than you do.

bonbon
Reply to  John Endicott
November 5, 2019 11:47 am

To know the Chicago Boys policies, either be crucified by them, or bone up on the rabidly fascist economics of Mont Pelerin Society Milton Friedman before a government dictates them.

The Chicago Boys of Friedman’s spoor, are fundamentally opposed to the US Constitution General Welfare Clause, unique worldwide.
It is an enduring shame to hear Americans promote their own undoing!

bonbon
Reply to  bonbon
November 6, 2019 12:11 am

There we have it – Friedman’s disdain for the founding principle of the USA shows up in Pinochet’s actions.

National Review Editor, William F. Buckley, Jr., well known for his own fascist sympathies, who, when asked about Friedman’s ideas in 1971, said, “It is possible that Milton Friedman’s policies suffer from the overriding disqualification that the imply cannot get a sufficient exercise in democratic situations.” Translation: You need a dictatorship to implement the drastic cuts in consumption and living standards that Friedman’s policies call for.

John Endicott
Reply to  bonbon
November 6, 2019 4:51 am

David, I’m shocked, shocked to find that fake news propaganda is being quoted by bonbon.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Robert W Turner
November 5, 2019 8:40 am

Robert
Your description of Marx comes very close to a description of certain climate alarmist.

November 5, 2019 7:20 am

David
Good review.
However, the time to have “divested” oil stocks was on their peak in 2014. Crude’s high was 147 in 2008 and the next rally reached around 107 in 2014.
With this, oil stocks made a much higher high than in 2008.
One of the writers at MacLeans Mag was bold and wrote up my research.

https://www.macleans.ca/economy/economicanalysis/why-the-price-of-oil-may=be-about-to-tank/

The main point was that base metal miners in 1910 learned how to mine low-grade copper. That was at Bingham Canyon, Utah. And it is still operating.
The next was in Nevada when miners figured how to mine low-grade gold deposits.
And then petroleum engineers created a revolution in discovery and production.

Ron Long
Reply to  Bob Hoye
November 5, 2019 10:27 am

Bob, your last paragraph is fracking right on and is a tribute to American Ingenuity.

Tom Abbott
November 5, 2019 7:41 am

From the article: “There are people who are profiting right now off of this climate disaster.”

What climate disaster? Delusional. Seeing things that are not there.

PaulH
Reply to  Tom Abbott
November 5, 2019 9:52 am

There is no climate disaster, but the Green Blob receives plenty of profit from the approximately $1Trillion to $2Trillion being flushed every year into the phony climate emergency. Many, many political and professional careers would not exist if it weren’t for CAGW.

Petit_Barde
November 5, 2019 9:23 am

On the black T-shirt of the lady (first picture) clearly suffering a nervous breakdown : “Climate change kills.” …

– didn’t know that a statistical distribution could kill someone,
– must kill probably a lot less than stupidity.

Coeur de Lion
November 5, 2019 9:38 am

When disinvestment comes up, I’m bound to mention the lunatic policy of the Synod of the Church of England which damages their pension funds. They believe in the IPCC’s SR1.5 travesty and are dead against providing electricity for the poor of the world. I thought that might be a form of racism, but then the Archbishop of York is black so it can’t be that. It must just be the stupidity that burns,

KcTaz
November 5, 2019 11:02 am

Coeur de Lion,

Humans have been ripping off people of the sames race as themselves since time immemorial. African nations are mostly of the same race but having been warring against each other for thousands of years.

“The time is long overdue to stop looking for progress through racial or ethnic leaders. Such leaders have too many incentives to promote polarizing attitudes and actions that are counterproductive for minorities and disastrous for the country.” 
Thomas Sowell
It is even easier it is to do that to ones own race when you don’t even live in the nations whom you are destroying with your ideology.

Taphonomic
November 5, 2019 1:13 pm

“The problem is not the weather, the problem is capitalism”

Try again. The capitalist USA has reduced CO2 emissions. Communist China has massively increased CO2 emissions, is the worlds largest emitter, and continues to increase emissions.

Stevek
November 5, 2019 2:06 pm

If blackrock and vanguard divest all oil shares that will drive down price of the stocks and other investors will simply swoop in to buy the stocks at a bargain.

November 5, 2019 2:28 pm

Because a person has a bit of paper saying that they passed a exam does not
mean that they are automatically intelligent.

It simply means that they knew the answers to the questions asked at that time.

MJE VK5ELL

thingadonta
November 5, 2019 2:30 pm

I like the references to Animal House.

Don’t forget Sigourney Weaver in Galaxy Quest: “It’s stupid, but I’m gonnna do it.”

And Argo” You want to come to Hollywood, act like a bigshot but never really do anything?…You’ll fit right in.”

Olen
November 6, 2019 7:59 am

There is humor in this. The demonstrators would have them destroy profits when their business is investing in profits. The purpose of business is to make money. The best way to do that is through free enterprise that benefits the individual. People are greedy with self interest and that is best expressed in the book by Ayn Rand and the movie the Fountainhead with Gary Cooper giving the speech in court of the interest of the individual. My only objection is the use of fossil fuels and lumping coal, oil and gas in that category. There is also the theory that oil is produced naturally in the ground. Dead plants and animals are mostly consumed on the surface as California is now experiencing. Excellent article and comments.

Johann Wundersamer
November 17, 2019 7:28 am

“Figure 1. Can you say “greentards”?”

After greentarding who’s able to formulate intelligible expressions.

https://www.google.com/search?q=tar+and+feather&oq=tar+and+feather&aqs=chrome.

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