Fire at a bus depot in Potters Bar, just North of Greater London.

BBC Reports:

“A number of buses have caught fire at a town centre transport depot. Heavy smoke drifted across Potters Bar after Hertfordshire crews were called to the scene on the High Street at 14:36 BST.”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-61543634

“Paul Kirby, a BBC reporter who saw the fire, said he spoke to bus drivers who told him they were relieved the underground diesel storage appeared to be safe. It is thought that up to seven hybrid buses had gone up in flames and “you could hear several loud bangs which they said were tyres” he said.”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-61543634

No idea, at this stage if the fire started in a battery; however, this quote also in the report: –
“Eyewitness Shaun Cunningham said he heard an “unbelievable noise that sounded like a jet” and he saw a bus had “exploded into a ball of flames”.”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-61543634

HT/Auto, Jim T, Jerome P and maybe others I’ve missed.

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May 22, 2022 10:13 pm

They’re hybrids.

Vuk
Reply to  JOHN T. SHEA
May 22, 2022 11:45 pm

Buses are more vulnerable on probability because of number of batteries and number of cells in each battery. If only one cell overheats or goes short during charging the whole lot will go up in flames.
p.s. Tesla car battery has about 7,000 cells, so total number in the bus system could be in dozens of thousands.

Last edited 1 month ago by Vuk
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 5:10 am

Every cell should be a meter away from every other cell. Oh wait…

MarkW
Reply to  David Wojick
May 23, 2022 8:41 am

Batteries practice social distancing?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  MarkW
May 23, 2022 9:07 am

What else are you going to do? You can’t put a mask on them! 🙂

Gunga Din
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 23, 2022 10:14 am

Virtual connections!
(It worked so well for education.)

Gerald Machnee
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 23, 2022 1:19 pm

Maybe an experimental injection that will stop infectious explosions???

Observer
Reply to  Vuk
May 24, 2022 12:55 am

I use a hybrid bus quite often. They’re much quieter than the old diesels and pollute the air far less.

Except when they spontaneously combust, of course.

One of these things is going to blow up during rush hour, and if it’s a double-decker, a lot of people won’t be able to get out in time.

Nasty way to go.

HotScot
Reply to  JOHN T. SHEA
May 23, 2022 1:18 am

And therefore carry a shedload of batteries.

D. J. Hawkins
Reply to  HotScot
May 23, 2022 5:18 am

Literally.

Bryan A
Reply to  JOHN T. SHEA
May 23, 2022 6:14 am

Which only means they have smaller/fewer battery packs than an EV bus but they still have Spontaneously Combustible Lithium Batteries

Rick C
Reply to  JOHN T. SHEA
May 23, 2022 8:16 am

We have two hybrid cars which do get much better gas mileage than the ICE versions. Given the current price of fuel that’s a good thing. But I would not own a plug-in hybrid or EV because I don’t like the idea of charging unattended in my garage. If a hybrid battery lights up while driving, at least you can probably pull over and jump out. If your car bursts into flames in your attached garage while you sleep, you may never wake up.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Rick C
May 23, 2022 9:12 am

I suspect that after a few payouts the insurance companies will refuse to insure your home if it has an attached garage and you charge your car in the garage. So, you will have to charge your car in the driveway or on the street. After the thefts increase with cars parked outside, the auto insurance rates will increase to cover their losses. It is a lose-lose situation.

Glen
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 25, 2022 6:24 am

If plug-in vehicles start taking their toll on insurance company profits, the feds will step in and make up for the short falls.The feds will never allow the insurance companies to “discriminate” against plug-ins. My $.02

rickk
Reply to  Rick C
May 23, 2022 3:46 pm

If I remember correctly, GM makes the purchasers of the Volt sign off that they will not store their car in their home garage. It needs to be out on the driveway…unclear why though

.KcTaz
Reply to  rickk
May 23, 2022 8:56 pm

If you can’t start it in your garage, then, you can’t put it into your garage unless it’s running and you don’t turn it off. Do I have that right?

.KcTaz
Reply to  Rick C
May 23, 2022 8:55 pm

I feel the same way. Besides the added cost of a hybrid, I didn’t want a battery in my garage, esp., not since it would be right next to my gas hot water tank!

Gunga Din
Reply to  JOHN T. SHEA
May 23, 2022 9:32 am

Not anymore!

Pflashgordon
Reply to  JOHN T. SHEA
May 23, 2022 11:14 am

The news story said hybrids, but, if one can believe Wiki, the manufacturer has not sold any hybrid Metrodeckers. Furthermore, the company has recommended that its entire fleet of Metrodecker EVs be idled pending investigation. We’ll wait and see, but this looks like another EV bus calamity.

Barry
Reply to  JOHN T. SHEA
May 23, 2022 5:56 pm

Thanks Tipster!

Bryan A
May 22, 2022 10:21 pm

Here is a lithium battery roaring “like a jet”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqV6zEO7hEQ
And this one really “Jets”

Last edited 1 month ago by Bryan A
Dennis
Reply to  Bryan A
May 22, 2022 10:33 pm
  1. Spectacular, imagine being in an EV with seat belt on and exothermic reaction takes place resulting in that inferno.
Alexy Scherbakoff
Reply to  Dennis
May 22, 2022 10:41 pm

I think the windows wind up and the doors are locked if there is an issue with the battery. If you are in an inferno can anyone hear you scream?

Nick Graves
Reply to  Alexy Scherbakoff
May 23, 2022 12:16 am

That’s one of the reasons that they have a separate conventional 12v system on HEVs and BEVs.

Which flummoxes the owners if the 12v one goes flat & the car won’t start.

Bryan A
Reply to  Nick Graves
May 23, 2022 11:41 am

I’ve yet to be flummoxed by a dead battery in my ICE vehicle, I just hop into my other ICE vehicle, drive over to the auto parts store, drop $150 and replace the battery.
Easy Peasy Lemon-squeezy
How many EV batteries can be easily replaced by the owner from the auto parts store for under $200?

Bryan A
Reply to  Bryan A
May 25, 2022 6:54 am

If worse case happens and my other ICE is unavailable because my Wife is out someplace I can walk the mile to the auto parts store and carry the battery back. Try that with an 1,100lb Tesla replacement

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Alexy Scherbakoff
May 23, 2022 9:20 am

The solution is to have the Li-ion battery packs held under the car by releasable clamps that are actuated by heat or a sudden voltage drop. In the event of a short-circuit, the battery pack will drop on the pavement like a bomb, allowing the car to coast to a stop a safe distance ahead.

It will also do wonders to re-train drivers who like to tailgate. After running over an incendiary battery bomb, if they survive, they will keep plenty of distance between themselves and the EV in front of them in the future.

MM from Canada
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 23, 2022 9:41 am

“In the event of a short-circuit, the battery pack will drop on the pavement like a bomb, allowing the car to coast to a stop a safe distance ahead.”

You’d have to have pretty high clearance to be able to drive over an ejected battery pack, wouldn’t you? And your scenario would only work if you were driving in a straight line. On a curve, you’d have a problem.

Last edited 1 month ago by MM from Canada
Matthew Schilling
Reply to  MM from Canada
May 23, 2022 10:48 am

What about the poor sap driving in the car behind the EV?

Mike McMillan
Reply to  Matthew Schilling
May 23, 2022 12:52 pm

As we used to say in the military, “You gotta expect losses in a big operation.”

Richard Page
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 23, 2022 6:26 pm

Fit ejector seats.
Car on fire? Then leave by the quickest way possible.

niceguy
Reply to  Richard Page
May 24, 2022 4:52 pm

If a baby survives that, he’ll be a test pilot!

niceguy
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 24, 2022 4:51 pm

Next: do a passengers plane/bomber crossover.

markl
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 25, 2022 1:47 pm

The new Teslas have the battery pack integral with the frame. There’s nothing to “drop”. Early in their life Tesla envisioned batteries as being quick and easy to swap instead of charging them. That idea went nowhere as it’s not practical being that the battery packs are stressed members of the body and need careful alignment.

Meab
Reply to  Dennis
May 23, 2022 9:07 am

Kamala Harris is leading the Biden Administration’s charge to replace school busses with these fire traps. She gave a speech yesterday outlining her concerns with exposing school children to diesel fumes. Somehow that’s bad but incinerating school children is ok? What are these morons going to do when all these EV busses have to be withdrawn from use?

According to Real Clear Politics, 41% of Americans still approve of the Biden administration. Hard to believe that there are that many idiots. The good news is 54 percent disapprove.

Graemethecat
Reply to  Bryan A
May 23, 2022 6:33 am

Blimey!

Somehow I can’t see myself buying an electric or hybrid car now.

.KcTaz
Reply to  Bryan A
May 23, 2022 9:06 pm

The commenters on that video are saying it’s not a Lithium battery but a LiPo, whatever that is.

Reply to  .KcTaz
May 24, 2022 9:36 am

LIPO = lithium polymer

Dennis
May 22, 2022 10:31 pm

State Governments in Australia now require Electric Vehicles and hybrids to display a blue triangle sticker on the front and rear registration plates to alert road traffic authorities and fire services to the potential fire hazard.

Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles are not required to display a warning sticker unless converted to Liquid Petroleum Gas or Compressed Natural Gas fuels, fully or dual fuel system.

I understand that the number of EV (plus Hybrid) are about one per cent of the global fleet of vehicles registered.

DaveS
Reply to  Dennis
May 23, 2022 5:09 am

In the UK EV owners can have a green rectangle at the start of the reg plate (I think it’s optional but they all seem to have them). It’s really intended for virtue signalling, but it does provide a warning for the emergency services so does actually serve a useful purpose 😀

May 22, 2022 10:38 pm

Putin can save his missiles

Phillip Bratby
May 22, 2022 10:48 pm

No sane person would travel in an electric bus.

Watch this by the UK’s leading expert on battery fires, starting at about 1hr 62mins: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9B5M8qHQQ0

Speed
Reply to  Phillip Bratby
May 23, 2022 3:24 am

And there have never been gasoline-fed fires in IC cars …

Alba
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 3:36 am

“gasoline-fed” or “gasoline-caused”?
Have any stationary IC vehicles gone on fire just because the gasoline went on fire all by itself?

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 3:58 am

Certainly not spontaneous fires in diesel buses

Bryan A
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 5:20 am

Never one which combusted SPONTANEOUSLY
Didn’t look like there was any ACCIDENT involved

Last edited 1 month ago by Bryan A
Speed
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 6:21 am

In response to all who reflexively clicked on the little negative symbol …

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) says that vehicle fires account for nearly one in every eight reported fires, so it’s worth knowing how to reduce some of the risk in your own.

Contents

  1. Design Flaws
  2. Poor Maintenance
  3. Car Crashes
  4. Arson
  5. Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Batteries
  6. Overheating Catalytic Converters
  7. Overheating Engines
  8. Spilled Fluids
  9. Electrical System Failures
  10. Fuel System Leaks

https://auto.howstuffworks.com/car-driving-safety/accidents-hazardous-conditions/10-causes-of-car-fires.htm

Have a nice day.

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 7:33 am

The response of all who clicked knowingly on the little negative symbol underneath your earlier post at the start of this thread was based on . . .

The known fact that lithium batteries can spontaneous burst into flames even after being unused for a day or two, whereas the same is definitely not true of gasoline- or diesel-fueled ICE vehicles (which incidentally do have lead-acid batteries used for starting the engines).

You have a nice, reflective day also.

paul courtney
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 7:35 am

Mr. Speed: How very thoughtful of you!! Reducing risk, who could oppose that? I for one am all for it, and am surprised you don’t take your own suggestion. Eliminating #5 would remove the risk of fires you can’t put out, are you with me? Eliminate the hazard of EV fire, who could oppose that?

ihfan
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 7:38 am

Are you willfully ignorant? The entire point is that gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles don’t just spontaneously combust, unlike battery-powered vehicles.

MarkW
Reply to  ihfan
May 23, 2022 8:49 am

Are you willfully ignorant?

Was that a rhetorical question?

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 8:16 am

Only #5 has the spontaneous combustion feature! 😮

They’re not even safe as cargo on a ship/plane. Yet some lunatics want them to power
aircraft!

https://www.foxnews.com/auto/cargo-ship-4000-cars-sinks

I found a picture of you driving your EV car. Park safe!

clowncar.jpg
Graemethecat
Reply to  Old Man Winter
May 23, 2022 2:09 pm

🤣🤣🤣

Romeo Rachi
Reply to  Old Man Winter
May 25, 2022 7:07 am

I work for a very large aerospace firm and lets just say they are going head long into urban mobility and electric flight. It isn’t a pipe dream but moving into reality. I don’t think it will work long-term and there are inherently more issues with it than are currently known but this is the trajectory we are on.
However, the green beast is alive and well and the statement from the CEO was something akin to ‘doing this (electrification of flight) will ensure the future of air travel’.
So, regardless of what we think or know regarding the dangers associated with batteries and what not, they are moving forward. I can’t go into the design phase but I will say that initially, they will be more of a hybrid system than a fully electric system.
The clown show is alive and well.

MarkW
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 8:48 am

Why is it that every time the subject of electric vehicle fires come up, some troll drags out the same tired, irrelevant studies?

Old Man Winter
Reply to  MarkW
May 23, 2022 9:39 am

Cuz they, as with Rev “Net Zero” Speed, the head flock fleecer- I mean,
preacher- @ The Church of the CO₂ Climate Cult go with what they got-
ABSOLUTELY NOTHING! 😮

Bryan A
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 11:47 am

Thanks for the reminder Speedy, I hadn’t yet know “knowingly clicked” on the Negative Vote to your post yet

MarkW
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 8:47 am

The critical issue is relative numbers.
Gasoline powered vehicles generally only catch fire after a big crash.
Beyond that there’s the fact that electric’s are only about 1% of the fleet and are much newer to boot, yet the vast majority of fires are being caused by them.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 9:26 am

Considering the number of gasoline powered cars on the road, they are very rare. I once drove my Corvette for over an hour with a leaking fuel line filter under the hood with the only downside being terrible gas mileage.

Michael Ozanne
Reply to  Speed
May 24, 2022 3:20 pm

https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/News-and-Research/Fire-statistics-and-reports/US-Fire-Problem/osvehiclefires.pdf

Look hard, you won’t find spontaneous combustion of the fuel store in there..

Jay Willis
Reply to  Phillip Bratby
May 23, 2022 7:31 am

“about 1hr 62mins:” it’s not that long! It’s 1:42 in total.

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  Jay Willis
May 23, 2022 8:34 am

Shhh! It’s a secret!

Editor
Reply to  Phillip Bratby
May 23, 2022 2:17 pm

People with less money than others may have to rely on public transport. Travelling in a bus isn’t a matter of choice, and if the local buses are electric that’s not a choice either. Those people’s lives have just gone down a notch through no fault of their own, following the downward notch from the surge in electricity prices caused by renewables.

When they have been reduced to slavery, the next layer of society will be worked on. Best to stand up for them now.

Andrew Wilkins
May 22, 2022 10:54 pm

I watched it on the BBC news. The explosion is just like the electric bus that blow up recently in Europe (France?). That isn’t a diesel explosion. It’s a battery lighting up. They need to withdraw all electric buses from operation.

Brad-DXT
Reply to  Andrew Wilkins
May 22, 2022 11:44 pm

I think Biden’s limo should be switched to an EV to save the planet.

Dennis
Reply to  Brad-DXT
May 23, 2022 2:34 am

I noticed on television on Saturday evening the Opposition Leader now Prime Minister getting into a car with Protective Service personnel vehicles following.

It was a Tesla S EV.

He made it to the victory party.

D. J. Hawkins
Reply to  Dennis
May 23, 2022 5:22 am

“The Prime Minister rolls “Luck” +19 and arrives at his destination.”

Max P
Reply to  D. J. Hawkins
May 23, 2022 2:07 pm

Can we consult the “Wander Damage Table” next time?

Brad-DXT
Reply to  Dennis
May 23, 2022 9:19 am

He should switch to a German or French bus to save energy.

Andrew Wilkins
Reply to  Brad-DXT
May 23, 2022 2:43 am

Brilliant +10

Reply to  Brad-DXT
May 23, 2022 2:57 am

Then you Kamala are you sure?

Brad-DXT
Reply to  bob boder
May 23, 2022 9:10 am

Yes. Whoever is pulling the strings on Biden will pull the strings on her and nothing will change except a larger percentage of people willing to use the 25th to remove the president.

Rich Davis
Reply to  Brad-DXT
May 23, 2022 3:48 am

Best to use second-hand batteries salvaged from wrecked limos to optimize the planetary savings.

Rxc
Reply to  Brad-DXT
May 23, 2022 4:34 am

Better yet, all school busses should be electric, too. The reaction from parents will be informative.

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Rxc
May 23, 2022 7:36 am

I would not wish such a possible fate on my worst enemy, let alone on school-age children.

Mikeyj
Reply to  Brad-DXT
May 23, 2022 6:13 am

I think everyone in Washington D.C. should use EV transportation

Gerry, England
Reply to  Andrew Wilkins
May 23, 2022 2:23 am

Diesel doesn’t explode as it is not volatile like petrol. It does actually have a lower ignition temperature than petrol as that just evaporates.

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Gerry, England
May 23, 2022 8:28 am

You can throw a match into a pool of it & the match will go out. Petrol will burn. Vapors from
either one are what explode.

MarkW
Reply to  Old Man Winter
May 23, 2022 8:53 am

They only explode if they have the correct mixture of air and fuel. And for both, the range of mixtures that will explode is quite narrow.
If it’s an enclosed container, the match will just go out from lack of oxygen.

Paul C
Reply to  Andrew Wilkins
May 23, 2022 5:37 am

Seems like they are taking action.
https://www.whtimes.co.uk/news/potters-bar-fire-tfl-removes-buses-8987492
The series of fires centred around electric and hybrid buses seems to be catching the attention of the operators of said vehicles.

Matt Dalby
Reply to  Andrew Wilkins
May 23, 2022 10:57 am

The latest I read claims that it was the charger not the batteries that started the fire. Obviously this would only make E.V.s twice as dangerous as there are 2 major fire risks.

fretslider
May 22, 2022 11:43 pm

Anyone remember Mattel’s hot wheels?

Brad-DXT
Reply to  fretslider
May 22, 2022 11:46 pm

Yeah, they were developed after Matchbox.

fretslider
Reply to  Brad-DXT
May 23, 2022 12:01 am

Not to mention Dinky and Corgi

Nick Graves
Reply to  fretslider
May 23, 2022 12:17 am

Go and have some coffee…

fretslider
Reply to  Nick Graves
May 23, 2022 1:12 am

Gee thanks man

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  Nick Graves
May 23, 2022 8:36 am

He didn’t get it.

JCM
May 22, 2022 11:49 pm

It’s all bogus.

The value of green tech is solely based on speculation of its future value. It relies on speculative interest (new investors). Any doubt about climate will directly impact valuation. The financial risks from climate denialism far outweigh real climate changes. The capex is over $5 trillion for green tech. Too big to fail.

$5 trillion annual investment today is riding on a real market of buyers ‘only’ $50 billion. It’s totally out of hand, speculative value exceeds the market 100 fold. It’s dangerous. This, where ordinary citizens now have pensions tied up in this scheme.

A significant flaw in climate science can cause global financial collapse. At $5 trillion would be equivalent to wiping a large country off the map. The financial marketplace now completely reliant on legislation by democratically elected governments. Where every lawmaker, every media institution, and every NGO ‘charity’ has skin in the game. Not good.

All it would take is a decade of global cooling to drive everyone nuts. Climate reporting is being driven to a catastrophism narrative not by science, but by financial market forces. This, under the guise of moral purity and ‘responsible investment’.

Speed
Reply to  JCM
May 23, 2022 3:26 am

Preaching to the choir … hope you feel better.

Graemethecat
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 6:39 am

Merely facts, chummy. Too bad you don’t like them.

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 8:45 am

What’s the matter, Rev “Net Zero” Speed? Are the people here a lot harder for you to
fleece than yours at The Church of the CO₂ Climate Cult? 😮

slow to follow
Reply to  Speed
May 26, 2022 1:17 am

Speed: Where is JCM wrong? Please tell us.

Anybody with a responsible attitude to humanity would carefully layout and counter JCM’s errors because his analysis has serious implications for the well being of the current and next generations who are, by and large, currently enjoying the benefits of prosperity.

michel
May 22, 2022 11:51 pm

In other news Stuart Kirk, the HSBC banker who said publicly that Global Warming was not a significant investment risk, and backed it up with slides, has been suspended….

According to the FT.

Dennis
Reply to  michel
May 23, 2022 2:35 am

How dare he!

/sarc.

fretslider
May 22, 2022 11:54 pm

Now is the time to move against the GWPF…

“The Global Warming Policy Foundation, a climate sceptic thinktank, has been reported to the Charity Commission by the Green MP Caroline Lucas and Extinction Rebellion.

The move comes after the Guardian revealed that the group received funding from fossil fuel interests.”

HotScot
Reply to  fretslider
May 23, 2022 1:25 am

Green policies are so popular in the UK, there is one green MP, and that’s Lucas.

The claim from Lucas and XR is probably that some old geezer who contributed online once had a coal fire in his living room.

Crowcatcher
Reply to  HotScot
May 23, 2022 2:26 am

And, look at the environmental (emphasis on “mental” disaster of a constituency she represents, a truly delusional woman.

fretslider
Reply to  Crowcatcher
May 23, 2022 3:18 am

She is a retard. A very right on retard.

fretslider
Reply to  HotScot
May 23, 2022 3:18 am

You do know what the title of Lucas’ PhD thesis was, don’t you? If you don’t….

Writing for Women: a study of woman as reader in Elizabethan romance.”

Well that beats my very old BSc in biology.

Peta of Newark
Reply to  fretslider
May 23, 2022 3:49 am

Elizabethan Romance was hysterical…
I once visited Kenilworth Castle (somewhere near the middle of England)
It seems, without mincing words, that Good Queen Bess, despite being a virgin, was a bit of whore.
She ‘led men on’ – enticing them to build lavish houses, castles, mansions etc which she would visit (free hotel room innit) as she went about the country letting folks know who she was and what she was about.
(Raising taxes and spying on everyone = nothing new under the sun)

Kenilworth was one of the places she came to stay, after the guy had spent simply gobsmacking amounts of money – in the hope of wooing her when she came calling. ##
But while she was there, she politely ignored the guy’s romantic overtures.

Seemingly as her and her entourage were leaving, the queens carriage was ambushed by a ‘singing holly-bush‘ (a minstrel of the day wearing camouflage)

Apparently singing hollybushes were The Most Romantic Overture any man could make towards any girl – at that time. Damned expensive too.

History records that they fell out of favour

## Kenilworth had an epic garden which no-one officially knew about, it was soooooo lovely. The original plans were destroyed and anybody/everybody who did know what it was like were sworn to The Utmost Secrecy – so secret that even today what you see in Kenilworth Garden is no more than Climate Science = speculative guesswork

Last edited 1 month ago by Peta of Newark
fretslider
Reply to  Peta of Newark
May 23, 2022 4:02 am

I should have guessed, Elizabethan romance…. prick teasing.

Peta of Newark
Reply to  Peta of Newark
May 23, 2022 4:04 am

Missed the edit..
It was a bit sad actually. The guy who owned Kenilworth and so as to get over his sadness at hus failure of winning Queen Bess, went back to business of full time soldiering – he was pretty high ranking sort.

Got himself killed inside 12 months

Women eh, – how does that ‘living’ cliche go?

fretslider
Reply to  Peta of Newark
May 23, 2022 4:39 am

Wimmin: Can’t live with ’em, can’t live without them….

Brad-DXT
Reply to  fretslider
May 23, 2022 10:17 am

I think the correct cliché goes “Women, can’t live with them, can’t shoot them”.

StephenP
Reply to  Peta of Newark
May 23, 2022 4:42 am

Lucy Worsley did a reconstruction of the firework display Robert Dudley put on for Queen Elizabeth1.
The whole programme is not available but there is a clip from it.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09cfwt4

Last edited 1 month ago by StephenP
It doesn't add up...
Reply to  StephenP
May 23, 2022 1:27 pm

A Pressie for Queenie….

Michael in Dublin
Reply to  HotScot
May 23, 2022 5:00 am

The GWPF reports are cogent and clear in their reasoning – something that is absent in alarmist and green circles. The latter have to resort to name calling and the like because they have no solid arguments based on empircal observations.

Last edited 1 month ago by Michael in Dublin
DaveS
Reply to  HotScot
May 23, 2022 5:17 am

The problem being that the main parties are themselves so steeped in greenery that we effectively have 600+ green MPs, all peddling the same cr*p.

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  fretslider
May 23, 2022 8:38 am

CRU received funding from fossil fuel interests, lots of it. They should be defunded too.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  Jeff Alberts
May 23, 2022 9:18 am

Yes. When Hubert Lamb left the Met Office to set up CRU at the University of East Anglia the University agreed to match the funding he had already received from Shell.

.KcTaz
Reply to  fretslider
May 23, 2022 9:21 pm

CRU took tons of money from oil companies. Where was the Guradian’s expose on them?
Mythbusting the Oil Libel
https://bit.ly/3bX2YOC
EXCERPT
[The following emails come from a single year, the year 2000, which marked the start of a bidding war between Shell, Esso/Exxon-Mobil and BP for the ‘science’ of the CRU.

Mike Hulme and Tim O’Riordan……If the dangerous-AGW hypothesis is the main selling-point of the wind-farm industry, it’s the very raison d’etre of the energy-indulgences anti-industry: carbon credits, carbon capture, carbon sequestration, emissions trading.

2. Shell’s interest is not in basic science. Any work they support must have a clear and immediate relevance to ‘real-world’ activities. They are particularly interested in emissions trading and CDM.

Next, “Esso”—which is UK English for “Exxon-Mobil”—also sees the investment opportunity. Mike Hulme writes (Climategate file 959187643.txt):
I would think Tyndall should have an open mind about this and try to find the slants that would appeal to Esso.

The Tyndall climatologists grow so accustomed to the attentions of the fossil-fuel giants that by year’s end they’re taking it for granted that Beyond Petroleum will be another suitor. The scientist Simon Shackley writes:

Subject: BP funding…
dear TC colleagues, it looks like BP have their cheque books out!]

Vuk
May 23, 2022 12:08 am

OT
HSBC has reportedly suspended a senior executive ahead of an internal investigation into a presentation he made that accused central bankers of overstating the financial risks of climate change.
Stuart Kirk, the global head of responsible investing at HSBC’s asset management division, attacked climate “nut jobs” during the speech.
Britain’s biggest bank had faced calls to sack Mr Kirk after he hit out at climate activists and asked “who cares if Miami is six metres underwater in 100 years?”
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2022/05/23/hsbc-suspends-banker-nut-job-climate-remarks/

Vuk
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 4:07 am

P.S. if Mr. Kirk is dismissed from HSBC he is unlikely to be employed by another large institution, in which case he might set up his own investment fund.
I will follow this case and if Kirk’s investment fund comes to being, I will put a bit of my own money in it, since I think this guy knows what he is talking about.

Solomon Green
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 5:06 am

I feel sorry for Kirk. But he should never have taken the job with HSBC, a bank which is better known recently for bending the knee to China – “to hell Hong Kong and the Uyghurs”.

As a former unpaid non-executive director of one of HSBC’s subsidiaries, I was invited to a one day investment seminar where the goody for all attendees was Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth”. The bank has been woke since before the term was even invented.

H.R.
Reply to  Solomon Green
May 23, 2022 12:22 pm

So you’re saying HSBC hates their employees? Couldn’t they have at least given everyone a t-shirt or an inkpen?
😉

Louis Hunt
May 23, 2022 12:17 am

Recent headlines:

Mar 29, 2022 — California’s Modesto City Schools ordered 30 Blue Bird All American Type D electric school buses to convert nearly half of its fleet…

Apr 8, 2022 — New York State legislators have agreed a budget that includes committing the state to 100% electric school buses by 2035.

MAY. 20, 2022 The Biden administration announced Friday it’s making $500 million available to school districts and other eligible operators and contractors to replace their fleet of diesel school buses with electric ones. 

What could go wrong? If they can’t abort them, they’ll find another way to reduce future generations.

Alexy Scherbakoff
Reply to  Louis Hunt
May 23, 2022 1:02 am

I’ve heard that roast kid is very delicious.

Crowcatcher
Reply to  Alexy Scherbakoff
May 23, 2022 2:27 am

Very like lamb!!!!

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Crowcatcher
May 23, 2022 9:36 am

No, more like goat.

Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 23, 2022 2:44 pm

Or “long pig”

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Louis Hunt
May 23, 2022 2:23 am

and when one goes up and kids get fried will joe label himself a domestic terrorist for forcing the cruddy things ON schools?

Vuk
Reply to  ozspeaksup
May 23, 2022 2:57 am

Unlikely to catch fire while driving, cells are discharging. Up to now all fires started at bus depots while they are on charges, voltage at ends of each cell is higher than operating one, so if cell is suspect it’s more likely to go off then.
But total damage would be higher since number of bus on charge at same time. High temperature from fire on one bus would trigger off batteries in one parked few feet away regardles if on charge or not.
The other dangerous situation is damaged battery in case of a crash.

Vuk
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 3:58 am

What does this mean for an average EV motorist?
If you by a second hand EV with high millage, that has been charged/discharged hundreds of times (or you have reconditioned batteries, if there is such a thing) and you are at an extra-fast charging station, don’t sit inside your vehicle regardless how could might be outside, best stand some distance away while your EV is charging.

fretslider
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 4:06 am

A 50L petrol tank will always hold > 49L

ihfan
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 7:48 am

Up to now all fires started at bus depots while they are on charges

.. except for the two that went up in France recently:

https://insideevs.com/news/583324/paris-suspends-149-bollore-electric-buses-after-two-fires/

Vuk
Reply to  ihfan
May 23, 2022 7:55 am

There were on a top up induction charging spot.

Vuk
Reply to  ihfan
May 23, 2022 11:17 am

Buses need lot of power to run smoothly during the day which single charge can’t provide so they have induction charging top up points.
Here what is done in London:
“IPT provides a flexible and reliable wireless charging solution to this project with minimum visual pollution and noise. The buses in London run their service with en-route opportunity charging. The buses were charged wirelessly at either end of the route, where they stopped over a 100kW charging plate during scheduled layover periods. The charging system starts automatically charging the bus every half an hour during the day for charging at 100kW for 6-8 minutes. Also, the batteries were charged by overnight plug-in charging at the bus depot.”

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 10:01 am

It seems that failure of the separator between the cathode & anode inside the cell
causes a short circuit which causes the cell to heat up & catch fire. Since charging
raises the voltage between the two puts more pressure on the separator making it
more likely to fail. If I’m correct, fast charging would apply even more voltage
differential- thus pressure- for more current to flow heating the battery even quicker

Obviously, they need to redesign it and/or increase production quality as each battery
contains 1000s of cells. With electric grid batteries, weight & size would be less of a
consideration so they may need to use other materials vs lithium if they can’t find a
fix.

Tim Gorman
Reply to  Louis Hunt
May 23, 2022 6:13 am

The Democrat Infrastructure and Jobs Act has $5B in it to subsidize electric SCHOOL BUSES!

A disaster just waiting to happen!

ihfan
Reply to  Tim Gorman
May 23, 2022 7:50 am

Just wait until a school bus goes up in flames at the depot and takes out a whole bunch of buses. Parents will bring the school districts back to a state of sensibility.

Matthew Schilling
Reply to  ihfan
May 23, 2022 10:56 am

Multiple buses burning in a garage is much better than multiple children burning in a bus.

HotScot
May 23, 2022 1:17 am

We were at Imperial War Museum Duxford, in Cambridge that day, and could see the smoke plume from there.

JohnC
May 23, 2022 1:29 am

Diesel doesn’t explode does it?

LdB
Reply to  JohnC
May 23, 2022 2:06 am

Not unless mixed with ammonium nitrate

Oldseadog
Reply to  JohnC
May 23, 2022 2:10 am

Only when vapourised and under very high compression in a cylinder in an engine.

Speed
Reply to  JohnC
May 23, 2022 3:33 am

But if it leaks out of a tank or from a fitting (or during refueling) it can catch fire and burn lots of stuff including busses and buildings.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 4:04 am

It’s very difficult to start diesel burning. I had a broken injection pipe once, diesel was spraying all over the engine, including on the exhaust manifold. No fire.

BobM
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 4:19 am

Diesel does not catch fire easily.

Bryan A
Reply to  BobM
May 23, 2022 6:17 am

Gas can ignite from a burning match.
Diesel can extinguish a burning match.

Disputin
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 6:27 am

I have seen many times diesel spilling. Never one case of a fire. Plese show us a couple of examples. (I’m not holding my breath!)

DaveinCalgary
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 6:37 am

Speeds knowledge of the world seems to come from Hollywood movies rather than experience. Here’s a quick demonstration of the flammability of various fuels. After putting a blow torch to diesel it almost burns for a second!

ihfan
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 7:51 am

But if it leaks out of a tank or from a fitting (or during refueling) it can catch fire and burn lots of stuff including busses and buildings.

And yet it just doesn’t seem to happen, does it?

MarkW
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 10:34 am

Absent an accident, leaks from the fuel system are very, very rare.

FrankH
May 23, 2022 2:53 am

Probably/possibly an electric bus fire.
“The depot is home to Metroline, which runs buses in London.,,
“It is thought that up to seven hybrid buses had gone up in flames…”
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-61543634

And here’s a youtube press release(?) from January, showing how proud they are of their new electric bus.

michael hart
May 23, 2022 3:19 am

A simple thermodynamic issue with increasing energy density of current batteries is that they will move from a fire risk to an explosion risk. We may well already be close to the maximum as far as safety is concerned.

Fossil fuels are controllable insofar as they are not premixed with all the oxygen required for combustion. Batteries do not require external inputs to release their energy.

Speed
Reply to  michael hart
May 23, 2022 3:38 am

Better keep your iPhone in a fire and explosion proof box — not in a pocket or purse. And they are certainly too explosion and fire prone to take on an airplane,

Vuk
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 4:01 am

Small number of cells in hand held devices reduces probability of one going wrong and setting battery on fire.

D. J. Hawkins
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 5:27 am

Not to mention, they do, on occasion, catch fire.

Speed
Reply to  Vuk
May 23, 2022 6:27 am

The large number of phones in circulation increases the probability of one going wrong and starting a fire in someone’s pocket or purse or desk or car or house.

Vuk
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 6:42 am

… or on an aeroplane.

michael hart
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 9:12 am

Speed, it’s also a question of scale. A digital watch is never blamed on starting a fire. But you can’t run a bus that way. Heat dissipation and all that.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 9:42 am

Are you saying it has never happened? I imagine that if anyone who usually carries their cell phone in their hip pocket were to experience a spontaneous fire, they would find another way of carrying their phone.

Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 23, 2022 12:14 pm

People carrying their phone in a hip pocket quickly learn that is a bad idea.
Phones have a low crush tolerance.

Most of my pants now have a pocket sewn in just below the front pockets. A pocket just right for normal size phones.

Battery shorts must reach lithium’s ignition temperature before the battery combusts.
Small devices dissipate heat quickly, thus preventing most small device batteries from igniting.

Once lithium reaches decomposition temperatures, they are almost impossible to extinguish.

MarkW
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 10:47 am

I know you take great pride in your ignorance, but cell phones were banned from planes when they were new because of the fire risk. The phone manufacturers did a lot of work on the batteries to reduce this risk.

Paul C
Reply to  MarkW
May 23, 2022 12:30 pm

There was less investment made in reducing the fire risk of the cheap battery power banks. They have done and still do regularly cause fires.

Bryan A
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 5:40 am

Only if damaged or sometimes during charging

Speed
Reply to  Bryan A
May 23, 2022 6:32 am

Not only …

The reason for your phone overheating will vary. Physical damage—the kind sustained from a fall or excessive bending—can disrupt the inner workings of the battery. Leaving the phone out in the sun for too long, malware overworking the CPU, or a charging debacle can all cause short circuiting within the device.

Or it could be something outside your direct control. Batteries degrade over time, so if a device has been used for several years, it’s possible for the internal components to fade, leading to swelling and overheating. Or an issue with the phone’s production may be to blame, which you can’t really account for.

https://www.pcmag.com/how-to/why-phones-explode-and-how-to-prevent-it-from-happening-to-you

paul courtney
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 8:03 am

Mr. Speed: Thanks again for giving us the unvarnished truth about how great EVs are.

Bryan A
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 8:42 pm

Sure makes a great argument AGAINST placing 7,000 – 14,000 of them charging in your garage overnight.

Graemethecat
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 6:52 am

Handheld electronic devices require tiny currents compared with vehicles. Even so, there have been many lithium battery fires in laptops and PC’s.

Graemethecat
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 6:55 am

Funny you should mention aircraft – a number of Boeing 787’s have burned due to lithium battery fires.

MarkW
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 10:45 am

Different technology, as well as only one or two cells instead of thousands.
Finally, how often do you charge a cell phone when on a plane?

Or you actually as desperate as your posts make you sound?

Peta of Newark
Reply to  michael hart
May 23, 2022 4:14 am

Yes an no..
A Complete Muppet Issue in reality

If they’d used LiFePO4 batteries, instead of Li-Ion, nothing would have happened

We have all heard the Urban Myth of the female bus driver who constantly had to be rescued while out on her route and if she actually made it back to the depot, her bus was a flat-battery and out-of-diesel wreck.

It seems she misunderstood the concept of Regenerative Braking, where upon The Battery is recharged when you press the brake pedal.

So she rode around all day with her foot on the brake, safe in the knowledge she was ‘Saving The World’ and ‘Thinking of the Children’

michael hart
Reply to  Peta of Newark
May 23, 2022 9:24 am

Funny you should say that. Two days ago a female driving instructor voluntarily joked to me about female drivers when her female pupil had stopped at an embarrassing point at traffic lights. 

I offer no opinion, other than risks between drivers are different.

michael hart
Reply to  michael hart
May 23, 2022 9:39 am

On a more technical note, explosives are judged partly by the energy density, and also by the specific mass density of the compound.

Some years ago I watched an excellent lecture by the person responsible for making Octanitrocubane. 

The shape of the molecule delights chemists, mathematicians, and generals. But the crystal structure didn’t demonstrate the density required for military use, despite the computer modellers forever shifting the result in the desired direction. It’s not just climate science that plays these funding games.

Klem
May 23, 2022 3:33 am

I just looked up the price of electric busses:

“To buy an e-bus today you can expect to pay around $1,000,000, as compared to $750,000 or so for a diesel bus, or about 30-40% more, but over the life of the bus, e-buses are about 25% cheaper due to the reduced operating costs”

Haha Haha!

Dennis
Reply to  Klem
May 23, 2022 3:49 am

As long as the EV buses are operated for many more years than internal combustion engine buses to reach break even on cost price.

ihfan
Reply to  Klem
May 23, 2022 7:54 am

but over the life of the bus

Do they factor in premature retirement from fire and explosion?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Klem
May 23, 2022 9:46 am

Once the insurance companies get some experience with battery fires, I would anticipate that the insurance premiums will easily eat up the savings in operating costs. Not only does a defective battery destroy its bus, but it will probably take several others with it and damage the parking facility and chargers.

j t
May 23, 2022 4:07 am

… and I can imagine those behind the curtains pushing and profiting from this “green” ($$$ not Health) energy disaster are laughing into their martinis and Dom. They’re only sad that there were no dead burned bodies smoldering in the carcasses of those buses.

Last edited 1 month ago by j t
GaryD
May 23, 2022 6:22 am

I would think the insurance will become prohibitively expensive for electric bus fleets

Joel
Reply to  GaryD
May 23, 2022 8:30 am

They will mandate cheap insurance.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Joel
May 23, 2022 9:48 am

That will mean mandating bankruptcy. The city will have to self-insure, which means increased taxes on those who don’t use the buses.

MarkW
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
May 23, 2022 10:51 am

Mass transit is already heavily subsidized, Last time I saw a study, less than 10% of operating expenses comes from the fare box in most cities.

Joe Shaw
Reply to  Joel
May 23, 2022 6:17 pm

They will not need to. Most municipal fleets in the US are self-insured by the government entity that operates them. Any losses will be borne by the taxpayer.

Tom Halla
May 23, 2022 6:44 am

Schadenfreude

John Bell
May 23, 2022 8:02 am

All parked side by side, that is a no-no with e busses.

CD in Wisconsin
May 23, 2022 8:10 am

South Korean automaker Hyundai just announced that they are going to invest $5.5 billion in an EV car and battery production facility in Georgia….

Hyundai Motor Group Will Build Big EV Plant And Battery Facility In Georgia (insideevs.com)

“Hyundai Motor Group announced a major $5.54 billion investment in new electric vehicle and battery manufacturing facilities in Bryan County, Georgia (as part of a $7.4 billion investment planned in the US by 2025).

It will be the company’s first site dedicated to electric vehicles, with an annual capacity of 300,000 units of a “wide range” of models.”

**********

Although the Hyundai plant will make EV cars and not buses, this still seems like a rather bad time to be making such an investment anywhere given all the EV battery fires we’ve seen.

Don Perry
Reply to  CD in Wisconsin
May 23, 2022 11:19 am

Especially since Hyundai already has problems with fires from traditionally-fueled cars.
https://nypost.com/2021/05/04/hyundai-recalling-390000-cars-over-fire-risk/

Richard Page
Reply to  CD in Wisconsin
May 23, 2022 6:42 pm

True but it’s got to be better than trying to ship the finished product by sea!

RLH
May 23, 2022 8:24 am
DaveS
May 23, 2022 9:56 am
Gunga Din
May 23, 2022 10:01 am

Mr. Layman here.
If a lead/acid, NiCad, alkaline battery develops a short, that heat source won’t start a fire without fuel and O2.
A lithium ion battery short has both fuel and O2 built in. That’s why they are so hard to put out.

Gary Pearse
May 23, 2022 10:56 am

These catastrophes in the making for transport, renewables power, hydrogen ‘economy’, etc. are due entirely to lack of proper feasibility studies being done to determine reliability, affordability and safety. The crash test dummies are the citizenry!

Speed
May 23, 2022 12:50 pm

This has been fun. Commenters responding to my earlier comment enjoyed themselves so much I thought it would be interesting and a public service to put a little more fat on the fire … errrr … facts on the fire.

National Fire Protection Association
The leading information and knowledge resource on fire, electrical and related hazards

Search Results For “Lithium-ion batteries”
https://www.nfpa.org/standard_items/search_results?term=abe8b098-782f-40a4-a19f-44a8c1598a4a

Those commenting on the wisdom of putting Lithium batteries on airplanes may find this interesting …
A Look Back: How Boeing Overcame The 787’s Battery Problemshttps://simpleflying.com/boeing-787-battery-problems-overcome/

Enjoy.

Graemethecat
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 2:04 pm

Boeing “solved” the problem of overheating lithium batteries by upgrading the fire suppression system.

Speed
Reply to  Graemethecat
May 23, 2022 3:21 pm

It’s not quite that simple or straightforward … this from the simpleflying.com article linked above …

“Design feature improvements for the battery include the addition of new thermal and electrical insulation materials and other changes. The enhanced production and testing processes include more stringent screening of battery cells prior to battery assembly. Operational improvements focus on tightening of the system’s voltage range. A key feature of the new enclosure is that it ensures that no fire can develop in the enclosure or in the battery.”


Bryan A
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 9:03 pm

And yet still there are NEWS stories about burning Busses and burning Cars. Buses that are parked and recharging overnight https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/06/12/electric-bus-inferno-in-hanover-germanyexplosive-fire-causes-millions-in-damages/
To Busses spontaneously combusting
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/05/01/electric-bus-catches-fire-after-battery-explosion/
Even cars on cargo ships during transport overseas are burning
https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/02/18/was-the-felicity-ace-fire-caused-by-electric-vehicle-batteries/

Speed
Reply to  Bryan A
May 24, 2022 3:37 am
  1. To the best of my knowledge Boeing does not manufacture busses or cars.
  2. We know nothing about the age, maintenance or battery technology of the busses mentioned at the link
  3. To the best of my knowledge there has been no news about the cause of the fire aboard the Felicity Ace. I note that the headline is a question, not a statement.
Bryan A
Reply to  Speed
May 24, 2022 3:02 pm

1) Not certain where you got Boeing from (The link is to a WUWT article about the burning electric Busses in Germany)
https://m.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=T71cVhxG_v4

2) But we do know that the Battery exploded as evidenced from the video

3) Yep convenient for the EV manufacturers that the Felicity sank with all cargo aboard and now rests on the sea floor under 2 miles of water. Very difficult to proclaim or even investigate to determine the cause with certainty. But all those burning Lithium Batteries certainly doomed the vessel.

Last edited 1 month ago by Bryan A
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 3:05 pm

To electrify the world’s cars will need global production of lithium, cobalt and other metals to increase about a thousand times.

Can you remind us where this is all going to come from? Which planet, for instance?

O sorry I forgot – politicians and celebrities can now snap their fingers and new technology appears to fulfil political demands. The legal profession could sure use time travel – what’s the time-line on that?

Speed
Reply to  Phil Salmon
May 23, 2022 3:32 pm

I have no knowledge or opinion with respect to the earth’s lithium stores … but … it has been predicted many times that we would soon run out of oil.

… historical projections suggest that the world has “almost run out of oil” at least five times in the past century. Here are some examples:

“The world will run out of oil in 10 years.”  – U.S. Bureau of Mines (1914)
“The world will run out of oil in 13 years.”  – U.S. Department of the Interior (1939 and 1950)
“The world will run out of oil and other fossil fuels by 1990.” – Paul Erlich, Limits to Growth (1973)
“The world will run out of oil in 2030, and other fossil fuels in 2050.” -Paul Erlich, Beyond the Limit (2002)

https://www.e-education.psu.edu/marcellus/node/826

Prediction is hard — especially about the future.

Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 3:47 pm

The way peak oil becomes / has become self fulfilling is where establishment activists divest from, legally attack and otherwise lynch fossil fuel companies. Then say “o my word – fossil production is declining”. And why have fuel prices gone up so much? Nothing to do with us! Russians I guess

Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 3:49 pm

This was probably why America precipitated the war in Ukraine. To allow Russia, not climate activism, to be blamed for rising prices.

Bryan A
Reply to  Phil Salmon
May 23, 2022 9:07 pm

How exactly did America precipitate the war in Ukraine?

Bryan A
Reply to  Speed
May 23, 2022 9:05 pm

And how many times has the Earth “Run Out of Oil” since the first prediction in 1914?
Hint…
ZERO

observa
May 24, 2022 12:54 am
Tim Crome
May 24, 2022 10:17 am

I’ve dug a bit deeper, amazing what you can find!

The most trustworthy evidence is a tweet, a high resolution photo from the local fire brigade (https://twitter.com/fire_PottersBar/status/1528528518283415556/photo/1). This shows all 6 damaged buses.

Two of these are the new all electric Switch Mobility MetroDecker EV (https://www.switchmobility.tech/en/current-vehicles), the one on the far right, still burning well, and the one third from the left that is just a smoking shell. This is also the one seen exploding in the video’s online (https://twitter.com/i/status/1528371914267402240) and is clearly the bus where the fire started.

The 2 on the left are Volvo’s diesels from 2011 (confirmed by the Bus Audit from March this year – https://tfl.gov.uk/corporate/publications-and-reports/bus-fleet-data-and-audits – who knew such things existed!), I think the remaining 2 are ADL Enviro 400 Hybrids, from about 10 years ago.

Interesting little investigation into the London bus fleet! Discovered that they now have 785 all electric buses (9% of total) and have started to introduce Hydrogen Fuel Cell buses too (22 as of the end of March), also not without fire risks!

Fran
May 24, 2022 10:59 am

Interesting that this news did not make it into the Daily Mail. Just like vaccine injuries, it is “disapeared”.

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