Bonnie bombs

All the worry being foisted in the MSM related to “Bonnie” and the Gulf Oil spill seems to be evaporating.  NHC has discontinued Tropical Storm Warnings.

[Image of probabilities of tropical storm force winds]

BULLETIN

TROPICAL DEPRESSION BONNIE ADVISORY NUMBER   9

NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL     AL032010

1000 AM CDT SAT JUL 24 2010

…BONNIE HANGING IN THERE WITH 30 MPH WINDS…TROPICAL STORM

WARNINGS DISCONTINUED…

SUMMARY OF 1000 AM CDT…1500 UTC…INFORMATION

———————————————–

LOCATION…28.0N 86.7W

ABOUT 165 MI…265 KM ESE OF THE MOUTH OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER

ABOUT 155 MI…250 KM SW OF APALACHICOLA FLORIDA

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…30 MPH…45 KM/HR

PRESENT MOVEMENT…WNW OR 300 DEGREES AT 17 MPH…28 KM/HR

MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1014 MB…29.94 INCHES

WATCHES AND WARNINGS

——————–

CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY…

ALL TROPICAL STORM WARNINGS ARE DISCONTINUED

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT…

NONE.

FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA IN THE UNITED

STATES…PLEASE MONITOR PRODUCTS ISSUED BY YOUR LOCAL NATIONAL

WEATHER SERVICE FORECAST OFFICE.

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK

——————————

AT 1000 AM CDT…1500 UTC…THE CENTER OF TROPICAL DEPRESSION BONNIE

WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 28.0 NORTH…LONGITUDE 86.7 WEST. THE

DEPRESSION IS MOVING TOWARD THE WEST-NORTHWEST NEAR 17 MPH…28

KM/HR. THIS GENERAL MOTION IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE AS THE CENTER

MOVES INLAND OVER THE NORTHERN GULF COAST BETWEEN SOUTHEAST

LOUISIANA AND ALABAMA TONIGHT.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE BARELY 30 MPH…45 KM/HR…WITH HIGHER

GUSTS.  THESE WINDS ARE CONFINED TO A FEW RAINBANDS MAINLY TO THE

NORTH OF THE CENTER. NO CHANGE IN STRENGTH IS FORECAST BEFORE THE

CENTER REACHES THE COAST. A GRADUAL WEAKENING IS EXPECTED AS THE

SYSTEM MOVES INLAND.

ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE FROM A RECONNAISSANCE AIRCRAFT

WAS 1014 MB…29.94 INCHES.

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND

———————-

WIND…ISOLATED GUSTS TO TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS IN SQUALLS ARE

LIKELY TO SPREAD OVER PORTIONS OF THE NORTHERN GULF COAST…FROM

SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA EASTWARD TO THE FAR WESTERN FLORIDA PANHANDLE

LATER TODAY.

RAINFALL…BONNIE IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL

ACCUMULATIONS OF 1 TO 2 INCHES OVER PORTIONS OF SOUTHERN

LOUISIANA…SOUTHERN ALABAMA…SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI…AND THE FAR

WESTERN FLORIDA PANHANDLE…WITH POSSIBLE ISOLATED MAXIMUM AMOUNTS

OF 3 INCHES.

NEXT ADVISORY

————-

NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY…400 PM CDT.

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54 thoughts on “Bonnie bombs

  1. MSM cries “WOLF!” …… again.
    If it had developed into a CAT 3 or 4, it would have been “proof” of AGW. The press coverage will die as fast as this storm since it didn’t deliver the AGW goods.
    I’m glad there was nothing much to it for the affected residents’ sake.

  2. Another Tiny Tim bites the dust.
    Oh well, it’s not just Bonnie that bombed. The media did try to make it out to be more than it was. Though at least Fox News seemed to be geographically challenged when referring to the the storm as coming from the Caribbean, when it formed north of Haiti/Dominican Republic. Last I looked, the Caribbean was located south of that island.

  3. Bastardi called this correctly several days ago. It is interesting to hear him actually accuse TPC of lying and then give his reasons why this is so. Why TPC makes some of the statements they do is beyond an objective look at the weather.

  4. Interesting . A couple of days ago I was watching The Weather Channel’s tropical update when their hurricane expert informed Jim Cantore ( who was on location in south Florida ) that Bonnie would peter out in the Gulf . Big Jim was obviously displeased . So far , the near record tropical season that Cantore and other commited alarmists has failed to materialize . Let’s all hope that this trend continues .

  5. I am a bit curious what the increased wave motion from the storm will do to the oil from the spill, especially the oil that was mixed with emulsifiers. A lot of it just may disappear. Many, many years ago (while at sea and while it was still legal) adding a little dish soap to the bilge water before pumping it overboard resulted in an almost undetectable light brown cloud of very small particles that almost immediately disappeared. There was no noticeable effect while snorkeling through it. Or course we weren’t fish trying to breathe it.

  6. Sorry – I meant Cantore and other commited alarmists PREDICTED . As an aside , I suspect some of have actually hoped for such a catastrophe .

  7. The real center of circulation (making land fall in Huston today) [it will be back in 109 days ready to talk business] was West of the rain band that they called Bonnie, Because there are no major outer planets having a synod conjunction with the earth until mid August, the precipitation was “missing” from the center of circulation, as the global circuit is still in the ion charge mode, it increases global precipitation rates post conjunctions. (Remember the flash floods in March, April?)
    The real hurricane season will kick in after the first of three synod conjunctions with Neptune on the 20th of August, then really get crazy just after the combined synod conjunctions with both Jupiter and Uranus on the 21st, and each other on the 24th of August. There might be enough power in the solar wind disruption coming on the 21st to 24th to shut down some Power grids, with the geomagnetic storms they will probably generate.
    I would expect to see an increase in background seismic activity 30 days both sides of the double conjunction. Just wait till they start saying the AGW caused all of the sudden activity right on (planetary scheduled) time.

  8. So Joe Bastardi hit it right on the nose huh, again. Don’t get too big of a head now Joe.

  9. The crisis mongers must be singing:
    “My Bonnie lies over the ocean,
    My Bonnie lies over the sea,
    My Bonnie lies over the ocean,
    Oh bring back my Bonnie to me.”

  10. There is a rumor that Al Gore has ordered several billion breeze boxes and some barges (leased from Enron) to set them up on. He figures with all the breeze boxes turned on, not only will he simulate at least a tropical storm, but he will elevate the temperature due to all the power being used, once again proving his point about AGW (Al Gore Whining).

  11. Why has the hurricane season flopped so far?
    Is it the changes due to oncoming La Nina, that went where they didn’t expect La Nina to go?

  12. As I posted on Tips & Notes a couple of days ago, more proof that warmer SSTs are not the only player in tropical storm development.

  13. Joe Crawford says:
    July 24, 2010 at 9:09 am
    “I am a bit curious what the increased wave motion from the storm will do to the oil from the spill, especially the oil that was mixed with emulsifiers. A lot of it just may disappear. […]”
    I just read in some news article that dispersed oil is broken down quicker than undispersed; their only worry is that the underwater plumes might affect organisms more.
    Source:
    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-bp-oil-plumes,0,2578252.story
    I’m not that worried though. I prefer oily fish anyway 😉

  14. @Richard Holle
    “Jupiter (and the other planets) do not have much influence on the orbit of the Earth around the Sun from year to year. The VSOP model of the motion of the planets (from which the positions of the planets can be calculated quite accurately for thousands of years) indicates that the distance between the Sun and the Earth can get up to about 2400 km (about 2/5 of the diameter of the Earth) larger or smaller because of the influence of Jupiter.
    A difference of 2400 km in the distance of the Earth from the Sun corresponds to a difference of about one part in thirty thousand in the amount of sunlight per unit area that reaches the Earth. This is far smaller than the observed variation, which is more like one part in a thousand, and which is mostly tied to the sunspot cycle”
    http://www.astro.uu.nl/~strous/AA/en/antwoorden/planeten.html#v457
    The other major planets being much further away and much smaller than Jupiter, have even less effect.

  15. Leon Brozyna says:
    July 24, 2010 at 8:30 am
    Another Tiny Tim bites the dust.
    Oh well, it’s not just Bonnie that bombed. The media did try to make it out to be more than it was. Though at least Fox News seemed to be geographically challenged when referring to the the storm as coming from the Caribbean, when it formed north of Haiti/Dominican Republic. Last I looked, the Caribbean was located south of that island.
    ————
    It seemed NOAA’s tracking was bit off, too, being about 100 miles south of it’s course, and about as straight a line as it could be, not the curve they modeled and never changed. The primary reason it bombed was it got sucked into a (High pressure?) system to it’s west which quickly dragged it out, so it couldn’t develop. That system was pretty strong and it was the main reason the potential depression futher east of Bonnie never developed, however that one has never left the eastern coast of Mexico and looks like it might redevelop and maybe head north behind the High as the High moves into Texas.
    I’ll be interested to see if and when NOAA might make note of the one over Mexico. It seems more likely than the new one to the west they note, but I’m not in this profession.

  16. asmilwho says:
    July 24, 2010 at 10:52 am
    Reply; The information you posted is valid on the tidal orbital parameters, do you have information on the strength of the electromagnetic interactions that accompany the synod conjunctions?
    Which is the mechanism I am proposing to cause these predicted effects.
    Could you give me a better prediction?
    Richard Holle

  17. Following along with Mark Sudduth’s http://www.hurricanetrack.com it became clear fairly early (about Tuesday) that Bonnie was going to go out with a whimper.
    Notwithstanding the named storms predictions, this year is analog with 2005….so we may yet be very active. Happily, with adroit analyses of the ENSO, the PDO and the AO etc., the fervor for AGW-boosted hurricane intensity is totally debunked.
    The Hansenesque tendency to want to make every situation a critical one makes preparation and mitigation all the more difficult. Factual precision and accuracy are, as ever, the key.

  18. rbateman says:
    July 24, 2010 at 10:21 am
    Why has the hurricane season flopped so far?
    Is it the changes due to oncoming La Nina, that went where they didn’t expect La Nina to go?

    Because we aren’t in peak season yet. The active part of the Atlantic tropical season starts in August 1 to November 1.

  19. Dusty says:
    July 24, 2010 at 11:00 am
    The primary reason it bombed was it got sucked into a (High pressure?) system to it’s west which quickly dragged it out, so it couldn’t develop.

    It was actually a low pressure. The persistent high pressure is what is sitting over the eastern US causing it to be so hot. I know it was a low pressure because Joe Bastardi talked about that low pressure and how it would hurt Bonnie a few days ago.

  20. To asmilwho and others who dismiss planetary influence:
    Do not underestimate the influence of planetary mechanics. Jupiter controls the 11 year Sun spot cycle. This cycle alone creates numerous harmonics at 11.1212×2^N, where N is any number from 0 to 11. The product of 22, 45, 90, 180, 360, 720 and 1,440, 2,800, 5,600 11,500 and 23,000 years results in miriad cycles which effect the climate. Then there is the Moon with its 18 year tidal and 1,800 year declination cycles. Venus, Earth and Jupiter create a 20 year Landescheidt tidal cycle. Jupiter and Saturn combine to create a 60 year climate cycle. And when some of these cycles get together and reinforce, dramatic climate changes can be expected. Uranus a magnetic giant controls the solar 18,000 magnetic reversal cycle. And on, and on, and on.

  21. Wade,
    The peak season is not through November, it’s a short window from August through September. Activity drops off dramatically in October and November.
    There are no signs of increased activity developing in the next few weeks, so we will need about 2 named storms per week in the peak period to verify forecasts from the NHC and others…
    Much like Bonnie, I think the seasonal forecast was exaggerated as well…

  22. @Richard Holle
    The planets are, on a large scale, electrically neutral. There are no net electromagnetic forces between them.
    If this were not so, it would have been detected long before now: electromagnetism is 10-to-the-power-of-37 times stronger than gravity. (http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/forces/funfor.html)
    This strength is easily demonstrable – on a dry day, rub a comb across your shirt to give it static electricity, then hold it over a piece of paper on a desk. If you were successful, the piece of paper lifts off the desk. It takes an entire planet to keep the paper on the desk, but this force is easily overcome with everyday materials employing the electromagnetic force.

  23. Regarding Gulf / Oil alarmism, here’s the synopsis of the Friday night (7/24) Coast to Coast AM show:

    Gulf Oil Spill & Climate Change:
    Filling in for George, Art Bell was joined by Professor Peter Ward for a 4-hour discussion on how the Gulf oil catastrophe ties in with climate change. Ward believes BP significantly underestimated the amount of oil that was released from their deep sea well, and worries about the environmental impact of not only the spill but the cleanup efforts also. Chemical dispersants, which have helped break apart the surface oil, are potentially destructive to the cell walls of microorganisms at the base of the marine food chain, he explained. The heavier part of the oil spreading across the sea floor will eventually break down into poisonous hydrogen sulfide gas, Ward continued. Massive quantities of methane, also a byproduct of the leaked oil, will ultimately end up in the atmosphere where it will contribute to increased temperatures across the planet, he added.
    Ward said he considers the global warming debate settled — greenhouse gases are making Earth hotter. Evidence in the geological record indicates that during epochs of high carbon dioxide levels (1000 ppm), temperatures were high enough to completely melt the continental ice sheets. As the planet’s current average CO2 level approaches 400ppm, Ward theorized what would happen if all of the ice on Greenland melted. According to this disaster scenario, the sea levels would rise 24 feet and cause an unimaginable worldwide calamity. A sea level increase of only 3 feet, which Ward thinks could happen within 40 years, would be enough to destroy considerable portions of the planet’s agricultural land, cause nations to seek arable land in other countries, and lead to wars and potentially nuclear exchanges, he noted.
    Ward spent several weeks in Antarctica, where he discovered that, despite its name, the permafrost is melting. He described another, perhaps more frightening, climate disaster scenario involving the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. According to Ward, this ice sheet could break off within a decade and cause 20 feet of sea level rise — enough to kill a billion people. Should some of his worst fears come to fruition, Ward expects Russia and Canada to emerge as the flooded world’s new Wheat Belt. Ward also spoke about the Sun’s inconsequential contribution to global warming, as well as possible solutions to the problem, including painting rooftops white, burying charcoal in the soil, putting iron in the Pacific to cause phytoplankton to bloom, and most importantly, reducing the population of the planet.

  24. I may live in Nevada, but hurricanes are my hobby. I happen to be sitting on a boat near the Eastern tip of Puerto Rico prepping it for the season, to ward off any incoming that I can. It seems to me that WUWT would do well to consider Ryan Maue’s web site on this subject. Dr. Maue has reduced the worlds tropical cyclone activity to a graph. A very revealing graph. http://www.coaps.fsu.edu/~maue/tropical/

  25. rbateman says:
    July 24, 2010 at 10:21 am
    Why has the hurricane season flopped so far?
    Is it the changes due to oncoming La Nina, that went where they didn’t expect La Nina to go?
    ==========================================
    Rob, here are a couple clues, though not the whole picture for sure:
    1) A lot of hellaciously dry air out over the Atlantic Basin. Damn Sahara!
    http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/east/natl/flash-wv.html
    2) Climatologically speaking, the real season does not ramp up until August anyways.
    God its hot here in ORF today.
    104 Sweltering Degrees. This is the type of weather where we start to wish for a tropical cyclone.
    Chris
    Norfolk, VA, USA

  26. Wade says:
    July 24, 2010 at 11:38 am
    It was actually a low pressure. The persistent high pressure is what is sitting over the eastern US causing it to be so hot. I know it was a low pressure because Joe Bastardi talked about that low pressure and how it would hurt Bonnie a few days ago.
    ===========================
    Right, upper level lows are the death of tropical cyclones, because the brisk winds they produce in the upper levels, shear apart any convection that tries to get organized around the center.

  27. mike sphar says: “I may live in Nevada, but hurricanes are my hobby.”
    So do you live in Nevada or not? Seriously though I like the ACE graph in your link. I think it ties in nicely with Willis’s paper in the new thread, namely that the earth produced more concentrated convection and global cooling in the 90’s and to a smaller extent in the mid 00’s to offset the global warming which came from natural sources such as the PDO and (to some extent) man-made CO2.

  28. The way to remember the peak hurricane season is a little mnemonic I learned in Jamaica:
    “June, too soon,
    July, stand by,
    August, you must,
    September, remember,
    October, all over.”

  29. Wade says:
    July 24, 2010 at 11:38 am
    ——–
    Thanks, Wade.
    ********
    savethesharks says:
    July 24, 2010 at 1:47 pm
    Right, upper level lows are the death of tropical cyclones, because the brisk winds they produce in the upper levels, shear apart any convection that tries to get organized around the center.
    ——
    So upper level lows rotate counter-clockwise? That was the one I’d been watching tear Bonnie apart on NOAA’s satellite imagery and the water vapor flash page specifically.
    Another question, if you don’t mind. That flash animation showed that Bonnie is pretty much dissipated and about all inland by 4PM today, but the 4PM advisory says it is 100 miles ESE of the mouth of the Mississippi River. What is used to determine the “center” of a depression — via the bounds of the minimum central pressure?

  30. Following high activity predictions after 2005 that flopped, they began making news stories about water spouts along the coast of Florida. I hadn’t heard of them before. Soon they will be reporting on sailing conditions for toy sailboats.

  31. Please be careful when you say a storm bombs! Call it a dud instead! That’s a real NWS term for the sudden development of a nor’easter off the Atlantic coast. Actually, it’s “bomb out.” No one has come up with a better term yet. Suggestions welcome!
    http://www.usatoday.com/weather/tg/wnoreast/wbombs.htm
    There was an effort to replace the “Big Bang” with something more cosmological, but nothing seemed to work.

  32. Ric Werme says:
    July 24, 2010 at 3:26 pm
    There was an effort to replace the “Big Bang” with something more cosmological, but nothing seemed to work.

    Well it’s about time someone did.
    Ohhh, you mean the name, not the theory. Heheh.
    How about ‘Complete Codswallop’ ? 😉

  33. Not knowing much about the mechanics of these beasts, I assume tropical storms rely on water uptake from the surface and plenty of heat to keep going with force. Would the oil on the surface tend to dampen the cycle somewhat by preventing some evaporation? Or is the relative extent of the slick too small to make a difference?
    Been distracted by the gyrations of the politicians in Australia lately, leading into the Aussie election.

  34. rbateman says:
    July 24, 2010 at 10:21 am

    Why has the hurricane season flopped so far?
    Is it the changes due to oncoming La Nina, that went where they didn’t expect La Nina to go?

    As others have noted, things don’t really get cranking until August and September. Personally, I think the start of Hurricane season should be moved to July, and June storms could be called pre-season storms. New England gets snow in November (and sometimes October or September), and no one calls that snow season.
    (Technically the snow season runs from the beginning of July to the end of June, but most people don’t know that….)
    La Nina is generally supportive of an active season in the Atlantic.
    Joe D’Aleo has a lot to say about the “July lull” at
    http://icecap.us/images/uploads/tropics.doc
    A couple excerpts:
    One of the key reasons for the quiet period is a large slug of Saharan dust which has blown across the subtropical Atlantic shown in yellows and reds on the Wisconsin CIMSS imagery below. This dry dusty air produces stability and inhibits any convection. It is typical of July and usually explains the mid summer lull.
    My guess is an above normal season but not the extreme number of storms as in 2005. The AMO remains well above normal with the warmth in the tropics and North Atlantic, usually correlating with active seasons. Warm water off the east coast makes the threat of a major storm more likely. Warm Atlantic summers with a negative PDO usually mean enhanced east coast threats.

  35. savethesharks says:
    July 24, 2010 at 1:47 pm

    Right, upper level lows are the death of tropical cyclones, because the brisk winds they produce in the upper levels, shear apart any convection that tries to get organized around the center.

    Also, and perhaps more important, upper level lows don’t ventilate the storm – healthy tropical storms need a high pressure system pushing air away from the top of the storm so that convecting air has someplace to go. this shows up in satellite photos as clockwise flows of cirrus clouds.

  36. Bulldust says:
    July 24, 2010 at 4:07 pm

    Not knowing much about the mechanics of these beasts, I assume tropical storms rely on water uptake from the surface and plenty of heat to keep going with force. Would the oil on the surface tend to dampen the cycle somewhat by preventing some evaporation? Or is the relative extent of the slick too small to make a difference?

    The most believable speculation I’ve heard says that the wind will churn up the water so much that their will be plenty of water surface. Hurricane strength winds blow the tops of the waves and make a lot of spray.
    Also, there are reports that people are having trouble finding oil on the surface to collect. Assuming that the leak really is secured, it will be interesting to see how quickly the Gulf recovers, especially if oil stays in some subsurface layers and keeps things anoxic.
    I’m sure it will recover more quickly than the Valdez spill in Prince William Sound thanks to warm temperatures and hungry bacteria. All that oil is a lot of energy, and given the oil seeps in the Gulf, I figure there has to be a lot of bacterial critters that know how to put oil to good use.
    Must be a good season to be a oil muching bacterium.

  37. Dusty says:
    July 24, 2010 at 2:48 pm
    So upper level lows rotate counter-clockwise? That was the one I’d been watching tear Bonnie apart on NOAA’s satellite imagery and the water vapor flash page specifically.
    Another question, if you don’t mind. That flash animation showed that Bonnie is pretty much dissipated and about all inland by 4PM today, but the 4PM advisory says it is 100 miles ESE of the mouth of the Mississippi River. What is used to determine the “center” of a depression — via the bounds of the minimum central pressure?
    ===========================
    Yup. All low pressure centers “cyclones” rotate counterclockwise in the NH. Of course it is flipped in the SH.
    And all high pressure centers, or anticyclones, circulate clockwise in the NH…and counter-clockwise in the SH.
    There is the rare “anticyclonic tornado” from time to time….but you will never see such reversed rotation and violation of the Coreolis Force, demonstrated on anything more localized than a tornado.
    Watch the second star of the show here….a clockwise NH tornado.
    Pretty rare….and fascinating….

    Chris
    Norfolk, VA, USA

  38. Dusty says:
    July 24, 2010 at 2:48 pm
    Another question, if you don’t mind. That flash animation showed that Bonnie is pretty much dissipated and about all inland by 4PM today, but the 4PM advisory says it is 100 miles ESE of the mouth of the Mississippi River. What is used to determine the “center” of a depression — via the bounds of the minimum central pressure?
    ========================
    The flash animation I referenced is water vapor information, so it should not be used to determine the low level circulation…which may be in a different place. (or what’s left of it LOL).
    Chris
    Norfolk, VA, USA

  39. “Charles S. Opalek, PE says:
    July 24, 2010 at 12:10 pm
    To asmilwho and others who dismiss planetary influence:
    Do not underestimate the influence of planetary mechanics. ..”
    Hallo Charles – I didn’t say that I don’t estimate the influence of planetary mechanics.
    Richard made a specific prediction that an alignment of Jupiter and Uranus and whatever else will influence the weather in the Caribean in August.
    What I pointed out is that this is either undectable (if mediated by gravitation) or impossible (if mediated by the elctromagnetic force). Other long range forces don’t exist, as far as anyone can tell.
    There is a clear difference between weak forces operating over four and a half thousand million years to set up the kinds of harmonics you list, and the idea that these forces will affect the weather over the next few weeks.

  40. Mike Sphar, Thank you, they are indeed very interesting graphs. They correspond rather nicely with solar activity graphs. Curiouser and curiouser.

  41. asmilwho says:
    July 24, 2010 at 10:53 pm
    “Charles S. Opalek, PE says:
    July 24, 2010 at 12:10 pm
    Reply; Each of the planets that contain magnetically susceptible materials in their make up will exhibit homopolar generator properties proportional to three main vectors;
    1) the total amount of magnetically susceptible materials contained.
    2)The angular momentum of the body,
    3)The total amount of magnetic lines of force cutting through the body.
    There are standing magnetic fields surrounding the Galaxy, the solar system is passing through, there are also fields that extend from the sun out to the limits of the heliopause, that concentrate in the direction of the center of the galaxy, which the planets circulate around in, the continual variation of these almost DC standing fields felt by each of the planets is an inductive electromotive dance by which the total magnetic flux of the whole system remains balanced.
    As the solar magnetic poles rotate on a 27.32 day period the Moon responds with a North / South declinational dance to counter balance the South to North movement of the COM of the Earth +/- 1,200 Km on the smooth ellipse the barycenter of the two scribe as “The Earth’s Orbit”. The hopolar generated fields are Negative at the poles and Positive at the equator, so yes the planet have no static fields between them, only on each of them from pole to equator.
    In the case of the Earth this resultant standing voltage runs between over 200 volts per meter to around 80 volts per meter, (measured either from the ground up or from the equator toward the poles) varying in both space and time due to these interactions with the background magnetic flux value.
    To get an idea of the total power involved, multiply the average 100 volts by the distance from Equator to pole in meters. This is the voltage that could be derived by doing the work of stopping the Earth’s rotation, or on the other hand this is the average power that is expended / stored in keeping the rotational momentum of the Earth steady, in the face of the current level of background magnetic flux.
    To get the total power storage involved in amps, multiply the voltage found above by the velocity in Meters per second of the angular momentum of the earth’s total mass.
    Yes electromagnetic forces are 10^27 times the force of gravity, as you mention.

  42. >> rbateman says:
    July 24, 2010 at 10:21 am
    Why has the hurricane season flopped so far?
    Is it the changes due to oncoming La Nina, that went where they didn’t expect La Nina to go?
    <<
    It is not unusual to have no significant activity before August. Hurricane Andrew was an August storm.

  43. savethesharks says:
    July 24, 2010 at 7:50 pm
    savethesharks says:
    July 24, 2010 at 7:53 pm
    ———–
    Thanks, Chris for the explanation and tips. Since then NOAA identified another Low near New Orleans which I looked at using IR AVN imaging flv and I could see it faintly and it was much more clear with their Atlantic Floater 1 IR AVN imaging. There can be a big difference in the location of a center between a system at the lower level than at the higher which one can see using water vapor.

  44. Anyone familiar with the dynamics of what causes a Cat 3 or 4 hurricane to take a quick track via the central Atlantic and slam into Europe and cause major devistation and flooding in the low countries?

  45. @richard holle
    ‘There are standing magnetic fields surrounding the Galaxy, the solar system is passing through, there are also fields that extend from the sun out to the limits of the heliopause, that concentrate in the direction of the center of the galaxy, which the planets circulate around in, the continual variation of these almost DC standing fields felt by each of the planets is an inductive electromotive dance by which the total magnetic flux of the whole system remains balanced’
    Does this paragraph come with an English translation? I am just a ‘Hard Science’ graduate from Oxford University and I can’t make head or tail of it. This is not because I am too stupid to understand.
    Or is it just complete BS as per ‘synod conjunctions’.

  46. Latimer Alder says:
    July 26, 2010 at 12:44 am (Edit)
    Does this paragraph come with an English translation? I am just a ‘Hard Science’ graduate from Oxford University and I can’t make head or tail of it.

    I had no trouble understanding it. Which Oxon science degree are you a graduate of?

  47. @Richard Holle
    Presumably one has to define a little more precisely the “electromagnetic interactions” between planets that allow synods with distant planets to have tangible effects on climate. Just referring generally to “electromagnetic interactions” risks falling into the trap alluded to by the following quotation from Richard Dawkins:
    “… Imagine a fictional conversation between the lazy alter egos of two scientists working on a hard problem, say A L Hodgkin and A F Huxley who in real life won the Nobel Prize for their brilliant elucidation of the biophysics underlying the nerve impulse.
    “I say Huxley, this is a terribly difficult problem. I can’t see how the nerve impulse works, can you?”
    “No Hodgkin, I can’t, and these differential equations are fiendishly hard to solve. Why don’t we just give up and say that the nerve impulse propagates by Nervous Energy?”
    “Excellent idea Huxley, let’s write the Letter to Nature now, it’ll only take one line, then we can turn to something easier.” “

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