Australia Sees Coldest and Wettest Spring in Decades Amid Third La Niña in A Row

From the NoTricksZone

By P Gosselin

By Die kalte Sonne.
(Translated/edited by P. Gosselin)

2007 La Nina. Symbol image, from NASA. 

When it comes to German TV meteorologists, warm and dry weather is no longer good weather, but bad weather. At least that’s what often we read. Australia has at present very beautiful weather by this logic. ABC reports about an unusually cold season down under.

“The exceptionally cloudy conditions this spring kept maximum temperatures well down on recent years.

Melbourne, Adelaide and Canberra all shivered through maximums at least one degree below average and the lowest since 1992. Brisbane’s spring was the coldest in 12 years, and for Perth it was the coldest in six.

Sydney’s maximums were the lowest in four years but the mean temperatures, which includes the minimums, was the coldest since 2003 and the city failed to reach 30C for the first time in three decades.

Hobart was colder in 2021 and Darwin does not have a spring.

Even more unusual is some western suburbs of Sydney, including Penrith, failed to hit 30 degrees for the first time on record.

This spring was only the second time in a decade the mean maximum averaged across Australia was below the long-term average.

Of the 42 seasons since winter 2012, the only other season with colder than normal days was summer 2020-2021.”

The article does not name a changing climate as the cause, also known as climate heating because with such cooling, that would be a bit difficult, although it is also often argued that it is getting colder because it is getting warmer. It is the La Niña situation that is bringing Australia the humidity but also the cold. In 2010 there were also such temperatures and also then there was a strong La Niña.

What is unusual this time is that it is already the third La Niña in a row.

“In many ways this spring just followed the script and had no chance of being the often romanticised warm and sunny version depicted in fairy tales.

Throughout the past 20 years only one other spring has been colder than normal for maximums, and that was 2010 — also a year with a strong negative Indian Ocean Dipole and La Niña.

What was a surprise though was the abnormally cold November which eventuated after numerous pulses of polar air escaped from Antarctica and took a vacation on our shores.

The result was rare late spring snow as far north as Central West NSW and the coldest November on record for some towns, including Forbes and Ivanhoe, where maximums were more than five below average.”

We remind you once again that the U.S. Weather Bureau always makes its forecast regarding El Niño and La Niña only for a period of about 6 months. There is a reason for this: longer-term forecasts, such as those made by PIK in 2019, turn out to be wrong. Instead of an El Niño, a La Niña came. One has heard little about further forecast attempts since this misprediction. We reported on the failure at the time. Reliable forecasts would undoubtedly be important in order to be able to adjust to the conditions, but perhaps “science is settled” is not yet the last word in wisdom. Or to put it philosophically in the style of Plato: We know that we know nothing. The World Meteorological Organization cautiously assumes that we can expect La Niña conditions for the next few months.

  • “”The tropical Pacific has been in a La Niña state since September 2020 with a short break in June-August 2021; this La Niña situation is still continuing as of mid-November 2022, with La Niña event thresholds exceeded for both oceanic as well as atmospheric conditions.
  • Model predictions and expert assessment indicate that La Niña is very likely to continue, with about a 75% probability, during December-February 2022/2023. The chance of ENSO-neutral is about 25% and for El Niño is near-zero. For January-March 2023, the probability for La Niña decreases to about 60%.
  • Transition of the current La Niña to ENSO-neutral is favored during February-April 2023, with about a 55% chance of ENSO-neutral conditions in this period, increasing to about 70% during March-May.
  • The chance of El Niño developing is negligible until later in boreal spring, increasing to around 25% during May-July 2023.”
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Tom Halla
December 7, 2022 2:08 pm

Of course, the ENSO has nothing to do with it?
Anyone who paid attention to weather in California is well aware of the effects of an El Nino, but tying those to climate change does not seem easy.

Bryan A
Reply to  Tom Halla
December 7, 2022 2:17 pm

That’s because the engine that drives El Niño and La Niña doesn’t play with models
Models, We don’ need no steenkin models

n.n
Reply to  Bryan A
December 7, 2022 3:47 pm

Well, perhaps one. A working hypothesis. Emphasis on “working” as in functional.

rah
Reply to  n.n
December 11, 2022 1:29 am

How you gonna do that when the accuracy of weather models gets iffy more than 3 days out?

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Tom Halla
December 8, 2022 3:32 am

“but tying those to climate change does not seem easy.”

I would say impossible, given our current state of understanding.

Forrest Gardener
December 7, 2022 2:18 pm

“There’ll be bush-fires for sure, me man,
There will, without a doubt;
We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
“Before the year is out.”

Hivemind
Reply to  Forrest Gardener
December 7, 2022 4:48 pm

And later, when rain did come:

And every creek a banker ran,
And dams filled overtop;
“We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
“If this rain doesn’t stop.”

RickWill
December 7, 2022 2:24 pm

The BoM has a real challenge on its hands to keep a warming trend in the face of inevitable cooling in the Southern Hemisphere.

The BoM homogenisers will feel they are being left in the cold, literally, compared with their northern counterparts who will not even need to try to get a warming trend. Climate change is doing that for them.

Must be hard for M. Mann to reconcile what he sees around him now in this warming world:
https://www.news.com.au/national/fluffy-snow-covers-penn-states-main-campus/video/e6c41c04fd93db91aa617291be1e0c42

The Southern Hemisphere has just turned down from its recent highest average annual solar input of 357W/m^2 while the Northern Hemisphere has just started its long climb from its recent lowest average annual input of 349W/m^2. An 8W/m^2 difference that will be reverse in 23,000 years. NH has a lot of warming to come and a LOT more snow.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  RickWill
December 8, 2022 3:34 am

“The BoM homogenisers will feel they are being left in the cold, literally,”

That’s funny! I like it!

MarkH
December 7, 2022 2:32 pm

I’m sure that Tim Flannery is feeling quite embarrassed right now. I mean, surely he’s drafting up a contrite apology of his claims that it would never rain again (and if id did it wouldn’t be enough to fill the dams). Claims that were used by politicians to de-prioritize maintenance and improvement of flood mitigation infrastructure, which has now resulted in much destruction. I’m sure he must feel really bad about what he said, right?

Forrest Gardener
Reply to  MarkH
December 7, 2022 2:46 pm

Flannery? Embarrassed? Feeling really bad?

Doubt it. I’ve seen no sign of introspection whatsoever among doom mongers.

Last edited 1 month ago by Forrest Gardener
May Contain Traces of Seafood
Reply to  MarkH
December 7, 2022 10:25 pm

Tim? Embarrassed?

He will just come back and say “I said ‘could’ be rooned”

It is all in the wording when you are in the fortune telling game.

Also, while we are reminding Tim of things he has no shame about – Perth? Ghost Metropolis??

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  MarkH
December 8, 2022 8:23 am

Sarc, I’m sure…

sherro01
December 7, 2022 2:35 pm

The satellite tale for Australia, updated yesterday.
Geoff S
http://www.geoffstuff.com/uahdec2022.jpg

RickWill
Reply to  sherro01
December 7, 2022 3:10 pm

The Southern Hemisphere is cooling south to north as the average solar intensity moves northward.

Pacific in interesting because it takes the cold waters in the south northwest meaning the southern Pacific is cooling west to east in the subtropical zone.

Ken
December 7, 2022 2:38 pm

“Sydney’s maximums were the lowest in four years but the mean temperatures, which includes the minimums, was the coldest since 2003 and the city failed to reach 30C for the first time in three decades.”

I hate to be pedantic but it’s maxima, not maximums and minima, not minimums.

Janice Moore
Reply to  Ken
December 7, 2022 2:45 pm

Good catch, Ken. Just so no one blames author Pierre Gosselin, he was quoting this Australian:

Tom Saunders is a Meteorologist with the ABC in NSW.

(https://www.abc.net.au/news/tom-saunders/101602016)

from Saunders’ article here:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-11-30/weather-australia-experienced-coldest-spring-in-decades/101712340

Last edited 1 month ago by Janice Moore
ClimateBear
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 7, 2022 9:15 pm

Is he actually a meteorologist or one of the cadre of ‘climate communicators’ that are in train to be the BOM go to talking heads?

BTW, I caught part of the movie of 1984 while flicking on TV last night. The actual 1984 seems pretty ordinary from memory by comparison but current times no so. Will ‘climate communicators’ have the power to arrest climate contradictorians? The right of entry into all your property, devices and even your mond?

Will it be a criminal offence (a deemed contradictoran statement) to point out say, that Sydney had a record cool spring recently.

Shoki
Reply to  Ken
December 7, 2022 3:47 pm

In modern English, either is acceptable. If you hate it, why do you do it?

maximum
max·i·mum  (măk′sə-məm)
n. pl. max·i·mums or max·i·ma (-mə)
1.
a. The greatest possible quantity or degree.
b. The greatest quantity or degree reached or recorded; the upper limit of variation.
c. The time or period during which the highest point or degree is attained.
2. An upper limit permitted by law or other authority.
3. Astronomy
a. The moment when a variable star is most brilliant.
b. The magnitude of the star at such a moment.
4. Mathematics
a. The greatest value assumed by a function over a given interval.
b. The largest number in a set.
adj.
1. Having or being the greatest quantity or the highest degree that has been or can be attained: maximum temperature.
2. Of, relating to, or making up a maximum: a maximum number in a series.

minimum
min·i·mum  (mĭn′ə-məm)
n. pl. min·i·mums or min·i·ma (-mə)
1.
a. The least possible quantity or degree.
b. The lowest degree or amount reached or recorded; the lower limit of variation.
2. A lower limit permitted by law or other authority.
3. A sum of money set by a nightclub or restaurant as the least amount each patron must spend on food and drink.
4. Mathematics
a. The smallest number in a finite set of numbers.
b. A value of a function that is less than any other value of the function over a specific interval.
adj.
Of, consisting of, or representing the lowest possible amount or degree permissible or attainable.

Last edited 1 month ago by Shoki
Duane
Reply to  Shoki
December 8, 2022 8:12 am

There is really not that much uniformity in what is acceptable English.

For instance, I learned early on that the plural of craft is craft, as also in aircraft. Dictionary.com as well as Merriam-Webster list the plural of aircraft as “aircraft”. Yet I cringe whenever I read instances of the word “aircrafts” and “crafts” … from what I can tell, it is non-American English speakers who are the ones tending to say “aircrafts” instead of “aircraft” as the plural of aircraft.

Who is right and who is wrong? I dunno. But whenever I read or hear “aircrafts” it just makes me cringe!

Shoki
Reply to  Duane
December 8, 2022 9:49 am

Your examples are not the usage in question, but you are correct regarding the plurals of craft and aircraft. The word “deer” is another example commonly pluralized incorrectly.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Ken
December 8, 2022 5:11 am

my pedantic aargh is “forecastED”
no, it’s FORECAST

Shoki
December 7, 2022 3:05 pm

Distilled: They have no idea of causation or the likelihood of a given condition. But, they are certain that unless we destroy modern society, we all gonna die.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Shoki
December 8, 2022 3:39 am

That sums it up pretty good.

sherro01
December 7, 2022 3:14 pm

Melbourne radio 3AW, 10am today 8 December, announced a weather forecast for possible snow flurries at Mount Donna Buang and Mount Hotham which is a not-very-high 1860 m peak.
This might have happened before in local history, but I cannot recall earlier snow forecast so far into summer. It is tricky to search. I am not saying that the sky is falling, but I am suggesting that super hot days get more publicity than super cold days. Geoff S

Mike
Reply to  sherro01
December 7, 2022 3:20 pm

Don’t mention the cold. I did once but I think I got away with it.

Nick Stokes
Reply to  sherro01
December 7, 2022 4:22 pm

This might have happened before in local history,”

It has. Here is a picture of Xmas Day in Mt Buller (lower than Hotham), 2006:

comment image

It was actually an amazing time. The fire engines were there to save the resort from fires that had ringed it for weeks, and came right up to the lodges. But on Xmas eve it rained, and then snowed.

And then there is the famous white Xmas in Canberra, 1968.

Last edited 1 month ago by Nick Stokes
Duker
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 7, 2022 4:50 pm

Xmas ?

This archival film shows heavy snow in Oct 1968, maybe it was just a dusting by late Dec?

Nick Stokes
Reply to  Duker
December 7, 2022 5:00 pm

People there were still talking about the Xmas event when I arrived in 1969. But I think it only settled on the hills around Canberra.

Nick Stokes
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 7, 2022 5:05 pm

Here is the Canberra Times report. Actually, it doesn’t mention snow in the city, only a lot of rain,, but in the mountains further south. Also Christmas snow at Mt Hotham in Victoria.

Mr.
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 7, 2022 6:06 pm

Nick I lived for nearly 20 years on a 2,000 ft elevation property looking straight south at Mt. Torbrek.
The latest snowfall we had there was 15th November, back in 2004 iirc.
Didn’t settle of course, but just about every other year we’d get a mid to late October snowfall thar left an inch or so on the ground for up to 2 days.

Mr.
Reply to  Mr.
December 7, 2022 6:19 pm

Clarification –
I didn’t mean snow fell just on Mt Torbrek on 15th November (that’s an unremarkable event).
I meant it fell on my property at 2,000 ft elevation (625 m).

Hivemind
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 7, 2022 4:54 pm

It also snowed in Canberra in October around 1982 (I can’t quite recall when). That snow stayed on the ground for weeks outside the Campbell Offices.

downunder
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 8, 2022 12:52 am

Blame it on CO2

MarkH
Reply to  sherro01
December 7, 2022 6:57 pm

The BoM forecast for Mt Baw Baw (~1500m elevation) for today is for a top of 2C with a snow shower or two. Can watch the snow on various snow cams on the mountain.

I’m a little further down the slopes, but it’s pretty cold here today, currently 12C with cold sharp showers that would definitely be falling as snow at higher altitudes.

ClimateBear
Reply to  sherro01
December 7, 2022 9:26 pm

Just for context, I was in the central highlands of Tassie a some time back, staopped at a petrol station to buy fuel. It was a cold day with a bit of snow around and about this time of year. I asked if this was unusual and she said, ;nah, it snows once a month up here, any month, winter or summer, ya get used to it.

I also recall one hot summer’s day reports of people being attended to for heat stroke at Devonport beach and on the same day people stuck in blizzards and needing rescue on the overland track in the central highlands, not all that far away from Devonport, say 100 km.

In Tassie speak that’s just another day of weird weather but in ‘climate communicator’ speak it would be ‘deadly heat wave on North Coast coincides with catastrophic snow storm in Central Highlands to trigger emergency response teams as deadly climate change shows the full range of its extremes. Miraculously no lives lost.’

ozspeaksup
Reply to  sherro01
December 8, 2022 5:15 am

yes abc hysteria over NT run of 40c days(ie not unusual) declaring it a heat emergency
little mention of the Vic NSW snows(rare but does happen in summer)
woodcutters in westvic couldnt get INto paddocks for more wood as the season stayed damn cold and wet. had a few near 30c days hmm maybe 3 so far
last night and tonight down to 6 or 7c and hot water bottles in use again

Editor
December 7, 2022 3:34 pm

Hey — I have lived in the Land of Oz — and i can tell you that I did not shiver when it was “under 30°C” which in the United States is HOT WEATHER at 86°F. If it had been two degrees warmer, 32°C/90°F, it would have been called a Heat Wave.

That’s some kind of nutty news reporting.

PCman999
Reply to  Kip Hansen
December 7, 2022 8:44 pm

Counts what you are used to: Indonesians wearing heavy leather jackets or sweaters during an evening at 28°C, and Canadians running around in shorts and t-shirts the first time in the year the mercury peeks out above 10°C.

Humans are incredibly adaptive, animals too.

Makes me shake my head in disbelief when green cultists get heart palpitations over the thought of temperatures rising a handful of degrees over a century when I got to deal with -20 to +35°C and back again in just a year.

ClimateBear
Reply to  Kip Hansen
December 7, 2022 9:35 pm

What really gets my goat these days is the dramatically coloured temperature maps of Oz where purple and black are used to indicate the hottest areas. The bobble head then goes on about extreme heat in the north of the continent where it gets over 40˚C. Having lived up there for a year or so that is normal for up to half the year and nothing to write home about but hey, it transmits the ‘deadly climate change’ narrative loud and clear to the bulk of the population living on or near the coast in the SE and SW corners of the continent. BS 101, the only compulsory subject in any Arts, Churnalism, Political SCience and Climate Science degree these days. A major in BS will take you a very long way, why do you think Twitter and Tik Tok are so popular?

son of mulder
December 7, 2022 4:15 pm

It must be Climate Change. Is this an event that you want us Brits to compensate for? If somewhere has bad weather what’s the scale of reparations we must pay for our giving the Industrial Revolution on the world? Counter to that though, if somewhere has good weather then that must also be down to Climate Change as well and what’s the scale of payment we should receive for giving the Industrial Revolution in that case?

Mr.
Reply to  son of mulder
December 7, 2022 6:13 pm

Yes, so many questions to ponder about climate change, Grasshopper.

Sadly, being blind, I do not have those powers that St. Greta possesses that enables her to actually see CO2 in the air around us.
We are all so blessed to have such a visionary walking among us on this Earth.

angech
Reply to  Mr.
December 7, 2022 6:57 pm

This set of La Nina’s has been insipid at best [compare top past ranges this century at BOM]
Even so it has led to a slight drop in global temperature.
There is nothing to stop their being 10 La Nina’s in a row if the natural variability so ordains.
Let us hope we get at least 2 more to put global warming to rest.

angech
Reply to  angech
December 7, 2022 7:11 pm

Surely that picture of Ayers’s rock is photo shopped?
I have been there during a wet period and doubt there could be that much water around.
Still other wise a good story

sherro01
Reply to  angech
December 7, 2022 8:04 pm

angech
That image does not look like a photograph – more like an AI picture similar to the recent series of windmills behaving badly. Geoff S

Mr.
Reply to  angech
December 7, 2022 8:12 pm

I climbed to the top at dawn one clear August morning.
So cold my eyelids kept sticking together. Freezing.

You wouldn’t see any local Aboriginal people up there at these times – they’ve observed & learned enough over their 50k years living out there to know not to pull such Darwin Award stunts as we tourists there get up to.

It is a breathtaking view from the top though, no denying that.
Once is enough for anyone in their lifetime though.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Mr.
December 8, 2022 5:27 am

climbed in 72 on a school tour theres seamonkeys living in the rockpools there(or were)and yes once was enough while young and fit ups not bad down is a fair sod on the knees

John Hultquist
Reply to  angech
December 7, 2022 8:38 pm

I comment farther down. The problem for me is I can’t find a real photo that quite matches the orientation.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  angech
December 8, 2022 5:25 am

actually be careful they tried to ban a cartoon piccy of the rock as offending aboriginals this week and all representations are supposedly theirs to have a say on nowdays
madness much?
you bet!

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  angech
December 8, 2022 8:59 am

I’d say to put global warming alarmist to rest. I’d welcome more climate warming! Warmer is better!

John Hultquist
December 7, 2022 8:31 pm

 The image at the top appears to be a large colorful elephant. On the left, its trunk points away from the viewer. Beneath its forehead is an eye, and to the right of that is a folded-in ear. Its tusks and legs are stirring the water as the mighty beast locomotes through the water.  
I can find the door. 🤣

Gary Pearse
December 7, 2022 8:51 pm

“We remind you once again that the U.S. Weather Bureau always makes its forecast regarding El Niño and La Niña only for a period of about 6 months. There is a reason for this: longer-term forecasts, such as those made by PIK in 2019, turn out to be wrong”

I trust they will be more careful in the future about byproduct forecasts of ENSO, such as the recent overhyped hurricane season. NOAA’s poor forecasts this year proved they slavishly and lazily weigh the presence of la Niña too high (I thought they were at least more sophisticated than this). I doubted their hyped forecast because the principal component, water surface temperatures were not particularly warm.

I noted with the 2016 el Niño that the volume of warm water in the equatorial zone was relatively small (from the Hovmoller diagrams) and thought el Niño couldnt last. The heat was quickly dissipated and the temperatures plummeted. I followed the long stretch of near neutral temperatures over the next year and ultimately into a seemingly permanent la Niña persisting today.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hovm%C3%B6ller_diagram

Those we pay handsomely to do this job didn’t seem to notice we were having a huge teaching moment regarding climate. Surely some of them know this meme is over with.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Gary Pearse
December 8, 2022 3:50 am

“Surely some of them know this meme is over with.”

I would think so. Not all of them are stupid.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Gary Pearse
December 8, 2022 9:02 am

Agreed, except the “principal component” comment is also too simplistic.

Gary Pearse
Reply to  AGW is Not Science
December 8, 2022 10:32 am

Cold water hurricanes, huh? Look up Accumulated Cyclone Energy, ACE. Yeah you can have as deep a la Niña as it can get, but, if SST is below 28C, no hurricanes!

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/6843/hurricane-ready-sea-surface-temperatures

Have a take, please.

andersjoan
December 7, 2022 10:41 pm

I am invited to “join the discussion”. But what exactly is the discussion about?? Please supply a fact to discuss – or a definite theory about a scientific process.

All we have seen for now 30 years are unsubstantiated theories about climate in general as well as about various climates in specific areas – and no theory, no prophesy, ever proving to come true.

The only thing that is clear is that nobody, but nobody, actually KNOWS the full complex facts behind climate change. So what is the point of harping on about it all, for heavens sake? Time only will tell – but we may have to wait a thousand years before a definite answer will be with us.

Mr.
Reply to  andersjoan
December 7, 2022 11:50 pm

various climates in specific areas

Glad you mention that.

There are literally hundreds (maybe thousands?) of unique climates around this planet.

All doing their own unique things in their own cycles centuries after centuries.

But apparently, all of their unique dominant behaviors can be averaged together over a year or so, and ultimately determined to be controlled by how much CO2 cycles above them over their differing seasons and cycles.

Which as mentioned, are so different as to be akin to averaging say, the gastronomical enjoyment different people might be getting from eating a plate of fresh kale or a plate-sized rib eye steak done perfectly to their preference.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Mr.
December 8, 2022 5:29 am

EPA aus just got a load of their ideas taken in full by Pliberserker
theyre planning to stop ALL extinctions by controlling us nasty humans
yes this is true and on air announced with much fluff today
god help australia

Tom Abbott
Reply to  andersjoan
December 8, 2022 3:53 am

“but we may have to wait a thousand years before a definite answer will be with us.”

I think a decade or two of global cooling while CO2 increases would do it.

Last edited 1 month ago by Tom Abbott
AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Tom Abbott
December 8, 2022 1:37 pm

No, they’ll just tell you the trend is for too short a time period. During a previous pause, Phil Jones was asked how long the pause would need to be before it would be long enough to be significant. The pause reached that length, but no end to the climate nonsense occurred.

No matter how many times their predictions fail, the goal posts will simply get moved down the road a bit and the twaddle will continue. Our only hope is for enough people to awaken from their slumber and vote the idiots out.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  AGW is Not Science
December 9, 2022 4:17 am

Yes, I know. Mann or Hansen (I forget which) has already said that a decade or two or cooling would not falsify the Human-caused Climate Change Meme.

But, considering the source, what else would they say?

I think the average person, after a decade of cooling temperatures, would be wondering what all the commotion over CO2 was about.

Ireneusz Palmowski
December 8, 2022 1:30 am

I expect snow in England today and more frost.
comment image

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Ireneusz Palmowski
December 8, 2022 3:57 am

Yes, it looks like there is a big low pressure system over parts of Europe (center marked) and the west side of that circulation is bringing cold air down from the north, into the UK.

https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/500hPa/orthographic=-12.64,25.48,264/loc=9.006,60.430

Last edited 1 month ago by Tom Abbott
Ireneusz Palmowski
Reply to  Tom Abbott
December 8, 2022 6:58 am

Unusually strong pressure over Greenland. 1077 hPa at sea level.
comment image
The daily AO index

comment image

Last edited 1 month ago by Ireneusz Palmowski
Editor
December 8, 2022 2:54 am

What is unusual this time is that it is already the third La Niña in a row.“. Not all that unusual, it’s the fourth triple La Nina in under 70 years – 1954–57, 1973–76, 1998–2001 and now 2020–23. .

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Mike Jonas
December 8, 2022 4:16 am

Thanks for that info, Mike. It seems that after big El Ninos, we get multiple La Ninas, at least in the last two examples.

Last edited 1 month ago by Tom Abbott
Tom Abbott
December 8, 2022 3:30 am

From the article: “The exceptionally cloudy conditions this spring kept maximum temperatures well down on recent years.”

They have stumbled onto part of the secret. Now, they just have to figure out why there were exceptionally cloudy conditions. Hint: It wasn’t CO2.

Energywise
December 8, 2022 6:57 am

When is the Global Freezing cult starting?

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Energywise
December 8, 2022 1:39 pm

As soon as they can’t hide the lack of warming with “adjustments” to the data.

Duane
December 8, 2022 8:23 am

An interesting study was just published, described at https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/world-s-oldest-dna-reveals-a-lush-arctic-landscape-in-greenland-2-million-years-ago/ar-AA152MGk, that reports DNA analysis shows that Greenland was a lush temperate forest 2 million years ago when average temperatures there were 20 to 34 degrees (it didn’t say F or C, but I would assume F) warmer than today. The article further states that that result compares to today’s Greenland which is described as a “polar desert”.

How does one square that obviously very positive environment with today’s very negative environment, and then conclude that “global warming” is somehow destroying the planet?

Also, how do they ignore the vastly warmer environment of 2 million years ago – which is well after the beginning 2.6 MYA of the Pleistocene and its continuous cycles between glaciations and interglacials … yet with no SUVs or coal plants to blame it on?

Of course, the answer is that the warmunists have a narrative and they refuse to acknowledge that it is all bullshit.

Last edited 1 month ago by Duane
Redge
December 8, 2022 10:25 am

Melbourne, Adelaide and Canberra all shivered through maximums at least one degree below average and the lowest since 1992. Brisbane’s spring was the coldest in 12 years, and for Perth it was the coldest in six.

Etc.

And none of this takes into account urban and population growth in the last 30 years

Hatter Eggburn
December 8, 2022 1:19 pm

Any bets for a fourth La Niña year?
As renowned meteorologist Stan Laurel says, “it could happen”

Ireneusz Palmowski
Reply to  Hatter Eggburn
December 9, 2022 1:17 am
Hatter Eggburn
December 8, 2022 1:21 pm

Ayers Rock in the rain looks like a half submerged wading elephant

Last edited 1 month ago by Hatter Eggburn
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