Greedy Africans are starving our cars

US politicians and bureaucrats have less compassion and common sense than an  average Londoner

Guest essay by Paul Driessen

“You’ve heard of Live Aid? Well, this is Drive Aid,” an ardent young man says, as he approaches London pedestrians. “Greedy people in developing nations are eating huge amounts of food that could easily be turned into biofuel to power our cars. African acreage the size of Belgium is being used for food, and we’re saying it should go to cars here in the UK. Can we have your support?”

Londoners reacted with disbelief and outrage, the ActionAid UK video shows, and refused to sign his mock petition. The amusing stunt drove home a vital point: Biofuel programs are turning food into fuel, converting cropland into fuel production sites, and disrupting food supplies for hungry people worldwide. The misguided programs are having serious environmental consequences, as well.

Why, then, can’t politicians, bureaucrats and environmentalists display the common sense exhibited by London’s citizenry? Why did President Obama tell Africans (many of whom are malnourished) in July 2009 that they should refrain from using “dirty” fossil fuels and use their “bountiful” biofuel and other renewable energy resources, instead? When will Congress pull the plug on Renewable Fuel Standards?

Ethanol and other biofuels might have made some sense when Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and established mandates (or “standards”) requiring that refiners and consumer purchase large quantities of ethanol and other biofuels. Back then, despite growing evidence to the contrary, many people thought we were running out of oil and gas, and believed manmade global warming threatened the planet. But this is not 2005. Those rationales are no longer persuasive.

The hydraulic fracturing revolution has obliterated the Club of Rome “peak oil” notion that we are rapidly exhausting the world’s petroleum. Climategate and other IPCC scandals demonstrated that the “science” behind climate cataclysm claims is conjectural, manipulated and even fraudulent. And actual observations of temperatures, storms, droughts, sea levels and Arctic ice have refused to cooperate with computer models and Hansen-Gore-EPA-IPCC disaster scenarios.

In fact, biofuels and Renewable Fuel Standards cannot be justified on any grounds.

The United States is using 40 million acres of cropland (Iowa plus New Jersey) and 45% of its corn crop to produce 14 billion gallons of ethanol annually. This amount of corn could feed some 570 million people, out of the 1.2 billion who still struggle to survive on $1.25 per day.

This corn-centric agriculture is displacing wheat and other crops, dramatically increasing grain and food prices, and keeping land under cultivation that would otherwise be returned to wildlife habitat. It requires millions of pounds of insecticides, billions of pounds of fertilizer, vast amounts of petroleum-based energy, and billions of gallons of water – to produce a fuel that gets one-third less mileage per gallon than gasoline and achieves no overall reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

Ethanol mandates have caused US corn prices to rocket from $1.96 per average bushel in 2005 to as much as $7.50 in autumn 2012 and $6.68 in June 2013. Corn growers and ethanol makers get rich. However, soaring corn prices mean beef, pork, poultry, egg and fish producers pay more for corn-based feed; grocery manufacturers pay more for corn, meat, fish and corn syrup; families pay more for everything on their dinner table; and starving Africans go hungry because aid agencies cannot buy as much food.

By 2022, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (amending the 2005 law) requires 15 billion gallons of corn-based ethanol and 21 billion gallons of cellulosic and other non-corn-based biofuels. That will monumentally worsen all these problems.

Equally insane, the Environmental Protection Agency’s draft rule for 2013 required that refiners purchase 14 million gallons of cellulosic biofuels. There’s a teensy problem: the fuel doesn’t exist. A mere 4,900 gallons were produced in March, and zero the other months. So companies are forced to buy fantasy fuel, fined big bucks if they do not, and punished if they get conned into buying fraudulent “renewable fuel credits” from “socially responsible” companies like Clean Green Fuel, Absolute Fuels and Green Diesel.

Ethanol collects water, which can result in engine stalls. It corrodes plastic, rubber and soft metal parts. Pre-2001 car engines, parts and systems may not be able to handle E15 fuel blends (15% ethanol, 85% gasoline), adversely affecting engine, fuel pump and sensor durability. Older cars, motorcycles and boats fueled with E15 could conk out in dangerously inopportune places; at the very least they could require costly engine repairs. Lawn mowers and other gasoline-powered equipment are equally susceptible.

On a global scale, the biofuels frenzy is diverting millions of acres of farmland from food crops, converting millions of acres of rainforest and other wildlife habitat into farmland, and employing billions of gallons of water, to produce corn, jatropha, palm oil and other crops for use in producing politically correct biodiesel and other biofuels.

To top off this seemingly inexhaustible list of policy idiocies, all this ethanol and other biofuel could easily be replaced with newly abundant oil and gas supplies. Amazing new seismic, deepwater, deep drilling, hydraulic fracturing and other technologies have led to discoveries of huge new reserves of oil and natural gas – and enabled companies to extract far more petroleum from reservoirs once thought to have been depleted.

That means we can now get vastly more energy from far less land; with far fewer impacts on environmental quality, biodiversity and endangered species; and with none of the nasty effects on food supplies, food prices and world hunger that biofuel lunacy entails.

We could do that – if radical greens in the Obama Administration, United Nations and eco pressure groups would end their ideological opposition to leasing, drilling, fracking, Outer Continental Shelf and Arctic National Wildlife Refuge development, Canadian oil sands, the Keystone pipeline and countless other projects. We could do so, if they would stop behaving like environmentalist Bull Connors, arrogantly blocking the doors to human and civil rights progress.

This colossal global biofuels industry exists only because resource depletion and climate Armageddon ideologies do not die easily – and because politicians lavish government mandates and billions of dollars in taxpayer and consumer subsidies on firms that have persuasive lobbyists and reliable track records for channeling millions of those dollars back to the politicians who keep the racket going.

The ActionAid UK video has lent some good British gallows humor to a serious issue. As another well-known Brit might say, it is time rein in a global SPECTRE that has wreaked too much human and environmental havoc.

To get that long overdue effort underway, Congress needs to amend the 2005 Energy Policy Act, eliminate the Renewable Fuel Standards and end the taxpayer subsidies.

A few thousand farmers and ethanol makers will undoubtedly feel some pain. A few hundred politicians will have less money in their reelection coffers. However, countless wild creatures will breathe much easier in their newly safe natural habitats – and millions of families will enjoy a new birth of freedom, a new wave of economic opportunity, and welcome relief from hunger and malnutrition.

_____________

Paul Driessen is senior policy analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow (www.CFACT.org) and author of Eco-Imperialism: Green power – Black death.

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Resourceguy

Excellent. Every point is spot on. We need a lot more activism to stop this madness.

JY

I’d like to know if any of the big oil companies have been buying up farm land in preparation for the biofuels thing.

Gunga Din

To add the the illogic, ethanol production produces CO2.

Mike jarosz

As unenlightened as most Americans are I wonder how that question would be answered in the U.S. ” Would you sign a petition to stop the U.S. production of biofuels from a food source that could be used to feed starving people in Africa?”

Sean

Ban biofuels

Gene Selkov

Apparently the biofuel hype buys approval among large crowds. Buses in Cambridge proudly wear the “100% biofuel” signs and nobody throws stones at them. In reality they use a split petroleum diesel – recycled cooking oil system. There is nothing “bio” about it.
http://newsroom.scania.com/en-group/2013/05/22/cambridgeshire-shows-the-way-to-the-future/

albertalad

I’ve been loaded drunk and still unable to think like an eco freak – what does one have to do in life to be that brain dead? God only knows of the various states I’ve been in over time – but at no time could I possible think that bizarre.

John Phillips

The farmers are getting rich here in ND, not from the oil, but from farming. And whenever a piece of farmland becomes available, they bid it up to ridiculous prices. I guess it must all pencil out, but it has to come to an end at some point. There will then be a farmland bubble burst. None I know “believe” in AGW, but they all grin when the subject comes up.

David, UK

@ albertalad: Simple. In the morning you’ll wake up sober. The eco freaks will still be brainwashed.

DirkH

albertalad says:
June 23, 2013 at 1:26 pm
“I’ve been loaded drunk and still unable to think like an eco freak – what does one have to do in life to be that brain dead? ”
Choom.

JDN

Most Africans have no money. No money to buy food, farming equipment; they do not constitute a demand. It makes no sense to sell them this food. If you give them the food, you destroy the ability of local farmers to sell their crops. All large scale starvations are based on inadequate distribution of wealth. May I introduce you to UN Agenda 21, a fine program that aims to solve that problem through by way of a small tax on developed nations along the lines of their fuel consumption. Can I have your support, Sir?
Seriously, there is little effective demand for food in poor countries. How did you get to be a policy analyst?

RiHo08

Biofuel was suppose to come from switch grass and many other cellulose dense crops. The technology was “just around the corner.” The organisms to throw into the brewer’s pot were to break down cellulose and make….ethanol.
Well, well, what have we here? The organisms aren’t cooperating. It seems that there is a bit more to the break down of complex cellulose as opposed to breaking down sugars that reside in cane and corn. In other words, the hype preceded the technology. Where did we see that before?
Think: wind, solar, biofuels….
So, by an ingenious bit of farm subsidy Congressional sausage making, the every year 15% excess corn crop could be “plowed” into making ethanol while the cellulose technology catches up. Great! Unfortunately, there is a delay in the technology, and, as usual with Federal programs, too many hogs are feeding at the trough so the corn acreage increased. Instead of 15% corn surplus to ship off shore to hungry people, we now have converted 40% of acreage to corn biofuel ethanol. Now it would be too politically risky to shut the faucet off.
George Washington had to deal with corn ethanol during the Whiskey Rebellion of 1791. Historical lessons Congressional types do not forget.

Any program, such as biofuel, which must be subsidized via government, is by definition, not economically viable.

Justthinkin

“Ethanol and other biofuels might have made some sense when Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and established mandates (or “standards”) requiring that refiners and consumer purchase large quantities of ethanol and other biofuels. Back then, despite growing evidence to the contrary, many people thought we were running out of oil and gas, and believed manmade global warming threatened the planet. But this is not 2005. Those rationales are no longer persuasive.”
Well. That one paragraph sure screwed an otherwise good sarcastic article.
Ethanol and other biofuels???? There is only ONE biofuel,ethanol. And it never has,nor ever will make sense.
They are not standards,they are mandates.Used by eco-goons to impose their will on others.
Thousands still believe “manmade whatever” still threatens the planet.
I suggest Mr Driessen eat nothing but pine needles and grass for the next 2 months,if he believes his position is so right.
Or did your auto-post screw-up,Anthony,and the above post should be in Friday Funnies?

William McClenney

Simply excellent! Marvelous pathology.
I truly loved:
“3 meals per day or 3 miles per day?” Brilliant!!

A surreal world indeed!
I have a question. The recent fires from peat land burning in Sumatra which is choking Singapore with smoke, how much of that is caused by clearing land for palm-oil production to create bio-ethanol for the European car market?
Anyone knows?

GlynnMhor

LOL.
That about says it all, unfortunately.

Still LMFAO.
Its a serious problem though. My family is feeling the pinch, from soaring food prices. I can only imagine what really poor people are enduring.

Ian W

The biofuel industry knows it generates as much CO2 as ‘fossil’ fuels
The biofuel industry knows it is responsible for destruction of virgin rain forest, and loss of habitat for wild life such as Orangutans and displaces croplands in the USA
The biofuel industry knows it is forcing prices of food higher and increasing the probability of starvation in third world countries
But The biofuel industry could not care less – wallets are being filled by the money laundering subsidies from taxation. Fat wallets erase bad consciences
And of course all the ‘do you want fries with that’ marketing ‘professionals’ in transportation of all types are pushing how ‘green’ their vehicles and now aircraft are ‘because they use biofuels’ or are ‘flexfuel’.
A child dies every 5 seconds from hunger and these people are happy making money by turning food into fuel. In the 3 minutes it takes you to fill your tank with ‘green’ E85 fuel – 38 children will have died from starvation. Good to be green?
The world is facing a hunger crisis unlike anything it has seen in more than 50 years.
925 million people are hungry.
Every day, almost 16,000 children die from hunger-related causes.
That’s one child every five seconds.

http://www.bread.org/hunger/global/

DrJohnGalan

A really powerful way to get the message across – most people have not thought about this. (I wonder when it will be on the BBC)

Latitude

It requires millions of pounds of insecticides, billions of pounds of fertilizer, vast amounts of petroleum-based energy, and billions of gallons of water –
====
…and it’s not regulated the same as “food”….so the sky is the limit

Leon Brozyna

Food for cars but not for stomachs … and how many people die from starvation/malnutrition every year … sounds like genocide to me.

Mike from the Carson Valley where we know about cold and hot

government driven economics, still not working, reminiscent of the failed soviet socialist politics.

Tonyb

Gene
Surely the recycled cooking oil used in those buses in Cambridge comes from vegetable oil . In which case that makes it bio fuel surely. Cook with it first then use it for transport. Sounds a good use for the stuff
Tonyb

It’s not just the Africans. The greedy Mexican peones want to make tortillas with their corn. Off with their heads I say — forget the petitions!
America too needs bio-fuel — where is the president when he is needed?

Resourceguy

I forgot to mention the new trend. It is from some African countries and UN agencies urging cash shipments from the US instead of grain. They want to stop distorting local farm prices with the shipments but will take the cash instead. I’m sure this will get to the poor that need the food at affordable prices—just as sure as I am of UN good intentions on the science behind global warming and regional wealth redistribution. Any mistakes the UN makes in this policy push can be made up with more appeals for cash. It’s a despicable way to get double payments.

Jay

Population growth in the 3rd world is the greatest threat to the planets biodiversity.. The burn anything for fuel and eat anything for food is doing the planet no favors..
Environmentalists dont want another billion people, never mind two three or four.. So they bring market forces to bear that will make it a bad idea for poor people to have children..
So you make it look like your going after 1st world big business or the oil and gas companies..
You demonize them while promising huge sums of money to all the poor people (read leaders), if only they will starve themselves to.. loose a few pounds..
The people in charge of these questionable countries jump at the chance of free money..
Starving their own people gives them money up front and saves them from having to pay for bullets later, when they have to shoot them anyways..
Not to many double bonuses in Africa..

WTF

Here in Ontario I pay the extra and use Shell Hi-test. No ethanol.

Brazil is using its best regions for agriculture to produce ethanol from sugar cane.
Stupidity is not the privilege of any country!
Signed: A Brazilian.

Mike jarosz

Liberals(government) have visions. Conservatives have consequences.Liberals have good intentions. Conservatives have results. Thomas Sowell has written a number of books on economics. This has never been about saving the planet.

GunnyGene

@ Jay says:
June 23, 2013 at 3:34 pm
Population growth in the 3rd world is the greatest threat to the planets biodiversity.. The burn anything for fuel and eat anything for food is doing the planet no favors..
Environmentalists dont want another billion people, never mind two three or four.. So they bring market forces to bear that will make it a bad idea for poor people to have children..
So you make it look like your going after 1st world big business or the oil and gas companies..
You demonize them while promising huge sums of money to all the poor people (read leaders), if only they will starve themselves to.. loose a few pounds..
The people in charge of these questionable countries jump at the chance of free money..
Starving their own people gives them money up front and saves them from having to pay for bullets later, when they have to shoot them anyways..
Not to many double bonuses in Africa..
**********************************************************************
I thought you were talking about the USA until I read the last sentence. Perhaps it was only a vision of the USA in another few years, if We the People don’t correct the political mistakes of the last few years quickly and permanently.

Dodgy Geezer

@Mike jarosz
As unenlightened as most Americans are I wonder how that question would be answered in the U.S. ” Would you sign a petition to stop the U.S. production of biofuels from a food source that could be used to feed starving people in Africa?”
They would probably say “Which Africa?
Africa, Albuquerque, Bernalillo, NM 87102, USA
Africa, Galena, Delaware, OH 43021, USA
Africa, Rockport, Spencer, IN 47635, USA
Africa, Kissimmee, Orange, FL 34747, USA
Africa, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN 55404, USA
Africa, Gallatin National Forest, Big Sky, Madison, MT 59720, USA

d

oil is aboitic – there is no shortage – just politically and financially convenient to state such.
biofuels are a waste of time also – elts drive food prices higher
fracking is also a waste of time and slowly they are making vast tracts of land unfriendly to human settlement and over time you will see the relocation of people as per the UN agenda 21 initiative
Its all just part of the plan

Catcracking

Excellent article,
I agree with everything so stated.
One omission that I would note is that the corn ethanol farming/production causes massive pollution in the Gulf of Mexico that would be unacceptable for any other industry,
Go to
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-06-14/gulf-of-mexico-s-extinction-by-ethanol.html
The pollution in the Gulf of Mexico from corn ethanol has been well known for years; yet ignored by our government, the environmentalists, and the MSM. I attended a conference over 13 years ago where this problem was outlined. We make a big deal when a small oil spill occurs in the Gulf (The BP oil spill was not small) while ignoring the well known fact that runoff from the corn farming causes a swath of the northern Gulf of Mexico that each summer turns into a dead zone, drained of oxygen and devoid of life, and will be larger this year than usual.
“If conditions are right this year, the dead zone might occupy an area the size of New Jersey, or 7,800 square miles.”
“Once the Mississippi’s waters reach the Gulf and the warming sun, the nutrients cause huge algal blooms. While the algae are blossoming, they suck oxygen from the water, and again after they die and fall to the bottom to decompose, where bacteria further deplete the water of oxygen. Fish either die or head farther from shore.”
It is a disgrace that the EPA ignores this environmental issue while mandating more and more ethanol each year.

Bill Illis

Just wanted to note that there are several companies out there pushing the cellulose ethanol scam. They have extracted 100s of millions of dollars from gullible governments all over the world over the years and haven’t produced any ethanol of note to date.
Ethanol is alcohol which comes from natural yeasts which work on sugars.
There is no yeast that turns cellulose into alcohol.
Momma Nature has been working on cellulose for almost 400 million years and she hasn’t found a quick way to break down celloluse and especially turn into sugars or into alcohol yet.
The cellulose to ethanol business is a scam, just like almost everything green.

megawati

Alas, all those good intentions. Like the U2 concert where the ever-sanctimonious Bono got the audience quiet, started clapping his hands and said: “Every time I clap my hands a child dies in Africa”. Shouted a Scotsman in the audience: “Well, stop clapping your hands then, you f… bastard”.

Ian W

Per Strandberg (@LittleIceAge) says:
June 23, 2013 at 2:16 pm
A surreal world indeed!
I have a question. The recent fires from peat land burning in Sumatra which is choking Singapore with smoke, how much of that is caused by clearing land for palm-oil production to create bio-ethanol for the European car market?
Anyone knows?

Yes it is caused by claimed illegal fire setting and the industry blamed is the palm oil industry…
SINGAPORE—Smog accumulating over Singapore from fires in Indonesia worsened again on Thursday, prompting concern about widening economic and diplomatic fallout, amid government warnings the haze could cover the small, island country for an extended period.
With public anger rising, Singapore pressed its neighbor for urgent action against the purposely kindled forest fires that have billowed into one of Southeast Asia’s worst air-pollution crises.
………………
Some experts blame large commercial farms on Sumatra that are part of Indonesia’s $21 billion palm oil industry, the world’s largest. Three of the biggest palm oil companies in Indonesia are based outside the country: Indonesian-owned and Singapore-based Golden Agri-Resources, E5H.SG -0.90% Wilmar International, F34.SG +0.31% also based in Singapore, and Malaysian-based Sime Darby 4197.KU -0.95% .
Environmental activist group Greenpeace says half of all the land where the biggest fires are occurring in Indonesia is controlled by commercial plantations, suggesting companies are clearing land to make way for new crops. The Singaporean prime minister also linked the fires to commercial enterprises, rather than small landholders. But Wilmar and Sime Darby on Thursday attributed the fires to small landholders, as did Astra Agro Lestari, AALI.JK -1.58% one of Indonesia’s largest palm oil companies.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323300004578557420367297556.html

Ian H

d says:
fracking is also a waste of time and slowly they are making vast tracts of land unfriendly to human settlement and over time you will see the relocation of people as per the UN agenda 21 initiative

Either this is pure Lewandowsky bait or you’ve been sampling too much of the bioethanol.
Fracking is highly profitable and unsubsidised so how can it be a waste of time. And despite the propaganda of those who oppose it, there is no detectable sign of fracking on the surface if it is done properly. So how can fracking be making “vast tracts of land unfriendly to human settlement”.

Patrick

Live Aid did, and is still doing, a lot of good work in Africa, specifically Ethiopia. Unfortunately, far too much of that money was pilfered by authorities. There is plenty of food in Ethiopia, in fact so much so quite a bit does go to waste (Which surprised me). People still go hungry simply because most people are not working and food prices have increased, in a only a few years, to levels that even working people can’t afford. Some of that is due to Govn’t/corporate corruption, a poor low wage economy (Even some tourist trinkets are made in China rather than locally), and forced land evacuations. I think this is what the UN’s Agenda 21 has in store for all peoples except them, of course.

Lew Skannen

I know it would be naughty but I would have signed the petition with zeal. Just to annoy the Action Aid do-gooders. They are right about bio-fuels but you can be sure that many of their other ideas are just as whacky. Having spent time in Africa I am opposed to all aid and aid organizations.

GunnyGene

@ Ian H says:
June 23, 2013 at 5:30 pm
d says:
fracking is also a waste of time and slowly they are making vast tracts of land unfriendly to human settlement and over time you will see the relocation of people as per the UN agenda 21 initiative
Either this is pure Lewandowsky bait or you’ve been sampling too much of the bioethanol.
Fracking is highly profitable and unsubsidised so how can it be a waste of time. And despite the propaganda of those who oppose it, there is no detectable sign of fracking on the surface if it is done properly. So how can fracking be making “vast tracts of land unfriendly to human settlement”.
*************************************************************************************
Indeed it is. I just signed a 3 year lease with a local company (in MS) to drill on my land 🙂 . Fracking was attempted here around 30 years ago, however the soil at 7000′ was uncooperative so this will be a ‘traditional’ vertical well. Mainly clay, which simply clogs up the works as it enters the pipes. Fracking is useful in brittle stone. In any event a drill pad is one acre (208′ square) in size, and includes the storage & separation and other machinery for drilling and pumping. Not exactly ‘vast tracts’ of land. I certainly have no intention of moving because of it. There are also a great many regulations regarding water and chemical disposal, etc. and restoration of any land needed for temporary road access, etc. All of which is paid for by the drilling company. I’m certainly looking forward to the extra income, and not the least bit concerned over any paranoia about human settlement 🙂 . I have farmer neighbors with producing wells in the middle of their fields, and haven’t heard a single complaint yet.

David

There is one problem with the article.
Hydraulic fracturing spreads poisons in the environment leading to toxic chemicals leaching in to water supplies, Fracking is being used by the Globalists.to poison land in order to snatch it up at low prices.
There are MASSIVE oil reserves in North America and no doubt other places round the world that are as yet untapped, THEY are the answer to the peak oil myth.

US politicians and bureaucrats have less compassion and common sense than an average Londoner
—————————————
Who could have imagined that that was even possible?

Tom in Texas

David, then we’re doomed, ’cause they’ve been fracing for over 60 years. I think they originally used TNT (great way to fish too – bag your limit every time).
Then you do a 180 in your last sentence, which I agree with.

Other_Andy

@David
“Hydraulic fracturing spreads poisons in the environment leading to toxic chemicals leaching in to water supplies.”
Really?
Any examples where that has happened in the last 65 years?

Grey Lensman

There are some errors in the comments above. Ethanol is not the only biofuel. Try Biodiesel and wood, chips or pellets.
I live in the middle of the deadly haze caused by burning land to clear it for Oil Palm plantations. The excuses, moaning and investigations beggar belief because what is required is ACTION, Put the fires out and get the land owners to pay. The problem with doing this is that the Corporations are trying their best to blame the subsistence farmers who had their land stolen for the fires.
Another problem, biofuel from palm oil, which is not a food and very efficient is declared evil by the greens, yet they love wood chips and pellets.
So much so, they closed Drax in UK and are converting it to wood pellets, which they source from clear cutting North Carolina. Wow really good that.
Palm oil converted to biodiesel, is used in the plantations along with recycled waste thus no fuel, fertilzer or insecticide is used.
Another issue that needs a clear report here is how clean is wood, I have read that emissions from wood burning are far higher/worse than coal. Anybody have the facts/data
choke, cough splutter, idex over 400

Mike McMillan
Mike Bromley the Kurd near the Green Line

Gunga Din says:
June 23, 2013 at 1:10 pm
To add the the illogic, ethanol production produces CO2.
True. But it’s noble cause CO2.

Mike Bromley the Kurd near the Green Line

d says:
June 23, 2013 at 4:41 pm
oil is aboitic
It may well be, but I think you meant: “abiotic”. In which case you’d be insulting a whole MESS of Cretaceous plankton and algae.

Robin Hewitt

But what I don’t understand is…
What were “Londoners” chosen as the benchmark to gauge “US politicians and bureaucrats” ?