Geography is hard

My local alternate weekly in Chico has a “Green Guide”. This week’s lead story was “Scientists break ice in Greenland”. There’s only one problem.

They included a picture of Antarctica with the story.

While also an island of ice like Greenland, there’s extra points deducted for juxtaposing Antarctica with the word “Arctic” in the story.

I find it all hemispherically hilarious. I know geography is hard, but please, do try harder. Google Earth is always helpful at finding those pesky out of the way places you’ve never visited.

UPDATE: To be fair and thorough, I decided to swim upstream into the news feed current to their cited source the “Environmental News Network” to see what map they provided, just in case the map error originated there. ENN had it right and showed Greenland, though they did mention Antarctica in the first sentence talking about the two largest ice sheets on Earth.

source: http://www.enn.com/sci-tech/article/41614

UPDATE2:

About 18 hours after I first published this, the Chico News and Review took out the picture of Antarctica from the online edition, though it remains of course in the print edition.

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81 thoughts on “Geography is hard

  1. They do, at least, admit that the Earth’s temperatures were higher during the Eemian interglacial, than they are today. This is something most warmist deny on a daily basis.

  2. Am very glad for my keyboard I wasn’t drinking coffee when the picture showed.
    Poor things, must be a terrible pressure to get word-inches each week.

  3. What a bunch of dummies. Everybody knows that south is supposed to be at the bottom of the map.

  4. I’ll give them points for being on the correct planet.
    Wait up! I’d better go back and re-read the article. That could be wrong. too. Better make sure they weren’t referring to the Martian poles.

  5. Another teensy little problem — Antarctica is a continent (at least under most continent models). The island of Greenland is a tad smaller …

  6. Well… it’s sorta close… just th’ other end of the globe is all… Geez. Picky, picky:-)

  7. The Eemian interglacial period was only 2 to 3 F warmer than now? It would have taken at least decades for Greenland to lose its ice at that temperature level. — John M Reynolds

  8. Picky, picky, picky.
    You sound that the sort of guy that would also expect that official temp measurements be made in a sound, repeatable, accurate method.
    You need to lower your expectations.

  9. Interesting to observe that they actually found ice from a period when it was 2 to 3 degrees warmer than today. Shouldn’t it all have melted?

  10. You’re such a stickler for detail. Anthony. One bunch of ice crystals looks much like another.

  11. I’m astounded they came up with an “astoundingly large ice core” I would have expected the width to be set by their coring equipment and the length to be pretty well estimated by gravitational studies.
    Quite the astoundingly amusing article.

  12. Y’know, when you spend all your time with models, you get a little out of touch with the real world.

  13. Did they find any evidence of the SUV’s people were driving back then to cause all that warming?

  14. Flash news: Journalism hits rock bottom.
    This is to be expected when reporters write stories about subjects they have no knowledge of and places few have ever been.
    Perfect for alarmism. Who’s going to know? Geography isn’t taught much any more.

  15. Mike McMillan says:
    August 18, 2010 at 2:53 am
    What a bunch of dummies. Everybody knows that south is supposed to be at the bottom of the map.

    Some Australian maps have south at the top of the map.

  16. Mike McMillan says:
    August 18, 2010 at 2:53 am
    What a bunch of dummies. Everybody knows that south is supposed to be at the bottom of the map.
    ———————————
    We in the southern hemisphere are grossly insulted by such levity’s with the true orientation of our planet!
    Everybody knows that the south is at the top of the map and here is the evidence to prove it!
    http://pds2.egloos.com/pds/1/200608/30/46/c0022246_18341475.jpg
    http://www.thesavvytraveller.com/agraphics/world_views/maps/odt/upside_down_475h.jpg

  17. I think that ice core must be a lot more than 1.58 miles long if it was drilled from the island shown in the picture. Although how the ice survived the “millions of degrees” centigrade core of the earth I don’t know. Even Al Gore would have been right to think that the earth’s core would have melted it a bit.
    /sarc off. Tongue out of cheek.
    Whose tongue and whose cheek I would rather not say 😉

  18. 1.58 miles, huh. It’s going to need to get really, really warm in a hurry if that much ice is going to melt in the next few years. Hmmm.

  19. ” DoctorJJ says: August 18, 2010 at 5:12 am
    Did they find any evidence of the SUV’s people were driving back then to cause all that warming?”

    The God’s chariots must have burned a lot of oil-based fuel. If one believes the Summarian tablets and Zacharia Stitchin’s accounts of ancient “Gods” coming in fiery chariots from the skies.

  20. It reminds me of my problems. I need to lower my expections a lot so they have a chance at meeting them.
    Is it possible with the weight of 1.58 miles of ice that they (greenie weenies) believe the weight may tip the island if it doesn’t melt?

  21. I hope the ship/helicopter pick-up crew didn’t go to the wrong place. You can tell he’s a new reporter and hasn’t been told that today’s temps are at unprecedented highs. I guess we skeptics have to take what we can get in the straight goods about climate science. He’ll get a shot of Greenland in a follow-up article on Antarctica.

  22. Given the way they are calibrating the isotope data from Greenland, they will find it was 5C to 6C warmer in Greenland during the Eemian interglacial. (Technically, they might find it far warmer than that because a large amount of the glacier melted (it would be difficult for that amount of ice to melt if Richard Alley’s -30C to -55C temperature estimate for the Greenland summit during the past 100,000 years is correct – let’s go back to the relatively long interglacial 450,000 years ago and the southern third of Greenland was semi-forested .
    CO2 levels? 270 ppm to 280 ppm in both periods so it wasn’t caused by CO2.

  23. This new (never before seen) image of Greenland will probably end up in the new IPCC reports. Someone better tell Steve McIntyre.

  24. Actually, when you’re on the ground (or even 5 miles up) it does look the same. Picky! Picky! Picky!
    Let it be! Let it be!
    Oooooooooooooooooooooooh!
    Oooooooooooooooooooooooh!
    Oooooooooooooooo0ooooooh!
    Let it be!

  25. So typical.
    An Inconvenient Truth featured (on movie posters/etc) a clockwise flow into a ‘menacing’ cyclone–which only occurs in the Southern Hemisphere–where vastly fewer people would be affected by AGW/growth in cyclone intensity. These people never let the truth get in the way of a good story, and all too often are woefully ignorant of geography, history, meteorology, etc.

  26. Oldshedite says: “Life’s especially hard if your a woolly mammoth with nowhere to go…”: “Woolly mammoth killed off by climate change”
    Yeah, but the Telegraph also said the mammoths caused that climate change in the first place, so it’s only fair!
    “Mammoths contributed to global warming with methane emissions”
    http://tinyurl.com/27ksynj

  27. “…when the Earth’s temperatures were two to three degrees Fahrenheit warmer than today…”
    Wow! I thought the CAGW brigade thought today’s warming was ‘unprecedented’ – now who’s a fool!

  28. At least there were no pictures of cute and cuddly polar bears adrift on the floe. The science is advancing in some respects. We should be grateful for this small step at least.

  29. This is typical of their facts being wrong. But that does not matter as long as they have good intentions. The fact that the greens ideas have cost billions in tax dollars and bad research and investments and laws should be of no concern to anyone in a coma.

  30. From: Bill Tuttle on August 18, 2010 at 4:21 am
    (emphasis added)

    Both “Antarctica” and “Greenland” contain three vowels? Check.

    Wait a minute…

  31. Nah, I think Bill wins. Did anyone actually COUNT the vowels??
    #
    #
    Bill Tuttle says:
    August 18, 2010 at 4:21 am
    Both islands? Check.
    Both ice-covered? Check.
    Both “Antarctica” and “Greenland” contain three vowels? Check.
    Close enough. Run with it…

  32. ROM: August 18, 2010 at 5:27 am
    Everybody knows that the south is at the top of the map and here is the evidence to prove it!
    Aha — another fan of The Heterodyne Boys And The Dash To The East Pole

  33. JP: August 18, 2010 at 5:24 am
    Some Australian maps have south at the top of the map.
    Conflicted much?
    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McsWKczU6wc&fs=1&hl=en_US]

  34. @kadaka (KD Knoebel):
    Are you suggesting that “Antarctica” does not contain three vowels?
    Clearly, it does. It contains three instances of “a”, which is a vowel. That its total vowel content is four does not make it somehow not contain three vowels. In fact, it demands it. For the statement “the word ‘Antarctica’ contains three vowels”
    to be false, “Antarctica” would have to contain two or fewer vowels.

  35. Wow! That must be REALLY rotten ice at the bottom….
    And a question: as most of Greenland is NOT in the “Arctic” and they are not drilling in “Arctic ice”, they’re @ 77.45°N 51.06°W – 200 miles NE of Baffin Bay – a LONG way away from… and as “Arctic” ice is NOT on land, how would studying a Greenland ice core, created mostly by snow fall, tell us anything about Arctic ice, created mostly by water freezing? Hey, I’m just asking….
    And Anthony, if you’re thinking about posting more weather/climate gaffes/idiocy from the Sacramento News & Review, (and I’m not saying it’s a bad idea) you better start a new blog site because that is going to take up a lot of space and time.

  36. uppyn says: August 18, 2010 at 4:09 am
    Interesting to observe that they actually found ice from a period when it was 2 to 3 degrees warmer than today. Shouldn’t it all have melted?

    Do I have to explain everything?
    It did, but we had an ice age in between then and now, and it refroze.
    Sheesh.
    JP at 5:24 am , ROM at 5:27 am
    Guys, when reading those maps in Australia, south is still at the bottom.
    Here’s the true map of Texas – http://bigthink.com/ideas/21224
    It correctly shows that El Paso, Texas is closer to San Diego, California than it is to Beaumont, Texas.
    Regards,
    Mike in Houston, webmaster for Melbourne
    http://www.aussiecon4.org.au/

  37. “The NEEM team is composed of more than 300 ice-core scientists from 14 nations.”
    Wow, I seriously doubt the world needs 300 ice core scientists from 14 nations wasting taxpayers $$$ on this study in greenland. You would think at least one of them would have been able to distinguish Antarctica from Greenland.

  38. jcl says: August 18, 2010 at 7:35 am
    . . . Both “Antarctica” and “Greenland” contain three vowels? Check.

    a, i, and e.
    That’s three.

  39. Homer says:
    Lisa, Vampires are make-believe, like elves, gremlins, and eskimos. ( and Greenland!)

  40. #
    #
    Steve in SC says:
    August 18, 2010 at 5:59 am
    Probably one of the 57 states…..
    _________________________________________–
    Obama was talking about the 57 NATION states in the new world of Global Governance.
    He just got his teleprompter notes mixed up. Those notes were for AFTER he and his buddies, Al Gore and Maurice Strong rearrange the world into a one world government.
    (I hope this is sarcasm….)

  41. To quote MW 2010, “We assume that the data selection, collection, and
    processing performed by climate scientists meets the standards of their discipline.”
    QED

  42. You’ve got to remember that these are just simple journalists. These are people of the land. The common clay of the new West. You know…
    Seriously, the guy who wrote the article is probably NOT the same guy who selected the picture. Different department.

  43. Here it comes the guy who will root up weeds…
    “As I watched in sorrow, there suddenly appeared
    A figure gray and ghostly beneath a flowing beard
    In times of deepest darkness, I’ve seen him dressed in black
    Now my tapestry’s unraveling, he’s come to take me back
    He’s come to take me back”
    Carole King “Tapestry”
    Phil Jones said, regarding peer review:
    I can’t see either of these papers being in the next IPCC report. Kevin [Trenberth] and I will keep them out somehow—even if we have to redefine what the peer-review literature is!

    Despite being caught suppressing data, Jones’ dishonesty is not abated one jot. After stepping down from his position at CRU, he went to Nature magazine and said this:
    I don’t think we should be taking much notice of what’s on blogs because they seem to be hijacking the peer-review process.
    Yes, Phil, it is blogs that are the problem. If you get caught with your pants down, point to the other guy and tug at his trousers.
    Now, Nature also publishes many physics papers, acting as a mouthpiece for the standard model, so my analogy between climate science and physics is not a long reach
    http://milesmathis.com/phycor.html

  44. I suspect the hand of a geographically knowledgeable editor who needed to fill some white space. Antarctica is much bigger than Greenland so a picture of Antarctica will fill up much more of that white space than a picture of Greenland, and the type of people who would notice the difference are not the CN&R’s main audience.

  45. The answer is always to spend more on public education, no matter what you see here.
    CALIFORNIA
    $7,511 per student, plus 44% unreported spending** by state gov’ts = @10,000 per student
    **Source: “To document the phenomenon, this paper reviews district budgets and state records for the nation’s five largest metro areas and the District of Columbia. It reveals that, on average, per-pupil spending in these areas is 44 percent higher than officially reported.” Cato Institute

  46. Remember these are the people that were brought up with the meme that everyone gets the same prize in a contest so no one’s self esteem is hurt.

  47. Most in the media should steer away from reporting on climare-related issues and stick to things they understand like Lady Gaga and Lindsey Lohan…

  48. Re: My local alternate weekly in Chico has a “Green Guide”.
    “Alternate weekly”, does that mean it is the alternative to intelligent, alternative to educated, or alternative to serious journalism?
    Scratch that last bit, when it comes to “serious journalism” CN&R is second only to the defunct Chico Beat.

  49. David: August 18, 2010 at 12:08 pm
    Scratch that last bit, when it comes to “serious journalism” CN&R is second only to the defunct Chico Beat.
    Is second best better than a first worst?

  50. Oldshedite says:
    August 18, 2010 at 2:30 am
    Life’s especially hard if your a woolly mammoth with nowhere to go…
    “Woolly mammoth killed off by climate change”
    I’d love to know how the mammoths survived the onset of all those interglacials previous to the present one.???

  51. “They do, at least, admit that the Earth’s temperatures were higher during the Eemian interglacial, than they are today. This is something most warmist deny on a daily basis.”
    Who has denied this? Name names, give links, please.

  52. “Who has denied this? Name names, give links, please.”

    Michael Mann and the ‘Hockey team’ and their acolytes in the media who claim modern temperatures are, quote: “unprecedented!”

  53. If current climate change is anthropogenic and we are sending ourselves to hell in a hand-basket, studying the Eemian period ice cores is hardly going to be …useful for predictions of future climate.”

  54. John Trigge: August 18, 2010 at 3:03 pm
    If current climate change is anthropogenic and we are sending ourselves to hell in a hand-basket, studying the Eemian period ice cores is hardly going to be …useful for predictions of future climate.”
    And if it isn’t, you’ll have wasted a perfectly good hand-wringing.
    You don’t study ice cores to predict the future — you study them to understand the past.

  55. The NEEM Project is seen by the msm as a way to imagine life in a warmer world, which presumably will be our fate if we fail to adopt the ‘precautionary principle’.
    I guarantee in six months, when the first studies start coming out, all the chatter will be focussed on abrupt climate change at the end of the Eemian and the causation.

  56. I don’t think we have to worry about journalists who can’t spot the difference. This is a really big ice core and I for one look forward to what it may tell us, providing it isn’t passed through the AGW filter first.

  57. Bill Tuttle says: ‘You don’t study ice cores to predict the future — you study them to understand the past.’
    That’s true, but on the other hand they will find the natural variability triggers at the end of an interglacial. Very exciting times going forward.

  58. The ENN article links through to the NEEM website at the Danish Ice and Climate Research Institute.
    There’s probably a counterfeit picture there of a section of ice cored from “the last meters” above bedrock. It’s probably counterfeit because such ice would likely contain gasses under such extreme pressure they would explode at normal atmospheric pressure. The caption under one of the pictures of the ice core section proclaims “there are rocks and stuff” in ice within 2 meters of bedrock. The ice core section is completely clear and colored a sort of dullish blue grey.
    Extreme northwest Greenland has ice-free surfaces, that’s why Thule Air Base was built there. In some places the snow doesn’t fall enough to replace the melt and there’s exposed ground. Thule is located next to one of the few places where the Greenland icecap can be approached and ascended by land. It’s quite a feat to drill through 2.5 km of ice, but it’s not unprecedented at all and has been done all over Greenland by various groups since the 1950s or so. Some old cores are still housed in ice caves near Thule or Pissifuk.
    The slant of the original article was specifically toward finding ancient life at the border between ice and bedrock. With the project name of NEEM I think it’s a fair conclusion that they will find what they are looking for: nematodes and ancient neem trees.

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