Add your own 'Radar Channel' to your TV

I’ve mentioned in the past that my weather technology business has been hit hard by the current economy and that from time to time I would be using WUWT to announce new products or product reviews that might interest readers. Here’s my latest invention that turns any LCD monitor or TV into a private “live” weather radar channel by simply attaching this appliance to the rear and plugging it in. A number of customers for our regular StormPredator software have done similar setups with spare PC’s to provide radar displays at their home or office, but until now, there was never any simple and affordable way to just add the radar channel to an existing monitor or TV.

The cool part is that there is no subscription fee to get any of this imagery. Coverage is USA nationwide with 155 NEXRAD radar locations available.

StormPredator Radar Appliance for Desktop or Wall mounted LCD monitors and TV’s

Above: the StormPredator Radar Appliance automatically updates and loops the radar imagery.

Click image to see larger image showing terrain and storm detail.

What is it?

The StormPredator Radar Appliance is a small, self contained automatic appliance that connects to any LCD monitor or TV with a SVGA port or HDMI port and turns it into a dedicated 24/7 weather radar display.

It mounts directly to the rear of the LCD monitor/TV using the included VESA mount. Once setup, the StormPredator Radar Appliance will run continuously and unattended to provide live radar coverage of the area you select. It uses a special version of our popular StormPredator desktop software designed for unattended continuous operation.

A typical setup is to use your big screen TV normally with CATV or satellite, but to add this unit into a spare HDMI input or the SVGA input if your TV has one. You can easily switch back and forth from that input and live TV or if your TV offers a “picture in picture” feature, you can have a small radar window onscreen with live TV.

What else is it useful for?

Anywhere needing storm tracking at a glance. Unlike watching a cable TV channel like “The Weather Channel” you don’t have to wait for them to get around to showing your area of interest. For example: Radio stations that offer live weather reports can benefit by having “live doppler radar” to refer to at any moment.

Above: Example of the StormPredator Radar Appliance on an LCD TV in a live radio booth

Is the radar imagery really free?

Yes! Our system takes freely available raw radar data from NOAA’s National Weather Service and combines it with our stunning terrain imagery to produce a high quality presentation.

There are no fees for the data – ever. All you need is a working wired or wireless Internet connection to receive the data and start displaying your own radar channel.

Other applications include:

  • Interstate truck stops, rest areas, and restaurants that cater to travelers
  • Dispatch centers where weather is a factor in planning operations
  • Hotels/motels that want to offer a lobby display
  • Airports that want to add live radar to the flight schedule displays
  • Local or in-house cable TV channels that wish to offer a live local radar channel
  • Radio stations that report live weather, but who cannot afford a radar or radar service

  • TV stations for offering a live local radar on a secondary HDTV channel
  • Golf courses and other outdoor recreation facilities that need to track weather for safety
  • Agricultural operations that have workers in the field
  • Utilities that need to track storms in operations centers

What are the advantages of the StormPredator appliance?

  • Works with your existing network, wired or wireless WiFi
  • Setup in minutes, no special skills or tools required
  • Operates like a web browser silently fetching and updating images
  • Intelligent updater updates only images that change – low bandwidth impact
  • Uses the NOAA national NEXRAD network – public data – NO subscription fees
  • Nationwide coverage including Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico
  • Continuous unattended 24/7 operation
  • Near silent operation (cooling fan at 26 decibels), internal automatic housekeeping
  • Small, thin, low power – mounts anywhere – mounting hardware included
  • No user interaction or mouse/keyboard input required
  • Gives radio stations the ability to have their own live Doppler Radar Weather
  • Custom basemaps with additional towns/locations can be imported
  • Will automatically export the radar image as a still or animation to your web page
  • Images are brandable as your own local radar service with your text/logo
  • Customizable to send email/pager/cell phone alerts on severe weather detection
  • Can also be operated interactively for tracking if desired, has all the interactive features of our desktop application available when used this way.

Above: The StormPredator Radar Appliance mounted on the rear of a 27" LCD TV

Above: The StormPredator Radar Appliance mounted on 27" LCD TV, top front view showing WiFi antenna and power switch/power indicator light


Want one? See more specs and order it here

Fathers day is coming up, which is a perfect excuse to buy one for yourself since you really didn’t need another tie anyway.

Oh, and no, I don’t have a radar appliance that tracks Al Gore…yet.

StormPredator Radar Appliance for Desktop or Wall mounted LCD monitors

Above: the StormPredator Radar Appliance automatically updates

and loops the radar imagery. Click image to see larger image

showing terrain and storm detail.

What is it?

The StormPredator Weather Appliance is a small, self contained automatic appliance that connects to any LCD monitor

or TV with a SVGA port or HDMI port and turns it into a dedicated 24/7 weather radar display. It mounts directly to the

rear of the LCD monitor/TV using the included VESA mount. One setup, the StormPredator Radar Appliance will run

continuously and unattended to provide live radar coverage of the area you select. It uses a special version of our popular

StormPredator desktop software designed for unattended continuous operation.

What is is useful for?

Anywhere needing storm tracking at a glance. Unlike watching a cable TV channel like “The Weather Channel” you don’t

have to wait for them to get around to showing your area of interest. For example: Radio stations that offer live weather

reports can benefit by having “live doppler radar” to refer to at any moment.

Above: Example of the StormPredator Radar Appliance on an LCD TV in a live radio booth

Other applications include:

  • Interstate truck stops, rest areas, and restaurants that cater to travelers
  • Dispatch centers were weather is a factor in planning operations
  • Hotels/motels that want to offer a lobby display
  • Airports that want to add live radar to the flight schedule displays
  • Local or in-house cable TV channels that wish to offer a live local radar channel
  • Radio stations that report live weather, but who cannot afford a radar or radar service – see below
  • TV stations for offering a live local radar on a secondary HDTV channel
  • Golf courses and other outdoor recreation facilities that need to track weather for safety
  • Agricultural operations that have workers in the field
  • Utilities that need to track storms in operations centers

What are the advantages of the StormPredator appliance?

  • Works with your existing network, wired or wireless WiFi
  • Setup in minutes, no special skills or tools required
  • Operates like a web browser silently fetching and updating images
  • Intelligent updater updates only images that change – low bandwidth impact
  • Uses the NOAA national NEXRAD network – public data – NO subscription fees
  • Nationwide coverage including Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico
  • Continuous unattended 24/7 operation
  • Near silent operation (cooling fan at 26 decibels), internal automatic housekeeping
  • Small, thin, low power – mounts anywhere – mounting hardware included
  • No user interaction or mouse/keyboard input required
  • Gives radio stations the ability to have their own live Doppler Radar Weather
  • Custom basemaps with additional towns/locations can be imported
  • Will automatically export the radar image as a still or animation to your web page
  • Images are brandable as your own local radar service with your text/logo
  • Customizable to send email/pager/cell phone alerts on severe weather detection
  • Can also be operated interactively for tracking if desired, has all the interactive features

    of our desktop application available when used this way.

Above: The StormPredator Radar Appliance mounted on the rear of a 27″ LCD TV

Above: The StormPredator Radar Appliance mounted on 27″ LCD TV, top front view showing

WiFi antenna and power switch/power indicator light


StormPredator Radar Appliance Specifications:

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46 thoughts on “Add your own 'Radar Channel' to your TV

  1. I’ve noticed that Doppler radar centered near Pendleton does not sweep into Wallowa County, and neither does the one in SE Washington. Is it the mountains blocking it? We have a large county surrounded by mountains and not much in the way of population. But it would be nice to track storms. If Doppler reached us. Am I just not reading it right?
    REPLY: Yeah, mountainous terrain makes if difficult for radar which is line of sight. But looking at the Walla Walla radar range it seems to cover Enterprise, OR. Which is near you. -A

  2. Too bad this is proprietary to DOS. Mac users must use a DOS partition. Heck, you can’t even use this on a web browser or an iPad. When will software vendors realize that there are an ever growing number of users who do not owe fealty to the Lord of Redmond?
    REPLY:
    1- Wrong, sorry. It is not proprietary to DOS. It uses Windows XP.
    2- We looked at the Mac Mini as a candidate platform – We deemed it too expensive (about $550 average street price) and the software development tools would all have to be repurchased. It also has no HDMI port, putting it behind the power curve.
    3- I’ve learned from personal experience with NuBuss and Power PC not to trust Apple to keep things available. Jobs has pulled the rug out from under me twice now as an Apple developer, and I really don’t care to repeat the experience.
    4- If you wish to run the software on Apple Mac, no problem! It has been successfully run under the two most popular Windows emulators for Macs.
    5- Who cares what it runs on as long as it works and is affordable? It’s an appliance not a personal tool. Your comment is just the never ending OS bashing based on personal preferences. We aren’t selling an OS, we are selling a solution. You can’t make the same solution on Apple hardware and software for the same price, and price is king.
    6- Our next level product, ViziFrame, uses Linux, again we couldn’t do the same job with mac hardware and software for the price. Apple makes some great stuff, but their price point generally makes them unsuitable for most OEM implementations.

  3. K. Montgomery says:
    May 8, 2010 at 5:07 pm
    God that’s cool. Too bad it doesn’t work in Canada.

    Bet Anthony will tell you it will work in Canada with a catch. I always thought Canadian weather was suppose to be a bit lame so just because you don’t get your area, for some real excitement you could hook in to the latest tornado chase across Texas or keep an ‘eye’ on those late summer Atlantic huricane ‘eyes’, right from the comfort and safety of your recliner, commercial free and 24/7!
    (How am I doing Anthony?) 🙂

  4. Oh, and no, I don’t have a radar appliance that tracks Al Gore…yet.
    Just always look near the oceans. Apparently he likes to live next to them….maybe to watch his 20 feet of ocean level rise first hand in luxury?
    photo of Al Gore’s new “ocean view villa”
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_orkXxp0bhEA/S94eHo6LdjI/AAAAAAAAdDQ/wklhl-GODoA/s400/100502-gore-house5.jpg
    …Southern California’s rich and famous…
    http://www.latimes.com/classified/realestate/la-hm-hotprop-20100508,0,1010789.story

  5. Anthony for a regular guy you come up with some real clever stuff.
    REPLY: Thanks – Anthony

  6. Looks like the Aspire Revo… I have one. Nice little PC, trying to get full 1080p with hardware acceleration working as we speak. XBMC beta might do the trick.
    REPLY: Yes, that’s the hardware platform we chose, with a clean copy of WinXP. The OEM version of XP they offer is loaded with bloatware/adware, takes about 4-5 hours to uninstall it all. We also created our own custom machined VESA mount for it, as well as integrated WiFi, both of which are included. XMBC works best when installed to HD, rather than their live USB drive. -A

  7. This is very handy but if you want to increase your intelect 27.3% then kill your TV.
    REPLY: or just pull the plug on cable TV, and FYI, you may need to do just that as you spelled intellect incorrectly 😉 -A

  8. Oh, and no, I don’t have a radar appliance that tracks Al Gore…yet.

    What I really want is an Algore countdown clock to Armageddon (as in “we only have ten years to save the planet” and that was about 4 yrs ago) …
    .
    .

  9. Joe says:
    May 8, 2010 at 8:39 pm
    I already have one of those chairs, but it’s rather expensive. Consist’s of an office over an old barn/garage. Kinda wobbly, I can feel earthquakes in Eureka when nobody else can.

  10. I am amazed. But will the new gizmo officially record my area’s historical low temps and convince THE government entity to allow our temps back into the record? Why has our government approved, government employed station been shut down? Is it because we are too cold to report?
    We are fifteen degrees below average and almost fifty degrees below our record high. We have experienced 3-5 degrees below record lows and yet our local newspapers aren’t reporting any unusual weather. My gas furness is running as I type and it is May 8th. We had snow yesterday.

  11. I wonder why Windows XP? 🙁
    Why NOT BSD/Linux? Without the graphical burden and OEM prices?!
    Regards
    REPLY: Why program in not Cobol, or Fortran, or LISP? The simple fact is that I made the choice, and it was the best one for the product, since we would have had to completely rewrite our StormPredator application, which is designed for Windows. We choose Windows because it has the largest market share. Our next level weather display product uses Linux. Of course none of this matters since you can’t use this product in Poland anyway. -A

  12. I’ve got a copy of Storm Predator and it’s great fun. Sometimes when I’m wondering what’s going to happen next, I just look out to sea from San Francisco (we get what ever is out to sea just a few hours later…).
    Lots of cool things it does, but I’m still learning all the knobs and levers 😉
    Oh, on the OS wars issue: I love Macs. My family has, oh, I donno, maybe a half dozen of them (at least 4 laptops…). I have to second what Anthony said… We’ve got 3 different processor types, a gaggle of plugs and cables nobody else has ever seen, and the peripherals du jour problem. Oh, and it’s a Mac kernel, so just like Unix / Linux under the skin… except when it isn’t… So I have figured out more ‘magic incantations’ than I care to think about just to get around how it does something unlike anyone else on the planet… then get to do it all again next week…
    (For example, something developers frequently need to do, “Becoming Root” or the main Admin account. There is a bit of obscure magic needed to get it to LET you try to become root. Yeah, a ‘security feature’. I’ve done it once or twice. Then a year or three passes, one went to the shop for a repair and came back with root in the (disabled) default condition again. So now I get to go searching for that weird backdoor to turn on the ‘normal’ root access all over again… It’s that kind of stuff that drives you up a wall after a while…)
    So despite the fact that I’d rate the OS choices from first to last as:
    Mac O/S
    Linux
    Windoz
    the fact is that were I developing a product, I’d direct my guys to develop for Windoz first, old windoz second, Linux 3rd, and Mac last. Simply for reasons of market share and cost. Take on the hardest lifting last…
    But back on topic: you really do want this Storm Predator stuff, it’s fun to play with!

  13. Off topic I know but puts politicians under radar surveillance,
    “Cooler Heads Coalition 16/4/10 congressional briefing on the science and politics of the “Climategate” scandal. Featuring presentations by George Mason University Distinguished Senior Fellow Pat Michaels and International Climate and Environmental Change Assessment Project (ICECAP) Executive Director Joseph D’Aleo.”
    Looks like the warmists were able to censor the earlier link to this video, which is well worth a look, but it is now embedded on this site.
    http://www.palmerston-north.info

  14. Anthony
    What we really need is an instrument to detect temperatures. We could then record locations over a long period of timne and find out if…. Oh wait that device has already been invented some 350 years ago, trouble is that after all this time no one who draws a govt salary has learnt to use them properly yet.
    Grea idea Anthony-is this something that could likely be adapted for potentially large markets such as the UK or can it only ever be specific to the US radar installations?
    (my mother worked on the very first radar installation in England during WW2)
    tonyb

  15. I think a similar product in Europe would have a market. The euroweather channel on Sky never seems to show the radar and satellite data, or if they do it’s not for Italy. The data does seem to exist because google earth shows the both satellite and radar data.
    Maybe if the box could alternate between satellite and radar, that would be nice too.

  16. E.M.Smith says:
    May 8, 2010 at 11:36 pm
    Good to see a comment from you. Been rare for a while. I’m still hoping for the day I see you and Anthony kicking butt on a Glenn Beck show. A guy can hope, can’t he?

  17. Mr Watts,
    Perhaps I was too succinct in my questions.
    It’s not my piece of cake what OS platform your software runs on. But I saw an autonomous hardware which does NOT have to have any OS screen. It suffices to have any web browser running in kiosk mode. In such case it is better to use something more reliable, efficient and for free. Simply Linux.
    But “my” problem with your announcement lies in the form of the advertisement and the issue of correctly selecting target users. The whole text is misleading, yes, misleading (e.g. “StormPredator Radar Appliance is a small, self contained automatic appliance” – excellent piece of new-speak from Orwell’s 1984).
    If I read the features data correctly, the StormPredator Radar Appliance is de facto a small PC without PC attributes. Why you didn’t say so? Just like many ATMs or Information Kiosks, where the OpSystems are of secondary importance. BTW, the “market share” used by you as one of the decisive arguments for Windows XP is not relevant here then.
    Of course I forget the application issue. Mea culpa. I suppose the software existed in Windows version and was written prior to the device what gave you no choice.
    But I still do not know if this “appliance” is for me – the common TV user (forget my country) – or for the radio stations or other institutions.
    Once I wrote that I like to read your weblog not only for the science but also for the interesting views from all over the World and contained in comments, however lofty it sounds. Up to now I was convinced that all Americans know that there is NO such thing like “free lunch” (apart from “free Linux” of course 🙂 ). After reading your text I have no doubts that I was wrong because – “radar imagery (is) really free”. “Only” the appliance has a cost attached… (sarcasm). Nice hype with this “really free”…
    I may watch radar maps from all over Europe on my PC for some time in 24/7 mode and for free. Perhaps there is a significant difference between typical radar maps found in Internet and the maps offered by the StormPredator software/appliance? Make me convinced to them then.
    Another example – what’s the difference between StormPredator Radar Appliance and StormPredator Software? Why “the Appliance” is better then an old cheap PC running StormPredator Software? Could the application run on Linux+Wine platform? Etc. There more “niches” you define in the times of “hard economy” the more products you will sell (or the probability of doing so will be higher).
    From PR side or efficient advertisement point of view the ad should be rewritten.
    Regards
    P.S. I wish I live in the USA. Perhaps I wouldn’t play smart Aleck but I would download the software and test it. 🙂
    REPLY:[“radar imagery (is) really free”. “Only” the appliance has a cost attached… (sarcasm). Nice hype with this “really free”…]
    Amusing, to say the least. Next time I’ll just give everything away for free, hardware and all, so as not to offend Linux users such as yourself. 😉 -A

  18. As found in Przemysław Pawełczyk from May 8, 2010 at 10:52 pm:

    REPLY: Why program in not Cobol, or Fortran, or LISP? The simple fact is that I made the choice, and it was the best one for the product, since we would have had to completely rewrite our StormPredator application, which is designed for Windows. We choose Windows because it has the largest market share. Our next level weather display product uses Linux. Of course none of this matters since you can’t use this product in Poland anyway. -A

    Well, I just installed Wine on my Debian Linux box to run an old Windows app. I did not have to reprogram the app for Linux, and arguably it was working better since my previous OS was Win ME. 🙂 Less crashing is always nice.
    Shouldn’t take much to see if StormPredator will run on Linux with Wine. If it does, well then… BTW, before any complaints about Wine start flying, please follow the link I provided and click on the large “About” graphic. In the “Learn more” section, “Common Myths about Wine” is rather informative. Also there is a link there for Codeweavers, who sell a supported version (CrossOver), and they also have a service to get a software developer’s product quickly running on Linux and on Macs (if needed).
    Should be worth looking into. Plus if it works with Wine you can likely build a custom Linux kernel with just the basics needed, and have a much smaller OS that can run as well (or better) on less hardware.
    REPLY: Windows ME aka Mangled Edition, truly the worst Windows OS ever released. (Not counting MS “Bob”) -A

  19. The link (click on the picture) which is supposed to show larger image and terrain does not work on three different browsers in the UK. Just leads to a tiny place-holder. Can it be fixed?
    REPLY: works fine here, maybe you have a popup blocker turned on -A

  20. Interesting. Will it download and show on my (BMW) display screen which has a smart phone interface? For example it would be very useful to have visual storm track info as we traverse Kansas in tornado season.
    REPLY: Our software does that upon alert status, check the features at http://www.stormpredator.com

  21. Pamela Gray says:
    May 8, 2010 at 5:08 pm
    I’ve noticed that Doppler radar centered near Pendleton does not sweep into Wallowa County
    Pamela,
    I always use the Boise ID radar for up here in Enterprise. The Pendleton radar is blocked by the mountains.

  22. Is it a pure appliance, running from an image – or – does the opportunity exist to make some modifications?

  23. Eric Dailey says: May 8, 2010 at 7:49 pm
    “This is very handy but if you want to increase your intelect 27.3% then kill your TV.”
    There used to be a knob on televisions labeled ‘brightness’, I tried turning it up, it didn’t work.

  24. Do agree about the platform choice. I prefer Macs for work and home because on average, most applications are ok for my purposes and preferences, from doing stuff in Python, to making diagrams in OmniGraffle, to recording satellite TV.
    But when you’ve basically got a need for just one appliance to do one job well, then by all means balance all the requirements and pick the best solution available. Nobody cares what it runs. If the thing overheats or crashes or is too expensive or too awkward in use, then something was specified wrong. But if it plugs in and you can forget about it and it just works, then all the choices were right.

  25. Probably no need for this question:
    Will the WIFI system handle WPA, WPA-2, etc?
    REPLY: Yep

  26. Any VAR (Value Added Resale) or OEM private label distribution opportunities available?
    REPLY: Yes, we can.

  27. Anthony,
    “Dispatch centers were weather is a factor in planning operations” needs to be corrected to “Dispatch centers where weather is a factor in planning operations”.
    Also, there is something on this webpage which is causing the CPU usage to operate at 37% to 100%, and it stops churning like that upon leaving the Webpage: WIN XPSP3.
    REPLY: It is the animated GIF at the top. I suspect you either don’t have enough memory to run it (and you are getting disk swap) or you have a graphics card issue of some sort, like a driver problem. -A

  28. Found in: kadaka (KD Knoebel) on May 9, 2010 at 2:42 am

    REPLY: Windows ME aka Mangled Edition, truly the worst Windows OS ever released. (Not counting MS “Bob”) -A

    All hail Norton Utilities, that which really makes Windows work! 😉 It can (almost) be fun watching how many times Crash Guard pops up while Win is doing… just about anything.
    But the virus charts kept saying the same thing, the bug writers were focused on XP and that type file system (NT?), and ME either wouldn’t get infected or, sometimes, the virus would be “loaded” but do nothing. XP was too bloated for my P2 (besides the virus issue), so I rode out the “planned obsolescence” until upgrading to a used P4 with no OS. Now I suffer from “Linux senility,” I can hardly remember what a PC OS crash is!

  29. Pamela Gray says: May 8, 2010 at 5:08 pm
    I’ve noticed that Doppler radar centered near Pendleton does not sweep into Wallowa County, and neither does the one in SE Washington. Is it the mountains blocking it? We have a large county surrounded by mountains and not much in the way of population. But it would be nice to track storms. If Doppler reached us. Am I just not reading it right?
    REPLY: Yeah, mountainous terrain makes if difficult for radar which is line of sight. But looking at the Walla Walla radar range [closest RADAR is in Pendleton, OR] it seems to cover Enterprise, OR. Which is near you. -A

    Which elevation scan … the 0.5 degree elevation scan?
    As the more astute readers are aware, the NWS NEXRAD WSR-88D (and follow-on product) scans, depending on RADAR mode selected, scans it’s area at a number of ‘elevation’ angles in order to create a suite of RADAR imagery products …
    Anthony, I haven’t checked, but your Level III (or II) data source should have those other elevation scan angles available, and, you could pull in the full suite of elevation scans and create a ‘composite’ display of precipitation (as some I-net sites e.g. the NWS do).
    A good review of WSR-88D Radar Coverages owing to terrain may be found here:
    http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~jzhang/radcov.html
    Cutting to the chase, the map in the link following gives RADAR coverage at 5 kilometers (above ground level) and it would seem to indicate that for Wallowa County, Oregon the better choice for RADAR coverage is not the closest RADAR (Pendleton, OR Radar) but rather Spokane, WA Radar and/or the Boise, ID Radar:
    5km AGL coverage: http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~jzhang/radcov/US_lamb.radcov_5kmagl.jpg
    At 10 km they all provide coverage (although at this height RADAR reflectivity data may be of limited value):
    10 km AGL coverage: http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~jzhang/radcov.html
    .
    .

  30. D. Patterson May 9, 2010 at 8:38 am says:
    “Also, there is something on this webpage which is causing the CPU usage to operate at 37% to 100%, and it stops churning like that upon leaving the Webpage: WIN XPSP3.”
    Probably not AW’s webpage – this really old computer, 198 mg mem., 450MHz, running ZA, AVG, Ad-Aware, windows defender, and Firefox 3.6.3 with WUWT and 4 other tabs (and taskmanager) open uses only 13% with gusts up to 48%. Try cleaning with Crap Cleaner and Glary Utilities, use the services tab in the administrative tools to turn unnecessary things off. Would recommend regedit, too, but only if you’re very careful and backup first to an external drive (in case you have to replace your computer). Programs above are all freebies, btw, but really good. Sorry if this is too long and off-topic but a churning computer is frustrating.

  31. this is not free
    BUY The StormPredator Radar Appliance
    #WXSPRAPP StormPredator Applicance $399.95
    REPLY: Nobody ever implied that it was, the data is free, hardware costs money, what part of that don’t you understand?

  32. Found in crucilandia on May 10, 2010 at 10:46 am:

    REPLY: Nobody ever implied that it was, the data is free, hardware costs money, what part of that don’t you understand?

    After the many decades of promoting “free” wind and solar power in perpetuity, perhaps some people are forgetting how “free” usually works. Of course this happened long ago with regards to “free speech.”
    Anthony, what happens if NOAA decides to start charging for the data, or even just asks users to sign up for a free registration from the computer they are using? Please don’t say out-of-hand that will never happen. WUWT is considered the premiere website of the anti-CAGW rebellion, and this administration likes their Chicago-style politics. Are you certain they won’t respond to such a major thorn in their backside with a spit in your eye? 😉

    REPLY:
    If they did, it wouldn’t just be me, they’d have millions of users that get the same data off their website complaining also. It would also mean that radar would have to come off the NWS webpages.
    Interestingly there was a time when you had to pay for radar access, about 2001 this changed to public access. Pressure from many groups to make the radar data free on par with surface data and forecast data. I’m not worried about it since the charter of NOAA is for free data access and putting the genie back in the bottle would be very difficult for them.
    Like anything you subscribe to, be it for free or pay, you run the risk of that entity yanking the access or folding. I could cite the same worries about hundreds of other data and media sources, but I don’t let such worries cripple product development. -A

  33. this implied that it was free.
    “Is the radar imagery really free?
    Yes! Our system takes freely available raw radar data from NOAA’s National Weather Service and combines it with our stunning terrain imagery to produce a high quality presentation.
    … All you need is a working wired or wireless ”
    REPLY:How odd. I’m surprised that you seem to ignore the picture of the hardware in front of your face, and the word “system” in the sentence you hold up as evidence of your own misinterpretation on “free-ness”. I can’t help it if you see “free hardware” where none actually exists. Sheesh. -A

  34. crucilandia said on May 10, 2010 at 1:55 pm:

    this implied that it was free.
    “Is the radar imagery really free?
    Yes! Our system takes freely available raw radar data from NOAA’s National Weather Service and combines it with our stunning terrain imagery to produce a high quality presentation.
    … All you need is a working wired or wireless ”

    Are you the crucilandia who posts at Weather Underground? If so, you’ve got some nice intelligent posts over there. But after reading through a bunch, it seems to me there may be a communication problem, people often don’t fully understand what you are saying and sometimes you misunderstand other people.
    Take it exactly as it says, the imagery is free. And just as when you look at any other free content found on the internet, the hardware to display the free content still needs to be paid for. In much of the United States you can put up an antenna and get free over-the-air TV shows, but before you can watch the shows you still have to acquire (usually by purchase) the antenna, TV, and the electrical power needed.
    You buy the StormPredator appliance, you supply a broadband internet connection and the TV or monitor, then the appliance takes the free NOAA data from the internet and displays the free imagery, which is “free” as in there is no further charge for it.
    The other way to get the free imagery is to buy the StormPredator software and install it on your own computer. There is a trial version available for download so you can “try before you buy.”
    Hope this helps.

  35. Thank you for your comments and feedback. It was a very clear explanation.
    There is a lot of bickering on that blog and it is very hard to understand those blogger since they are vague and misunderstand the science behind the whole thing. I try not to get involved and present information as succinctily as possible.

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