New WUWT Oceanic Oscillation Page – With Link Tutorial

Introducing WUWT’s newest addition, the Oceanic Oscillation Page, which includes graphs and graphics,on Oceanic Oscillations including the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), El Niño/La Niña and the Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation (AMO). It was a struggle to find content for this page, particularly the Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation (AMO), so if you have any suggested additional content for the page, please note them in comments below.

Also, there have been a number of requests submitted for tutorials to help provide background on the information contained within the reference pages. As a starting point there are now Link Tutorials at the bottom of the Oceanic Oscillation Page and the Atmospheric Oscillation Page. Please take a look at the Link Tutorial and provide any thoughts, recommendations, additions and corrections in comments below.

If you have not had the opportunity to review the other WUWT Reference Pages it is highly recommended:

Please note that WUWT cannot vouch for the accuracy of the data within the reference pages, as WUWT is simply an aggregator. All of the data is linked from third party sources. If you doubt the accuracy of any of the graphs on the WUWT Reference Pages, please note it in comments and try to leverage the extensive Source Guides at the bottom of the Reference Pages to identify the associated source data.

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17 Responses to New WUWT Oceanic Oscillation Page – With Link Tutorial

  1. Matthew W says:

    Without a doubt this is the most comprehensive website about the SCIENCE of climate !!
    Thanks Anthony !!

  2. FrankK says:

    The “Global Climate History” says “Not Found”

  3. FrankK says: May 30, 2011 at 11:17 am

    The “Global Climate History” says “Not Found”

    Link fixed, thank you.

  4. phlogiston says:

    This is an excellent resource – all these data pages on hand at WUWT will help immensely during scientific debates, finding supportive data wont require so much net trawling.

  5. FrankK says:

    In the Atmospheric page and the troposphere graphs is there a site where the actual values are available? While an overall trend line is of interest, looking at the last 10 years would suggest that the temp is either steady or declining.

    Thanks for this comprehensive compilation.

  6. FrankK says: May 30, 2011 at 11:43 am

    In the Atmospheric page and the troposphere graphs is there a site where the actual values are available?

    Yes, the overall FTP folder for the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) is here;
    ftp://ftp.ssmi.com/msu/

    the source data is in this folder;
    ftp://ftp.ssmi.com/msu/monthly_time_series/

    and I believe this is the data set that you are looking for:
    ftp://ftp.ssmi.com/msu/monthly_time_series/rss_monthly_msu_amsu_channel_tlt_anomalies_land_and_ocean_v03_3.txt

  7. Robert says:

    Why are you not showing the Trenberth version of the AMO or the standard one either? Using Humlum’s site maybe easier but the other versions are just as easy to find. Having known Ole, he’s a smart guy but he’s no expert on the AMO, best to go to NOAA and other organizations for the data.

  8. SBVOR says:

    Anthony,

    I suspect you’re aware of this already. But, the following NOAA page is full of AMO data:
    http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/timeseries/AMO/

    Also, there is an “interesting” correlation between AMO cycles and climate hysteria cycles:
    http://sbvor.blogspot.com/2010/12/how-amo-killed-cagw-cult.html

  9. Robert says: May 30, 2011 at 1:38 pm

    Why are you not showing the Trenberth version of the AMO or the standard one either? … but the other versions are just as easy to find.

    Post links to any current data sources and they will be considered.

  10. SBVOR says: May 30, 2011 at 1:55 pm (Edit)

    I suspect you’re aware of this already. But, the following NOAA page is full of AMO data:
    http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/timeseries/AMO/

    Yes, unfortunately it’s data only, i.e. no associated graphs were found. I’ve added the link you suggested under “National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL)” in the Source Guide on the Oceanic Oscillation page.

  11. TrueNorthist says:

    Thanks JTF. This is yet another great addition. These resource pages are invaluable for refuting hyperbole with facts.

    Cheers!

  12. Geoff Sharp says:

    The OOPC website provides another resource that could be added to the WUWT reference pages. There is AMO and PDO data and graphs along with many other references.

  13. R. de Haan says:

    Just beautiful. Thanks

  14. savethesharks says:

    Justthefacts and Anthony,

    Thank you for your efforts on this!

    Much appreciated.

    Chris
    Norfolk, VA, USA

  15. Geoff Sharp says: May 30, 2011 at 5:07 pm

    The OOPC website provides another resource that could be added to the WUWT reference pages. There is AMO and PDO data and graphs along with many other references.

    Good stuff, I will add content from OOPC to several of the reference pages. Thank you.

  16. vukcevic says:

    It was a struggle to find content for this page, particularly the Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation (AMO), so if you have any suggested additional content for the page, please note them in comments below.

    Here are outlined some additional details relating to the origin of the Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation (AMO).

  17. Gary Swift says:

    Suggestion:

    On the graph; Add a horizontal line at zero and a horizontal shaded area to represent ‘normal’ conditions to highlight the extreme episodes.

    Nice info. I have looked for that info many time, and it’s darn hard to find.

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