Garbage study claims: global warming will cause U.S. sleep loss

From the UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA – SAN DIEGO and the “correlation is not causation unless we take a survey and plug the results into a model and ignore UHI” department comes this “anything goes” paper that has the magic words for making headlines, but very little if any real science in it.

Losing sleep over climate change

Climate change may keep you awake — and not just metaphorically. Nights that are warmer than normal can harm human sleep, researchers show in a new paper, with the poor and elderly most affected. According to their findings, if climate change is not addressed, temperatures in 2050 could cost people in the United States millions of additional nights of insufficient sleep per year. By 2099, the figure could rise by several hundred million more nights of lost sleep annually.

The study was led by Nick Obradovich, who conducted much of the research as a doctoral student in political science at the University of California San Diego. He was inspired to investigate the question by the heat wave that hit San Diego in October of 2015. Obradovich was having trouble sleeping. He tossed and he turned, the window AC in his North Park home providing little relief from the record-breaking temperatures. At school, he noticed that fellow students were also looking grumpy and bedraggled, and it got him thinking: Had anyone looked at what climate change might do to sleep?

Published by Science Advances, the research represents the largest real-world study to date to find a relationship between reports of insufficient sleep and unusually warm nighttime temperatures. It is the first to apply the discovered relationship to projected climate change.

“Sleep has been well-established by other researchers as a critical component of human health. Too little sleep can make a person more susceptible to disease and chronic illness, and it can harm psychological well-being and cognitive functioning,” Obradovich said. “What our study shows is not only that ambient temperature can play a role in disrupting sleep but also that climate change might make the situation worse by driving up rates of sleep loss.”

Obradovich is now a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a research scientist at the MIT Media Lab. He is also a fellow of the Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Obradovich worked on the study with Robyn Migliorini, a student in the San Diego State University/UC San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, and sleep researcher Sara Mednick of UC Riverside. Obradovich’s dissertation advisor, social scientist James Fowler of UC San Diego, is also a co-author.

The study starts with data from 765,000 U.S. residents between 2002 and 2011 who responded to a public health survey, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study then links data on self-reported nights of insufficient sleep to daily temperature data from the National Centers for Environmental Information. Finally, it combines the effects of unusually warm temperatures on sleep with climate model projections.

The main finding is that anomalous increases in nighttime temperature by 1 degree Celsius translate to three nights of insufficient sleep per 100 individuals per month. To put that in perspective: If we had a single month of nightly temperatures averaging 1 degree Celsius higher than normal, that is equivalent to 9 million more nights of insufficient sleep in a month across the population of the United States today, or 110 million extra nights of insufficient sleep annually.

Areas of the western and northern United States — where nighttime temperatures are projected to increase most — may experience the largest future changes in sleep. CREDIT Courtesy N. Obradovich

The negative effect of warmer nights is most acute in summer, the research shows. It is almost three times as high in summer as during any other season.

The effect is also not spread evenly across all demographic groups. Those whose income is below $50,000 and those who are aged 65 and older are affected most severely. For older people, the effect is twice that of younger adults. And for the lower-income group, it is three times worse than for people who are better off financially.

The effect on sleep of warmer than usual nights is most acute during the summer and among lower-income respondents and the elderly. CREDIT Courtesy N. Obradovich.

Using climate projections for 2050 and 2099 by NASA Earth Exchange, the study paints a bleak picture of the future if the relationship between warmer nights and disrupted sleep persists. Warmer temperatures could cause six additional nights of insufficient sleep per 100 individuals by 2050 and approximately 14 extra nights per 100 by 2099.

“The U.S. is relatively temperate and, in global terms, quite prosperous,” Obradovich said. “We don’t have sleep data from around the world, but assuming the pattern is similar, one can imagine that in places that are warmer or poorer or both, what we’d find could be even worse.”

###

The research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation, grants no. DGE0707423 and TG-SES130013 to Obradovich, DGE1247398 to Migliorini, and BCS1439210 to Mednick. Mednick is also funded by the National Institute on Aging (R01AG046646) and the Department of Defense (Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award).


In the press release, they give this DOI link, which seems to be DOA: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1601555

But I dug out the article and here is the link: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/5/e1601555.full

The SI is here: http://advances.sciencemag.org/highwire/filestream/195722/field_highwire_adjunct_files/0/1601555_SM.pdf

Abstract

Human sleep is highly regulated by temperature. Might climate change—through increases in nighttime heat—disrupt sleep in the future? We conduct the inaugural investigation of the relationship between climatic anomalies, reports of insufficient sleep, and projected climate change. Using data from 765,000 U.S. survey respondents from 2002 to 2011, coupled with nighttime temperature data, we show that increases in nighttime temperatures amplify self-reported nights of insufficient sleep. We observe the largest effects during the summer and among both lower-income and elderly respondents. We combine our historical estimates with climate model projections and detail the potential sleep impacts of future climatic changes. Our study represents the largest ever investigation of the relationship between sleep and ambient temperature and provides the first evidence that climate change may disrupt human sleep.


There isn’t a single mention of UHI or Urban Heat Island in the paper, but they do say this in a roundabout way in the SI for the paper: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/advances/suppl/2017/05/22/3.5.e1601555.DC1/1601555_SM.pdf

Some might desire that we control for common demographic covariates. Unfortunately, as these demographic characteristics may also be impacted by the climatic variables within a locality (for example, if a particular demographic sorts into living in less extreme environments), including these variables has the potential to bias our coefficient of interest on nighttime temperature anomalies (making the variables ‘bad controls’). As a result we exclude them from our specification in Equation 1 in the main text.

They reference “climatic variables within a locality”, i.e. “microclimates” or UHI if one considers that. The IPCC stated in AR3 that

“it is well-known that compared to non-urban areas urban heat islands raise night-time temperatures more than daytime temperatures”

In the abstract of this study, Obradovich posits:

Might climate change—through increases in nighttime heat—disrupt sleep in the future?

It’s as if this kid never heard of UHI as a factor for increasing nighttime temperature. Mind-boggling.

I wonder how many of the respondents were from major cities, like Las Vegas, NV? There, the city has been booming, and if you consider the usual “climate change” metric, i.e. average temperature, yes it looks like it’s gotten warmer there since about 1973-75, before that, the trend is mostly insignificant.

But if you look at the Maximum and minimum temperatures separately, a clear UHI signal emerges that correlates with the building boom. Maximum temperatures are actually lower than in 1937.

While minimum temperatures are upwards

Increasing minimum temperatures are a sure sign of UHI, the city government itself even acknowledges it¹. ((see references). UHI increases nighttime temperatures due to there being more concrete, asphalt, and other impermeable surfaces storing daytime heat and releasing it at night -this  is not “climate change” in the sense they use it, yet they don’t seem to even be aware of it as a possible confounding factor. Did the author, Obradovich, control for city dwellers vs. country dwellers? It doesn’t look like it.

The graph they cite “The effect on sleep of warmer than usual nights is most acute during the summer and among lower-income respondents and the elderly.” also isn’t about climate change. It’s about affordability for air-conditioning – not only for purchase, but for powering it. Low income and fixed income people (elderly) often can’t afford to purchase and/or run an air-conditioner. But instead of factoring in that, they immediately jump to climate change” as the culprit. Interestingly, in Table S4 of the SI for the paper, they show that low-income people tend to have about 4 times the rate of sleep loss as the financially well of. This could be due to lack of air-conditioning, or simply worrying how you are going to pay your bills and keep your kids fed – the things that really keep people up at night.

In a story in Psychology Today, they list the most common reasons for less sleep:

Increased sleep deprivation, or sleep deficit, has sometimes been described as a symptom of the recent decrease in leisure time in American society (see, for example, Juliet Schor’s bestseller The Overworked American). Working hours increased during the second-half of the 20th century, along with sharp growth in American productivity and prosperity. A doubling of productivity could have translated into both higher incomes and decreased working hours, yet today employees rarely have a choice between getting paid in time or money. Instead, Americans, relative to the past, work more, earn more, and spend more. This focus on work and consumption over leisure time has brought about an increased “time squeeze.”  While this is especially true for the average American woman, the time squeeze cuts across gender, social class, and marital status.

Moreover, the recent growth of digital media and smartphones has dramatically raised productivity expectations and blurred the line between work and personal life. This decrease in free time and increased pace of life and stress has brought with it reduced sleep, with real consequences for physical and mental health, performance at work, and quality of life.  For example, in the 1960s, the average amount of time Americans spent sleeping was between 7 and 8.5 hours a night, while today 50% of the population averages under 7 hours, and, according to a 2008 survey, 1 out of 3 Americans say they get a good night’s sleep only a few nights a month or less.

But Obradovich doesn’t seem to look at any of those factors, such as having a cell phone waking you up at night, or the general trend for less leisure time and more work. No, Obradovich jumps right on the correlation with temperature, thinking that is the only cause, seemingly excluding other more confounding factors. Then, they take that data from the survey and plug it into a model of their own design, and bam – instant conclusion – we’ll all get less sleep due to “climate change”.

Finally, Obradovich commits the cardinal sin of climate alarmists everywhere conflation of weather and climate in his thinking:

The study was led by Nick Obradovich, who conducted much of the research as a doctoral student in political science at the University of California San Diego. He was inspired to investigate the question by the heat wave that hit San Diego in October of 2015. Obradovich was having trouble sleeping. He tossed and he turned, the window AC in his North Park home providing little relief from the record-breaking temperatures. At school, he noticed that fellow students were also looking grumpy and bedraggled, and it got him thinking: Had anyone looked at what climate change might do to sleep?

Kid, one HEAT WAVE does not equate to “climate change” it’s weather, and weather is NOT climate.

In my opinion, this study by Obradovich is garbage, and was a conclusion looking for a paper to support it. How this sort of junk gets past peer review I have no idea.

References:

(1) Summary Report, Urban Heat Island Effect, City of Las Vegas, Office of Sustainability,  April 2010

From:  http://www.lasvegasnevada.gov/files/UHI_Report_2010-2.pdf

(2) Source for data: NOAA/NWS Las Vegas, from

http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/vef/climate/LasVegasClimateBook/index.php

(3) Losing Sleep in the 21st Century
In a rapidly evolving American society, people are sleeping less and less. May 07, 2013

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/limitless/201305/losing-sleep-in-the-21st-century

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198 thoughts on “Garbage study claims: global warming will cause U.S. sleep loss

  1. Do academics to lazy to do actual research to avoid perishing by publishing simply sit around and try to think up the wildest possible negative consequences of balmier WX?

    • Professional student trying to justify his privileged, do-nothing existence. I think I’ll do a study showing how snowflakes replicate using this guy and his study as an example. And blame it on gorebull warming, of course.

      • By 2099, the figure could rise by several hundred million more nights of lost sleep annually.
        Well even if the analysis was worth something, with the current US pop. that is only about one night person per year. Hardly going to sink the boat is it?

        A century is a long time and the world will be very different by then and judging by the way things are going right now we will have many other things to worry about and causing us to lose sleep by then.

        This is just further proof that the effects of climate change are so small and insignificant that they have to project them out over 100y to get anything.

        We will have forgotten all about AGW long before then.

      • I don’t notice the study looking at how many people lose sleep because they are too cold and how the hypothetically warmer conditions will improve sleep across the nation.

        Unscientific blather as usual.

      • The study was led by Nick Obradovich, who conducted much of the research as a doctoral student in political science at the University of California San Diego.

        Yep, politics, not science.

      • Political science used to mean the study of politics, maybe it now means he was studying politicised science and is now qualified to produce such unscientific garbage.

      • The paragraph about the co-authors makes interesting reading. Despite the titles, not a scientist amongst them.

      • Apparently math is not a part of the Political Science curriculum. From the study;

        “The main finding is that anomalous increases in nighttime temperature by 1 degree Celsius translate to three nights of insufficient sleep per 100 individuals per month. To put that in perspective: If we had a single month of nightly temperatures averaging 1 degree Celsius higher than normal, that is equivalent to 9 million more nights of insufficient sleep in a month across the population of the United States today, or 110 million extra nights of insufficient sleep annually.”

        Three addition sleepless nights per 100 people per month is

        3/ (100 * 30) = 0.001 or 0.1%

        With the US population at about 330 million, a 1C increase would, if the study is correct, cause an increase in sleepless nights of 330,000 per month, not the claimed 9 million. To put that in perspective, that’s 330,000 sleepless nights out of 9.9 billion nights of sleep. Crisis averted!!

    • Holy…that was a lot of reading to find out that conclusion, which I knew by the title what it was, and which would have sufficed for the entire report. How do they extrapolate down to .1 degree? Obviously the author of this ‘study’ didn’t get enough sleep. I plan to be taking a nice long dirt nap by 2050 so it won’t affect me too much, other than maybe warmer dirt. Anyway, I am getting a solar powered coffin to keep my arthritic bones warm in winter. Sorry, hard not to be a bit jaded about these taxpayer funded science ‘studies’.

      Put a wet towel on your head/body at night, if you don’t have A/C. Get a fan. Get an ice pack pillow. Soak in cool tub for an hour before bed and lower your core temperature some. Go for a midnight swim. Get a dehumidifier. Don’t complain…it always feels worse when you complain.

      • ..or just go to Walmart and buy a bigger AC……a 1200 btu Arctic King would have froze his cahones off

      • Another positive feedback loop. More a/c means more power generation which in many places means more burnig of fossil fuels which means more warming. Not to mention that a/conly works if it has somewhere to exhaust the heat to. If it’s too hot outside the a/c won’t even work. The “science” behind most deniers arguments are really only affective at making the case for ignoring them.

      • Anyone who argues that they don’t care about the effect we may be having on the natural world because they won’t be around to see the outcome is a selfish, sociopathic, piece of [pruned].

        [Language, pruned off. .mod]

      • “If it’s too hot outside the a/c won’t even work. ”

        What a load of absolute BS. !!

      • Junk Enns, Junk Out…

        (five bucks says that mr. enns is a drive by troll and he won’t be around to answer my comment)

      • John Enns may 28, 2017 5:28pm

        “…piece of [pruned].”

        MODS take notice (thanks)…

        [Done. Thank you. .mod]

      • “More a/c means more power generation which in many places means more burnig of fossil fuels which means more warming. ”

        There has been no proof that carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere causes warming. The evidence is more the other way… a slight local warming effect causes earlier cloud formation, which has a strong cooling effect. This negative feedback keeps the Earth the same temperature, no matter how much CO2 is in the atmosphere.

        In the late 1970’s, I read a Scientific American article which showed how inorganic processes would keep the Earth at a temperature similar to today, even if there was no life. That was in the days when SA articles still contained actual science. Now it’s just a warmist mouthpiece.

      • Another positive feedback loop. More a/c means more power generation which in many places means more burnig of fossil fuels which means more warming.

        No, actually getting average temperature up reduces amount of heating needed in buildings, and thus reduces total energy consumption.

        EIA tells for example “Due to the mild climate, 14% of California homes are not heated”. That percentage may get up if the climate warms up. This is more true the more north you go.

        Not to mention that a/c only works if it has somewhere to exhaust the heat to. If it’s too hot outside the a/c won’t even work.

        If it doesn’t work, fix it.

      • Why wait until 2099 to think the temps will increase a few degrees? Most people live in cities where the Urban Heat Sink already has temperatures anywhere from 2, 5 even 10 degrees warmer than the surrounding countryside depending how big the city is, especially night time when all the heat has accumulated all day and is radiating away all night.

        This study doesn’t even differentiate for the two different scenarios in rural or city bias, even in present day 2017. The UHI is right now a whole lot hotter than the projected increase for rural earth, and it is unlikely that even if average temperatures rise 2 degrees overall, that is not going to make cities any hotter than they already are today. That is the first absolute failure of this ‘study’ and why it should have never passed peer review.

      • Why waste money to buy air-conditioning, let alone move to higher altitude or further north, when ranting irrational fear, obscene insults and disproportionate claims towards the rest of the mankind is enough? /sarc

      • Anyone who argues that they don’t care about the effect we may be having on the natural world because they won’t be around to see the outcome is a selfish, sociopathic, piece of [pruned]…More a/c means more power generation

        So we’ll just ignore the fact that this pisspoor excuse for a human being that wrote this study….
        ….is so spoiled and used to AC he can’t sleep without it

    • This ‘paper’ perfectly fits the bill as an LPU – a ‘least publishable unit’. An LPU is a commodity produced by academia used to either generate direct funding from government or other trustee funds via some formula or in order to generate points contributing to the institution’s ‘rating’ again via some formula.

      I know of one institution that actually has a graphic of a ‘speedometer’ or other ‘guage’ that shows how the outfit iks travelling in international ranking in ‘(un)real time’. I gather it appears on the screen when academics login to their internal web page. Maybe there is a guage for their own pwrformance. Essentially it is the KPI approach used like a cattle prod or a taser to ‘underperformers’.

      It is a pretty sick and perverted approach although the Nazi’a or STalin’s mob would be green with envy they did not have the technology. God only knows what variants the North Koreans have.

    • War.we temperatures have a negative effect on sleep and the planet is getting warmer. In this vaseit really is as simple as 1+1=2. If you or anyone else believes otherwise you’re not to bright.

      [The mods have elected not to correct the as-found typo’s, grammar errors, and illogical statements in the above. .mod]

      • And yet people manage to sleep in the moist tropics.

        A hammock in the Amazon is comfy, with no cover but a mosquito net, just like the indigenees.

      • The argument fails. Current sleepless nights, he argues, are caused by warmer than normal temperatures. Models predict an increase in the mean. They do not predict an increase in the number of nights that exceed the mean.

      • Again, a load of BS,

        If there is further beneficial warming, it will be in cold regions first.

        Just take off a blanket.

      • JE,
        That should be, “…You’re not TOO bright.” I hope you aren’t trying to be a role model.

    • John Enns: Nobody said they didn’t care…people observed they would be dead and gone by then. Chill out, and put a wet towel on your head. It will calm you down, and make you think a little clearer. If anything, global cooling would be a real disaster so don’t get your knickers in a knot. I am not a Deni@r, I am a Skeptic. All scientists should be skeptics, unlike your preconceived notions that we don’t care. We need to raise the standard of living for people here and everywhere, because that is and has been the best way for people to have a chance in this world. I am sure you would agree with that.

      • Yes, I have, and a lot of other humid places in the summer. The humidity eventually condenses. A fan helps move the air around. Better than baking all night in a brick building. Or sleep on the roof or outside.

        I thought someone might mention Indiana or Houston.

      • I just was out for a bit, Chimp. Sleeping with a window open in my city is a good way to get mold issues due to the humidity.

      • “Have you ever been in Dallas in August?”

        Judging by the temperatures that are regarded as “heatwaves”, it sometimes get as warm as Canberra in the summer.

      • I grew up sleeping without AC in the summers in San Antonio TX (a few hundred miles south of Dallas) ; my grandmother grew up sleeping without electricity at all in a small town just east of San Antonio! ; my mother and father grew up sleeping and working in south Texas without AC .

    • “Real scientific research”
      It’s actually from a department of political science.
      “Obradovich is now a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and a research scientist at the MIT Media Lab.”

    • I think that is causing some to take dirt naps in renewables-obsessed countries like Germany.

  2. This guy is a political science major. His paper is meant to provide support for a political position.

    • Exactly SMC, his paper proves that Political Science is not actual science. They just threw in the Science terminology to sound more acceptable and important than Political Dysfunctional Crapweasel, which is what all of this is.

    • “This guy is a political science major. His paper is meant to provide support for a political position.”

      Right premise, wrong conclusion. Should have read: “This guy is a political science major. The published conclusions of a person who wasted years of his life majoring in an oxymoron shouldn’t’ be taken seriously.”

      As an example, notice the following paragraph:

      “The effect is also not spread evenly across all demographic groups. Those whose income is below $50,000 and those who are aged 65 and older are affected most severely. For older people, the effect is twice that of younger adults. And for the lower-income group, it is three times worse than for people who are better off financially.”

      One reasonable conclusion from this paragraph is that ignoring climate change will have the net effect of giving people more sleep at night. If the goal is to reduce sleep deprivation due to hot nights, which exists even absent any CO2-driven climate change, the last thing you want to do is hurt the financial position of those less well off. Certainly making energy more expensive by fighting “climate change” will make the poor less likely to use their air conditioners during hot nights. Cutting back on fossil fuel use will also inevitably hinder economic growth and make more people poor. Not building coal power plants in developing countries condemns billions of poor people around the world to the continuing detriment of the sleep deprivation they are already experiencing,

      Silly political science major.

  3. “data from 765,000 U.S. residents between 2002 and 2011 who responded to a public health survey, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study then links data on self-reported nights of insufficient sleep to daily temperature data from the National Centers for Environmental Information. Finally, it combines the effects of unusually warm temperatures on sleep with climate model projections.”

    Surely a well devised research project, no doubt.

    • Absolutely, just had to be a well devised research project, to wit:

      AH SO, …. via telephone interviews the researchers collected … “data on self-reported nights of insufficient sleep” ……. which everyone should accept as the actual, factual, honest truth.

      Simply because the government employees at the CDC were conducting those “telephone interviews”.

      The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the nation’s premier system of telephone surveys that collect state data about health risk behaviors, chronic health conditions, and use of preventive services among US residents.

      With more than 450,000 adults interviewed each year across the United States and participating territories, the BRFSS is the largest continuous telephone health surveillance system in the world. Each year, states can choose to add several optional modules to their core surveys. These modules are sets of questions about various health topics, such as the respondents’ experiences with chronic illnesses, workplace conditions, diet, and prevention behaviors like disease screenings and immunizations.

      Read more @ https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/brfss.htm

      • Simply because the government employees at the CDC were conducting those “telephone interviews”.

        Actually, they outsourced the survey and Americans in warm climates were getting phone calls at 2:30 AM local time from Pune, India. So of course they were sleep deprived.

  4. Garbage ….

    (love it, Anthony! great writing)

    Embarrassing garbage, too:

    The negative effect of warmer nights is most acute in {a northern hemisphere} summer, the research shows. It is almost three times as high in summer as during any other season.

    (eye roll)

    • Janice,

      “(love it, Anthony! great writing)”

      Sure is, I feel, but this brings up something I’ve wondered about many times . . In cases like this where there is a subject article being critiqued, the little gold stars at the end allow no differentiating between the subject content and it’s critique . .

      Now, I’m not saying I lose sleep over this conundrum . . but I do suggest it be made clear that all ratings be made with regard to this site’s” contribution/take on whatever matter is being discussed . . which by rating high in a case like this would indicate the reader agreed the subject paper is garbage.

      Make it so, please ; )

      • (Yeah, I messed up the html coding AND the “it’s” . . no gold stars for me ; )

      • Hi, JohnK: Yes! I think that every time there is a well-written WUWT presentation of a junk science paper. I usually don’t vote at all. I wish there were a heading such as you suggest, e.g.:

        Your vote is for how WUWT handled the discussed article; not the discussed article itself.

        OR

        Your vote is your opinion of the underlying article discussed, not the WUWT analysis of it.

        It would make the stars mean something in such cases!

        I give your idea 5 STARS * * * * *. :)

    • The negative effect of warmer nights is most acute in {a northern hemisphere} summer, the research shows.

      This is because there are VERY FEW people worldwide in the southern hemisphere who have the choice of being able to install a/c in the summertime months. (Australia, BA Argentina, and New Zealand are among the very few places that offer enough economies and salaries and reliable power to install ac. ) Rural and sub-tropical Africa? Mountainous Chile and the plains of Argentina have as many people as Canada, US, or Europe to compare like-climate people with a/c and without a/c ????

      • I really don’t think that warmer nights during the {northern hemisphere} summer has any negative affects whatsoever on the sleeping habits of those persons that are employed at nighttime and sleep during the daytime, of which there are literally tens-of-millions of individuals. Plus the celebrators, crooks and party-goers who stay up all night and sleep all day.

    • The negative effect of warmer nights is most acute in {a northern hemisphere} summer, the research shows. It is almost three times as high in summer as during any other season.

      Eye roll is not enough, this is fracking insane. Everybody in the north wait for the summer. Even if they don’t have AC to make their rooms very comfortable. Elderly people, for God’s sake, move south to get to a much warmer climate, when they retire. You can not, seriously, start complaining about sleepless nights. There is 27 gazillion other things more important, and, seriously, that problem is both something people will adapt to and mitigate for.

  5. Losing sleep over climate change

    Climate change may keep you awake — and not just metaphorically.

    They don’t seem to care about how “Daylight Savings Times” disrupts sleep patterns in one day twice a year.
    What’s the big deal about sleep patterns being disrupted over a hundred years?
    (Maybe they’re referring to the people they’ve used “CAGW” to scare the sh*t out of so they’d vote accordingly?)

    • “how ‘Daylight Savings Times’ disrupts sleep patterns”.

      It’s well known that daylight savings time makes the curtains fade in Queensland.

    • What about Closet Monsters – did they factor in Closet Monsters? Everyone knows that Closet Monsters manifest themselves in warmer temperatures and at night only.

      • You might have a point. I saw a documentary that showed Closet Monsters tend to be taken out of circulation when the door leads to a frozen climate.
        I think the name of the Hollywood documentary was “Monster’s Ink”.
        (I don’t know why. Maybe Closet Monsters like to write on the doors?)

  6. Anthony ==> Nice job with this — but maybe a wasted effort. Epidemiological studies like this, that don’t actually measure the effects on any one person, but report vague, ill-defined maladies across large numbers of people, and then project these into the general populations across vast spans of time (50 to 100 years), totaling ignoring confounding societal factors that are known and acknowledged to be constantly changing, like the use of air-conditioning in warmer climates and the effects of acclimatization to warmer nights, are not valid from the git-go.

  7. “The main finding is that anomalous increases in nighttime temperature by 1 degree Celsius translate to three nights of insufficient sleep per 100 individuals per month.”

    Seems like a small number. That gives 36 nights of insufficient sleep per 100 people per year if the entire year is 1 degree warmer than average. Or, 0.36 nights/(yr degC) of extra insufficient sleep per person.

    That is a 0.1% increase in sleeplesser nights per degree C.

    Given the plethora of other causes for sleeplesser nights, no-one will notice, even if the study is correct.

    Or to modify the press release claim-

    “According to their findings, if climate change is not addressed, temperatures in 2050 could cost people in the United States up to 0.1% more nights of insufficient sleep per year.”

    • Yep.

      plethora of other causes for sleepless nights

      From Seattle to Miami, Americans (since that’s the subject population, here)
      couldn’t get you off my mind

      Tossin’ and Turnin’

      (youtube — Bobby Lewis)

      Big Clue for you, Obradovich, et al.: I heard the milkman at the door

      That was a looooong time ago, man, er, I mean DUDE. :)

      Way before human CO2 was even a gleam in Slick Al’s beady little eye.

      • Nice reminder using The Bobby Lewis song, Janice. Was first thot in thisold brain when I read first few sentences of the article.

        I sang along with the song with my classmates using those new things called transistor radios.

        You must been able to hear and thump when still in the womb!!! I was in high school and heard other iconic platters so appropriate today – “Get a Job” comes to mind.

        Growing up in New Orleans during the 40’s and 50’s was great training and conditioning for my later endeavors ( think jungles of VietNam and such). Took about two nights in-country and I was back at home, as I grew up with no AC and all we had was a whole house fan that worked really well. Of course, we had the harrassment artillery firing out to scare the bad guys every night, but sleeping in hot weather was not our main concern.

        More later on the meat of the wimpy PhD in California supposed research conclusions.

        Gums sends…

  8. The new “Department” name has to be the longest one yet.

    I’d love to see a full listing of WUWT Departments. It would be hilarious…

    • Someone once said, “Any science with an adjective in front of it isn’t science.”

      • May have been true once. Rocket science is mostly engineering, but materials science is real science. And complicated, too.

        Parts of actuarial science count. I’ve heard lots of medical and biological things described as “x” science. If you go at it with the scientific approach, it’s science. (You could even have witchcraft science, if you did it that way. I’d love to see it. Shared results and reproducible experiments.)

      • Yes, there are exceptions. When I was working in Missiles & Space Division at X Aircraft Co, I was in the “Materials Research & Process Engineering” group. “Science” was rarely used. But that was before “science” or “engineering” was attached to everything, even trivial lore.

        If someone shared their Witchcraft Science with you, you might end up as a toad.

  9. One can predict anything 30-100 years from now and not have to worry about being wrong if it is in regards to “global warming”. There’s not way to prove it until the time occurs.

  10. First, the fact that he has A/C is part of the reason he can’t sleep in the heat. He’s spoiled. Many of us are. (I don’t survive without A/C.) Older people who have had no A/C and the poor who can’t afford it should not be as bothered by the heat, rather than more bothered. I suspect they don’t sleep as much because they can hear the hum of the neighbor’s A/C and are not happy. Also, people in African jungles sleep—even when it’s really, really hot. Of course, they work for a living. They adapt.

    Also, it really doesn’t matter if older people get less sleep. We naturally sleep less as we age and many older people can take naps in the daytime if not working. It’s not a crisis, though it could be to someone dead set on proving an unprovable theory.

    If less sleep is a crisis, why are interns forced to work 36 hours straight, dispatchers work rotating shifts, etc. We don’t care about sleep deprivation in those cases.

  11. Hm. In 1902, a publishing company’s ink was sliding off its magazine pages. It was July in Brooklyn, NY. Huh. Guess it musta been pretty hot. A guy named Carrier went down and controlled the humidity by controlling the very warm temperature.

    In the years to come (long, long, before the late 1980’s) demand air conditioning SOARED. Guess it got kind of hot back in the olden days…..

    Guess we oughta just tell the developing world they don’t need AC and refrigeration for food (no, wind and solar are not going to provide that for them, lol)

    A Short History of Air Conditioning

    (youtube)

    Amazing. That was over a hundred years ago…. Human CO2 was a tiny percentage of what it is today. Either CO2 back then was much more powerful, or….. it really doesn’t do a whole lot to temperature, does it.

    CO2 UP (dramatically). WARMING STOPPED.

    Game over, garbage science hu$tlers.

    ******************************************
    Lesson 2: Technology happens.

    Go, engineers!!! #(:))

    • Janice Moore May 28, 2017 at 2:52 pm

      In 1902, a publishing company’s ink was sliding off its magazine pages. It was July in Brooklyn, NY. Huh. Guess it musta been pretty hot.

      HA, its been more than just “pretty” hot during the summer months in New York City from the mid to late 1800’s (long before any increase in CO2 jump-started CAGW) and the early 20th Century ….. and thus the reason that grand estates (of the rich and famous) and tourist hotels, etc., were built in the Adirondack Mountains, the Catskill Mountains and in many villages and towns in-between …… to play host to the mass migration of NYC residents trying to evade the extreme summer temperatures in the City.

  12. “wind and solar are not going to provide that for them”

    One thing solar can’t do: provide A/C in the night.

      • For how many people
        at what price per hour?

        Note: before the investment in solar equipment (including regular maintenance) is recouped, it will need to be replaced.

      • Janice, if you took the time to read the link I provided, you’d see that the plant is rated at 110 MW, so you can do the math (note that’s 110 MW x 24 hours.) In any case the plant has a PPA @ $0.135 per kwh. Also, as with any electric generation plant, they all need maintenance, so what is your point about “replacement?” (mirrors only need replacement if they break.)

      • Ah , Tonopah . The solar plant that uses all that natural gas to keep the salt molten ……
        And fries birds …. THAT ” project ” …..

      • Darby: You did not answer my question.

        I’ll answer it for you. Solar cannot provide adequate, 24-hour, AC to a meaningful percent of the population of any city.

        You also ignored the negative ROI (and EROEI) of solar components.

      • Janice, please read up on how a solar thermal plant works. You obviously are clueless as to the fact that Crescent Dunes provides power 24 hours per day. Secondly, you’d best provide me with where you get your ROI/EROEI numbers for solar thermal plants. I believe you are confusing PV with a thermal plant. You do realize that heliostats are just mirrors, and don’t degrade in performance right?
        ….
        ….
        Now, for your claim about an “unanswered question”…..the number of homes a 110 MW plant is capable of supporting depends on what you use as the average daily consumption of a “typical home.” Using EIA 10812 kwh per year, you get 1.25 kw per hour. That means the 110 MW would run about 88,000 homes.

      • The planned output (not reached yet) is 500 GW-h. At the highly subsidized rate of .135 $ per kw-h, it would take 15 years just to recover the principal. Add to that the interests and running costs (even heliostats are not eternal…). Janice is right

      • Ms Moore and Mr. Darby: From “Environmental Effects of Solar Thermal Power Systems” (UCLA 12/1982 UC 11.62), February 1981 – Natural desert dust and other emissions adversely affect heliostat performance. Washing each heliostat once per month would use up to 11 million gallons (3.4 acre-foot) of precious desert water per year. Reduction of heliostat performance without nearly continuous washing would be devastating to efficiency:
        Clean heliostat mirror 88%
        1 month without washing 26%
        2 months without washing 2%

        Incidentally, spilled heat transfer fluid would react with desert soil to produce carbon dioxide.

      • The same mechanism that drives a weight-driven clock (Grandfather type) could be used to provide A/C in the night.
        If I could get enough of other people’s money I would have one built for demonstration. This would be a boondoggle just as is the Crescent Dunes Solar Project.

      • Neil Jordan, you can clean the desert dust off of the heliostat with compressed air.

      • Thats not allowed! Compressed “air” contains evil CO2. Its evil, EVIL, I tells ya!!!!

      • And what runs the compressors? And what cleans their intakes?
        If the compressed air is brought in from offsite, what transports it? And what runs that?
        And what keeps the dust from just settling back down after it’s been blown around? At least a water wash keeps it on the ground for a while.

      • drednicolson::
        ::
        And what runs the compressors? (The same electricity that would have pumped the water) And what cleans their intakes? (an air filter)
        If the compressed air is brought in from offsite (there is plenty of air right at the site, no need to bring it in ) , what transports it?(no transport) And what runs that?
        And what keeps the dust from just settling back down after it’s been blown around?(gravity) At least a water wash keeps it on the ground for a while.
        ..
        ..
        The problem with using water is you DO have to truck it in, but you can use local air in an air compressor.

  13. I had trouble sleeping when Sydney had a hot night. Strangely my Indian and Thai friends weren’t bothered by it. Conversely, my Scandinavian friends aren’t bothered by cold nights.

    I hypothesise that if I had another 83 years to adapt, I might acclimatise.

  14. I don’t even know anyone who doesn’t sleep in 72 degree temps. Climate control has been around for a long time and most people have it. Now let’s hear this guy’s wisdom on the benefits of global warming on a winter’s sleep.

    • 72F is the thermostat setting on my A/C. For Oklahoma summers, it downright pleasant.

  15. He was inspired to investigate the question by the heat wave that hit San Diego in October of 2015. Obradovich was having trouble sleeping. He tossed and he turned, the window AC in his North Park home providing little relief from the record-breaking temperatures.

    Ah maybe something was wrong with his A.C.? Note Oct. 2015. Did he check the filter, did it have freon or what ever.

    Has he had himself check for sleep apnea?

    michael

  16. My cure for a warm muggy night.
    Open windows 1 through 4
    Adjust the 5′ ceiling fan over the bed from 1 to 6. 6 being hurricane.
    Toss the blankets and sheet.
    Stiff scotch before bed.
    If all else fails
    Shove the GF over the the other side of the bed.

  17. The hardest part of getting a doctorate (at least for me) was coming up with a dissertation topic that I could get accepted by my committee and subsequently defend. Picking some global warming related topic in my engineering discipline wouldn’t cut it. But I suspect that in political science it would be low hanging fruit… approved!!!

    • And how many hundreds of “pro-CAGW” climate papers on how many hundreds of different topics are written properly; but get have an editor/reviewer/department head require a “,,, will be affected by future climate change” paragraph be added during the approval process?

      • PiperPaul – let me offer this conjecture: There are too many smart people going to universities coming out stupid.

  18. Now we need a study to see how many sleepless nights are caused by all the end-of-the-world fear mongering about climate change. Then we can compare the two studies to see which is worse.

  19. People cannot sleep at night because of all the artificial lights. The more LEDs are burning the midnight oil the more sleep gets lost. But LEDs are good for saving energy and thus the environment and thus the climate. No wonder that artificial light is not the culprit but global warming.

  20. How this sort of junk gets past peer review I have no idea.

    I know.

    A systematic review of all the available evidence on peer review concluded that `the practice of peer review is based on faith in its effects, rather than on facts’. link

    The expectation that peer review provides any kind of good effect is badly misplaced.

    • It is in “Science Advances”. One of these open access offshoots of reputable journals, in this case about 2 years old. The deal is that authors pay a lot of money and get quick turn-around. The thinly disguised promise is light reviewing.

  21. How ironically lovely that Mr. Obradovich provides the solution to insomnia within the four corners of his paper….

    :)

  22. I have the perfect solution for those suffering from climate-caused sleeplessness;
    Read this paper.

      • Butch MacGillicuddy! Young man, the librarian wants a word with you in her office. If you please.

        1. “WTH” will get across your point just as well and not needlessly offend. (yes, I saw your cute little quip the other day (smile))

        2. This is a family site so…. THIS is Lucky! :)

        And no wonder you get little rest — he’s only 12 weeks old! :)

        Take care, up there.

        btw: I am still regularly praying that you find “her,” and are “lucky” every night for the rest of your life (after you are married, I mean!). I know you never asked me to pray!

        #(:))

  23. The alternate and more realistic conclusion to be drawn from this “research” is that air-conditioning helps people to sleep better.

    It’s true I tell you. I have conducted extensive research using a sample population of 2 (my wife and I). For most of the year we do not use any cooling (and we don’t own a heater). Then as warmer weather approaches we use ceiling fans. Finally as the hotter weather arrives we use the air conditioner at night. All weather related sleeping problems are thus solved trivially.

    Was it Lee Kwan Yew as President of Singapore who regarded air conditioning as the key to his nation’s prosperity? He was right.

    Now, here’s where I salute the cleverness of the authors. All you have to do is to sell your intellectual soul to Satan, express all of the above as an unavoidable, looming man made catastrophe and you too can have a seat on the gravy train. Way to go guys!

  24. Hot temperatures, brownouts caused by intermittent electrical capacity (e.g .twilight periods), and blackouts caused by night time conditions, is a recipe for not only sleep loss but also heat exhaustion and hyperthermia.

    • re: irregular electrical capacity

      The solution is literally blowing or gone with the wind.

  25. Anecdotal, I know, but I’m 76 and hot nights do not stop me sleeping. If anything I sleep longer because the preceeding hot day tires me out more.

  26. [yawn] Yet another applied linear no-threshhold hypothesis malfeasance that allows armchair statistician advocates to inject tiny probabilities into extremely large populations to come up with integer ‘victim’ counts, despite no shortage of victims surrounding them by other (much more likely but Not Presently Under Discussion) means. The next step is to choose a stock photo of a drooling infant and float it over the press release so people conclude this is the baby that won’t get enough sleep. The step after that is for climate-hungry researchers to siphon off money that would have been spent exploring more significant causes of sleep deprivation.

    Like researchers hiking over whole gelatinous mountains of chemically induced cancer to gather in the tiny spot where a hypothetical cell division might be affected by beta decay so they can write a radiation scare paper.

    Credo of the 12st century:
    “If we claim this to be statistically possible, we can pretend to have seen it.”
    WORSE THAN THE CHURCH EVER WAS

    • My favorite: the deeply tanned activist protesting anything to do with a nuclear facility for anything. Where’d you collect all that radiation poisoning on your skin there, friend?

  27. It’s this increasingly crazy world due to the Internet. Nothing to do with weather or climate.

    • It’s this increasingly crazy world due to the Internet. Nothing to do with weather or climate.

      Times of London
      Dear Sir,

      I am firmly opposed to the spread of microchips either to the home or to the office. We have more than enough of them foisted upon us in public places. They are a disgusting Americanism, and can only result in the farmers being forced to grow smaller potatoes, which in turn will cause massive unemployment in the already severely depressed agricultural industry.

      Yours faithfully,
      Capt. Quinton D’Arcy, J. P.
      Sevenoaks

  28. All-India average temperature also present similar pattern to Las Vegas wherein the night temperature showed higher raise. The met stations are more concentrated in urban areas. The system in India [British legacy] is that where Revenue officials are located, for ease of measurement and record to serve their interests, met stations were established. Thus Indian temperature is contaminated with UHI effect. Thus the rural impact is less reflected in All-India temperature. However, rain gauges were spread far and wide.

    Dr. S. Jeevananda Reddy

    • Where can one find maximum and minimum temperature graphs by city like the one shown in this article?

  29. Just kill the Nation Science Board, the National Academies of Science (include Engineering and Medicine), the National Institute of Health and the National Science Foundation.

    These “bureaucracies” can be shown, and have been, to be linked to the Islamic State in USA! (Follow The Money! pssst pssst Western Union wire transfers via iPhone!)

    Problem solved.
    Jajajajajajaja

  30. They can predict sleep patterns 82 years out??

    What if more people drink a cup of Chamomile tea before bedtime? Can they predict how much of each kind of tea will be consumed to offset the effects of ‘additional warmth’?

    Will people sleep better knowing their onerous winter heating bills will be reduced? Science isn’t as easy as it used to be when sleep forecasting was only good for about three days.

  31. “The study was led by Nick Obradovich, who conducted much of the research as a doctoral student in political science”

    Poli Sci. For the stupid kids on campus who flunked out of a real major. Which explains why they would think that with 80 years of warning, northern Minnesota residents STILL wouldn’t have bought an air conditioner, if this scenario came to pass.

  32. Considering the existing dichotomy between estrogen-based and testosterone-based units WRT comfortable sleeping temperatures, mitigated or exacerbated by more or less covering(s), about half the population will be more comfortable and sleep better if it is warmer.

  33. Simple advice: GET AN AIR CONDITIONER THAT ACTUALLY WORKS !

    Mmm. I’m feeling a bit hungry now, and it’s really warm outside. Warm weather, thus, must cause increased hunger. Increased hunger causes obesity. Hence, human-caused global warming is causing the obesity epidemic.

    My dog is panting. … warm outside. Hence, human-caused global warming is causing dogs greater heat stress.

    My lip itches. … warm outside. Yaddah, yaddah, yaddah …

    “Garbage” is a bit too polite.

    • Hey Robert, I’d say you couldn’t make this stuff up but you just did!

      Those are great suggestions for research grant proposals. It’s very kind of you to assist those who need grant ideas the most. Hopefully those who gain from your ideas will at least give you a hat tip.

      • I got a million of ’em.

        My butt feels numb. Oh, I’ve been sitting quite a long time reading all the research about human caused climate change catastrophe.

        Conclusion: Human caused climate change causes numb ass syndrome.

        To all grant-seeking humanitarians, you are most welcome. And, hey, I’m not greedy — a fifteen percent tip will do just fine.

  34. It is not warm temperatures that cause people to lose sleep. It is above average temperatures that create a problem.

    We humans are very adaptable. Temperatures that are suddenly 10-15 degrees warmer than the summer average (a heat wave) create a problem, temperatures that are a degree or two warmer than they were when you were a kid are no problem at all. They are now the average temperatures that your body has adapted to without any effort.

    This adaptability is the thing that allows humans to move to different parts of the world many times during a lifetime without losing much sleep. The fact that a college graduate might not understand this simple concept may cause me to lose some sleep. Three fact that a journal would publish this stupidity will certainly cause me to lose some sleep.

  35. Know what keeps me up at night? Not the climate, or temperatures, or sea levels. What keeps me up at night is wondering if I took the garbage out. And the cat, wanting out, or in, or out. Pesky beeatch. The stupid [pruned] these kinds of idiots keep prattling on about is totally meaningless.

  36. Well, I think it is pretty obvious that the election of Donald J. Trump as POTUS is causing liberal greenies and Eco-Terrorists around the world to lose a whole lotta sleep !!… D’oh !

  37. If its hot at night and cant sleep buy a ceiling fan like i did. Cheap to run and very effective

    • except my ceiling fan goes clunk, grind, clunk, grind, clunk, grind… etc etc etc etc

      Maybe I should get it replaced ??? ;-)

  38. Yep Nick Obradovich lives off us.
    He’s likes carbon spewing aeroplane travel.
    All AWG academics should disclose their carbon footprint as an addendum to any study they publish.
    Furthermore they should annually declare how they’ll reduce their carbon footprint year on year.
    Naturally this this would include:
    Abstaining from travel to conferences.
    Disposing of their motor vehicle.
    Disconnecting their home from the electricity grid.
    Rejection of portable devices including cell phones etc.
    Can anyone add to this list and we’ll email it to Nick Obradovich when it reaches 50 actions he can take to set an example to us.

    Remember AWG science is all about setting examples.
    You know like the West must cut emissions to set an example to China & India.

  39. To see the inane topics, juvenile level of research and the thought processes and logic of PhDs displayed in today’s supposedly technical papers that are accepted and pass peer review is disgusting. Anthony ticked off half a dozen confounding factors killing off this shameful piece of nothingness.

    I began to notice the anti-intellectual mindset first in high schools in the 1970s and 80s when my children attended. Bright children were discriminated against and at the end of the year, everybody got a trophy and even valedictorians were drawn from students of second or third rank. Then Universities threw open their doors in this continuing trend of industrial democracy where “everyone has something to offer”. Prizes were given out for ‘participation’ in classwork. Egads! When I was a school boy you got the strap if you didn’t.

    Then Nobel Prize value plummeted to zero when they started giving them out to terrorists, BSers, con artists and in one case as a bribe to a new US president to bring him into the plot to destroy America. Crackerjack(™) offers prizes of superior quality. Alfred Nobel, an industrial icon, has rolled over in his grave so often he’s likely propelled himself out of the graveyard.

    Progressive women are carrying on the fight against we-of-no-membership in the diversity klatch (and long vanquished already!) . They created scores of faculties for women with fields of study that defy definition and understanding. They are neither afraid or embarrassed to produce papers on feminine glaciation and the like and of course such faculties are not open to men, at least of the non diversity class, not that I would be interested in Victimhood 101, or the like. Apparently they are not yet satisfied with their 70% majority in scholarly pursuits.

    I’ve often remarked on the enormity of the task of righting the ship of science. What does one do with PhDs in smoke shoveling held by little more than average IQed folks who don’t know they never received an education nor were really up for one? Build new institutions with higher standards, new filtered, discriminating scholarly journals that run in parallel with the rotted out ones. Do Harvard, Oxbridge, and the lot become higher high schools? Cheesh, I don’t think it can be saved.

  40. I’m likely to be sleeping 24 hours a day, by 2050 or so….. Does that make me an ‘out-lier’?

  41. “But Obradovich doesn’t seem to look at any of those factors, such as having a cell phone waking you up at night,”

    Yep. Not me, though. I’m still living in a world of landline phones with a ringer on/off switch – mostly “off”.

    I have to wonder, though it’s a bit off-topic: has the access to modern technology actually engendered any better quality of communication between people? My daughter has one of these smart phones (that she sleeps with) and for the rare call that I do get, I have to ask her to stop washing her vegetables, sit down, and speak into the microphone. Is it a wonder they take their “multi-tasking” mindset to bed with them?

    http://fortune.com/2015/06/29/sleep-banks-smartphones/
    “Here’s how many Americans sleep with their smartphones”
    Fortune Magazine.

  42. Maybe they could do a study to see how much sleep people will lose because they can’t afford their energy bills due to increased “green power” costs. That would be interesting to see.

  43. I am lucky enough to live in the sub tropics. For a few glorious months every year I have the privilege of sleeping bare naked (under a mosquito net) on Egyptian cotton sheets…because the air temperature is so close to comfort conditions that I don’t need any clothes or covers! Perfection.
    Now the night time temperatures (it’s winter) are plunging as low as 15˚C and I’m back in my jammies with TWO doonas!

    • Most older people can’t sleep at night because they sleep a lot during the day. If you’re tired you will fall asleep whatever the situation even behind the steering wheel of a moving car.

      The other problem is the hour you have to get out of bed to go to work.

  44. and why the ‘concern’ about folks losing sleep?

    I’m reminded that the powers-that-be inside Europe were concerned about the number of ‘premature deaths’ in Europe. Fine & good you say, they’re concerned over our well being.

    Not really. The actual concern was that folks who die, before they officially retire at age 65 (say) cease to pay tax. Thus the grand edifice of Europe was threatened by lack of tax revenue.

    And so it is here? Grown ups amongst us know that you can catch up sleep BUT – if you have to work flat-out 100% all of the time all the time, primarily to pay tax (mandatory take in UK is now near 70% of gross income) even 1 night’s poor sleep will affect you – and how many around you?
    Is this why British Airways, the NHS and Oroville (nearly) crashed?
    People are not machines yet are increasingly regarded as money making contraptions. Thus the Erosion of Civilisation continues.

    Also, our headline says ‘garbage’
    Clear headed, strong and self-confident people would ignore it, They’d pat the kid on the head, say “That’s very lovely. Maybe go help your sister make a daisy chain in the garden now”

  45. People in places like Los Angeles will loose much sleep over the next twenty years, the propaganda will cause so much worry about the climate that a warm night will freak them out. The cost of their electricity will be such that they can no longer afford AC. It should all come good after that as it will become obvious that the world is cooling.

    History gives us the temperatures and climate from the past, it is a roller coaster of ups and downs,cycles within cycles. These clowns that declare the sky is falling, calling themselves climate scientists need a wake up call. Perhaps your new president can give it to them by stirring the funding pot and giving funding to worthy people. Jumping out of the Paris stuff will make many sleep better.

  46. Is there any doubt that since the invention of the internet Americans sleep less than they did before? The internet is the real sleep loss evil that plagues America!!!!!!

    God! How many nights have i stayed up reading WUWT till the wee hours of the morning!!!!

    Eugene WR Gallun

    PS — where I am it is now 1:20 am.

  47. All of the happy little birdies chirping and singing their little hearts out at false dawn (4am, here in the great northwet) caused me to awaken and rise to join their joy at day break. Strong coffee on the deck, with the birds singing, is an excellent start!

    Wait…. That can’t be right! I lost sleep because of global warming??!! I’m a victim……right?

    • Victim?
      Hardly- more like guiltily awake and suffering from your own climate- changing transgressions. Especially if you are a “cis gendered white US male”, then it’s extra- strength all your fault.

      • Yes, I can misspell my own name, (while exhibiting some sort of Freudian guilt and not enough coffee.)

      • How bigoted and misogynistic of you! There are plenty of women and “people” of color working in the criminal investigative sciences, not just old, fat white guys. Although, they do tend to be in-charge most of the time. Hmmmm. Perhaps you are onto something.

  48. Anyone who lives within 2km of a big wind farm can tell you exactly how global warming causes sleep loss.

    WHUMP-shudder whooshWUMP-shudder….

  49. This is one of the most ignorant climate related ‘studies’ ever! Until a complete assessment with factors like 4g, 5g, EMF’s, Geoengineering, HAARP, and the multitudes of health related and un reported programs that would effect the climate, studies like this are an insult to the scientific communities at large and a grave reflection of where our world science leaders are being directed. Or worse, coerced into. This was truely garbage.

  50. Just so the record is straight…there have been a variety of ENGINEERS and ENGINEERING Professors who have “gone over to the dark side”, and sold their souls to the GOREBULL warming MONEY. A particular example? Frank Kreith, U of Colorado…author of a classic Heat Transfer, textbook…sold out about 20 years ago. I almost wonder if it was also a sign of a “declining mental acuity” (judging by some other things
    I read coming from Mr. Kreith.)

  51. I wonder if they thought to ask respondents if they slept with a window open :D

  52. Where can one find graphs of maximum and minimum temps by city as shown in this article?

    • I’d be a bit worried if I was a confidant and what I’d been told in confidence found it’s way into the hands of the opposing camp. I would expect never again to be told things in confidence.

      Then again as Yes Minister put it, the ship of state is the only ship which leaks from the top. Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.

  53. Time to get a new thermostat for my air conditioning unit. Mine doesn’t measure in 100ths of a degree.

  54. Hmmm. I sleep wearing a light coat, even when it’s hot at night. Does this mean, I’ll be able to forgo the coat and just wear my T-shirt?

  55. Yes, especially when the paid protesters bang the drums and blow their horns all night.

  56. The cost of living is very high in San Diego and sacrifices have to be made for promotions and raises in the great paper mill of publishing and accreditation.

  57. I could have told ’em the same for nothing – I’ve noticed on global warming days when the night time temperature is high, it’s harder to sleep. Compared to global not-so-warming days, when it’s cooler and easier to sleep.

    I wonder if whoever funded this pos feels they have got value for money. If it was me, I’d sue for the funds back.

  58. I have good quality of sleep until I start to worry about policy over reach germinating in California for national rollout when the next over reach junta controls the WH.

  59. Where to start with the methodological failures of this “study”…

    First, far more sleep is lost to the inventions of electric light and television. The influence (often adverse) of artificial light on the human sleep cycle is well-documented though still poorly understood. I was particularly intrigued by Ekirch’s research on the concept of “first and second sleep” – a phenomenon documented all the way back through the Canterbury Tales. When Ekirch isolated a group of modern people from all artificial light, he found that they naturally returned to that pattern after about 4 weeks. They also got a lot more sleep – far more than the marginal impact found in this study.

    Second, climate change is large-scale phenomenon. That is, it posits long-term changes, not short-term disruptions to temperature. Heat waves are a short-term impact. Anyone can be disturbed by an unusual short-term event. Animals (including humans and within limits) acclimatize to longer-term changes. In other words, a heat wave of a day or two will cause a few restless nights but at the end of an unusually warm month, I’m sleeping just fine.

    But it is theoretically possible that nighttime temperatures are something that humans have a particularly hard time acclimatizing to. While the Urban Heat Island effect is a good counter-example, a better comparitor to test the climate change/sleep hypothesis would be simple latitude. We know that northern regions tend to be cooler than southern regions. And even though inhabitants move all over the country, they acclimatize to those conditions within a period of weeks. For this hypothesis to be true, there would have to be a failure to acclimatize. And that failure relative to nightime temperatures should be very easy to detect. All else held equal, do people in the South get less sleep (or less good sleep) than people in the North? Other than Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD, which has to do with the amount of daylight received during the night by those in the far north and nothing to do with temperature), I am aware of exactly zero studies showing any evidence that those living in the North sleep any better or worse than those in the South.

    The age and income disparities are completely explained by the correlation between those factors and economic success. The poor and the elderly are less able to afford air conditioning and suffer during transient weather conditions like heat waves. The poor and the elderly, on the other hand, show no better survival or sleep patterns in northern vs southern cities. The fact that the poor and the elderly are at increased risk during weather extremes is completely uncontroversial – and completely irrelevant to the alleged conclusions of the study.

    Obradovich should stick to political science. He’s apparently not very good at real science.

    • Typo: “amount of daylight received during the night” should have been “amount of daylight received during the winter months”.

  60. I don’t understand the objections to this study – comments about UHI, cell phones, and climate change not being weather are all irrelevant to the main point. Humans sleep more poorly during warm weather, with warmer being roughly 68F, or 20C. Here is a summary of a study that concludes exactly that, a study not related to AGW concerns: https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-best-temperature-for-a-good-nights-sleep-1456166563
    Are there some folks for which this is not the case? Of course, just like there are folks who can smoke 2 packs of cigarettes and day and live to 100. But in general, humans sleep more poorly in warmer temperatures.
    Warmer nighttime temperatures can be caused by several factors – UHI is one. Climate change is another. If you don’t believe that substantial warming is occurring due to AGW, fine – but don’t use that as a smokescreen for denying the conclusions of the basic premise about temperatures and sleep.

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