090211-N-1082Z-111 GULF OF ADEN (Feb. 11, 2009) Suspected pirates keep their hands in the air as directed by the guided-missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf (CG-72) as the visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) team prepares to apprehend them. Vella Gulf is the flagship for Combined Task Force 151, a multi-national task force conducting counterpiracy operations to detect and deter piracy in and around the Gulf of Aden, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean and Red Sea. It was established to create a maritime lawful order and develop security in the maritime environment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jason R. Zalasky/Released). Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jason R. Zalasky, USN, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Somalia is Furious They Have Not Yet Received their Climate Finance

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Will nobody consider the detrimental effect of sea level rise on the Somalian maritime industry?

Climate change: ‘No more excuses’ at COP26 climate summit – poor nations

By Matt McGrath
Environment correspondent

More than 100 developing countries have set out their key negotiating demands ahead of the COP26 climate meeting in Glasgow.

These include funding for poorer nations to fight and adapt to climate change and compensation for the impacts they will be subjected to.

Highly vulnerable countries like Somalia are already suffering disproportionally from the impacts of climate change,” said Mahdi M Gulaid, deputy prime minister of Somalia, one of the countries behind the plan.

“COP 26 must be a key moment of delivery and there can be no more excuses for unfulfilled promises, particularly climate finance.”

In the report, the countries lay out what’s termed a “fair share accounting”, which allocates emissions cuts based on historical responsibility and the capacity to act. 

Under that scenario, the US would need to reduce emissions by 195% below 2005 levels by 2030. This could be made up of a 70% cut in domestic emissions plus $80bn a year in support for developing countries. 

For the UK, a similar approach would see a 70% emissions cut by 2030 plus $46bn a year in climate finance. 

Read more: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-57839368

You have to feel a bit sorry for negotiators sent by some of the world’s more politically challenged countries.

Imagine the situation after the big climate conference, when the negotiators entrusted with securing large quantities of soft cash from Western countries have to report back home to the murderous psychotic who sent them, and convince him that they never received any money.

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Klem
July 15, 2021 10:23 pm

I don’t blame them one bit for complaining. The UN promised climate money but it seems to disappear before it can be delivered. Funny about that, huh?

Eric Stevens
Reply to  Klem
July 15, 2021 11:09 pm

It’s the heat. The money evaporated.

Alan the Brit
Reply to  Eric Stevens
July 16, 2021 12:15 am

It must have all spontaneously combusted in the North-West American causing those big fires!!! Shame!!!

John in Oz
Reply to  Klem
July 16, 2021 3:12 am

It’s hiding in the oceans

dk_
July 15, 2021 10:31 pm

the Somalian maritime industry

Piracy, Eric?

road dog
Reply to  dk_
July 16, 2021 3:23 am

Seals will relish the opportunity for a(nother) live fire exercise.

Last edited 13 days ago by road dog
MarkW
Reply to  road dog
July 16, 2021 6:07 am

During WWII, deck guns were mounted on many merchant vessels in order to fight submarines. That practice could be adopted for dealing with pirates.

Last edited 13 days ago by MarkW
D. J. Hawkins
Reply to  MarkW
July 16, 2021 6:49 am

Harbormasters are understandably nervous about armed civilian vessels in their area of operation. However, line operators and shippers don’t have the spine to allow such defensive measures to be deployed.

Duker
Reply to  D. J. Hawkins
July 17, 2021 12:14 am

Really ?
Deck guns aren’t going to be useful, trained mercenaires with light weapons that shoot back more of deterrent

Duker
Reply to  MarkW
July 17, 2021 12:12 am

The submarines just stopped surfacing and getting the sailors to take to the boats before they sunk the merchant ship with gunfire…a torpedo without warning instead

Bill Parsons
Reply to  dk_
July 16, 2021 4:29 pm

Why ae these men smiling?

road dog
Reply to  Bill Parsons
July 16, 2021 10:25 pm

Because they know how effective our President is.

Duker
Reply to  road dog
July 17, 2021 12:17 am
Rich Davis
Reply to  dk_
July 17, 2021 11:08 am

Is there any other industry in Somalia?

tonyb
Editor
July 15, 2021 11:13 pm

Many on this board do not like to talk about population growth and there will be cries of Malthus when we look at the population of Somalia in 1950 at around 2.3 million. It is currently 16 million and the link shows the staggering projected increase

Somalia Population Growth Rate 1950-2021 | MacroTrends

Those who supported Geldorf’s live aid for Ethiopia in 1985 might like to look at the figures for that. country.

Ethiopia Population Growth Rate 1950-2021 | MacroTrends

Countries can not support this growth. There is neither the food nor water. The population as it expands often does so into unsuitable terrain.

The problems of the future-at least in Africa-is likely to come from population growth, not from climate

tonyb

Patrick MJD
Reply to  tonyb
July 15, 2021 11:38 pm

My first wife, who survived that 1985 Ethiopian famine, now living in Australia, is eternally grateful for what Geldorf did. There is plenty of water, plenty of food and plenty of corruption in Ethiopia.

Chaswarnertoo
Reply to  Patrick MJD
July 16, 2021 3:19 am

Geldorf was totally aware of the problem of overpopulation.

TheLastDemocrat
Reply to  Chaswarnertoo
July 16, 2021 9:25 am

Wow. OK, I will play along.
What would you say is the single leading “problem” of “overpopulation?”

No food?
No potable water?
No space to build a home?
Running out of fossil fuels?
“Poisoning the planet with pollution?”
Killing off enough species, such as pollinating bees, to doom us all?

Please tell.

But, you have to stick to one, and when that is debunked you cannot move on to the next imagined, evidence-lacking catastrophe, whack-a-mole style.

Jit
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 12:20 am

If you look at population in Ethiopia, it has grown enormously. But so have crop yields in Ethiopia.

The famine had as much a political cause as an environmental one.

tonyb
Editor
Reply to  Jit
July 16, 2021 2:44 am

“HOW MUCH AID DOES ETHIOPIA RECEIVE?Topping the worldwide list of countries receiving aid from the US, UK, and the World Bank, the nation has been receiving $3.5 billion on average from international donors in recent years, which represents 50 to 60 percent of its national budget.

HOW MUCH AID DOES THE UNITED STATES GIVE TO ETHIOPIA?In response to growing needs in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, the United States, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), is providing more than $152 million in additional humanitarian assistance.
HOW MUCH AID DOES THE UK GIVE TO ETHIOPIA?Ethiopia will receive $2 billion in British development assistance in a four-year period. Howard Taylor, head of the British aid program in Ethiopia, says the decision to boost assistance was based on need as well as evidence that the country has made major strides in recent years.”

Ethiopia relies primarily on subsistence agriculture. It is propped up by Foreign Aid. There is a crisis famine in Tigray.

Weather conditions have been favourable in recent years. The next time there is any sort of drought there will be widespread problems unless the foreign aid can mitigate matters.

We saw what an explosion of population did in Syria. Are you really suggesting Somalia, Ethiopia and many other countries can cope with such a rapid rise in population?

tonyb

Patrick MJD
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 3:16 am

Knowing what I know about Ethiopia (The Govn’t that is), they will take whatever is given to them. Almost none of that “aid” goes to where it is needed.

We know corruption is rife in Africa, so what is your point?

I know people who worked for UN aid agencies in Ethiopia that resigned because of the corruption.

The answer is to stop the aid.

At least Ethiopia has, mostly, funded their great dam funding themselves.

tonyb
Editor
Reply to  Patrick MJD
July 16, 2021 3:34 am

My point is that many of the countries are seeing a huge surge in population and do not have the infrastructure to support it. They will export people. Population with its related concerns is the problem not climate change but that will be blamed the next time there is the inevitable change in the weather.

It would be very useful to see an audit of where the foreign Aid actually ends up in all countries that receive it. It is badly targeted or often does not end up where intended.

H.R.
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 4:21 am

tonyb: It would be very useful to see an audit of where the foreign Aid actually ends up in all countries that receive it.”

Audit. It will ever happen. The kleptocrats take their massive rake, but some of that must be kicked back to the donor.

No one involved wants an accounting of where that money goes. And I’m pretty sure if there was an audit, the results would be slow, if ever, in coming and ‘lost’ somehow and unavailable.

Foreign Aid is another term for corruption and money laundering.

yirgach
Reply to  H.R.
July 16, 2021 6:06 am

Certain parties are deeply against an audit (be it foreign aid or voting) and they all have one thing in common: corruption.

MarkW
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 6:12 am

Countries seeing even larger increases in population are able to deal with poverty.
You see only the problem you want to see, not the problem that is.

Fran
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 11:51 am

Many years ago Canadian prime minister Cretien responded to “first people” demands for complete control over subsidies by offering to do away with the Dept of Indian Affairs if they submitted to external audit. Needless to say, the chiefs refused.

Duker
Reply to  Fran
July 17, 2021 12:22 am

It’s called ‘capacity building’ nowdays…..so they are only paying off the right people…in a clan based system you want at least some money to trickle down

Rich Davis
Reply to  tonyb
July 17, 2021 11:21 am

Poverty is the cause of overpopulation.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=jbkSRLYSojo

Also, please compare population trends for Somalia and Bangladesh.

Rich Davis
Reply to  Rich Davis
July 17, 2021 2:19 pm

Oops, that’s a good video, too, but I meant to link to this one:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FACK2knC08E

Specifically check out the segment at 8:00 if you don’t view it all. Bangladesh has gone from 7 children per woman to just a bit over replacement rate.

Jean Parisot
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 5:22 am

The problems in Tigray are due to lingering conflict. I was there in the late 90s and its still simmering. That famine (like most) are certainly anthropogenic.

Joao Martins
Reply to  Jean Parisot
July 16, 2021 6:50 am

It was aleady there by the end of the 16th century (no mistake: I wrote 16th, “sixteenth”). Many documents from Jesuit missionaries document it.

Duker
Reply to  Joao Martins
July 17, 2021 12:27 am

You mean they never had war and despotic rule in the 16th century?
Amoung the reasons for famine is they DONT use fossil fuels, any tree is soon cut down to provide warmth and cooking. The desertification inevitably follows

Joao Martins
Reply to  Duker
July 17, 2021 4:43 am

Perhaps my English is not very good, and there was a typo in “already”: what I meant is, there is a long record of problems (ethnic, religious, etc.) in Tigray, and we know it through the (sometimes very detailled) descriptions of Jesuit missionaries.

Last edited 12 days ago by Joao Martins
Newminster
Reply to  Jit
July 16, 2021 3:32 am

It’s been said often enough: drought is climatological; famine is political. Foreign aid has also been described as taking money from poor people in rich countries to give to rich people in poor countries.

It beggars belief that western politicians still don’t see that aid money — to Africa especially — needs not just strings attached but mooring cables! According to one source Mugabe had enough salted away in Switzerland to feed the entire population of Zimbabwe for a year — and still we poured money into his country.

Somewhere buried in my files is an article from 10 years ago arguing that Sudan had the potential to feed the whole of sub-Saharan Africa with the right technology and the right government, ie get rid of the warlords.If I can find it I’ll post a link.

Meanwhile Shellenberger’s Apocalypse Never is still compulsory reading for anyone who genuinely wants to be part of the solution.

MarkW
Reply to  Newminster
July 16, 2021 6:13 am

Prior to the communists taking over, the country now known as Zimbabwe was feeding most of Africa.
The problem is not and never has been over population. The problem has always been political corruption.

Duker
Reply to  MarkW
July 17, 2021 12:31 am

Never fed most of Africa…yes the white farmers were more productive , maybe 10% of maize grown in Africa

MarkW
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 6:10 am

Some on this board think all of the world’s problems could be solved if only there weren’t as many brown skinned people in it.

The problems of poverty are caused by government, not population. For some reason people fixate on the wrong problem and propose solutions that can’t work.

Duker
Reply to  MarkW
July 17, 2021 12:35 am

Yes even China has to import a lot of food and animal feed, but they can afford to do so

So self sufficency isn’t as easy as you might think , there can be serious mismatches between resources and the population to feed

Andy Pattullo
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 7:39 am

I don’t agree at all. We have plenty of historical evidence that even countries that undergo periodic droughts can manage to feed their growing populations if they reach a high enough level of development. It is a combination of corrupt ineffective governance, conflict, and the inhuman attitude of western wealthy nations who insist it is a sin to support cheap reliable electricity – the foundation of modern development in poor countries such as those in rift zone of Africa and the rest of sub Saharan Africa.

By focusing on population growth we miss the fact that development has shrunk high birth rates in countries who achieved better economic status. Many nations now have birth rates well below replacement and most global population growth is now driven by better and healthier lives with longer life expectancy, not births. There are enough resources and enough solutions for us all to have good lives and to reduce our impact on natural environments. We have to stop acting like the fellow on the street with the sandwich board declaring “the end is nigh” lest we make the prediction come true by our own ignorance.

Terry
July 15, 2021 11:26 pm

Pretty sure that Justin Trudeau will give them quite a bit. We Canadians punch way above our weight.

dodgy geezer
Reply to  Terry
July 16, 2021 1:08 am

You do. And it is rarely advertised.

Derg
Reply to  Terry
July 16, 2021 2:07 am

Giving away money is very easy if it’s fiat.

BallBounces
Reply to  Terry
July 16, 2021 4:52 am

We get to feel virtuous and it costs nothing — we just add it to the massive, stinkin’ pile of debt.

Rich Davis
Reply to  Terry
July 17, 2021 11:33 am

Will he present the cheque while in blackface do you suppose?

David Roger Wells
July 15, 2021 11:33 pm

Originally the GCF was to compensate developing countries for damage caused by climate change since the industrial revolution but when Christiana Figueres asked for evidence of damage caused by climate change no evidence was forthcoming. So in typical high handed fashion Figueres Tipp-Exed out compensation for and typed in investment for…. The belief remains that all weather events now are the result of accumulated Co2 emissions since 1760, otherwise there would be no weather? Amelia Womac Green Party said “but its what I learnt at school…”

Dr Friederike Otto having recognised the warming trend predicted by her modelling has not happened said this week on BBC Politics Live that what was maybe a once in 1,000 year event – the NW Heat Dome/Heat Wave – because of accumulated Co2 emissions since 1760 will now be a once in 5 or 10 year event. I find it difficult to believe that Otto and most other climate modellers still believe that a model they force in this or that direction by parameterisation to give a specific result can be described as evidence when they have programmed it to reflect their beliefs.

It isn’t about the money? Mark Maslin FRGS, FRSA is a Professor of Earth System Science at University College London. He is a Royal Society Industrial Fellow working with Rezatec Ltd, a company he co-founded. As a leading scientist with expertise in global and regional climatic change, he has published over 165 papers in journals such as Science, Nature, and The Lancet. He has been awarded grants of over £60 million from Research Councils, Industry, NGOs, Charities and the UK Government. Maslin appears regularly on radio and television, including: BBC One Climate Change: The Facts, Dispatches, Newsnight, Time Team, The Today Programme, In Our Time, the Briefing Room as well as the BBC, Channel 5, CNN, BBC World Service, and Sky News.

dodgy geezer
Reply to  David Roger Wells
July 16, 2021 1:11 am

what was maybe a once in 1,000 year event …….. will now be a once in 5 or 10 year event

They have that wrong. It should be a ‘once in thirty year event’. That means that there is no need to expect another one until the doom spreader is receiving his or her generous pension…

Duker
Reply to  dodgy geezer
July 17, 2021 12:41 am

That changed quick, 1 in 100 yr events only took a year or 2 become 1 in 1000…NY Times is calling Germany’s floods/flood/ village on a River bend a 1 in 1000 yrs flood ….
They dont even realise that after 1 in 50 yrs the step up to next level is very small

Joao Martins
Reply to  David Roger Wells
July 16, 2021 7:03 am

“but its what I learnt at school…”

Exactly! Spot on!

You have identified in your comment something that we all have neglected: school teaching. What is being taught. The contents of what is transmitted as knowledge by the school. Everywhere the same: in the USA, in UE, in UK, in all and every country. This is the real 5th column. Not the teachers, who are generous but useful idiots who themselves are convinced of what they teach: all the societies, which should have surveyed the prevailing brain-washing propaganda subjects and prevented them to contaminate the school programs.

Some centuries ago, smeone wrote (and it became the national anthem of one country), it is a very reasonable and urgent gathering cry for people everywhere:

“Aux armes, citoyens!”

Rich Davis
Reply to  Joao Martins
July 17, 2021 11:52 am

Say what you will about the French but they have a great national anthem. Then again the Soviet Union did too.

July 15, 2021 11:50 pm

The rich Western countries now serving as climate advocates should pay Somalia.ñ
Please see

https://tambonthongchai.com/2021/07/12/postbag/

griff
July 16, 2021 12:09 am

We need to address the German floods: these would have been exceptional even in winter, in summer there’s no adequate word for the scale of them

Three months rain in 24 hours with the flood onset in minutes…

This sort of slow moving very intensive summer rain system is EXACTLY as predicted by climate science… this is EXACTLY what the physics of a warming atmosphere dictates should happen.

Please don’t bother finding spurious previous examples or defining this as ‘just weather’

lee
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 12:11 am

Can’t face the ridicule. lol

Steve Case
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 12:24 am

Please don’t bother finding spurious previous examples or defining this as ‘just weather’

Thank you for saving me from the effort to go find them since you obviously know they exist.

TonyG
Reply to  Steve Case
July 16, 2021 11:38 am

“Don’t bother finding anything that contradicts my preconceptions”

What’s the right number of floods griff?

Duker
Reply to  TonyG
July 17, 2021 12:44 am

He’s not even looking back less than a decade
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_European_floods

On 30 May to 1 June, 150 to 200 mm of rain (5.9 to 7.9 in of rain) fell, in places reaching around 250 mm (9.8 in), which in just a few days was the equivalent normally seen over two and a half months on average

lee
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 12:26 am

Poor Germany relegated to be among those poor countries.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 12:29 am

No one “predicted” any such thing in Germany. What you’re describing is extreme weather. Please explain the appropriate “address” for floods. Are we talking pronouns here or postal codes?

What you’re describing is more associated with cooling than warming. It’s all that snow the CRU said was “a thing of the past” … but of course you don’t believe in the past as a mirror of the present. Make up your mind.

MarkW
Reply to  Rory Forbes
July 16, 2021 6:18 am

Unless it happens every year, it’s caused by CO2. At least that’s the story griff has been trained to tell.

Duker
Reply to  MarkW
July 17, 2021 12:46 am

The 2013 floods were just as bad….oh dears it doesn’t seem to be more than roughly a 1 in 20 yr event

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 12:32 am

I’ve been seeing this for most of my adult life in Europe, and with significant loss of lives. Why would it suddenly stop?

Bill Toland
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 1:10 am

“This sort of slow moving very intensive summer rain system is EXACTLY as predicted by climate science… this is EXACTLY what the physics of a warming atmosphere dictates should happen.”

Griff, as it happens, I know quite a bit of physics. This branch of physics which you are talking about appears to be unpublished in the scientific literature.

Last edited 13 days ago by Bill Toland
dodgy geezer
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 1:15 am

Well, I’m impressed. Can you provide the links to anywhere where climate physicists predicted that a warming climate would result in ‘slow-moving intensive summer rain systems’? That seems an awfully precise prediction, so you must have a specific paper in mind…

MarkW
Reply to  dodgy geezer
July 16, 2021 6:19 am

I’d also love to see some evidence that slow moving summer storms have never happened before.

Duker
Reply to  MarkW
July 17, 2021 12:48 am

Or that the warming Sahara can expect more rain

Bill Toland
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 1:24 am

Griff, so previous examples of flooding are “spurious” but the current example isn’t? I don’t think you know the meaning of the word “spurious”.

Last edited 13 days ago by Bill Toland
lee
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 1:52 am

I see the pundits have change from the wettest “evah” to the last 100 years.

Pamela Matlack-Klein
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 2:07 am

You posted this identical comment on the previous article, Heat Waves and Hot Air. cut and paste much?

Climate believer
Reply to  Pamela Matlack-Klein
July 16, 2021 4:24 am

Copy & paste @ comrade Grifter. (apologises Pamela)

It’s weather, and you know it.

Sticking your fingers in your ears and screaming don’t show me facts that shatter my world view, isn’t going to help.

I think people have had a belly full of your childish behaviour.

In all the years that you’ve spent here you’ve never once convinced anybody of anything, apart from the fact that you are an uneducated lefty militant extinction rebellion type foot soldier.

One of the “useful idiots”, one of the true believers, living a confortable middle class life in a world built on fossil fuels, even using them on a daily basis, but then feeling so much guilt that you feel you must atone for your sins by hypocritically berating others with diatribes of virtue signalling.

How worthless you are Grifter.

TonyG
Reply to  Pamela Matlack-Klein
July 16, 2021 11:39 am

Got stuck in a loop.

Oldseadog
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 2:08 am

Maybe if people stopped building in flood plains there wouldn’t be so much damage when the weather turns nasty.

Derg
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 2:09 am

You forgot to include the skate boarders word “extreme.”

Lrp
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 2:21 am

Nonsense, there are no physics of warming atmosphere. You just make up stuff.

Shania
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 2:28 am

Iam sure 1997 floods in CZ were caused by climate change too:D

Another Joe
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 2:44 am

Its just weather. It is proving there is no drought conditions!
Statistically it does look good when you spread the rain over three month.
So the climate statistic will not notice!
Its weather!

tonyb
Editor
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 2:50 am

Griff

You would have noticed the BBC at first said the worst floods in living memory. I checked through the records and saw there were 3 worst ones last century. They have changed it today to the worst in several decades.’. Anyone who has ever been to Central Europe will see the Historic floods marked on Church and Monastery walls at levels far above todays.

One problem we have is that population grows and then moves into areas that might be unsuitable. We saw that with the Somerset levels and in various other cities such as Shrewsbury.

These events get recorded and put on 24 hours MSM. In the past there may not have been people to see them let alone record them.

Which is not to take away from the current human misery but these things have all happened before and will happen again but it only takes a generation to forget the lessons that should be learnt

tonyb

MarkW
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 6:22 am

In other parts of the globe, floods are exacerbated by development in the watershed that feeds the river. I don’t know enough about the geography in this example to know if this is a factor.

Chaswarnertoo
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 3:20 am

Prat. Hochtwasser.

commieBob
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 5:07 am

My theory of natural variability also predicts that exactly those things will happen. Where’s my Nobel Prize?

Anyway my dear Griff, you give a wonderful example in the context of the present story. Somalia will suffer disproportionately from weather/climate related events as measured in terms of human misery. Germany will not. Why is that? Germany is prosperous and therefore much much more resilient.

What does Somalia need? Somalia needs prosperity, not supposed climate mitigation.

Tom in Florida
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 5:19 am

What do you mean by “we”?
Or is this another thing you want to be paranoid about?

Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 5:31 am

More misinformation and disinformation from the griffter…well, that’s his job here….someone has to do it.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 6:16 am

As always, griff demands that the rest of us be as blind as he is.
The mere fact that such events have happened many times before, is now just a “spurious example”.
It really is pathetic the way griff uses the few brain cells he has left to find someway to continue to defend his religious beliefs.

Lrp
Reply to  MarkW
July 16, 2021 12:37 pm

What do you mean, left?

Joao Martins
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 7:06 am

Go study European history, griff! Please, spare us from the exhibition of your ignorance…

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  griff
July 16, 2021 7:54 am

Behold, griff the spammer…

dodgy geezer
July 16, 2021 1:07 am

“…when the negotiators entrusted with securing large quantities of soft cash from Western countries have to report back home to the murderous psychotic who sent them, and convince him that they never received any money….”

My understanding of Somalia is that there is NO person in charge. A murdering psychotic would be a distinct advance on this.

Ed Zuiderwijk
July 16, 2021 1:33 am

What happened to Honesty?

Why don’t they just ask: give us yer money. Then we can cut the niceties and just say: no, you won’t get any.

A secundary advantage of such honesty would be the absence of any need for a get–together.

Coeur de Lion
July 16, 2021 2:03 am

In March 2019 Boris. ( the British Prime Minister) doubled UK’s contribution to the Green Climate Fund to £1.44bn or twenty quid from every man woman and child. What happened to mine? Oh, methane powered buses in Karachi I expect.

Oldseadog
Reply to  Coeur de Lion
July 16, 2021 2:11 am

More likely the hydrogen buses in Aberdeen.

Bill Toland
July 16, 2021 2:08 am

I see that Britain’s annual “donation” to developing countries is to be $46bn whilst the contribution from the USA will be $80bn. Since the American economy is 7 times the size of Britain’s, this seems rather disproportionate. Is Britain being singled out for some reason?

In any case, the size of the donation is irrelevant. Britain has no more money to give to anybody. The Office for Budget Responsibility’s latest forecasts show that Britain’s long term finances are a disaster. Hard decisions will have to be made in the future. There will certainly be no money for “climate reparations” or whatever it will be called. Even the very existence of the foreign aid budget will be questioned.

tonyb
Editor
Reply to  Bill Toland
July 16, 2021 2:53 am

Bill

I am sure Britain would be happy to give £500 billion annually and remain permanently in unheated homes in order to save the planet from its current normality.

Bill Toland
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 3:16 am

Tony, you have precisely summed up the position of the Green party in Britain. Unfortunately, this now appears to be the position of the British news media too.

Last edited 13 days ago by Bill Toland
tonyb
Editor
Reply to  Bill Toland
July 16, 2021 3:41 am

Bill

I am developing a nice little line in Hair shirts. Looking for good slogans such as “I need to fly round the world to tell others not to fly” and “Go Vegan-eat food flown in from all round the world. ”

Perhaps Caroline Lucas could be the first customer, then a bulk order (XXL) for the MP’s and one for Carrie ‘Let them eat wallpaper”

tonyb

Bill Toland
Reply to  tonyb
July 16, 2021 4:17 am

Oh yes, I have learned a lot from Caroline Lucas lecturing me on climate science whose phd is titled “Writing for women: a study of woman as reader in Elizabethan romance”.

If you are not British, you may be unaware of Caroline Lucas who is Britain’s only Green member of parliament.

Last edited 13 days ago by Bill Toland
Pamela Matlack-Klein
Reply to  Bill Toland
July 16, 2021 5:27 am

IMO both the UK and USA should be cutting their foreign aid budgets to ZERO! Until positive results start showing up from all the money these governments receive it is much better spent at HOME for the benefit of the taxpayers who are coughing it up.

Newminster
July 16, 2021 3:12 am

More than 100 developing countries have set out their key negotiating demands ….

Do these reporter guys not understand the English language? WTF is a “negotiating demand”?

MarkW
Reply to  Newminster
July 16, 2021 6:25 am

In order for it to be a “demand”, don’t they need to have some mechanism by which they can enforce their will on others?
Absent such a mechanism, wouldn’t “request” be more in order?

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Newminster
July 16, 2021 7:46 am

The 100 developing countries demand “climate change compensation” $USD based on their key negotiating strength that they otherwise will jointly declare the US to be a “bad” and/or “unfriendly” nation.

This is more than sufficient to make the current woke leadership of the Biden administration and the current Congress quiver in their boots. Therefore, the spigots will open and flow fully.

eo
July 16, 2021 3:35 am

Article 4 of the UNFCCC does not require developing countries to cut their emissions. The Kyoto Protocol took one step by giving carbon credits to any carbon reduction the developing countries will make above the baseline (CDM). US did not ratify (Al Gore signed the Kyoto Protocol on behalf of the US knowing very well the US senate will not ratify it). US main objection to the Kyoto Protocol was the credit given to good stewardship of the forest resources and the rapid growth of emission from China and India. When Kyoto Protocol expired and the Paris Agreement was negotiated the developing countries do not want to come on board if they are required to cut their emission as this is contrary to the UNFCCC the main treaty. Even if the UNFCCC says so, there is no restriction for developing countries to “volunteer” reduction in their emission. The developing countries readily “volunteered” reductions in their emissions called Nationally Determined Contribution because if they do so, they will not qualify for the billions of green funds. If one examine the Initial NDC of India, it kept on reminding the parties of the common but differentiated responsibilities provision of the UNFCCC ( in fact reading between the line the message seems to be that it is being forced rather doing it voluntarily) with a caveat that it needs $2.3 trillion to meet its obligation that bloggers on WUWT pointed out would really mean an increase of almost 300 per cent because it use energy intensity as a metric for its commitments.
Poor Somalia.Its emission is too small and even if it goes to zero it will not have any impact on the carbon dioxide. The most it will get is token. Money thrown will be to the big emitters as any reduction will potentially have something to show for the money.
The COP is entering an interesting phase as the pontificating is over and the realities are starting to bite. A Josh has pointed out in his cartoon—Where is my money.

Stephen Skinner
July 16, 2021 4:37 am

The UN must go. It is no longer fit for purpose and will likely create human suffering on a scale that would make the Chinese Cultural Revolution look amateurish.

Klem
July 16, 2021 4:43 am

Hey that’s my stolen boat, and those are my outboard motors!

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Klem
July 16, 2021 7:38 am

Slight magnification of the lead-in pic shows that those are Yamaha-brand outboard motors.

Those guys want “climate change compensation” (read that as $USD) from the United States, but won’t even buy American? Forget about it!

BallBounces
July 16, 2021 4:49 am

“the US would need to reduce emissions by 195% below 2005 levels by 2030.” Please explain how a 195% reduction works.

Bill Toland
Reply to  BallBounces
July 16, 2021 5:24 am

It’s very simple. The US would have to sequester enormous amounts of co2 to achieve negative emissions. There is currently no way to do this, but who cares? That is just a technical detail.

In fact, all developed countries will have to achieve negative emissions to offset the hugely increased emissions which will come from developing countries in the next century. If Britain ever managed to achieve “net zero carbon”, Greens swould say that this is insufficient. Brtiain would need to have a target of negative 100% carbon dioxide emissions. It doesn’t matter if these targets are impossible with our current levels of technology. That is just another technical detail.

Jean Parisot
July 16, 2021 5:19 am

If your trying to pose as fishermen, you should leave the camo at home.

Bruce Cobb
Reply to  Jean Parisot
July 16, 2021 7:13 am

How else are you going to sneak up on the fish then, eh smartypants?

JCalvertN(UK)
July 16, 2021 5:31 am

I imagine that a reasonable case can be made for some sort of wealth redistribution. (For example, if places like Somalia weren’t such violent hopeless “write-offs”, then the inhabitants might prefer to stay home in their native land and make a go of it there.)
But the case should be made honestly and up-front as “wealth-redistribution” – not under a BS cloak of “climate-change”.

Last edited 13 days ago by JCalvertN(UK)
PCman999
July 16, 2021 5:56 am

“US would need to reduce emissions by 195% below 2005 levels by 2030.”

I know that all the numbers with the UN IPCC and COP are just made up, but that line just proved it.

MarkW
July 16, 2021 6:06 am

Somalia is upset that their pirates are having to spend more on fuel, since rising sea levels mean their boats have to travel further to reach their targets in the shipping lanes.

H.R.
Reply to  MarkW
July 16, 2021 8:34 am

No. The rising sea levels means the water is higher on their boats. So it takes more fuel to plow through those higher water levels.

As sea levels rise, just think of the impact on fuel use. All those cargo ships will be using more fuel to plow through a deeper ocean. And the Somalia Pirates will have an easier time boarding since they will be higher up and closer to the gunwales.


For some reason, Somalia Pirates always reminds me of a baseball team. I think they might be in the pennant race this year. It’s not so much their hitting or pitching. It seems that when they show up, armed to the teeth, the opposing team forfeits and then runs like hell.

(Just in case… 😜)

Mac
July 16, 2021 6:06 am

The photo above brought back a memory. A student of mine (many years ago) practiced in Santa Monica Calif. When she retired she and her husband sailed their vessel near Somalia and were boarded by pirates and killed. It’s been a number of years since that happened; don’t remember the date.

Gordon A. Dressler
July 16, 2021 7:06 am

From the second-to-last paragraph of text quoted above that is attributed to Matt McGrath, “environmental correspondent” for the BBC:
“Under that scenario, the US would need to reduce emissions by 195% below 2005 levels by 2030.”

Uhhhhh . . . someone—anyone, even griff—willing to explain how you reduce a physical value below 100% of what it is. Isn’t the maximum one can reduce something 100% without it going negative . . . that is, drive it to exactly zero?

Or has McGrath invented a new world order in which there are negative value emissions, such that by the US emitting negative emissions these directly offset the positive emissions from third world countries? 🙂

Or, alternatively, is McGrath just wildly asserting that by 2030 US emissions will be 195% of 2005 levels, and it is this future value that must be driven to zero to meet what other (third world) countries “lay out what’s termed a “fair share accounting”? If so, what a bizzare way to write that assertion.

So sad. The BBC was once a reputable news agency, but now employs reporters that don’t even understand basic arithmetic or clear use of the English language.

Bruce Cobb
July 16, 2021 7:23 am

“No more excuses”.
Ok then, HOW ABOUT NO!

TonyG
July 16, 2021 9:46 am

What exactly does “195% below” mean? Wouldn’t “100% below” mean zero? So less than zero?

Why can’t they say “to x% of” instead?

garboard
July 16, 2021 10:25 am

after hurricane irma the Dutch offered billions in aid to st Maarten provided the dutch got to oversee its administration .leaders there refused the offer , much to the displeasure of the local populace .

Doonman
July 16, 2021 11:29 am

When you “fight climate change”, what is it that you do, exactly?

The only thing I ever hear about is the transfer of taxpayer dollars. We have already been doing that for some time with the present results apparent to everyone who bothers to read.

The Kyoto Protocol was an international treaty which extended the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change that commits state parties to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, based on the scientific consensus that global warming is occurring and that human-made CO₂ emissions are driving it.

Yale University study says the Kyoto protocol cost $716 billion.
https://cowles.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/pub/d12/d1201.pdf

When fighting something, positive results are necessary or you should quit. Especially when fighting invisible enemies for 30 years. So, what benefit did the world get for spending three quarters of a trillion dollars on fighting climate change?

Joel O'Bryan
July 16, 2021 3:22 pm

Give them fake money for a fake problem.

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