Dont Pay UK Leaflet. Source DontPay.UK

“Don’t Pay UK” Green Energy Bill Strike Gathers Momentum

Essay by Eric Worrall

h/t JoNova; Skyrocketing UK green energy bills have finally provoked a response, with 90,000 Britons and rising pledging not to pay their energy bills, until the government brings prices down to affordable levels.

We are a movement against the rise in energy bills

  • We demand a reduction in energy bills to an affordable level.
  • We will cancel our direct debits from Oct 1, if we are ignored.
  • We will take this action if pledges reach 1 million by then.

The Plan:

It’s simple: we are demanding a reduction of energy bills to an affordable level. Our leverage is that we will gather a million people to pledge not to pay if the government goes ahead with another massive hike on October 1st.

Mass non-payment is not a new idea, it happened in the UK in the late 80s and 90s, when more than 17 million people refused to pay the Poll Tax – helping bring down the government and reversing its harshest measures.

Even if a fraction of those of us who are paying by direct debit stop our payments, it will be enough to put energy companies in serious trouble, and they know this. We want to bring them to the table and force them to end this crisis. Here’s how we think we can get there:

Read more: https://dontpay.uk

Ofcom has responded by begging people not to boycott their bills;

Ofgem begs customers not to boycott paying their gas bills

Gergana Krasteva Sunday 7 Aug 2022 10:29 am

rits have been urged not to take part in a growing civil disobedience campaign over the rise of energy bills. 

Tens of thousands of people have already cancelled their gas and electricity direct debit payments from October 1 as part of the Don’t Pay movement.

Run by anonymous activists, the grassroots campaign is calling for households to boycott their bills in response to the energy crisis, which is driving millions into poverty.

In an interview with BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Ofgem’s CEO Jonathan Brearley warned this could hike up costs for everyone.

‘I know everyone is extremely worried about paying their energy bill,’ he said.

‘But absolutely I would not encourage anyone to join a campaign like this for two reasons.

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2022/08/07/ofgem-begs-customers-not-to-boycott-paying-their-gas-bills-17140495/

What a horrible situation.

If a million people stop paying their bills, there’s a real risk the government will play hardball, and simply cut them off, while running continuous BBC propaganda campaigns blaming Don’t Pay “freeloaders” for everything wrong with modern life.

But energy bills are so intolerable in Britain right now, many people will likely not be able to afford their energy bills anyway. Maybe Don’t Pay supporters feel they have nothing to lose.

A quick resolution to this crisis is unlikely. If the British Government started right now, stopped jerking Caudrilla around and gave the go-ahead for their Lancashire shale gas extraction plans, it might make a small difference by this Winter – but it would still take years to fully normalise domestic energy prices.

President Obama once explained how green energy would make bills skyrocket, which is exactly what has now happened. But Obama never explained what to do when ordinary people rebel against the gratuitous hardship of unaffordable green energy.

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Andy Espersen
August 7, 2022 10:18 pm

Here is the very first decision for the new Prime Minister. If he/she makes an 180 degree turn-around about all that panicky “climate change” nonsense he/she will be home and dry – and win the next election.

Redge
Reply to  Andy Espersen
August 7, 2022 11:30 pm

If only…

Alan the Brit
Reply to  Redge
August 8, 2022 12:48 am

Unlikely but needs to be done! As I have said several times before, “Welcome to the Holocene Inter-Glacial”, but of course it’s not as warm as the previous four Inter-Glacials dating back 500,000 years by between 2 & 4 degrees Celcius!!!

Robert Wager
Reply to  Alan the Brit
August 8, 2022 10:44 am

Yes but those were prolonged weather events, this is climate change…or something like that.

HotScot
Reply to  Andy Espersen
August 8, 2022 2:12 am

No politician will do a 180º on NetZero in the UK, there are far too many brain dead, media and celebrity following morons in the country who believe the world will end next month.

They will, however, do what British politicians usually do, gradually shuffle something too difficult to face into the long grass.

The demand to have us all driving EV’s by 2025 will be pushed out a few years, similarly the ban on gas boilers.

The 2050 objective will be next because the projects have all “been delayed by covid and Putin”. More excuses will be found until things go quiet altogether, as our government begins actively turning their back on the greens. Funding will dry up and green corporations will be leaned on.

As I have said before, don’t watch who gets Boris’ job, watch who is included in the cabinet. If Suella Braverman, Kemi Badenoch and/or Steve Baker are included you can be certain the next PM is serious about kicking NetZero into touch. Those three are all outspoken opponents of NetZero, and Baker is now a trustee of the GWPF so we know for absolute certain he’s a full blown climate sceptic. Meanwhile Baker has been busy organising The NetZero Scrutiny Group amongst MP’s, and it’s gaining considerable membership, 50 or so in about the last year from memory.

Dr. John Constable of the GWPF made a prediction recently, stating that in 20 years time renewables will be a distant memory.

This is the beginning of the end.

griff
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 2:30 am

There won’t be a ban on gas boilers, except for new properties.

Major research and investment already on a gas/hydrogen mix (which any post 1996 boiler will run on)

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 3:24 am

Griff,
Green activists are like blackmailers, always coming back for more and making bigger and bigger demands.

UK facing heat pump crisis as EU bows to eco mob and bans critical supplies
FACING pressure from climate activists, the European Union is accelerating its plans to ban a critical gas that is vital to use in heat pumps.
https://www.express.co.uk/news/science/1651676/heat-pump-crisis-critical-f-gas-shortage-scuppers-rollout-uk-energy-plans-hfc-eu-eco-mob

HotScot
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 6:03 am

Did I say there would be a ban on existing gas boilers?

No I didn’t. You can’t read and you fail to understand everything, in short you are a pest.

The ‘ban’ on boilers in older buildings will kick in when your existing gas boiler is no longer serviceable and the sales of new boilers will have ceased.

Then you have to shell out £30k on a new heat pump that simply won’t work in older buildings.

And don’t bother arguing the point, I have the quotations for £100,000 to convert my three bedroom, solid masonry, Victorian cottage to NetZero standards.

Only, the heat pump engineer told me they wouldn’t fit one to old British homes as it exposes them to being sued if they don’t work well enough.

Don’t you ever get tired of being ridiculed?

You must be getting paid to regurgitate bilge. No one could possibly be as motivated as you are to post dumb comment’s without considerable reward.

RickWill
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 8:54 pm

You must be getting paid to regurgitate bilge. No one could possibly be as motivated as you are to post dumb comment’s without considerable reward.

Awesome rebuke.

Not sure what griff is though so the term “no one” may not be appropriate. “griff” might be a Russian computer spouting all sorts of nonsense to derail threads.

MARTIN BRUMBY
Reply to  RickWill
August 9, 2022 12:15 am

So far as I am concerned, he (or she or it) is an Oxygen thief.

GeeJam
Reply to  HotScot
August 9, 2022 3:23 am

As approx 70% of UK households (by area – not population) are “off grid”, maybe Griff can also advise us about our oil-fired boilers!

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 8:46 am

As always, griff believes whatever the party tells him to believe.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 1:17 pm

As always MarkW starts a post with “as always.”

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 1:46 pm

As always, Simon has nothing intelligent to say.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 6:42 pm

As always MarkW has no sense of humour…

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 9:11 pm

That was humor? Don’t give up your day job.
Assuming this isn’t your day job.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 9:29 am

The gas/ hydrogen mix is limited to 80% gas/20% hydrogen which the infrastructure can cope with. Any higher proportion of hydrogen would require a complete overhaul of the distribution service and the replacement of millions of appliances with hydrogen specific ones.

Newminster
Reply to  Dave Andrews
August 11, 2022 3:17 am

“A complete overhaul of the distribution service” meaning the replacement of every inch of gas pipeline (certainly all the metal stuff) across the UK.
For the benefit of those who might think otherwise, griff!

TonyG
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 10:22 am

There won’t be a ban on gas boilers, until there is.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  TonyG
August 8, 2022 12:01 pm

If you want your gas boiler, you can keep your gas boiler./sarc

Rusty
Reply to  griff
August 9, 2022 3:30 am

Hydrogen is a pipe dream. Anyone who knows a bit of chemistry and physics understands why.

KAT
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 5:49 am

One can only hope!

Barnes Moore
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 6:44 am

Let’s hope he is a better predictor than all the climate alarmists, and that the stupidity of western “leaders” and the media pushing the GND do not totally bankrupt us in the meantime. With the US Senate poised to pass the Inflation Acceleration Plan loaded with all kinds of green goodies, the US may just leapfrog the UK, Germany, and the EU in general in the race to destroy western economies.

griff
Reply to  Andy Espersen
August 8, 2022 2:29 am

he/she won’t, for the simple reason climate change impacts the UK already and a large part of the population can clearly see that. There are no climate change deniers out there not already voting Tory anyway…

Editor
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 2:53 am

Dead wrong. If the Tories drop net-zero they win the next election in a landslide. The point being that this gives electors a real choice, and having two major parties supporting net-zero is no choice at all. Thank goodness Carrie is leaving number 10, at least there is now some hope. Liz Truss had better not blow this one.

Andy Espersen
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 3:06 am

Correction, griff : A period of slightly warmer climate “impacts the UK” at present – which will benefit us all, as a matter of fact. We will easily adjust to that – just like all our ancestors always did. But chances are that the climate will continue its inevitable progress towards the next ice-age – probably within the next couple of thousand years.

fretslider
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 3:28 am

“…a large part of the population…” – of Guardian readers, griff

Not the country.

What do Grauniad readers think?

KittyKats dr8765 57 minutes ago

“There’s only one species that I would like to see wiped out.”
Humans are selfish pests on this earth.

—————————————————————-

DaveTroll  richmanchester 7 minutes ago

beautiful creatures don’t smoke, drink alcohol, drive SUVs, vote for the likes of Bolsonaro and Boris, drop bombs, overfish or overgraze land. Because humans do, why should they suffer

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/aug/08/puffins-toucans-biodiversity-crisis-risk-of-extinction

Animals do like to get drunk, Guardian readers are a sad misanthropic bunch

Graemethecat
Reply to  fretslider
August 8, 2022 10:48 am

You couldn’t make this up. Grauniad readers are genuinely beyond parody.

MarkW
Reply to  fretslider
August 8, 2022 11:20 am

All herbivores eat as much as they can. Ditto for any animal that eats fish. Anyone who believes that nature never over consumes a resource is someone who has never had any contact with actual nature.

They really do believe that Bambi was a nature documentary.

I also notice that supporting those who the socialists support, is sufficient reason for humanity to be wiped out. No wonder socialists always end up backing mass murderers.

Newminster
Reply to  fretslider
August 11, 2022 3:21 am

I must say I’m struggling to see how even a Guardian reader could blame humanity for spreading bird flu among seabirds!

HotScot
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 6:17 am

Show us this British ‘climate change’.

Present the evidence of any detriment anyone suffers from it.

In the 2015 Indian ‘unprecedented’ heatwave with months of temperatures into the mid 40’sC there were 2,018 heat related deaths, from a population of 1.3bn, with 20% Extreme Poverty; defined as those living on less that $1.95 per day.

It’s simply not credible there were any meaningful death numbers over the single day (and of a matter of an hour or two) in the UK when some endured a momentary spike of just over 40ºC.

Go and peddle your tripe elsewhere.

Everything about life has improved over the last 50 years of you lunatics peddling your utter nonsense. The only reason there are gullible fools like you believing in the climate BS is because you are gullible enough to believe the MSM which is controlled by six wealthy individuals/corporations with a vested interest in regurgitating climate nonsense. They sell fear and doom and you fall for it.

MarkW
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 8:49 am

Every poll I have ever seen, regardless of country, has put climate change either dead last or second to last in the list of things that concern the voters.

HotScot
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 9:47 am

The online UN poll of millions of people found it came 16th of 16 choices, behind 15th place Internet access……

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 12:11 pm

And in every case was only on “the list” at all because the ‘surveyors’ put it there.

MARTIN BRUMBY
Reply to  HotScot
August 9, 2022 12:22 am

Quite right.

And you might have mentioned that relatively few people live bang next to an RAF runway.

And, of this few, many were likely on holiday on the Costa Lotta at the time.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 8:48 am

I see griff is still trying to push the lie that there were no droughts, floods, heat waves, cold snaps, or any other weather unpleasantness prior to the introduction of the evil gas.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 9:31 am

Wrong!

b.nice
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 4:09 pm

There are no “anthropogenic global climate impacts” in the UK.

Come on, List them ! .. or don’t.

They don’t exist, ANYWHERE, for that matter

Yes there are urban density and land use impacts.

But even the most clueless fool should be able to tell the difference.

Rusty
Reply to  Andy Espersen
August 9, 2022 3:29 am

No chance. She’s all ready said she will continue with net-zero.

Chaswarnertoo
August 7, 2022 11:23 pm

Net zero is a very stupid idea. Anyone who believes in it should stop exhaling CO2, right now!

Redge
Reply to  Chaswarnertoo
August 7, 2022 11:29 pm

Net-zero is a BS idea that allows CO2 “polluters” to carry on as they are providing they plant a tree or pretend to

Redge
August 7, 2022 11:28 pm

I’m surprised the BBC aren’t fully behind this.

If people don’t pay, they get cut off.

If people get cut off, they don’t use evil fossil fuels.

If people don’t use evil fossil fuels, they won’t survive the winter.

If people don’t survive the winter, the UK hits Net-zero early

Win-win in their misanthropic minds

tgasloli
Reply to  Redge
August 8, 2022 7:53 am

And, with fewer people to feed they can go ahead with the fertilizer and live stock bans. In every way a win for the climate catastrophists.

RickWill
Reply to  Redge
August 8, 2022 9:01 pm

Fewer people means less income for the BBC.

It would be smarter to simply stop paying the BBC tax. That would get rid of the main propaganda machine.

In Australia, the ABC is paid from general revenue and is never threatened when a Labor government is in Canberra.

It is interesting times – smarmy reporters are fawning over the new PM. It makes the end of the honeymoon even sweeter when it inevitably happens.

HotScot
August 8, 2022 12:24 am

Signed up to it several weeks ago.

Nothing to loose really. My bills have gone from £80 per month just over a year ago to £350 now and I expect to see them hit £500 by 2023. I’m retired so on a fixed income but no doubt the unemployed and welfare recipients will get help, but I won’t.

Our government had plenty of Taxpayers cash to splash about over covid, paying people to languish at home instead of going to work, but a genuine crisis turns up and they do literally f*ck all.

No doubt covid will make a surprise return this winter as people die from starvation or hypothermia.

Nor can electricity and gas companies cut off every supply (in fact very few) of non payers. Maybe the bozo’s who jumped at the chance of a smart metre will regret it when they are remotely cut off though.

Gary Pearse
Reply to  Eric Worrall
August 9, 2022 5:45 pm

Imagine the energy supplier “begging” the impoverished customer not to stop paying!! I guess with half a dozen of these gov trough feeders having gone broke year ago despite the generous subsidies and feed in tariffs they have reason to worry.

I’m hoping these parasites and the billionaire WEF totalitarians are fully invested in this modern day Titanic disaster. What goes for fun these days is news that Al Gore’s ‘Beyond Meat’ stock fell like a stone when MacDonald’s 100 store test showed people weren’t interested in going beyond meat for their burgers.

The Don’t Pay Power Bills campaign shows Atlas’s shoulders are still strong. There’s going to be a lot of this kind of thing. I’m thinking of exploring buying meat straight from the farmers and cutting the retailer out. A ‘cooperative’ for this kind of thing and black market solutions to the food crisis will become commonplace. Might pay a First Nations hunter to shoot me a deer.

RickWill
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 9:16 pm

The million customer threshold should give enough clout to threaten the survival of all retailers. That means the government will have to step in to ensure the lights stay on. The energy market will return to a social enterprise.

In the long run, the UK is stuffed. The current account losses appears unsustainable. It is very likely the GBP will be in the gutter sooner than later. Back in March, GBP1 would get RUB179. Now GBP1 buys just RUB73. Energy is king when it comes to backing a currency.

By March next year GBP and RUB could be at par. That is a gloomy thought.

Gary Pearse
Reply to  RickWill
August 9, 2022 8:17 pm

“By March next year GBP and RUB could be at par. That is a gloomy thought.”

I think there is a dollar to be made, though. Slimeball Soros sold the pound short and made 1 Billion on the trade in the 1970s. This went into his campaign to destroy free enterprise, the family, borders, culture, fix elections and other should-be treasonable activities. Probably gets a tax deduction for it these days.

TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 12:30 am

Nowhere does the ‘Don’t Pay’ campaign single out or even mention ‘Green Energy’ as the cause of the price hikes.

The driving force behind UK energy price rises is the increased cost of wholesale oil and, in particular, gas. This at a time when oil companies are making record profits.

Alan the Brit
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 12:54 am

Don’t forget those Green Energy intellectuals know all too well that the Sun shines 24/7 especially in the UK, & the wind also blows 24/7, scientific fact simply because they know little of reality & science especially!!! When I was a very young man full of idealism, my older work colleagues used to call me Green!!! Sarc!!!

observa
Reply to  Alan the Brit
August 8, 2022 1:41 am

That’s quite correct as green always means too young, not ripe, not fit for consumption as it gives you a bellyache.

Right-Handed Shark
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 1:23 am

Nowhere does the ‘Don’t Pay’ campaign single out or even mention ‘Green Energy’ as the cause of the price hikes.”

Possibly because they are every bit as gullible as you:

https://www.masterresource.org/droz-john-awed/25-industrial-wind-energy-deceptions/

PeterPetrum
Reply to  Right-Handed Shark
August 8, 2022 2:50 am

Superb article. I have saved it for future reference.

Gerald the Mole
Reply to  PeterPetrum
August 8, 2022 3:25 am

I agree. Thank you.

TheFinalNail
Reply to  Right-Handed Shark
August 8, 2022 3:54 am

Wind turbines aren’t causing the current crisis. Gas prices are.

Pat from Kerbob
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 8:02 am

What does Griff do when you are using the brain?

MarkW
Reply to  Pat from Kerbob
August 8, 2022 8:57 am

He’s using a brain? I see no evidence to support such a conclusion.

Felix
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 8:23 am

You are right, wind turbines are not causing the current crisis. Paying for them is, subsidizing them is. And they aren’t producing power. so they are not helping the current crisis either.

BobM
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 8:56 am

“How can you be so obtuse?”
The crazies that think random wind power is an answer are the same idiots that push to ban or make gas unavailable as an alternative when the wind stops blowing. If proper gas development was allowed in Europe, there wouldn’t be a “current crisis”. There isn’t any in the US.

MarkW
Reply to  BobM
August 8, 2022 11:23 am

Last year griff told us that a prolonged wind drought didn’t matter because a coal plant was available to pick up the slack.

This was a couple of weeks after he proudly proclaimed that the same coal plant was scheduled to be shut down and demolished.

BobM
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 3:36 pm

I no longer reply to anything from graft, nor from playdo, hoping they will eventually be ignored completely and just slink away

MarkW
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 8:56 am

There are none so blind as those who are paid not to see.

Wind mills don’t reduce the use of fossil fuels, because fossil fuel plants have to be kept in hot standby in order to take over whenever the wind slows down a bit, or whenever a cloud passes over the solar farms.

On the other hand, the morons who actually believe that wind and solar can power a modern society, do everything in their power to make fossil fuels scarce and expensive.

LdB
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 9, 2022 12:21 am

So stop complaining and simply stop using all gas 🙂

Last edited 1 month ago by LdB
HotScot
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 1:30 am

The price of oil has been driven up by geopolitical incompetence, the oil companies didn’t do that.

Nor did I hear people bemoaning the fate of oil companies when the price went negative and they were paying people to take the stuff.

The ‘record profits’ is a tactic being used by governments to cover for their appalling stupidity.

TheFinalNail
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 3:55 am

The point is, it’s got nothing to do with ‘green energy’.

HotScot
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 6:24 am

It’s got everything to do with green energy. We have been persistently told wind and solar are now the cheapest form of energy.

OK, so where has all that cheap energy gone? Why are my bills six times larger than they were a year ago if it’s not renewables causing it?

Biden has attacked the fossil fuel industry and told us we will all go renewable. OK, so we’re heading that way, but no signs of bills falling. Indeed, we know for certain they will continue to rise, which exposes every claim made about renewables as straightforward lies.

Last edited 1 month ago by HotScot
Meab
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 8:33 am

Dishonest comment, ToeFungalNail. The huge investments in wind and solar did not create reliable and affordable electricity. GangGreen sold renewables on a false promise. That’s why nuclear stalled and that’s why fossil fuel exploration and production was curtailed.

It’s got everything to do with phony green energy.

Stop lying.

MarkW
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 8:58 am

It has everything to do with green energy, because those who are pushing green energy are the cause of all the shortages and price increases.

Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 10:44 am

MarkW

 August 8, 2022 8:58 am
It has everything to do with green energy, because those who are pushing green energy are the cause of all the shortages and price increases.

Indeed, spot on.
And those who are pushing green energy are the cause of all the shortages and price increases, are also working on behalf of Poisoner Putin or the delightful Xi – although many will not accept this.
Their actions have weakened the West.
In many cases, this has been deliberate.
But some are still ‘useful idiots’.

Auto

Andrew Wilkins
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 9, 2022 11:52 am

In the UK it’s all the fault of green energy and the green zealots promoting it. If the zealots hadn’t worked to block fracking and the price of “renewables” wasn’t so damn expensive we wouldn’t be in this economic mess.
You’re a big promoter of “renewables” and oppose fossil fuels. You have blood on your hands – hope you’re proud of yourself.

In The Real World
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 1:41 am

The main reason for electricity prices to rise is Green taxes .
The Emissions Trading Scheme , [ carbon tax ] cost went up by several hundred percent from the start of last year .
This more than doubled the price for gas generation , which makes up the largest amount of power stations .

And today 8th Aug has seen the first power cuts for thousands of homes.
This is in Summer and with only a very small amount of battery EVs.
For just 20% of vehicles to charge up at any time would need a 100% increase in generation capacity .

It is not looking good for the Winter .

HotScot
Reply to  In The Real World
August 8, 2022 2:22 am

Where were/are the power cuts?

We have suffered numerous ‘micro’ power failures over the last year or so. In 30 years in the same house we might have suffered two or three per decade.

I live in Dartford, Kent.

In The Real World
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 6:47 am

For HotScot , power cuts for thousands of homes .https://www.express.co.uk/newhttps://www.express.co.uk/news/science/1651951/uk-power-outage-thousands-homes-electricity-cut-london-suffolk-surrey-essex-blackouts/science/1651951/uk-power-outage-

Up until the end of 2020 the average wholesale grid price of electricity had been averaging £30 to £40 per MWh.
From the start of 2021 the increase in Green taxes for large energy users like generating companies more than doubled the grid price .
And this was over 1 year before the Russian invasion . But that was a very convenient excuse for the media & politicians to try to say it was someone else to blame

The ETS Green tax increase also hit refineries , and made large increases on the price of road fuel at the pumps . But you will not see this in the media as they will not ,[ or cannot ], mention it and just blame the Russian invasion .

Gerry, England
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 7:11 am

Try living a bit further out and you will get used to them. I had one the other day I didn’t even notice until I saw that my servers were off-line. The flashing clock on the stove backed it up.

HotScot
Reply to  Gerry, England
August 8, 2022 7:33 am

When I lived in Scotland in the 70’s & 80’s I can’t recall a single power cut other than when the miners were screwing Ted Heath over.

The UK middle class shoulder a 50% Tax burden, yet our energy security is pants, our roads are crap, our NHS is dire, our welfare system is gargantuan, housing policy dire, so where is all the money going?

I keep saying this, politicians need to be held responsible for their failures in office, even when they have left it.

If the MD of a company screwed over his business and ran off with all the money, he’s liable for the rest of his life. There are numerous examples.

TheFinalNail
Reply to  In The Real World
August 8, 2022 3:56 am

The main reason for electricity prices to rise is Green taxes .

How can that be the case when it’s the gas price that’s crippling people? And it’s not like ‘green energy’ is forcing the poor energy companies to drive up their costs; they’re raking in record profits.

HotScot
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 6:38 am

Geez, you are dim.

The British are paying ~25% subsidies on their energy bills for green energy.

Being that my bills were about £80 a month just over a year ago, that 25% was worth roughly £20.

Now they are heading to £500 a month that 25% is around £125. The damn subsidy alone is more than my original bills.

Does all that nice cash going to renewable businesses provide discounts on green energy? No, of course not, it goes straight into the pockets of the turbine and solar providers.

They were making plenty of money on their £20 share of my bills, so why haven’t they refused the additional £105?

And you bitch about oil companies gouging.

FFS!

Gerry, England
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 7:37 am

You can also say that the cost of gas has been driven up by so many moronic nations that have chosen to use unreliable wind and solar to power their grids without understanding that it will never work need gas to stop the grids failing. In the case of Germany, they have shunned nuclear power and until recently coal. They have left the coal too late to cut back on gas as the river levels are stopping barges carrying full loads of coal.

MarkW
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 9:01 am

He’s not dim, he’s duplicitous. He knows that he’s telling lies, he doesn’t care. So long as the party gains more power, it’s a win for him.

b.nice
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 4:20 pm

That bares repeating….

“HE KNOWS THAT HE IS TELLING LIES”

Its deliberate, and malicious.

Last edited 1 month ago by b.nice
MarkW
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 9:01 am

Once again, the socialist tries to cover up the role green energy enthusiasts have played in making sure that fossil fuels are both scarce and expensive.

MarkW
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 8:54 am

Once again the socialists hate it when companies make profits.
Were you equally concerned a few years ago when oil companies were losing money hand over fist and a number of them went out of business?
Of course not, because the only standards any socialist has ever had is a double one.
Whatever position gives them the most stuff, is the one they take.

Regardless of whether “green energy” is singled out for causing the high prices, green energy is still the cause of the high prices.
There wouldn’t be these huge shortages in fossil fuels if it hadn’t been for all the roadblocks the socialists have been placing in the creation of reliable energy.

LdB
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 9, 2022 12:20 am

Well stop using all fossil fuels immediately … that will really hurt the oil companies 🙂

You greentards are brain dead … you blame the oil companies for making increased profit on a situation engineered by green policy.

Last edited 1 month ago by LdB
Newminster
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 11, 2022 3:34 am

What do you mean, “at a time when …..”? Oil companies are making record profits because of the increased price. And they are paying tax on those profits which in some cases are helping to offset a run of poor returns resulting, not least, from Covid.
Pension funds (and other investors) will be pleased to see a half-decent dividend again and the companies might just (if they’re allowed) invest some of the windfall in developing new fields (and some of the trickier older ones)!

Peta of Newark
August 8, 2022 12:59 am

BBC Headline 1:”Energy bills: Charities warn people against not paying

While the bureaucracy itself sets a blazing example:
BBC Headline 2:”Councils in England cut back on holiday food-voucher help

And the people themselves (gotta laugh at Auntie Bee’s naivete here), turn to the Black Economy so as to avoid the grotesque levels of taxation of this country…

BBC Headline 3:”Cost of living: People turning back to cash as prices rise

Lies lies lies wrong wrong wrong coming out of UK Government’s simultaneous Love of Money and utter complete financial ineptitude – more important to have an office party piss-up every (Fri) day to lubricate the Cronies than actually do anything important.
Apart from passing the buck and polishing your own turd-like virtue

And you couldn’t make it up, (apart from in the UK) there was/is A Plan mooted to tax people who don’t have children, in order to try boost turn around the UK’s present Extinction Rate
i.e A Birth Rate of 1.4

They are actually thinking of punishing folks who don’t have kids rather than rewarding the folks who do – as per the French model (and somewhere else I don’t presently recall)
what. are. the. words.

Apart from: “Get me out of this madhouse car-crash

Last edited 1 month ago by Peta of Newark
HotScot
Reply to  Peta of Newark
August 8, 2022 1:35 am

Well said Peta.

It’s also been a source of constant amazement to me that, while the birth rate in the UK stands at about 1.4 (sustenance level is 2.1) we have a so called Housing Shortage.

Quite how that works beats me, other than they are necessary to house the tens of thousands of illegal RIB riders sailing across the English Channel ever year, now enjoying life at Her Majesty’s pleasure, in four star hotels.

griff
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 2:35 am

A lot of it is second/holiday homes and split families/more single households.

Sunderlandsteve
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 4:05 am

Link to data please or are you just saying the first thing you can think of?

HotScot
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 6:39 am

Your usual imaginary drivel.

Buzz off pest.

Graemethecat
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 10:53 am

So nothing to do with legal and illegal immigration into the UK then?

michel
August 8, 2022 1:20 am

Paul Homewood has calculated that the total subsidy directed to wind and solar in the UK amounts to about 450 Sterling per household per year.

Its a large amount, it should be stopped. But its only part, and not the biggest part, of the cause of the current price rises. As Griff will probably point out, by far the largest factor is the worldwide rise in gas prices, and in the end that comes down to the Russian reaction to their failed invasion of the Ukraine.

Its not as simple as this suggests however, because the German and European dependence on Russian gas didn’t happen in a vacuum or because of the merits of the policy. It was substantially driven by a desire to move away from coal, and also by a German desire and decision to close down nuclear after the Fukushima accident.

This is what led to the total dependence on Russian gas, and to the dire consequences we are seeing this winter from its supply interruption. The rising price of gas is not due to the attempt to move to alternative energy, but the consequences of the rise are substantially due to the fact that more reliable sources of energy than Russian gas have been closed down in pursuit of the green dream.

The demand this winter in the UK will be to borrow hugely and subsidize gas for heating. Its inevitable, it will happen, and there will probably also be rationing of gas to industry. Or maybe the household subsidies will be funded by a tax on industrial and business uses of gas, which will also reduce gas consumption.

The UK, like Germany, has been persuaded by the green movement to close down its reliable coal fired generation without having a reliable alternative. This is the fundamental problem. And if you read Paul Homewood’s brilliant analysis of the latest national grid plans, you will see that this is a feature of UK thinking at both a political and business level.

https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2022/07/25/fes-2022-more-wishful-thinking/

griff
Reply to  michel
August 8, 2022 2:34 am

Yes, thanks, I would point out its the gas price.

But Homewood fails to recognise that subsidy for renewables is a declining item: new renewables are coming in without subsidy and I believe some of the older stuff is reaching the end of its strike price period…

Strike prices for many renewables are already below wholesale price driven by gas and the utilities are paying back money over the strike price.

Eng_Ian
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 2:50 am

What does wind power cost when the wind isn’t blowing? Is it cheaper than gas?

I must have missed the part where you said you can buy it on demand.

Right-Handed Shark
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 3:34 am

Not today they’re not:

080822-11_32AM.png
Last edited 1 month ago by Right-Handed Shark
RickWill
Reply to  Right-Handed Shark
August 8, 2022 9:30 pm

The guy on the right is not pulling his weight – lazy slacker.

HotScot
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 6:56 am

Paul Homewood is a retired accountant. He knows far more about the numbers than the vast majority of people, especially you. Have you read his most recent publication?

No, of course you haven’t.

MarkW
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 9:06 am

griff reads the Guardian and the latest talking points memo.

HotScot
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 11:33 am

griff can read?

MarkW
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 1:48 pm

Either that, or someone read it to him.

Simon
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 1:27 pm

Paul Homewood is a retired accountant. He knows far more about the numbers than the vast majority of people, especially you. “
So I just want to be clear… are you saying we should listen to people who are knowledgable in their field? I’m so confused. If I had a dollar for every time someone here says we shouldn’t? Appeals to authority anyone?

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 1:49 pm

Almost none of the so called climate scientists are experts in climate science.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 6:50 pm

No but they are experts in the fields they comment on. Unlike many in these parts…

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 9:14 pm

Actually, they aren’t. Not even close.
Thanks for at least trying to come up with a credible lie.

Luke B
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 11:10 pm

OK, there’s the (peer-review somehow…) climate science paper that concluded that most of the Earth will be unlivable in 50 years after using a definition which makes a high percentage of the inhabited area uninhabitable, cited the non-existence of large structures build by ancient civilizations in its postulated non-livable zone even though there are plenty there under the paper’s own definitions amongst other major issues. Picked up by the press naturally. Roy Spencer’s excellent well research study on climate sensitivity, on the other hand, is a bit harder to find and somehow wasn’t picked up by the mainstream so much.

Then there’s a paper (cited by a NASA article) which was supposed to have verified water-vapor feedback caused by CO2. The careful part of their work consists of meticulous verification of a rising trend in total water vapor in the area of Europe they were considering. Then, to draw the conclusion given in the abstract, they claim to use the process of elimination to conclude that their rising trend is only explainable by the rising trend in CO2. One could raise some entirely legitimate questions about this methodology already, but it becomes even better when to rule out alternative they look at the wrong body of water entirely because they got the general wind pattern of the region wrong in the first place.

Are these the experts I’m supposed to be taking at face value? I will note here that I’m not actually cherry-picking because I found a lot of problematic research and careless conclusions when simply following references of well-regarded sources. Basically, I couldn’t help tripping over it.

Simon
Reply to  Luke B
August 8, 2022 11:49 pm

Without any references I can’t comment. But here’s the thing, peer review is not a guarantee that they will get all things right, but they get a whooooolllllleeee lot more right than the enthusiastic amateurs.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 9, 2022 8:09 am

Actual data doesn’t support your conclusions.

Luke B
Reply to  Simon
August 9, 2022 5:39 pm

Future of the human climate niche Chi Xu, Timothy A. Kohler, Timothy M. Lenton, Jens-Christian Svenning, Marten Scheffer Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences May 2020, 117 (21) 11350-11355; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910114117

https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.1910114117

This is the first one to which I referred.
My dad was shocked that this got published since one could reasonably assign a middle schooler to work on refuting some of its points.

b.nice
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 4:26 pm

“are you saying we should listen to people who are knowledgable in their field?”

Something Simon has never done.

Simon exists on the ignorance of the Gruniad. !

A confused little muppet.

MarkW
Reply to  b.nice
August 8, 2022 6:31 pm

Simon believes that only those who agree with him, count as being knowledgeable.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 6:50 pm

“Simon believes that only those who agree with him, count as being knowledgeable.”
Kettle meet pot…

Last edited 1 month ago by Simon
MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 9:15 pm

The difference is that I can show why the people I agree with are experts. You on the other hand just take the word of those who tell you what to think.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 9:38 pm

The difference is that I can show why the people I agree with are experts.”
You also make a hell of a lot of stuff up.

Simon
Reply to  b.nice
August 8, 2022 6:51 pm

Simon exists on the ignorance of the Gruniad. !”
And you know this how?

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 9:16 pm

By every word you write.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 9:19 pm

Shows how little you know then.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 9, 2022 8:09 am

Nobody has ever learned anything reading what you have written.

michel
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 7:26 am

Not true. Look again at Homewood’s analysis. The strike price is only one aspect. Take out all the other subsidies, and compare the product being delivered, and both wind and solar are far more expensive and far less functional.

New renewables are not coming in without subsidy. Propose to treat them on a totally open market basis, no-one compelled to buy their stuff unless they find it fit for purpose and priced to that, and listen to the howls of anguish!

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 9:06 am

One type of subsidy has declined by a tiny amount. However the big subsidies remain and even get bigger.
The requirement that grid operators must buy whatever the wind and power charlatans produce, whether it is needed or not, followed by the failure to require wind and solar to produce power when it is needed, are the biggest subsidies.

Iain Reid
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 11:45 pm

Griff,

strike price for wind is not a basis for the cost of wind, simply because of all the many other costs that are required to make up for the intermittency and technical problems of incorporating wind into the grid. Wind, solar, wave tidal etc are not an equivalent to conventional generation and cannot replace it.
Nuclear strike price is the end of cost as it requires no special measures to feed the grid with it’s power.

The energy writers in the media do not seem to have grasped this simple fact and continue the relentless wind is cheap nonsense.

It doesn't add up...
Reply to  griff
August 10, 2022 7:38 am

Most renewables production is not under CFDs. It gets at least market price (the newest wind farms), or an ROC subsidy on top. The average CfD price paid out has been below and above market in recent months. There has been no great refund for consumers.

TheFinalNail
Reply to  michel
August 8, 2022 4:00 am

Paul Homewood has calculated that the total subsidy directed to wind and solar in the UK amounts to about 450 Sterling per household per year.

This, even if true, has absolutely nothing to do with the current crisis, which is the result of increased gas and oil prices. Increased costs to customers while companies and their shareholders rake in record profits. That’s why the ‘Don’t Pay’ crowd are angry. Nothing to do with renewables.

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 5:01 am

Everything to do with renewables aka Net Zero. Market is fixed so renwables are the supplier of choice when available, paid to switch off in oversupply situations, not forced to commit to supply specific amounts at specific times in advance.
Ban fracking and new North Sea exploration and development, close coal mines close and demolish the powerstations using coal. To cap it all then countries choose a single source with an aggresive stance against a neighbour. Talk about taking careful aim and shooting yourself in the foot.

There’s an apocryphal story of a Recruiting Sergeant in a post clearance Highland Settlement asking the lone old man why there are no young men to sign up as soldiers for the latest war. His reply “It’s gone to sheep, and since you preferred sheep to men let the sheep defend you”

Since you preferred renewables to fossil fuel let renewables supply your energy, or pay us the going rate for the short supply you created.

michel
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 7:22 am

As I have pointed out a couple of times, the rise in gas prices is not caused by attempting to switch to wind and solar generation.

But what you’re missing is that the rise in gas prices is happening against the backdrop of that switch, which brought with it the decomissioning of coal fired stations.

The result of that is the country has no alternative. Its not the rise in price of one form of energy that makes it a crisis. The lack of any alternative to that form is what makes it a crisis. For that, blame the greens.

And by the way, rising profits are a consequence of rising prices. Margins are not rising. The price rises, and therefore margins rise in absolute terms, not percentage terms.

There’s only one solution: drop Net Zero, drop all the various renewable subsidies, and a crash program to build out modern superheated coal plants.

Anything else leads to cold, rationing and poverty. And recession.

MarkW
Reply to  michel
August 8, 2022 9:08 am

Like most socialists, when TFN is forced to choose between what the party tells him to believe and reality, he chooses the party. Got to protect his subsidies after all.

MarkW
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 9:07 am

What is it about trolls and their eagerness to repeat the same disproven lies over and over again,

b.nice
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 4:33 pm

As you said above….

THE LIES ARE DELIBERATE.

and the ignorance is deep-seated.

b.nice
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 4:30 pm

WRONG!

The current crisis is ABSOLUTELY AND COMPLETELY because of the “greenie” agenda.

UK still has massive amounts of COAL AND GAS that would still be being used were it not for the IDIOTIC ANTI-CO2 agenda.

With that agenda, and the absurd subsidies and mandates to push wind and solar unreliables, this problem of unreliable expensive electricity WOULD NEVER HAVE ARISEN.

ThinkingScientist
Reply to  michel
August 8, 2022 12:47 pm

Gas prices were rising continuously through 2021. Thats why so many “energy suppliers” failed between July 2021 and January 2022. The price rose from around 50 to about 200p/therm by October 2021.

Ukraine was a month later. It contributed volatility but not much to the price. Ukraine is the politician’s smokescreen.

Natural gas – BBC News

And as for the oil price, that started rising around November 2020 when Biden was elected:

Oil – BBC News

Oil went from $100 to $120 when Ukraine was invaded, but that has fallen back already and UK pump prices are already levelling off or dropping slightly.

In both cases click the “5 yr” icon to see the longer term picture.

Ed Zuiderwijk
August 8, 2022 1:48 am

They are missing the point. What they should be demanding is that Milliband’s climate act be scrapped lock stock and barrel, that all subsidies for green hobbies be stopped forthwith. That would cut the cost of energy in half straightaway.

michel
Reply to  Ed Zuiderwijk
August 8, 2022 2:22 am

Unfortunately not. It would reduce by a total of 450.00 per household, on average. Paul Homewood has analyzed it in detail. This would help, but it would not cut prices in half. Nowhere near. You cannot get away from the fact that the main culprit is the rise in gas prices. This has happened, as I say below, in the context of the green energy insanity. But dropping green subsidies will not deal with the problem. It will help, but it won’t deal with it.

The correct solution is to build, immediately, lots of modern high efficiency coal fired stations. But they will not do that, of course. This is the context.

griff
Reply to  michel
August 8, 2022 2:32 am

There isn’t any coal mining infrastructure in the UK… 50% of coal we use is russian currently.

and the geology is against easy access to large coal volumes… unless you want open cast mining?

Eng_Ian
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 2:51 am

I suppose that fracking for gas would meet the demand. Would you encourage/support fracking for gas under the north sea?

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 5:04 am

No point in considering it.Even if we had coal there are no power stations left capable of using it, all but a couple demolished.

Right-Handed Shark
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 5:34 am
michel
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 7:34 am

One thing there is no lack of is coal, and people willing to mine and sell it to the UK. Now, its not a very nice fuel. The human costs are extreme. Its polluting.

But power stations based on it do deliver reliable electricity, 24 x7, with scheduled maintenance.

Make the unreliables do that, and watch the costs go through the roof. Storage or backup, makes no difference. One is too expensive to be considered, and there are operational issues too. The other means you don’t need the unreliables in the first place.

And no, the UK is not going to get through the winter unscathed. A cold January or February, with a blocking high, and there will be power outages and curtailing of gas supply to businesses (because you can’t curtail gas to homes for safety reasons on restart).

Its going to be very nasty. Put in weather stripping, and buy some fleeces and some hot water bottles. You are going to need them.

Pat from Kerbob
Reply to  michel
August 8, 2022 8:14 am

Just spent three weeks in the UK with family, every place we stayed would be a death trap in the cold, poorly insulated, leaky single pane windows and doors, simply not adapted for cold.
UK should start burning all the coal they can dig up and hope the scientologists are right about CO2, its the only thing that will save them.

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  Pat from Kerbob
August 8, 2022 1:17 pm

I grew up in one of those houses in the 1950s and 60s, except without electricity, mains gas and other more conveniences. Modern Britons would find those conditions extremely difficult to survive, it’s one thing I wish for Griff – a couple of winters without gas and electricity

MarkW
Reply to  michel
August 8, 2022 9:11 am

Coal is not polluting when burned in modern power plants.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 9:10 am

Nothing wrong with open cast mining. It’s efficient and when the mining is done and the holes are filled in, you can’t tell that it was ever there.

Gerald the Mole
August 8, 2022 1:54 am

The sheeple are getting what they voted for.

griff
Reply to  Gerald the Mole
August 8, 2022 2:31 am

Brexit and austerity…

Gerald the Mole
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 3:28 am

Hi Griff, I am honoured that you have responded to one of my comments even though your comment is irrelevant.

Disputin
Reply to  Gerald the Mole
August 8, 2022 6:17 am

Griff’s comments are always irrelevant.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 9:11 am

When did they vote for austerity?

Simonsays
Reply to  Gerald the Mole
August 8, 2022 3:23 am

Election have consequences. Most voters don’t know that!

HotScot
Reply to  Simonsays
August 8, 2022 7:00 am

The consequences would now be even worse than they are had the UK voted for the socialists at the last election.

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 8:09 am

I’ve never voted Labour just to get that clear.
I feel that the fact that since Cameron reigned in 2016 we’re going to have our third PM chosen by Tory Party members is not a good thing in all respects. Expecially as only one went on to win an election and did it on a single issue which despite claims was not an oven ready deal, nor did it take back control.

MarkW
Reply to  HotScot
August 8, 2022 9:13 am

One party pushes full socialism, the other party pushes socialism light.
The only difference is how fast down the road to hell you are going.

MarkW
Reply to  Simonsays
August 8, 2022 9:12 am

The voters voted for the party that promised them the most free stuff.
They rarely stop to think of all the baggage that comes with the free stuff.

DiggerUK
August 8, 2022 2:04 am

This doesn’t even qualify as a byline, let alone a headline.
There are in the region of 25 million homes in the UK, and less than a hundred thousand threatening to withhold payment. This isn’t the start of the revolution comrades.

There will be more than this move home without paying when they leave…_

IanE
Reply to  DiggerUK
August 8, 2022 2:51 am

I think you fail to understand that margins are low – despite all the wild claims of profiteering. Once margins go negative, the brown stuff is going to seriously hit the rotating blades!

DiggerUK
Reply to  IanE
August 8, 2022 4:36 am

Well, it’s a reply Jim.

griff
August 8, 2022 2:28 am

and that is entirely down to fossil fuel issues and/or international politics.

(The UK uses only 4% Russian gas and will have enough to get through the winter)

IanE
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 2:50 am

Well, yes:fossil fuel issues – because they have almost stopped the use of decent, cheap fossil fuels. All because of a childish fairy story.

TheFinalNail
Reply to  IanE
August 8, 2022 4:07 am

… they have almost stopped the use of decent, cheap fossil fuels.

Current UK fuel generation:

Fossil Fuels: 51.6%
Renewables: 29.2%

(As of 12pm GMT, 08/08/2022)

fretslider
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 4:47 am

Unreliables are not enough for a modern liberal society.

They never will be

IanE
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 5:05 am

Coal?

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 5:14 am

That’s because renewables aren’t delivering this week. in particular wind and solar at night
Wind less than 10% of installed capacity
Solar just over 50% of installed capacity
Combined wind + Solar about 25% of intsalled capacity.
When it’s dark tonight combined about 7% of installed.

Thanks to numerically and scientifically ignorant politicians we have a shortage of reliable energy hence market forces which don’t apply to renewables come into play.

Old Man Winter
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 6:31 am

“Renewables: 29.2%”

Of which is the 2 GW “ultra-dirty” bio with the “FREE 33% CO2 CHIPPING BONUS”!

Last edited 1 month ago by Old Man Winter
HotScot
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 7:08 am

That’s 80.2%

Where’s the rest coming from, unicorns?

Why are alarmist’s incapable of doing straightforward arithmetic?

MarkW
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 9:16 am

That’s 29.2% too much.

b.nice
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 8, 2022 4:55 pm

WOW..

so LUCKY there is still enough FOSSIL FUEL available, hey.

What happens when there isn’t?

Better open up those UK gas fields so that remains the case.

I’m sure any sane person would agree.

paul
Reply to  TheFinalNail
August 9, 2022 6:35 pm

29% is a sorry ass number for something that is supposed to be the future.
of energy

Eng_Ian
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 2:55 am

Do the interconnecting cables connect to the continent? If so, surely Britain is also exposed to the rising cost of electricity production where Russian gas is greater than 4% utilisation.

Or do the interconnectors only bring in W&S generated electrons and these can be bought on the spot market for less than the continental locals can buy gas derived power?

Can you explain how an interconnected market is not going to see similar price drivers?

fretslider
Reply to  Eng_Ian
August 8, 2022 4:09 am

“Britain is also exposed to the rising cost of electricity production”

Exposed?!!!

  • “only by paying record-high £9,724 per megawatt hour did lights stay on
  • Price hike above 5,000% came after emergency talks with Belgian suppliers

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11047167/UK-forced-electricity-Belgium-heatwave-stop-blackout-paid-5-000-MORE.html

When they’re prepared to pay those rates rather than frack and drill…

Last edited 1 month ago by fretslider
ResourceGuy
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 5:49 am

So natural gas and electricity are not fungible goods and not interconnected eh?

ResourceGuy
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 5:51 am

I think North America needs a wood export tax.

WSJ
Enviva is building several new pellet plants in the Southern Pine Belt with the aim of doubling production capacity over the next five years. It buys branches, bark, understory brush, sawdust, spindly or diseased logs and other waste wood from landowners and sawmills and processes the fiber into pellets that are about the circumference of a piece of chalk.
The company’s output flows from ports along the Atlantic and the northern Gulf of Mexico to European utilities and through the Panama Canal to Asia. Japan is a big importer, and Enviva has set up a sales outpost in Taiwan ahead of a big state-owned coal plant’s conversion to pellets.
The company on Thursday said it signed five-, 10- and 15-year supply contracts with new customers in Germany. One will burn Enviva’s pellets to produce heat used in a manufacturing process and another is replacing lignite coal and natural gas, which have surged in price even more than pellets. An existing customer elsewhere in Europe agreed to pay a higher price in exchange for more guaranteed volume.
Though some scientists and environmental groups contend that wood-fired generation is no cleaner than coal when it comes to emissions, burning biomass counts toward renewable-energy targets under European rules. Demand was already rising when Russia invaded Ukraine, leading to bans on imports from the aggressor, along with ally Belarus, and interrupting shipments from Ukraine.

Mr.
Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 8, 2022 9:08 am

Realities can always be ignored in order to accommodate a politically correct (“green”) arrangement.

And that’s what is rooting power production all around the world.

ThinkingScientist
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 12:53 pm

The issue will be if Putin switches off all gas to Germany and EU then EU will divert any spare electricity internally. UK has relied on interconnector’s to balance grid, they won’t be there.

We need to get self-sufficient and quick.

b.nice
Reply to  griff
August 8, 2022 4:59 pm

WRONG.... yet again….

The lack of available low cost electricity is ABSOLUTELY BECAUSE OF THE ANTI-CO2 AGENDA

UK could easily provide enough COAL AND GAS from its own resources.

Its greenie politics, un-backed by any rational science, that has caused this problem.

observa
August 8, 2022 2:50 am
fretslider
August 8, 2022 3:17 am

I got a copy of their email from a friend. Naturally, I have sent it on to other friends.

Hi Friend,

Thanks for your support.

The response we’ve had so far has been incredible – thousands of you have ordered leaflets to distribute and indicated that you want to start local campaigns in hundereds of towns across the country.

We’ve had messages of support from all sorts of people and groups across the country, from different background and with different beliefs.

This energy crisis affects all of us, and it’s up to all of us to stand up for ourselves.
We’re putting in place the infrastructure we need to build this campaign up seriously across the country. You’ll hear from us again very soon.

In the meantime, here are a few things you can do to help:

  • Print leaflets! We need to get Don’t Pay everywhere. This means talking to our neighbours, friends and family.
  • If you can, donate a few pounds to help us print flyers and pay for sending out emails.
  • Follow us on social media and mention us when people talk about energy bills.
  • If you are up for organising a local group, let us know if you haven’t already.

We need to build a critical mass of support to show the government and big energy companies that we are serious. A million people is a lot, but we have to think big.
That’s why we need people like you to take this idea and run with it. Make it your own and make it work for the people you know.

Solidarity,

Don’t Pay UK

Reply to  fretslider
August 8, 2022 5:02 am

I would recommend you print your own leaflets showing the real reasons why prices are high. And then end it with a joke – “What did people use for lights before candles? Electricity.”

August 8, 2022 3:57 am

Instead of UK wasting £3 trillion on climate change when other countries are building even more coal-fired power plants we should use it to subsidise energy bills

ih_fan
Reply to  Clark Cross
August 8, 2022 11:53 am

we should use it to subsidise energy bills

Or build nuclear power generation plants.

Vuk
August 8, 2022 4:30 am

Meanwhile BoJo and missus are “harmonising their rhythm with their inner balance’ thanks to ‘four energy points’ that were discovered ‘centuries ago’ in their hotel’s backyard’.” -reports Daily Mail.
In case you are tempted it is in place called Jezersko (not to be confused with Mars’ crater Jezero where the NASA’s Perseverance Rover is harmonising it’s rhythm) in country called Slovenia that no one ever heard of until President Trump married local girl called Melania Knauss.

Last edited 1 month ago by Vuk
Richard Page
Reply to  Vuk
August 9, 2022 2:51 pm

I’m sorry, are we discussing the same place? The country that was part of Yugoslavia until 1991? That Slovenia? I still have a Fodor’s guide that’s older than that country! Mind you, I still have a Fodor’s guide to the Soviet Union so it probably isn’t the best comparison!

George V
August 8, 2022 4:43 am

If this situation were to occur in the US, there would be plenty of activists working to convince the government to force the suppliers of power to pay the bills of those who cannot afford to pay. Of course, the suppliers of power then have to raise rates even more, causing more people to be unable to afford to pay bills, meaning the circle continues.

H.R.
Reply to  George V
August 8, 2022 8:33 am

You’re right, George. The gub’mint already did that on phone bills. If you look, there’s a charge (tax) that’s used to buy cellphones for poor people. I didn’t realize that having a cellphone was a basic ‘right’ but according to the regressives, it seems it is.

John Pickens
Reply to  George V
August 8, 2022 8:50 am

Sorry, that ship has sailed. In the US, assistance with payment of utility bills by low income households is already happening. It is administered by the states, and “paid for” by the US government under one of the many deficit spending measures passed by Congress.

MarkW
Reply to  George V
August 8, 2022 9:19 am

And when the whole system collapses, the same activists will declare that this just proves that the private sector is not capable of running power systems, so the whole thing has to be nationalized. That way power can be free for everybody. Government will just tax the rich to pay for it all.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 8, 2022 1:29 pm

And when the whole system collapses, …”
You are such an alarmist. The UK is not Texas.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 1:53 pm

Texas is in much better shape.
Regardless, you think that in the scenario described by George V, the system won’t collapse?
Or are you really just that eager to “as always” display your ignorance?

b.nice
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 5:02 pm

Yes, we know Texas has FAR TOO MUCH wind and solar to remain viable in bad weather conditions.

They should have stuck with RELIABLE Coal and gas for most of their supply.

Thanks for pointing out the blatantly obvious..

Simon
Reply to  b.nice
August 8, 2022 6:42 pm

“Yes, we know Texas has FAR TOO MUCH wind and solar to remain viable in bad weather conditions.”
Yeah nah.. except it wasn’t the wind and solar that was the problem. It was that Texas took a gamble and went it alone.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 8, 2022 9:20 pm

Once again, Simon takes the time to demonstrate his ignorance of reality.
Even if Texas had thousands of inter-ties, none of the grids surrounding it had any power to sell. They were all asking their customers to cut back as well.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 9, 2022 1:25 am

That’s a fictional version of the reality. Maybe you have a writing career to explore.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 9, 2022 8:12 am

The fact that every grid in the south and southwest was also struggling is reality. Just check the data. For once.

It doesn't add up...
Reply to  Simon
August 10, 2022 7:54 am

It was that Texas didn’t have enough dispatchable capacity avaliable, so when the wind died they ran out of reserve and then lost power to a cascading trip which knocked out supply to gas compressors, thus cutting gas supply to homes and power stations.

Jim Gorman
August 8, 2022 5:24 am

Regardless of what Griff and TFN say, they are whistling past the grave yard. This is a Ponzi scheme where wind and solar are collecting the money from everyone. Sooner or later the returns will fall and electricity will either become unaffordable in order to keep it running and/or non-existent.

Ben Vorlich
August 8, 2022 5:24 am

The reason the authorities don’t want non-payment to take hold is quite simple. Cutting off supply in winter will cause death, and that will lead to social unrest and public demonstrations.
Keeping supplies going will bankrupt energy suppliers, meaning one of two things, bailouts highly unpopular as politicians have convinced the public energy companies are the bad guys, or nationalisation something Conservative governments are against in principle.

The Poll Tax Riots were predictable, depending on several factors there may be demonstrations and riots.

If I were BP or Shell I’d start an ad campaign blaming government policies for the fuel shortages which is the truth of the matter

TonyG
Reply to  Ben Vorlich
August 8, 2022 10:40 am

BP and Shell, and the rest of them, don’t have the spine to do any such thing though. Never have.

ResourceGuy
August 8, 2022 5:31 am

They can still burn other peoples’ wood. Is this green colonialism?

WSJ
The wood-pellet market is on fire.
War has cut off the supply of compressed-wood pellets from Russia, Belarus and Ukraine to the power plants in Western Europe that burn them instead of coal. That has put a premium on pellets from North America, especially the U.S. South.
U.S. export volume, which has climbed steadily over the past decade, is running ahead of last year, when a record of more than 7.4 million metric tons of U.S. wood pellets were sold abroad, according to the Foreign Agricultural Service. The average price before insurance and shipping costs has risen to nearly $170 a metric ton, from around $140 last year. 

Enviva is building several new pellet plants in the Southern Pine Belt with the aim of doubling production capacity over the next five years. It buys branches, bark, understory brush, sawdust, spindly or diseased logs and other waste wood from landowners and sawmills and processes the fiber into pellets that are about the circumference of a piece of chalk.
The company’s output flows from ports along the Atlantic and the northern Gulf of Mexico to European utilities and through the Panama Canal to Asia. Japan is a big importer, and Enviva has set up a sales outpost in Taiwan ahead of a big state-owned coal plant’s conversion to pellets.
The company on Thursday said it signed five-, 10- and 15-year supply contracts with new customers in Germany. One will burn Enviva’s pellets to produce heat used in a manufacturing process and another is replacing lignite coal and natural gas, which have surged in price even more than pellets. An existing customer elsewhere in Europe agreed to pay a higher price in exchange for more guaranteed volume.
Though some scientists and environmental groups contend that wood-fired generation is no cleaner than coal when it comes to emissions, burning biomass counts toward renewable-energy targets under European rules. Demand was already rising when Russia invaded Ukraine, leading to bans on imports from the aggressor, along with ally Belarus, and interrupting shipments from Ukraine.

Disputin
August 8, 2022 5:56 am

Erm… Not paying the “poll tax” is one thing – you don’t in fact get anything for a tax, but you do get something for electricity, you get, um, electricity. What’s to stop them simply cutting you off for non-payment?

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  Disputin
August 8, 2022 8:19 am

The backlash from the public. A few deaths from cold will make headlines, which excess winter deaths don’t.
If all these non payers then go to a repayment plan then the supplier still has a problem, It’s a bit like owing mony to the bank, £5,000 is your problem, £50,000,000,000 is the bank’s problem

Olen
August 8, 2022 7:57 am

The power to limit food and energy is the power over life and politicians have decided to use it.

Gordon A. Dressler
August 8, 2022 8:01 am

Just wondering if Britons can buy coal or charcoal—perhaps peat from Ireland—on the open market?

Richard Page
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
August 9, 2022 2:55 pm

Not sure we’re allowed to buy peat anymore, are we? Isn’t it supposed to be bad for either wetland habitat’s, climate change and/or CO2 sinks or summat?

Pat from Kerbob
August 8, 2022 8:14 am

Just spent three weeks in the UK with family, every place we stayed would be a death trap in the cold, poorly insulated, leaky single pane windows and doors, simply not adapted for cold.
UK should start burning all the coal they can dig up and hope the scientologists are right about CO2, its the only thing that will save them.

Luke B
Reply to  Pat from Kerbob
August 9, 2022 6:42 pm

That is rather terrifying.

niceguy
August 8, 2022 8:24 am

Ofcom has responded by begging people not to boycott their bills;

Ofcom?

Ofcom is the UK’s communications regulator. We regulate the TV, radio and video on demand sectors, fixed line telecoms, mobiles, postal services

It doesn't add up...
Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 10, 2022 7:57 am

Are they taxing big oil producers like Russia, Saudi, China?

GORDON
August 8, 2022 9:46 am

UK folks should consider using the money saved from not paying their energy bills to buy Diesel Generators and Electric Heaters. Diesel is much safer to handle than gasoline.
Neighborhoods could get together to buy a couple and start their own grid.

Robert Wager
August 8, 2022 10:49 am

Mean while the La Niña continues to grow in strength and the AMO is shifting back to cold for the coming decades.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Robert Wager
August 8, 2022 1:40 pm

Details, details

Don’t look up

marlene
August 8, 2022 4:01 pm

FACEBOOK: Your message couldn’t be sent because it includes content that other people on Facebook have reported as abusive

markl
August 8, 2022 8:26 pm

I feel for our allies all over the world being used as climate change dummies. Unfortunately the UK is one of the hardest hit and most agreeable with the AGW mantra.

Bob
August 8, 2022 8:38 pm

I blame government politicians, bureaucrats and administrators, they are 100% responsible. At some point these devils need to be dealt with, they are extremely dangerous.

Jeremy Poynton
August 9, 2022 1:02 am

We’re signed up and I am just printing A4 flyers from the site to put through our neighbour’s letter boxes. Enough. Compliance in this household is now ZERO.

James Bull
August 9, 2022 9:33 am

I’ll have to look into this as something I can do, not that we can’t afford it at the moment but more in support of those who can’t and are being pushed further and further down by the stupid eco nuts.
Unfortunately most of the UK’s fleet of coal power stations are now housing estates so reducing actual cost of power is going to be problematic.
We’re also fighting against the vested interests of those who don’t care about anyone or anything other than their agenda.

James Bull

It doesn't add up...
August 10, 2022 6:53 am

It’s going to be a great test of smart meters. Lots of automated disconnections for non payment. Lots of excess deaths in under-heated homes where the cold makes fighting illness hard.

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