Poking a Hole in the Latest Younger Dryas Impact Paper (Uniformitarian Impact Craters, Part Trois)

Guest shoot-down by David Middleton Preface In my previous two posts on uniformitarian impact craters, we examined the pitfalls of drawing cartoons on Google Earth images without ever looking at the geology and how the Carolina Bays are as antithetical to impact features as any dents in the ground possibly could be.  Judging by some…

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Multiple, Intense, Abrupt Late Pleistocene Warming And Cooling: Implications For Understanding The Cause Of Global Climate Change

Guest essay by Dr. Don J. Easterbrook Dept. of Geology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA The results of oxygen isotope measurements from ice cores in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets several decades ago stunned the scientific world. Among the surprises from the cores was the recognition of multiple, late Pleistocene, extraordinarily abrupt, intense periods…

Where Lies the Younger Dryas Smoking Gun?

Guest Post by Dan Johnston I have been following the proposed collision theory for the onset of the Younger Dryas for a number of years with considerable interest as it explains so much in a relatively straightforward fashion, if true. The academic response to the hypothesis has been, predictably, harsh and unforgiving with accusations flying…

Widespread evidence of cosmic impact documented – likely cause of the Younger Dryas cool climate episode

From the University of California – Santa Barbara some paleoclimatology without the need to see hockey sticks. Comprehensive analysis of impact spherules supports theory of cosmic impact 12,800 years ago (Santa Barbara, California) –– About 12,800 years ago when the Earth was warming and emerging from the last ice age, a dramatic and anomalous event…

'Counterintuitive finding suggests that unexpected factors may govern a glacier's response to climate change'

From the University at Buffalo, new evidence that large ice sheets can grow/disappear quickly on decadal scales in response to regional temperature changes. A descriptive video follows. How fast can ice sheets respond to climate change? Scientists report that prehistoric glaciers reacted rapidly to a brief cold snap, providing a rare glimpse of glaciers’ response…

'We don’t believe the ice cores can be interpreted purely as a signal of temperature'

From the University of Wisconsin: Greenland ice may exaggerate magnitude of 13,000-year-old deep freeze by Chris Barncard Ice samples pulled from nearly a mile below the surface of Greenland glaciers have long served as a historical thermometer, adding temperature data to studies of the local conditions up to the Northern Hemisphere’s climate. But the method…