Redoubt volcano erupts again

From the Alaska Volcano Observatory:

The significant explosive event at 06:00 AKDT has ended. Continuing seismic activity and web camera images indicate that low level emissions of steam, gas, and some volcanic ash are continuing to be emitted at the volcano at altitudes of < 20,000′.

Ashfall resulting from the 06:00 AKDT event has been reported in Homer, Anchor Point, and Seldovia.

The Mt. Redoubt alert level is currently WARNING and aviation color code is RED.

WUWT reader Paul offers this time lapse of weather radar showing the eruption

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39 thoughts on “Redoubt volcano erupts again

  1. Has anyone seen a representation of high altitude SO2 concentrations since Redoubt started this eruption series? I have not been able to find any real time images.
    I know we had an anecdotal mention of airline passengers smelling strong sulfur odor during flights in the vicinity.
    I am just wondering if there is a real time satellite graphic out there somewhere that shows stratospheric SO2 concentrations in that area.
    Some pubs on SO2 and volcanic emissions:
    http://so2.umbc.edu/omi/pdfs/prata_acp-7-5093-2007.pdf
    http://www.oma.be/BIRA-IASB/Molecules/SO2archive/cases/kasatochi.php
    This site has some SO2 monitoring info but not for Redoubt.
    http://www.globvolcano.org/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=38
    Larry

  2. I expect that the AGW faithful are getting ready for this, so let’s beat ’em to the punch.
    The eruption of Redoubt will not be masking the warming; it will be adding to the ongoing cooling that’s developed over the past half decade or so. If it spews out enough matter into the stratosphere, it sould make for an interestingly cool NH summer.

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  5. So, with all this Volcanism, lower sunspots, Cool phase of the PDO, etc, etc, etc, for someone with a very real economic interest in the weather, does it seem like a pretty safe bet for way cooler this growing season? How’s about NA precip?

  6. As if it wasn’t cold enough in Alaska and the Canadian North this winter, have some volcanic ash to rub into your tundra.
    So which chicken comes before the egg, Deep Solar Minimum or Extra Volcanoes?

  7. The cold for next winter is looking like a given.
    The precip alteration is another story.
    The Laurentide Ice Sheet deflected the Pacific storms to make the Southwest a woodlands.

  8. Not to put the brakes on the SSN-Volcano conjecture, but how much better have we gotten at reporting volcanic activity over the previous minimums?

  9. How much CO2 does each of these eruptions emmit? (On average), and how does this compare with human emmisions?

  10. From reading many of the contributions to this site, and from the wider internet it seems that volcanic activity is seen as a minor contributor to any warming and a major contributor to cooling.
    I have as yet not seen any mention of the reservoir of heat contained within the earth’s interior as having any effect (except through volcanos and the possible use of geothermal energy to reduce carbon emissions due to power generation). Given that there is in effect a fluid layer between the surface and the core, and that there are gravitational effects on it from sun and moon and substatial frictional effects, then it can’t be treated as a constant. I understand that the differential rotation of core and crust is responsible for the earths magnetic field, which changes over time, so wouldn’t it be reasonable to assume similar variations in the other energy (heat) generated and a consequential impact on measured (and modelled) global temperatures?
    Perhaps one of the better informed guys or gals out there can help me out in this.

  11. Re Llanfar (21:58:57) :
    I’d say that our record of volcanic eruptions is even worse than that of temperature.
    A volcano strutting its stuff in the depths of the Andes or the chill wastes of Alaska wouldn’t exactly make the front page of The Times back in 1800.

  12. Peter Plail (01:01:32) : I have as yet not seen any mention of the reservoir of heat contained within the earth’s interior as having any effect (except through volcanos [etc…]
    Perhaps one of the better informed guys or gals out there can help me out in this.

    I’d echo that request. I’ve heard mines can be warm when they are really really deep. I know the earth’s heat conductivity is low but it’s not quite zero is is?

  13. hotrod (10:37:04) :
    Has anyone seen a representation of high altitude SO2 concentrations since Redoubt started this eruption series? I have not been able to find any real time images.
    – Spaceweather.com now has updated information to include this latest eruption along with a world map showing SO2 distribution. It looks like the Chilean volcano is adding a significant SO2 punch as well.
    http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2009/04apr09/gome2_so2_04apr09.gif?PHPSESSID=norbo6jbln7bjpn7reh0qqlam4

  14. I can’t find an e-mail address for you Anthony. So hope you read this.
    But did your hear that last night Sat Apr 4th the British TV channel 4 showed the dreadful Al Gore film ” An Inconvenient Truth” after most, if not all of it, has been shown to be false.

  15. Pofarmer (19:08:43) :
    So, with all this Volcanism, lower sunspots, Cool phase of the PDO, etc, etc, etc, for someone with a very real economic interest in the weather, does it seem like a pretty safe bet for way cooler this growing season? How’s about NA precip?

    Predictions vary with location. Research indicates a La Nina (mild at present) coupled with a cool PDO is associated with dry and hot conditions in SW USA and Central Great Plains (aka dust bowl), while the Northern tier states receive “normal to less than normal” precip with cooler temps (since there is disagreement as to what is normal, relatively speaking, cooler temps shall be defined as absolute summer max highs in the low 90’s). Other data indicates Australia and China will have poor (should that be poorer) wheat crops in the near future. Canadian wheat will suffer from cool temps as in late freezes. I’ve done considerable research into “climate change” mitagation for CBOT transactions, but here’s a good primer for you:
    http://www.geog.umn.edu/physgeog/kurt/research/reprints/Salzer%20and%20Kipfmueller_2005.pdf
    RECONSTRUCTED TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATIONON A MILLENNIAL TIMESCALE FROM TREE-RINGS IN THE SOUTHERN COLORADO PLATEAU, U.S.A.
    MATTHEW W. SALZER and KURT F. KIPFMUELLER1
    Abstract. Two independent calibrated and verified climate reconstructions from ecologically contrasting tree-ring sites in the southern Colorado Plateau, U.S.A. reveal decadal-scale climatic trends during the past two millennia. Combining precisely dated annual mean-maximum temperature and October through July precipitation reconstructions yields an unparalleled record of climatic variability. The approach allows for the identification of thirty extreme wet periods and thirty-five extreme dry periods in the 1,425-year precipitation reconstruction and 30 extreme cool periods and 26 extreme warm periods in 2,262-year temperature reconstruction. In addition, the reconstructions were integrated to identify intervals when conditions were extreme in both climatic variables (cool/dry, cool/wet, warm/dry, warm/wet). Noteworthy in the reconstructions are the post-1976 warm/wet period, unprecedented in the 1,425-year record both in amplitude and duration, anomalous and prolonged late 20th century warmth, that while never exceeded, was nearly equaled in magnitude for brief intervals in the past, and substantial decadal-scale variability within the Medieval Warm
    Period and Little Ice Age intervals.
    Obviously, this is my favorite since I live in KS but have holdings in NE. Apparently we are entering the cool-dry period, analogous to the 1920-1930s.
    Look at this summer’s weather patterns in the northern tier states but anticipate less precip. If you farm there, conditions indicate soybeans as you do not want to plant anything pre May 15 or so. However, there is a significant, unknown lag in affect, but current conditions here in ks appearto be nearing the “tipping point” :~P. As we enter deeper into the cycle, spring wheat would be recommended up north. I’m betting the farm (literally) that wheat will be a precious commodity in July 2010. But since I’m just an Agronomist and not a modeling climatologist, don’t take my word for it. Google:
    climate cycles warm-wet, warm-dry cool-dry cool-wet research. Happy reading.

  16. Re: Volcanic SO2, ask and ye shall receive… The AVO has posted the following SO2 scan from the Apr 04 burp in their redoubt images gallery (which maybe also says somebody there reads WUWT:):
    http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/avo/dbimages/display/1238900996_ak231.GIF
    “OMI satellite image showing extensive SO2 cloud (the red ribbon-like feature) from the April 4, 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. SO2 cloud is truncated on the right side at the edge of the satellite orbit.”
    Gallery: http://tinyurl.com/c3wgzj

  17. For those who were interested in the radar scan I’ve put up a better video then the first rushed attempt. There were some missing frames from the first one and I’ve worked the scans a bit for better clarity, added a bit of “hollywood” (hey, works for Al, doesn’t it?)
    http://tinyurl.com/cdvn7r

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