UK Police Lego. Rob Young from United Kingdom [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons (image modified)

Electric police cars are ‘running out of puff’ and causing ‘lots of problems’

Essay by Eric Worrall

“Running out of puff and then having to get another vehicle” – Who could have guessed electric vehicles don’t have the stamina required for reliable police duty?

Electric police cars are ‘running out of puff’ and causing ‘lots of problems’

ELECTRIC police cars are running out of charge when responding to emergencies because the sirens and blue lights drain the batteries, according to a Police and Crime Commissioner.

By FELIX REEVES

08:06, Wed, Jul 6, 2022 | UPDATED: 22:51, Wed, Jul 6, 2022

Gloucester Constabulary has the largest full electric fleet in the UK, with 21 percent of their 435 vehicles being electric. Chris Nelson, Conservative Police and Crime Commissioner for Gloucester, said officers who were driving the electric vehicles had difficult experiences finding chargers in the county.

A spokesperson for Tesla said the Model 3 had been able to do over 200 miles of blue light advanced driving.

It was able able to take part in runs that lasted four hours on active deployment under “advanced driving conditions”.

The tests come as police forces prepare for the 2030 ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles.

Mr Nelson continued, saying: “I’ve heard lots of problems with officers driving around in electric vehicles having problems trying to find recharging facilities.

“Running out of puff and then having to get another vehicle.

Read more: https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/cars/1636132/electric-car-police-use-battery-range-anxiety-pcc-gloucester-warning

Do police ask criminals they are pursuing to take a coffee break while they put their EVs on fast chargers?

EVs might be barely viable for ordinary people who don’t have to drive much, in a nation as compact as Britain. For police use, not so much.

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rhs
Reply to  roaddog
July 9, 2022 6:17 am

I live near Longmont, too bad this story didn’t make any useful news around here. The only news was an F150 Lighting was used to charge a Telsa.

Bryan A
Reply to  rhs
July 9, 2022 7:38 am

The only time battery emergency vehicles make sense is … Never
The only time EV Police cars will function well enough is when criminals are forced to drive EVs with far shorter ranges than Police EV Cruisers

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  Bryan A
July 9, 2022 10:17 am

When fossil-fueld cars are made illegal, then only criminals will have fossil-fueled cars.

Bryan A
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 9, 2022 12:05 pm

But, would they be able to find gas or diesel to refuel them?

cpratt@telusplanet.net
Reply to  Bryan A
July 9, 2022 8:29 pm

Ummmm Criminals are able to find ILLEGAL GUNS now….

Bryan A
Reply to  cpratt@telusplanet.net
July 10, 2022 10:19 am

But LEGAL guns exist and Legal Gas exists. If all Gas we’re illegal, where would they find it?
It isn’t like you could easily create in your backyard…
An Oil source
An Oil Refinery
Any/all of the 150 hydrocarbon chemicals that are combined in finished gas
Thousands of gallons of storage.

Making gas is far different from making whiskey or moonshine

MarkW
Reply to  Bryan A
July 10, 2022 1:06 pm

Even if legal guns did not exist, criminals will still be able to get their hands on guns. Just look at the availability of illegal drugs.

Bryan A
Reply to  MarkW
July 10, 2022 3:51 pm

Guns are also far easier to make in a simple tool shop, you only needs a small steel pipe a nail and a welder. Gas…not so much

MarkW
Reply to  Bryan A
July 10, 2022 5:08 pm

According to the reports I have read, former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was killed with a homemade gun.

Bryan A
Reply to  MarkW
July 10, 2022 10:09 pm

Exactly what I’m pointing out.
Anyone with a little ingenuity and a couple of parts can assemble a Zip Gun in their garage that can kill.

(You can even 3d print the necessary parts to assemble a functioning firearm)

But it takes far too many chemicals & much expertise to be able to refine oil into gasoline (that would work in most engines) in a space small enough to go unnoticed.

You’d do better to rebuild an ICE to run off pure ethanol and distill that in your garage

Last edited 1 month ago by Bryan A
AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Bryan A
July 11, 2022 4:29 am

At black market gas stations, of course.

MrGrimNasty
July 9, 2022 2:10 am

Well if you need another contender for most inappropriate use of battery power, idea most likely to fail….
https://notrickszone.com/2022/07/08/john-deere-engineers-really-aiming-to-build-battery-powered-harvesters/

Peta of Newark
Reply to  MrGrimNasty
July 9, 2022 3:57 am

John Deere did way too much harm when he invented the all-steel plough, or especially the coulter-disc that could cut the roots of the prairie grasses.

Ploughs are going to ki11 near infinitely more people than swords could ever hope to achieve.
Even nuclear swords.

Bad News for all you Lo-Till No-Till advocates out there, Roundup/Glyphosate is unimaginably worse than even ploughing is.

Because Roundup is a patented anti-biotic- the word translates as ‘Anti-Life
Just for once in this crazed and farcical world, somebody actually got something right.

MR166
Reply to  Peta of Newark
July 9, 2022 5:25 am

You have failed to mention that all of these farming advances have lifted most major cities out of food poverty. Here in the North East US acres and acres of land now have trees where once there were bare substance farms.

Spetzer86
Reply to  MR166
July 9, 2022 5:59 am

Of course, in some NE states, taxes had as much to do with it as income.

MR166
Reply to  MR166
July 9, 2022 7:00 am

Boy I sure do need an edit button!!!

bare sustanance farms.

william Johnston
Reply to  MR166
July 9, 2022 7:17 am

Subsistance? per chance?

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  MR166
July 9, 2022 8:43 am

“Sustanance” isn’t a word either.

MR166
Reply to  Jeff Alberts
July 9, 2022 11:54 am

As you can tell spelling was never me strong point.

Last chance!!

Sustenance definition, means of sustaining or supporting life or health; nourishment, especially food and drink: The small farm provided sustenance for the family of four during tough times.

MR166
Reply to  MR166
July 9, 2022 11:55 am

OMG it just keep getting worse.

As you can tell spelling was never MY strong point.

Janice Moore
Reply to  MR166
July 9, 2022 12:52 pm

But, your persevering, pleasant, personality and your well-informed mind make your lack of spelling ability negligible.

At least, your spelling mistake wasn’t made into a T-shirt
comment image

Janice Moore
Reply to  Janice Moore
July 9, 2022 1:03 pm

P.S. It took me awhile to find it, but, we DO have an edit button in our comments (available for about 10 minutes or so). It is invisible until you hover over it. It is a pale gray gear symbol.

It is located on the same line as “Reply” in the column to the <– LEFT of the right –>] side of your comment, a distance of 10% of the total width of the comment.

Old Cocky
Reply to  MR166
July 9, 2022 2:30 pm

Aren’t the substance farms in California and Oregon?

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  MR166
July 11, 2022 4:31 am

Think you meant “subsistence.”

Felix
Reply to  Peta of Newark
July 9, 2022 7:49 am

Do you also rant against the moles and gophers which eat roots from below? Insidious little bastards!

MarkW
Reply to  Peta of Newark
July 9, 2022 8:38 am

So farming kills people.

MarkW
Reply to  Peta of Newark
July 9, 2022 8:40 am

Between plows, glyphosate and sugar, I’m surprised that there are any humans left alive.

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  MarkW
July 9, 2022 10:19 am

Pity we weren’t k1lled outright.

cpratt@telusplanet.net
Reply to  Peta of Newark
July 9, 2022 8:31 pm

Food production and life expectancy has gone UP

Ian Magness
July 9, 2022 2:14 am

Police are working on a number of leads.
Sadly, none of them are long enough.

Apologies to the person I stole that joke off (but the police will never catch me).

Redge
Reply to  Ian Magness
July 9, 2022 2:59 am

I think that was a boyhood joke by Arthur Askey

Thanks for the reminder! 😉

Editor
July 9, 2022 2:17 am

“2030 ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles”. I suspect that this ban will end shortly after the new Tory leader takes over. Thank goodness Carrie has been pushed out of number 10 at last.

HotScot
Reply to  Mike Jonas
July 9, 2022 3:02 am

It won’t be immediately, it will be pushed further and further out over time in much the same way Germany has pushed out its coal ban from 2030 to 2035.

Mike Lowe
Reply to  Mike Jonas
July 9, 2022 3:06 am

Yes, BoJo has a lot to answer for, and Carrie is near the top of the list! Glad they are going!

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  Mike Lowe
July 9, 2022 4:27 am

You’re assuming Bunter will actually leave. A man with his track record of making things up to suit the circumstances then denying it ever happened will have to be carried out of Number 10 by at least six able bobied people

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  Mike Lowe
July 9, 2022 10:20 am

May they live happily ever after.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 11, 2022 4:37 am

May they freeze and/or starve to death in the dark along with every other Eco-Nazi loon trying to make that everyone ELSE’S future.

Right-Handed Shark
Reply to  Mike Jonas
July 9, 2022 3:17 am

Let’s hope. But I think only one of yesterday’s contenders, Steve Baker, had his feet on the ground but has decided to drop out. I fear the rest are just as “green” as Boris. God help us all.

Last edited 1 month ago by Right-Handed Shark
rhs
Reply to  Mike Jonas
July 9, 2022 6:06 am

She’ll find a way to influence the next bloke, even if she has to leave BoJo’s side.

Richard Page
Reply to  rhs
July 9, 2022 7:27 am

I think she’s shot her bolt on that one now. The Green blob will have to come up with new ideas to infiltrate their activists into no.10.

scott
July 9, 2022 2:28 am

Cant wait until they try to fight a bushfire in an electric fire truck

Michael ElliottMichael Elliott
Reply to  scott
July 9, 2022 3:00 am

Does the UK ban also apply to Hybreds ?

Michael VK5ELL

Archer
Reply to  Michael ElliottMichael Elliott
July 9, 2022 3:37 am

Yes. From 2035, you’ll only be able to buy new full-electric cars and light goods vehicles. They’ve given a whole five extra years of leeway for all those hybrid drivers.

Last edited 1 month ago by Archer
Giorgio
Reply to  Archer
July 10, 2022 7:26 am

Didn’t know UK had put in place the same absurd ban that the EU has. Or, as it seems, UK did it even before.
One wonders why they pulled out of the EU just to keep making the same mistakes

Bryan A
Reply to  scott
July 11, 2022 9:14 pm

Or electric aircraft dropping Phos-Chek on the fireline

HotScot
July 9, 2022 3:00 am

In my experience, police cars are used 24/7/365 and could easily do 200 miles per 8 hour shift. On beginning our shift one of the first jobs was to do a vehicle check, wash, and fully fuel the cars from the fuel pumps installed at the police offices.

The whole process took around 10 minutes, a little longer if you were single crewed (rare).

Running out of fuel was a disciplinary offence, not to mention the humiliation you would suffer from your colleagues.

The cars were also badly abused. A colleague once ripped the exhaust off our car on a demolished industrial estate. The exhaust pipe was hanging down so he was forced to reverse the car back to the office, about ten miles.

They were used to transport everything, including flea ridden dogs, crime victims, some strange bits of evidence and innumerable bleeding and/or vomiting drunks. The vomit and blood were dealt with by directing a water hose at them, invariably filling footwells with water. Rubber drain plugs in the floor were essential.

They were also used in appalling weather conditions, often being left to tickover with the heater on full so when you returned, it was a welcome haven of warmth.

Of course, the choice of cars were not down to cops who actually used them, they were assessed by the central garage and usually the first to use a new model were senior officers, who, if the even left the office, cruised about trying to catch cops doing something wrong.

EV’s are useless as a practical police vehicle, at least in the 70’s/80’s when I was in the job.

Mike Lowe
Reply to  HotScot
July 9, 2022 3:09 am

Footwell drain plugs in an EV with underfloor battery? Sounds unlikely, so maybe the vomit will just have to stay in the car!

Moderately Cross of East Anglia
Reply to  Mike Lowe
July 9, 2022 10:19 am

Perhaps it is just a cunning plot to electrocute the criminals in the back when the locks mysteriously fail… that doesn’t sound in the least paranoid does it?

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Mike Lowe
July 11, 2022 4:40 am

And eat its way into the batteries. What could go wrong?!

Rob Leviston
Reply to  HotScot
July 9, 2022 3:59 am

Having worked in a 24hr station, our vehicles would run basically all the time. Handed over from one crew to the next. refueling was fine whilst out on patrol. Cars were usually parked in the street outside the station. Only brought into the yard if you were transporting a crook. Cannot even imagine how a police force would function effectively with EV’s!

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  Rob Leviston
July 9, 2022 4:49 am

Like everyone else

Poorly

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  HotScot
July 9, 2022 9:13 am

The exhaust pipe was hanging down so he was forced to reverse the car back to the office, about ten miles.”

Couldn’t have called for a tow?

HotScot
Reply to  Jeff Alberts
July 10, 2022 4:28 am

“Couldn’t have called for a tow?”

Backwards?

Besides, far too much hassle. It would have required us calling our central garage which was about 20 miles away. They would probably have taken a couple of hours to respond, at least.

We got the car back to our office, took another one and left the Bar Officer to arrange to have the vehicle picked up the next day.

Redge
July 9, 2022 3:04 am

Off-Topic:

Sky News headline

Britain could reach 40C by mid-July, forecast computer models predict for first time

Temperatures have never reached 40C in the UK but for the first time ever forecast computer models have shown it could be possible for mid-July.

Given that lefties like Griff never get past the headline, reality buried deep in the story:

“Given that the UK’s previous hottest days have only seen a few places exceed 38C, this was unlike anything forecasters had ever seen before.”

However, it should be noted that this prediction has come from a single member of one ensemble forecast system.

“While it is possible, it’s extremely unlikely, even if the risk is the highest it’s ever been.

More propaganda from Sky News

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  Redge
July 9, 2022 4:41 am

Here in Derby we’ve a couple of days next weekend forecast into low 30s.but mostly low mid 20s on the three weather apps I use. I take an average for the future, if it’s good enough for Cli Sci it’s good enough for me. The fact that a couple of badly sited wether stations have recorded these high temperatures never makes it into the News

Redge
Reply to  Ben Vorlich
July 9, 2022 5:01 am

Forecast for my neck of the woods (Central Cheshire)

40C is just BS for most of us for the foreseeable future

Screenshot 2022-07-09 130034.jpg
Richard Page
Reply to  Redge
July 9, 2022 7:31 am

I’m in Lincoln and it’s been very sunny but not too hot out of the sun and with some cooling breezes.

Last edited 1 month ago by Richard Page
Scissor
Reply to  Redge
July 9, 2022 5:15 am

Yesterday, last night in fact, Boulder was to challenge its July record high temperature today.

Currently, the forecast says it will fail to reach that record high by only 11F.

Janice Moore
Reply to  Scissor
July 9, 2022 1:29 pm

This is the modus operandi of the meteorologists pushing (via “climate change” propaganda) solar, wind, electric vehicle, and like human CO2 scams.

All over the United States, day after day, NOAA and other agencies/individuals predict super HOT or super ccccold temperatures which do not happen. What does the average voter remember? What actually happened? No. They copy/paste, i.e., write over, that data (temporarily (very temporarily) written into their scratchpad memory) with the prediction they kept in the file labelled: “What Democrats must believe.”

fretslider
July 9, 2022 3:08 am

A lucky break?

“Three caravans reported stolen have been found in Gloucestershire. And what’s more, they were all recovered from the same site.”

However, pictures of the recovery operation show police cars towing the mobile homes across an open field“

https://www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk/news/gloucester-news/three-stolen-caravans-recovered-same-7311759

Only a Tesla (£90,000) EV can tow in the UK

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  fretslider
July 9, 2022 12:20 pm

Yet the tow vehicle doesn’t look at all like a Tesla.

Michael in Dublin
July 9, 2022 3:14 am

I love the “Lego” picture for this article.
It helps to make fun of the government strategy.

Ron Long
July 9, 2022 3:32 am

Maybe the realization that EV Police Cars can’t maintain a pursuit is the reason Washington and Illinois have banned pursuit of an escaping motorist (unless escaping from murder or equivalent), they’re getting the public ready for when EV Police Cars are deployed.

Reply to  Ron Long
July 9, 2022 5:12 am

I don’t think that is the reason. The reason Illinois and Washington have banned pursuits is the same reason why California made theft under $900 a misdemeanor instead of a felony. Publicly they say they want reform police and keep the jails free of petty criminals; in reality, they want to destroy society so it can be “built back better”.

MarkW
Reply to  Wade
July 9, 2022 8:50 am

Many of the same districts have let the criminals know that if they shop lift less than $100 worth of stuff, they won’t be prosecuted.

Janice Moore
Reply to  MarkW
July 9, 2022 1:51 pm

Disgusting.

While this is, de facto, happening all over (the scum of the earth run out the door with items and the store most often simply increases the price all the honest people must pay), to make it essentially de jure is revolting.

Bryan A
Reply to  MarkW
July 11, 2022 12:22 pm

But how long until the general public gets fed up and starts kneecapping them with aluminum bats

mal
Reply to  Bryan A
July 11, 2022 9:38 pm

If you do, you will be charge with felon assault and throw in jail for a very long time. After if you are law abiding you are not the protected class anymore.

Bryan A
Reply to  Wade
July 11, 2022 12:21 pm

I guess many homeless people are felons then. Shopping carts cost the stores about $1,200 each to replace. Time to incarcerate house the homeless

No one
Reply to  Ron Long
July 9, 2022 9:36 am

And then they’ll switch to pursuit by electric helicopter.

Given battery weights, they may just be electric hovercraft.

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  No one
July 9, 2022 12:22 pm

Good point, except that there are numerous electric helicopter drones (a friend owns several) that can carry a small payload. However, my friend only gets about 30 minutes per charge.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  No one
July 11, 2022 4:46 am

At least electric hovercraft won’t kill the occupants when they fall to the ground, useless.

Unless they don’t get away from it fast enough before the fire starts, of course.

Peta of Newark
July 9, 2022 3:58 am

farce

July 9, 2022 4:06 am

UK police don’t chase criminals. The clean up rate for burglaries in England is abysmal, some forces haven’t solved a single crime in over two years.

If they are racing anywhere it will be because someone misgendered somebody on Twitter.

Speed
July 9, 2022 4:07 am

Gloucester Constabulary has the largest full electric fleet in the UK, with 21 percent of their 435 vehicles being electric.

21 percent is not a full fleet. 100 percent would be a full fleet.

… officers who were driving the electric vehicles had difficult experiences finding chargers in the county.

If an organization is operating a fleet of electric vehicles in a small geographic area they typically install chargers in the fleet’s garage or lot where the vehicles can be charged overnight. Think UPS or FedEx. A full charge should last a whole shift. This is something that smart people work out before they spend money on a fleet of electric vehicles.

Beagle
Reply to  Speed
July 9, 2022 5:23 am

They just used poor English. They were trying to say that 21% of their fleet were full electric, so not including hybrids as electric.

Archer
Reply to  Speed
July 9, 2022 5:41 am

It’s not a full fleet that’s electric, it’s a fleet that is full-electric.

John_C
Reply to  Speed
July 9, 2022 5:20 pm

So if there are 3 shifts, you need 3 EVs to replace one, cheaper, longer range, more versatile conventional vehicle. I’m not convinced that’s a great trade.

mal
Reply to  Speed
July 11, 2022 9:44 pm

A full charge should last a whole shift. This is something that smart people work out before they spend money on a fleet of electric vehicles.” Smart people would not be thinking of requiring electric car before they build a grid that can support them. In the US we would need to increase electric generation by eight fold to power electric cars. I see none of that happening which means our so called better figure we all can walk. Worst they must think we are going to eat our pets also.

July 9, 2022 4:41 am

When I was young and drove like a speed demon, I would have loved police cars that ran out of battery range before they caught me.

Captain climate
July 9, 2022 4:45 am

We need to put a stop to this. They’re trying to ban the internal combustion engine and give us cars with no range and kill switches.

Reply to  Captain climate
July 9, 2022 6:54 am

Leftists are trying to make gasoline so expensive that more people
will want to buy electric cars.
With the 49mpg CAFE for 2026 models, thanks to the EPA,
there won’t be many new ICE cars for sale (except used ICE cars).
So take good care of your current ICE car.

James Stagg
Reply to  Richard Greene
July 9, 2022 9:10 pm

I intend to drive my ICE truck to my funeral.

Alasdair
July 9, 2022 4:52 am

EVs generate the same problem for the ambulance services. You will roughly but not quite need twice the number of EV than ICE vehicles to provide the same service. The daily logistics would be horrendous with potential death waiting in the wings.

Scissor
Reply to  Alasdair
July 9, 2022 5:20 am

Going to need a bigger parking lot as burning EV buses show that spacing matters to slow the spread.

No one
Reply to  Scissor
July 9, 2022 9:39 am

How many electric fire trucks would be required tor that incident?

Too many.

pigs_in_space
Reply to  Scissor
July 11, 2022 1:11 am

I just sent a report to DFDS about the fact all EV should be treated as hazardous cargo
ie. seperated from all other vehicles
The silence of the their reply is deafening being as they made me destroy EMPTY petrol cans in my boot to satsify their stupidity

An EV is a catastrophe waiting to happen on a channel ferry, on the lines of the chunnel fire or the Mont blanc tunnel fire, except it could spread to the entire car deck and take the ferry down on the lines of the Estonia disaster

ATheoK
July 9, 2022 5:05 am

It was able able to take part in runs that lasted four hours on active deployment under “advanced driving conditions”.

ICE powered police cars typically run for most of an officer’s 6-8 hour shift. Those vehicles then get handed over to the next police shift for another 6-8 hours.

Those shifts include patrolling throughout severe cold/hot/rainy inclement weather

Police departments replacing ICE vehicles with EVs, apparently will require a minimum of 3 times more EVs, likely more to cover EV inability to effectively operate at 100% through a police officer’s shift.

Taking the above article’s claim for 4 hour long shifts, implies 6 times as many EVs will be required to ensure 100% law enforcement coverage.

Any law enforcement department spending their precious vehicle funds on Tesla vehicles should be investigated for misuse of funds.

Having grown up near a city that operated electric trolleys, cities could wire their streets to support electric police vehicles.

Many urban areas run electric third rails for electric commuter trains, but I doubt cities want to run exposed high voltage ground rails through every neighborhood.

Perhaps, urban areas could expand their horse riding forces…

AndyHce
Reply to  ATheoK
July 9, 2022 12:42 pm

And pass legislation that requires criminals to only operate on electrified streets.

vboring
July 9, 2022 5:05 am

This sounds like a BS story. Lights and sirens use almost no energy.

And a map of fast chargers in the UK:
https://www.zap-map.com/live/
There’s no way to link to the filtered version, but you can filter it to only show the fast chargers. They’re everywhere.

rhs
Reply to  vboring
July 9, 2022 6:10 am

Just because a fast charger shows up on a map, doesn’t mean it is available or even functional.

MarkW
Reply to  rhs
July 9, 2022 8:57 am

Two extra points
Fast chargers still take 15 to 30 minutes to charge a battery to around 80%.
Fast chargers are murder on the cars battery. If you are going to fast charge 3 times a day, 7 days a week, you will be buying new batteries around once a year.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  MarkW
July 11, 2022 4:51 am

Plus there is probably a limited number of times that you can “fast charge,” and once that “allotment” is used up, you’ll be stuck with more like 45 minutes for that 80% charge.

MarkW
Reply to  vboring
July 9, 2022 8:55 am

If you had read the article, you would have found out that they are talking about the “advanced driving” that goes along with the lights and sirens being active.
That kind of driving cuts down the mileage that real cars get as well.

Simon
Reply to  vboring
July 9, 2022 2:28 pm

“This sounds like a BS story. Lights and sirens use almost no energy.”
I laughed too. Those were my thoughts when I read this. When you consider how much energy it takes to move a weighty EV, the sirens and lights would be soooo insignificant, I doubt you could even measure the practical difference. But it wont be questioned by the haters.
Meanwhile don’t take your eye of the ever developing ball…
https://cleantechnica.com/2022/06/24/catl-qilin-battery-with-1000-km-range-coming-in-2023/

Last edited 1 month ago by Simon
b.nice
Reply to  Simon
July 9, 2022 3:22 pm

Real data and experience, never was your friend, simple one.

Bryan A
Reply to  b.nice
July 11, 2022 5:52 am

And how much more energy does High Speed Pursuit use?
Hint Ludicrous mode can reduce distance available by more than half

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
July 9, 2022 4:10 pm

Once again, Simon demonstrates that he doesn’t read past the headline.
As to the mythical battery, why don’t we wait until one is actually produced.

According to the article, the battery has 13% more capacity than a Tesla. On the other hand Tesla advertises a 300 mile/480km range. Adding 13% to that gets you up to a 340m/550km range. Not 1000km.

Last edited 1 month ago by MarkW
Simon
Reply to  MarkW
July 9, 2022 4:59 pm

I love how Mark clambers for any possible reason to deny technology he is threatened by. If you actually read what I wrote, I didn’t say it was there yet and I too am skeptical till I see it actually happening…. but it is becoming increasingly obvious the walls are closing in on the knuckle draggers who cling to the old ways…. The exciting part is we will see how this battery stacks up next year when it goes in to production.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
July 9, 2022 9:56 pm

I quoted the article that Simon linked to, yet I’m the one “denying” technology.
I’m getting the impression that once again, Simon only read the title and not the article itself.

Poor Simon, he keeps embarrassing himself, and he’s the only one who doesn’t know it.

Electrics are the way of the future and anyone who disagrees is a knuckledragger? Simon really does believe the propaganda he’s paid to shell out.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
July 9, 2022 10:35 pm

Well, like I say, we will soon see. I for one will be watching to how see this tech works out. This is the biggest battery company in the world and they say it is ready to go. If it can charge to 80% in 10 mins, it will a significant hurdle gone.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
July 10, 2022 1:02 pm

Your faith in vague press releases is interesting.
If this mythical battery actually exists, the person who developed it deserves at least 1 nobel prize, because he’s invented a brand new branch of physics.

BTW, I like the way you back off your outrageous claims when presented with the facts.

Last edited 1 month ago by MarkW
MarkW
Reply to  MarkW
July 10, 2022 1:18 pm

Simon, think about it for a minute or two, if you are capable.
This battery allegedly holds enough power to run a car for 1000km. That’s more than three times the amount of energy that a Tesla battery is capable of holding. So either the battery is three times as large, or they’ve invented a mechanism to triple the energy density of a battery. Really, after decades of eking out tiny increases in density, someone’s claiming to have tripled it?
In addition to that, Do you even a faint inkling of the number of amps that would be needed to fill such a battery in 10 minutes? Tesla rechargers need a cable 1/2 an inch in diameter to recharge their batteries. You are claiming 3 times the capacity charging 3 times as fast. That’s 9 times the current. The Tesla batteries need active cooling systems to keep the battery from destroying itself from the heat generated during charging. This battery is going to be generating 9 times as much heat.

Those are just a few of the reasons why I’m sceptical. Your credulity to any claim that supports what you want to believe is well documented.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
July 10, 2022 1:53 pm

Firstly Einstein, “I” am not claiming anything. As I have said, but you clearly did not understand it, I too am skeptical. But the fact that this is the biggest maker of batteries in the world and they go in to production soon, means I cut them some slack and will look forward to seeing what it does. Unlike you who is really wishing failure on any innovation that does not put money into the oil industry, I am actually excited to see how this plays out. Watch this space….

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
July 10, 2022 5:12 pm

I love the way you socialists assume that anyone who disagrees with you must be in the pay of someone.

I’m skeptical of anything that violates basic laws of physics.
I also pointed out clear errors of math in the press release.

If neither of these bothers you, then no wonder you think socialism is a good idea.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
July 10, 2022 5:50 pm

I love the way you socialists assume that anyone who disagrees with you must be in the pay of someone.”
You are such a hypocrite…
“Simon really does believe the propaganda he’s paid to shell out.”
Pants down there my friend…

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
July 10, 2022 6:36 pm

Poor, poor Simon, is there you go again. Then again, it’s not like you shown enough intelligence to hold down a real job.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
July 10, 2022 7:26 pm

Then again, it’s not like you shown enough intelligence to hold down a real job.”
Like how the hell would you know? Make it up Mark at it again.

Bryan A
Reply to  Simon
July 11, 2022 8:12 am

I wouldn’t necessarily give any credence to websites that publish information from Chinese firms, the CCP controllers can only be trusted to publish propaganda

Simon
Reply to  Bryan A
July 11, 2022 1:56 pm

Fair enough, which is why I said I am skeptical. But still of interest to see what they have because clearly they have something waiting.

Bryan A
Reply to  Simon
July 11, 2022 9:17 pm

Hopefully something more than just another Orbo
Likely only delivers close to promised range in one of these
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuOL6G_Oyxs&t=4s
Or these

Last edited 1 month ago by Bryan A
MarkW
Reply to  Simon
July 11, 2022 11:36 am

During this exchange I have given data and examples from the article you linked to.
You on the other hand just spew insults.

In other words, situation normal.

mal
Reply to  Simon
July 11, 2022 9:50 pm

If the cars go into production and they are bought in mass where are you going to get the power to charge them. The Grid is at it limits now because of the green buckets of spit. So I guess you will be a good little sheepeople and just charge on you allotted days. As if you will have a choice.

Leigh
Reply to  Simon
July 10, 2022 6:10 am

Some obviously have no idea of the current drain of the electronic add-ons in such vehicles, think radio and t/phone comms equipment, radar, data terminals plus lights and sirens, particularly when the vehicle is stationary at an incident scene and depending on the vehicle tasking, battery driven aircon as well.

Simon
Reply to  Leigh
July 10, 2022 1:55 pm

Well lets’ see some data? I own a Tesla and I can tell you I barely notice any difference with the lights and wipers going, so I can’t see why a siren would do diddly squat to the batteries.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
July 10, 2022 5:15 pm

I see Simon has still not actually read the article. In the actual article they make mention of “advanced driving” that is occurring while the lights and siren are on as being the reason for the reduced driving range.

But then, Simon is not interested in any innovation that doesn’t promote his socialist ambitions.

pigs_in_space
Reply to  Simon
July 11, 2022 1:18 am

You obviously know f-all about motor sport.
The police advanced driving is supposed to involve flat out driving then slamming on the brakes constantly.
It’s a bit like hammering around a racing circuit with loads of chicanes and lots of extra load – usually fat plods and their equipment
Very far from your diddly – squat current driving style you are so complacent about.

It shows you know f-all about physics, electronics and load dynamics for a massively overweight car.

Bryan A
Reply to  pigs_in_space
July 11, 2022 8:35 am

At least their center of gravity is near the road surface…nice and low

Simon
Reply to  pigs_in_space
July 11, 2022 7:04 pm

I know mine goes like a scolded cat when I put my foot down.

joe x
July 9, 2022 5:18 am

lots of negativity here about ev police cars. the simple solution is to install charging stations at the donuts shops.

/sarc/

Scissor
Reply to  joe x
July 9, 2022 5:47 am

It’s obvious.

richard
July 9, 2022 5:41 am

Funniest thing I ever read about wind turbines which kind of gave the game away –

“Trident Energy has spotted an opportunity to reduce the risks and costs of providing offshore power. Offshore wind farms are being built in ever deeper, harsher waters. Diesel generators are used to provide power when these are without grid connection – but access for refuelling in this challenging environment is increasingly uncertain. Turbines without power are not an option. Turbine warranties are invalidated, with major implications for insurance and financing. Diesel refuelling costs are very high because of the costs of getting the fuel to the wind farm.

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  richard
July 9, 2022 12:27 pm

Turbines use electricity from the grid? Why?

MarkW
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 9, 2022 9:59 pm

To keep the gear boxes warm when they aren’t being turned at operational speed.
To keep the blades spinning slowly when they aren’t being driven by the wind so that they don’t develop flat spots on the bearings.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 11, 2022 5:45 am

They need to keep turning the mechanism periodically to prevent bearings from being damaged from the mechanism sitting in one spot, and need to heat lubricants in cold weather conditions to keep them “fluid.”

That’s the two reasons I’ve heard of.

Spetzer86
July 9, 2022 5:58 am

So, how long do officers get to sit at a charger while being paid? Does that come out as an official break or is it full pay? Seems like getting a car with a low-charge could be a positive.

MarkW
Reply to  Spetzer86
July 9, 2022 9:01 am

Beyond that, a car being recharged isn’t available to answer calls.

Tim Gorman
Reply to  MarkW
July 10, 2022 5:17 am

Meaning more labor costs (more police officers) for the taxpayers to fund!

rhs
July 9, 2022 6:14 am

I recently read that FedEx will be taking delivery of electric delivery trucks for use in California. The primary use will be on routes where the mileage is 10 – 50 miles per day. My only thought is, what good will 5 electric delivery trucks do? I would expect most do 75 – 125 miles per day.

Duane
July 9, 2022 6:33 am

The average street cop drives somewhere between 10 and 50 miles in a shift. Meaning with with blue lights and all (are they using LED lamps in this particular UK jurisdiction?), they’re getting 200+ miles of range. So a cop coming on shift with a fully charged vehicle should never need a recharge throughout their entire shift. It’s likely that the officers described in this post simply neglected to charge their vehicles. Same thing would happen if the prior shift failed to gas up at the end of their shift.

Then it comes down to charge time. It would make no sense at all to have a police force operate a significant number of EVs without installing Level 3 fast chargers at the precinct vehicle lot or garage. A level 3 charger can provide up to 20 miles of added range per minute of charging. Shift changes take, on average, about 30 minutes for roll call and pre-shift supervisor’s briefing.

So if the off-going shift returns to the precinct house and then plugs the vehicle into a fast charger, by the time shift change is completed the ongoing patrol should always have a full charge, of at least 200+ miles range, at the beginning of every shift. Which is more than enough for at least three shifts worth of driving per day (assuming 8 hour shifts), with blue lights and all.

For those agencies that allow officers to take their vehicle home, then the officers can plug into a level 1 120 VAC home charger overnight (“night” of course varying with the shift) and have a full battery at start of the next shift, again, good enough for at least 4 – 7 days of operations at 1 shift per day.

There should never be a need to “search for a charging station” during their shift.

It is only incompetence and negligence that produces the result described in this post.

tgasloli
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 6:59 am

Unless of course the wind doesn’t blow & the sun doesn’t shine so there isn’t any power for the fast charging station.

When you combine all the parts the renewable scheme can only fail.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  tgasloli
July 10, 2022 4:27 am

“When you combine all the parts the renewable scheme can only fail.”

That’s right. The alarmists/greens are trying to force an unworkable scheme on us.

Bryan A
Reply to  Tom Abbott
July 10, 2022 10:24 pm

And also…
At 120V AC (house current) it takes over 20 hours to recharge a 200mi EV battery from nearly empty. Cops that take their cruisers home will need to have a 480v system at their house to ensure the ability to recharge a potential nearly depleted EV battery after a long shift of chasing badduns

Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 7:02 am

I grew up in a small town of only a few square miles.
There was one police car used 24 hours a day.
Almost constantly on the move.
This police car put on a huge number of miles
and had to be replaced more often than you could
imagine. Not only would electric cars be much more expensive,
but with one car needed 24 hours a day, there would
be no time for charging. Perhaps the burglars (most common crime)
would take off 8 hours a day while the electric police car was charging?

Bryan A
Reply to  Richard Greene
July 10, 2022 10:26 pm

They would need 3 cars to allow for potential use while recharging

Richard Page
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 7:37 am

Plus of course that the faster you go the more charge you use; so if you’re really shifting then that 200 mile range is going to drop rapidly. Just as well then that the police are well known for driving everywhere at 37mph! sarc

Mr.
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 8:10 am

You make the standard mistake of folks who estimate the efficacy of batteries by working on “average” usage requirements.

It’s the “higher than average” demand conditions that render batteries, wind and solar not up to the entire job.

meab
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 8:29 am

You’re lying, AGAIN, DuhWayne.

https://pamplinmedia.com/lor/48-news/244840-112074-ask-a-cop-how-much-mileage-is-put-on-a-police-car?wallit_nosession=1

Quoting: “there is another factor that contributes to the 100,000-mile limit for police vehicles, and that is idling time. The Ford Motor Company states that every one hour of idling is equivalent to driving approximately 25 miles. On a normal 10-hour shift, a patrol vehicle drives between 50 and 100 miles.”

The average patrol car goes 50 to 100 miles per SHIFT, not 10 miles. Many police departments use the same patrol car for two shifts per day. That’s 100 to 200 miles per day. That’s why many police cars are sold after just two or three years – they have amassed 100,000 miles in a short time. DUH.

Police officers run the heater/Air Conditioning while idling. You expect them to sit in -10 degree cars in the winter and 140 degree cars in the summer? Can’t run the heater or A/C without using up the battery, so it’s not just miles per shift.

A Level 1 charger can put 1.5 kW into a battery. A 100 kWh battery would take 66 hours to charge at the police officer’s home, That’s almost 3 days, for the math-challenged (you, DuhWayne). NOT 10 hours.

Li-Ion batteries are good for 600 to 800 full charge/discharge cycles before their degradation starts to accelerate. Charge them twice per day and they won’t last two years.

DuhWayne, you’re a complete ignoranus (not misspelled).

MarkW
Reply to  meab
July 9, 2022 9:14 am

600 to 800 charge/discharge cycles, assuming that they are using normal charging.
With fast charging the number is a lot lower.

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  meab
July 9, 2022 12:33 pm

1) EVs don’t idle. Need to recompute for that.
2) FMC data may well be for American practice, not English.

Meab
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 9, 2022 1:12 pm

It takes energy to run the heater or A/C and the fan. In an EV that energy comes out of the battery, in an ICE car that energy is provided by the engine (A/C) or from waste heat (cabin heater). EVs also need to heat the battery in extremely cold weather. It takes well over a kW to run the cabin heater or A/C. A police car also needs power for the accessories; radio, computer, lights etc. although the power draw from those things are much less than heating and A/C.

Idling was used as shorthand for running systems that need to operate even if the car isn’t moving.

Meab
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 9, 2022 1:20 pm

I have no idea what FMC data is. Tried to DuckDuckGo it, no luck.

Janice Moore
Reply to  Meab
July 9, 2022 2:01 pm

My guess is Ford Motor Company. FORD: Found on Road Dead. OR! Fix Or Repair Daily. Bwah, ha, ha, ha, haaaaaaaaa! 😄

(yes, I am a Chevy fan)

paul
Reply to  Janice Moore
July 9, 2022 6:26 pm

oldies, but goodies…. love it !

Janice Moore
Reply to  paul
July 9, 2022 9:28 pm

: )

MarkW
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 9:04 am

10 to 50 miles on a shift?
Making it up again I see.

Regardless, fast charging a battery several times a day is a good way to ensure that you will have to replace that battery every year.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  MarkW
July 11, 2022 5:52 am

The battery probably won’t even permit fast charging beyond a certain number, so the car will just be plugged in for 45 minutes each time in short order.

MarkW
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 9:16 am

It is only incompetence and negligence that produces the result described in this post.

It really is amazing how Duane knows more about how to run a police station than do the police.

No one
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 9:45 am

Or perhaps take it home and run their drier and dishwasher.

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 12:36 pm

So, the on-coming shift takes about 30 minutes to punch-in and be briefed. And the off-going shift has already come in, and plugged the cars in for a quick charge. So the community has no police out on patrol, at all, for that 30-40 minute period. Shouldn’t the off-going shift come back to the police station just as the on-coming shift is ready to go out the door? Then the community would be patrol-less for just a few minutes. But not when using EVs.

AndyHce
Reply to  Duane
July 9, 2022 12:46 pm

and rolling blackouts

MarkW
Reply to  AndyHce
July 9, 2022 2:01 pm

I thought the rolling blackout was all the electric police cruisers with dead batteries.

dodgy geezer
July 9, 2022 6:36 am

A Modest Proposal.

Offer all criminals an electric car. This could be easily administered as a court penalty – convicted persons would have a free electric car provided for them when they came out of jail.

Then, whenever there is a police chase, all the cops need to do is to stay on their tail safely until they run out of juice…

Reply to  dodgy geezer
July 9, 2022 7:03 am

“Offer all criminals an electric car. “

Better yet, an electric chair !

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Richard Greene
July 11, 2022 12:20 pm

Better yet, an electric car WITH an electric driver’s seat allowing the person to be tazed remotely.

But then again, we shouldn’t give them any ideas.

Gordon A. Dressler
July 9, 2022 7:56 am

From the first sentence of the italicized, quoted text in the above article:

“Electric police cars are running out of charge when responding to emergencies because the sirens and blue lights drain the batteries . . .”

Now who, on God’s green earth, would have ever, ever thought such a thing could happen?

A simply amazing discovery, there.

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
July 9, 2022 12:37 pm

System designers should really, really, study how their system will be used in the field before they commit to a design.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
July 11, 2022 12:23 pm

Not to mention computers, radios, a/c, and every other thing conveniently “not in use” under the imaginary “conditions” they used to calculate the “estimated” ev “range.”

Sylvia
July 9, 2022 8:09 am

Good for the criminals !!!!! What a good choice these were !!

MarkW
July 9, 2022 8:36 am

The article says that the Tesla 3 can do four hours of “active deployment under “advanced driving conditions””, whatever the heck that means.
How many hours of “active deployment” can the car do after 3 hours of normal patrol?

observa
July 9, 2022 8:49 am

Hullo 911? I’m facing a home invasion but I do have an EV charger.

Olen
July 9, 2022 9:36 am

It’s like the covid vaccine, sell as much as possible no matter the consequences.

John Kelly
July 9, 2022 10:07 am

This is one of the funniest things I’ve read about climate change nonsense. I can just imagine the crims are planning their bad stuff to be carried out on the edge of the range of the cops electric vehicles. Maybe the Brits needs to bring back bobbies on bikes.

rah
July 9, 2022 10:24 am
Janice Moore
Reply to  rah
July 9, 2022 2:39 pm

Heh. I’ll bet you’d LOVE to have a battery-powered truck to drive for work, huh, rah? lol

SAMURAI
July 9, 2022 10:29 am

The empty-battery problem with Tesla EV police cars can be easily remedied.

When the battery is almost dead, the last remaining charge can be used to slide open the front and back floor boards, so all occupants can hunch over and run in place to propel the car like Fred Flintstone did in the good old days…

Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  SAMURAI
July 9, 2022 12:39 pm

Funny idea. But isn’t that where the batteries are?

John_C
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 9, 2022 5:30 pm

Yep. I see explosive bolts and a capacitor, with a ‘zero battery charge’ dry relay. Battery dies, BANG, battery drops and the car rolls on in extended pedal mode.

Last edited 1 month ago by John_C
Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 9, 2022 10:35 am

Are those blue lights, which are draining the batteries, LEDs?

AGW is Not Science
July 9, 2022 3:56 pm

I could have guessed…electric vehicles don’t have the stamina for most uses one might have for a “vehicle.” Why on earth would they have the stamina for demanding service like emergency vehicles?!

george1st:)
July 9, 2022 7:52 pm

I cannae change the laws of physics! I’ve got to have thirty minutes!



Bob
July 9, 2022 8:19 pm

They just keep getting dumber!

RoHa
July 9, 2022 10:43 pm

Decent, responsible, criminals would only use electric getaway cars.

John Sandhofner
July 10, 2022 7:59 pm

We have idiots in all aspects of government today who don’t have an ounce of common sense. They blindly go along with the talking points of the elite and never stop to think for themselves. They spend money mindlessly not even caring if is a good decision. Just doing what the climate czar says to do.

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