“Energy Fascism” (Rothbard 1974 speaks to us today)

From MasterResource

By Robert Bradley Jr. — August 16, 2021

“When the black day of August 15, 1971 arrived, we free-market economists predicted that shortages of all sorts of products would result from the price control…. On the day of the freeze, everything seem[ed] to be functioning smoothly, and so the general mood [was] one of euphoric success.”

“When Tricky Dick imposed Phase I in August, 1971, price inflation was proceeding at something like a rate of 4% per year. Now, after 4 1/2 ‘phases’ of varying degrees of price dictation, and continued monetary inflation by the government, we are suffering a price inflation rate of something like 10% per year.”

August 15, 1971, was the day that President Richard Nixon shocked the country, and indeed the world, with a price control order. Everything—all goods and services, as well as wages and interest rates—were frozen for 90 days. But Phase I would turn into four more phases in the 18 months before petroleum was singled out for price and allocation controls amid “the energy crisis.”

I have addressed this day of infamy in more detail here.

In this post, I excerpt from trenchant libertarian economist Murray Rothbard, whose 7,400-word article, Energy Fascism, was published in the January 1974 Libertarian Forum.

Two years ago, in response to the first freeze of Phase I of Nixon’s new economic policy, I wrote that “on August 15, 1971, fascism came to America.” Some critics felt that the label was overblown; but here we are, two years later, well into the next “phase” of the fascist logic upon which the Nixon Administration has embarked: totalitarian controls such as allocations and rationing.

He who says A must say B, and the logic of price and wage controls is marching us straight into a totalitarian, collectivist state: in short, fascism.

The crucial point on the energy crisis is that the crisis is not, as the Administration and the Establishment would have us believe, a visitation from on high, the result of the actions of the Arab sheiks, or a consequence of “excessive greed” on the part of the American consumer or of the oil companies.

The crisis is, pure and simple, the creature of the American government itself and its statist interventions into the economic system. And while the rest of us are placed into increasing subjection by the government, in the name of aiding or curing the energy crisis, the cause — government policy — continues on its merry way unchecked.

The major evil stems from the government’s policy of price controls below the free market level. There is one and only one possible cause of the phenomenon of a shortage, and that is government price control below the market. There are myriad actions of the government which have made energy fuels artificially scarce: but a shortage can only be caused by price control.

Economists define a “shortage” as a condition where consumers are not able to find the product. Regardless of how scarce the supply of a product may be, there is never any need for a shortage, for a disappearance of the product from the shelves.

For on the free market, if a product becomes more scarce, the price rises until the market is “cleared”, i.e. until there is sufficient supply available for those who wish to purchase the product at the market price. And so, if the free price system is permitted to operate, increased scarcity will cause a higher price, but not an outright disappearance, or “shortage”, of the product.

Shortages are solely the product of price controls, of not permitting the free market mechanism to function. The bigger the discrepancy between the government controlled price and the free market price, the bigger the shortage….

When the black day of August 15, 1971 arrived, we free-market economists predicted that shortages of all sorts of products would result from the price control, and that the shortages would develop increasingly after a period of time. On the day of the freeze, everything seems to be functioning smoothly, and so the general mood is one of euphoric success.

What is generally overlooked is that, since prices on August 15
corresponded to free-market levels, the frozen prices the next day would naturally correspond to these levels in much the same way. Free-market prices don’t change that much in one day. But it was predictable that as weeks and months wore on, and as the government continued to inflate the money supply and hence free-market price levels, the gap would grow steadily worse and eventually lead to aggravated shortages of product after product.

The rise in free-market price levels was aggravated by the accelerating expansion of the money supply by the government and by the fact that the lingering recession of 1971 was soon succeeded by a boom, thus removing any slack in the economy. When Tricky Dick imposed Phase I in August, 1971, price inflation was proceeding at something like a rate of 4% per year.

Now, after 4 1/2 “phases” of varying degrees of price dictation, and continued monetary inflation by the government, we are suffering a price inflation rate of something like 10% per year; and prices rose in December 1973 at an annual rate of approximately 26%. The rate of inflation is accelerating, and, apart from other evil consequences of this condition, the gap between the free and controlled prices of many goods continues to widen, and the shortages to emerge and grow steadily worse.

It is not only natural gas and petroleum that have suffered aggravated shortages due to price control; it is also and increasingly such crucial commodities as paper, steel, and plastics…

And so price controls, as was predicted, have led to shortages in
industry after industry. If the price system is allowed to function, then the free market quickly wipes out any shortage as the price rises to “clear” supply and demand on the market. Shortages under price controls persist and get worse, there being no market mechanism to remove them.

If prices are allowed to rise, then the price increase performs two important economic functions: 1) the “rationing” function, as buyers voluntarily restrict their purchases, in accordance with each individual buyer’s needs and abilities; and 2) the incentive function, the higher price stimulating increased production and supply over a period of time. Price control prevents both of these crucial functions from being performed, smoothly and voluntarily; instead, shortages persist and intensify.

In such a shortage situation, there must be some way of “rationing” the short supply. With prices not allowed to perform this task, other, arbitrary methods come into play: e.g. lining up for gas for several hours, or selling to favored purchasers. The next step, which has already occurred, is for the government to step in to ration by coercion, to allocate supplies in ways that it sees fit — ways that are always uneconomic and irrational as well as coercive and despotic.

We already have gasoline rationing at earlier than retail levels: [witness] the government’s arbitrary shutting off of fuel to the private airplane industry. And even at the costlier and more complex retail level, gasoline, for example, is already being “rationed” by arbitrary restrictions, and by official rationing in several states ( at this writing Hawaii, Oregon, New York, and New Jersey).

There are two major problems with all these rationing schemes: (a) they are arbitrary, irrational, and totalitarian, and (b) they freeze the shortage, since they fail to allow prices to rise to induce greater supplies of the product.

Take, for example, the arbitrary shutdown of filling stations on
Sundays. All that this accomplishes is to cause a rush on gasoline on Saturdays, as well as levying great hardship on drivers who have to travel somewhere, say in a sudden emergency, on a Sunday.

How many potential hospital patients have already been injured or even killed by the blunderbuss orders to shut down on Sundays?

The next step taken by our all-wise rulers was to impose maximum limits on each individual purchase of gasoline. The result, as could have been foreseen, was an uneconomical inducement to stop at a whole slew of filling stations until the desired amount is purchased.

Since Christmas, the New Jersey Turnpike has imposed lunatic maximum limits on each car’s purchase of gas: such that it is impossible to drive over more than a small fraction of the Turnpike. Each Turnpike ticket is stamped so that no more gas can be purchased. The result, of course, was that cars have been getting off and on the Turnpike repeatedly, picking up a new ticket along the way and getting the allotted amount at each turn. This absurd harassment is typical of the consequences of government intervention.

Furthermore, the gasoline scare — the fear that no filling stations may be open or available further down the road — has led everyone to keep their gas tanks as filled as possible, thus increasing the total purchase of gasoline as the average “inventory” of gas in the tank has risen.

Now, the governments have reacted to this development by beginning to impose minimum limits on the amount (in gallons or dollars) of gasoline purchased, so that no one may keep his gasoline inventory high. But minimum limits, by their very existence, seem destined to lead, in their own right, to a higher consumption of gasoline. Moreover, to have both minimum and maximum limits on purchases begins to approach Alice-in-Wonderland; perhaps one day some clown in the bureaucracy will inadvertently set the minimum limits higher than the maximum: and then all of us gas consumers will go bughouse in response to this new and devilish form of “Catch-22”.

In contrast to these irrational and meat-axe measures, formal gasoline rationing would at least have the merit of allocating to each consumer his 30 or 40 gallons a month, and then allowing him to consume them in any pattern he wishes: on Sundays, on the Turnpikes, or whatever. A rationing system. however, would be highly costly, would require an army of unproductive bureaucrats to administer and enforce, and would be even more comprehensively totalitarian. I t would also freeze the scarce supply and the shortage permanently.

The government is already confused about what sort of rationing system it is going to impose. There is the old and much reviled (justly so) World War I1 rationing system, in which no one was allowed to give away or sell his surplus ration tickets to anyone else. This prohibition made no sense at all. If the number of ration tickets matched the scarce supply (as it was supposed to), then if I (for example) sold my surplus anchovy tickets (as a non-anchovy eater) for someone else’s candy tickets (the other person being a dieter), then both of us would be better off. Why shouldn’t trading in ration tickets be allowed?

Indeed, this was the entering wedge, in Henry Hazlitt’s excellent novel Time Will Run Back, to move from a Communist economy of the future to a free market; the first step was: why not allow people to exchange their ration tickets?

Since Nixon’s economic advisers claim that they favor the “free market”, they have been reportedly toying with various “freeish market” versions of rationing. One is to allow a “white market”, with people being allowed to buy and sell ration coupons; if I don’t use my car much or at all, I can sell my surplus coupons to those who wish to use more than their allotted 40 gallons. OK, this plan (apparently the brainchild of Secretary Shultz), is certainly an improvement on the “traditional” World War I1 system.

But the very improvement points up the imbecility of the whole rationing scheme. Suppose, for example, that the current controlled price of gasoline is $.50 a gallon. No one knows what
the free market price would be (indeed it is impossible to know without letting the free market rip) , but estimates have ranged from $0.58 to $0.80 or $1.00 a gallon.

Suppose that the free market price is $0.80. Then the result of
this curious white market will be that the demands of the over-41) gallon buyers will drive the price up to approximately the $0.80 level. In other words, we would all be paying the $0.80 a gallon, and therefore there would be no further shortage; but the hitch is that the oil industry would be getting only $0.50 a gallon, while us under-users would be reaping the remaining $0.30. The moral issue is: why should I receive $0.30 a gallon for gasoline, I a non-producer?

The economic issue is that the oil companies would still have no incentive to expand production and sales to the consumer market, so that we would be paying the higher free-market
price without the benefit of inducing an increased supply. The idiocy of such a “solution” to the problem would be crystal-clear.

To complete the picture of rationing schemes, the above “extremist free market” proposal is countered by another variant, a “middle of the road” scheme in between World War II and Shultz. In this scheme, no one would be allowed to buy and sell ration tickets on their own and to each other; instead, the federal government would “nationalize” the ration ticket market. Everyone would have to sell their surplus stamps to the
government, which in turn would resell them.

In addition to getting its own unnecessary and uneconomic “cut” for these dubious monopoly services, the government would be making the fumbling attempt to find the market clearing price. This plan has all of the defects of the Shultz scheme plus many more; the government would clearly do a terrible job at trying to find the market price, a discovery job for which only the market itself is equipped.

Let us not despair completely, however; at least a partial salvation from this iniquity is already under way. It is an open secret that the heroic Mafiosi, always zealous at supplying goods and services that the State has declared to be illicit and illegal, have already revved up to print counterfeit ration tickets on a massive scale.

Presumably, the Mafia is using sources of information inside the government to find out exactly what the tickets will look like. It has been estimated that fully 15% of the gasoline sold for ration coupons in World War I1 was sold for black-market, counterfeit coupons. And that was in the midst of a war supported with enthusiasm by most of the populace.

If counterfeiting and black markets were so extensive in the midst of that patriotic fervor, what will it be now, when there is no popular war and the government is looked upon with healthy suspicion and hostility by the bulk of the American citizenry?

At first, of course, the Nixon Administration tried its best to rekindle the old wartime fervor. Establishment intellectuals, ever ready to call for sacrifice and scourging (of other people), wrote solemn if idiotic thinkpieces hailing the energy crisis as really, down-deep, a good thing.

Why? Because we, the American public, have gotten too soft; too affluent, too personal in our concerns. But now, whoopee!, the energy crisis will rekindle that good old wartime (!) spirit of self-sacrifice, of hardship, of rallying behind our beloved President to fight another “war”, this time against the energy shortage.

For a brief while, this hogwash seemed to work, as people always respond initially to calls for belt-tightening, self-sacrifice, national

unity, etc. But, praise the Lord, it didn’t take very long for the good old spirit of American individualism and “selfishness” to surface once again. The lack of “credibility” of our government surely helped speed this process of public awakening. For when the shortage actually began to bite, when gasoline lines developed and filling stations closed, reason and individualism came bounding back.

The public has been getting good and mad, and fist fights have been dotting the gasoline queues. The striking truckers, as wrong-headed as they were, were at least lashing out in an attitude of rebellion and pugnacity at the government-imposed system.

There are other hopeful signs. The Chamber of Commerce of the United States, the National Association of Manufacturers, and the AFL-CIO, each of whom hailed Nixon’s Phase I with joyous hosannahs, are now each and all committed to an all-out fight against price-wage controls.

Unfortunately, they do not have the guts and/or the insight to oppose the rationing and other despotic energy edicts, but at least they now oppose the control system which leads to the rationing schemes. It is particularly refreshing to see the NAM return home to an anti-control stand. The NAM was born, at the turn of this century, as a free-market, small business-oriented, opponent of the emerging corporate state system, for which they were lambasted by the corporate liberal National Civic Federation as “anarchists.”

During the 1930’s and 40’s, the NAM played a vigorous free-market role. Then, during the 1960’s, the NAM changed its
structure from rotating annual presidents to a full-time permanent president, W. P . Gullander, hailing from a corporation which would scarcely last a week without government contracts and subventions—General Dynamics. Under Gullander’s aegis, the NAM enthusiastically embraced the idea of “partnership between government and industry”, taking its place happily in the Welfare-Warfare Corporate State. But last year a revolution occurred within NAM, Gullander was sent packing, and the rotating presidency restored. Since then, the NAM has returned to a vigorous free-market position.

Other important anti-control sentiment has arisen. C. Jackson Grayson, head of the Cost of Living Council and boss of Phase II, and now back in private life, has recently delivered a blistering speech denouncing all price and wage controls. Perhaps in response to all this growing opposition, the Nixon Administration has announced the end of controls by April 30, thereby inaugurating Phase V.

But there are several important clinkers in the scheme. One is that energy controls will be tighter than ever; another is that direct controls will be replaced by long-term “voluntary” agreements by industry not to raise prices and wages
beyond a certain amount, these pledges to [be] monitored by the government on threat of reimposing direct enforcement. And so direct controls will continue past May, but in another and phonier guise.

Meanwhile, on the energy front, the threat of government dictation looms ever larger. Economic insanity is running rampant in the Congress, with plans emerging to: impose a federal tax on gasoline, and/or a “rollback” of prices, and/or an excess profit tax on the oil industry, and/or anti-trust prosecution, and/or a new federal oil corporation to produce and sell oil, and/or outright nationalization of some or all of the oil corporations.

A federal excise tax on gasoline to raise prices to market-clearing levels, would have effects similar to the “white market” scheme (provided that the government in its wisdom can find the market-clearing price!) Except instead of myself and other “under-users” reaping the hypothetical $0.30 a gallon, the government would get it, increasing its tax revenues.

Not only would there still be no incentive to increase oil production, but the government would increase its already crippling siphoning of resources from private to its own hands, aggravating the growing burden of parasitic statism on the private sector and on private production.

A “rollback” of prices — something never achieved even during World War I1 — would disastrously increase the gasoline and oil shortage. Anti-trust prosecution would help to destroy a vitally essential industry, and would intensify the shortage instead of alleviating it. Nationalization or a federal corporation means a massive leap toward socialism, with all the inefficiencies, shortages, parasitism, and totalitarianism that such a leap entails.

An excess profits tax is a particularly bizarre form of government
intervention. A shattering event occurs — the event may be a war, or an energy shortage. Imposing an excess profits tax necessarily requires defining what “excess” means, and invariably “excess” is defined as any profits greater than the base year before the event occurred.

But since profits are earned in proportion to the speed and efficiency by which the business firms adapt to the new event, this means that corporations are penalized precisely in proportion to their success in adapting to the new
conditions. A firm that meets the new conditions successfully earns profits and would be penalized by a severe tax; while the firm that sluggishly fails to adapt or to produce the newly-demanded product, suffers no penalizing tax at all. If the new event is an energy shortage, this means that firms successfully producing energy are penalized, while firms that inefficiently produce energy or don’t shift to the energy field are not penalized at all.

No better way can be found to cripple the efficiency and flexibility of the free enterprise system than an excess profits tax. Profits on the market are a measure of the efficiency and rapidity by which business firms meet the changing needs of the consumers.

To denounce an oil company for making “windfall” profits from an energy shortage makes as much moral and economic sense as denouncing physicians for making extra incomes during an epidemic. We should all rejoice when a corporation or other business firm makes high profits, for that is an indicator of great usefulness to the consumers; we should reserve our scorn for the firms that make losses and thereby display their inept management and lack of entrepreneurial ability.

Even apart from the great social merit of high profits, the hysteria about high oil profits is a piece of statistical charlatanry. The United Stated suffered a recession in 1969-71, and so corporate profits in those years were abnormally low; price controls based on profit margins in these recession years imposed further burdens on corporations, even past late 1971. In the oil industry, for example, left liberals point the finger of hysterical alarm at “swollen” oil profits in 1973, and point to the huge percentage increase of those profits over 1972. But any increase of profits
over an abnormally low base will yield a high and seemingly “excessive” percentage increase.

Thus, if Oil Company A had a net profit of $1000 in 1972, and $1,000,000 in 1973, leftist critics can screech about a huge 1000%
increase in profits; still better, if the company made zero profits in 1972, they could bleat about an infinite increase in profits. The point here is that the years 1969-72 were years of abnormally low profits for much of the oil industry, and that the higher profits in 1973 were bounce back to pre-1969 levels. Change the base year and you can make any set of figures seem excessive and unwarranted.

Thus, Business Week (Feb. 2 ) prints the profit statistics for the past decade of the 10 leading oil companies in the country. For four of these companies, the estimated 1973 profits are not yet available, but we have these estimated figures for the other six, which includes the top three (Exxon, Mobil, Texaco), and the fifth through the seventh ranking firms (Standard Oil of California, Standard Oil (Indiana), and Shell). Taking these figures, we have made the following calculations: the average rate of profit on invested capital of these six leading oil companies, for the average of the five pre-recession years, 1964–68, was 11.1%.

Profits then dipped from 1969–72, and rose again in 1973. The average rate of profit for these firms in 1973 was 11.2%. In short, profit rates are now what they were in the pre-recession years. And so even ignoring the beneficial nature of profits and considering the issue solely on left-liberal terms , we find that the bleating about swollen and excessive oil profits is totally
unwarranted, a piece of statistical legerdemain moulded to suit the ideological purposes of the critics. In the words of the old adage: “There’s three kinds of liars: liars, damned liars, and statistics.”

Western Europe, as everyone knows, is in the throes of an energy shortage even more severe than ours. The reason, however, is not as well known: because the inflation and price controls are even more severe there than here. There is one exception to the European energy shortage, however: West Germany. How come, since an economy as industrialized as West Germany is highly dependent on oil? How come there have been no electric blackouts and no rationing there?

New York Times article provides the clear-cut answer: no price controls on petroleum products. (Craig R . Whitney, “West Germans, At a Price, Avoid Oil Crisis,” New York Times, Jan. 24). The article points out that West Germany has no price controls on gasoline, heating oil or other oil products — in contrast to Britain, Italy, Sweden, and the Netherlands, which are suffering from
an oil shortage.

The article quotes oil company officials as stating that, as a result, “it was always in their interest to keep supplying West Germany
while it was sometimes not in their interest to keep supplying the other markets.” And West Germany has been far more dependent on Arab oil imports than the U. S . ; yet the free market allowed a plentiful supply of oil to be imported and sold. The cost to the German car owner of keeping an ample supply of gasoline was a mere 10% increase in price.

Gerhard Hess, trade director of the German firm, Geisenberg Oil,
noted that in contrast to West Germany, “in Italy there was a price limit of $30 a ton for heavy industrial oil. But now, Libyan crude oil costs $76 a ton at the port in Libya. For the companies, it just doesn’t make sense at those prices to deliver to Italy.” Hess trenchantly summed up the West German experience this winter: “The free-price system has proved itself so well, that only an idiot would say we should impose another system. Because we were not cut off from the free market, we got through this crisis.”

There is another great advantage to be reaped from allowing the free market to s e t the prices of oil. We hear a great deal about alternative potential sources of energy, from shale oil to solar energy to tropical oceans; whatever their technological status, they have not been tapped till now because they have been uneconomic — too expensive in relation to the more orthodox sources of energy.

A rise in the price of oil on the market will induce greater production and technological innovation into alternative energy sources, which will become increasingly competitive with existing fuel. And even within existing energy sources, a rise in the price of oil will, say, stimulate increased production of coal, of which there is enough under ground in America to provide all of our heating requirements for many generations to come.

There are, in addition to the controls-created shortage, numerous ways in which the U. S. government has artificially restricted the supply of energy, thus making energy more scarce and artificially raising the free-market price. Indeed, it almost seems as if every step of the way in the energy industries, government has been there to restrict supply and hence to raise price.

The abolition of these myriad interventions would allow a greatly increased production and supply of energy to the American consumer, at a lower market price. Some of these restrictions have been partially or wholly relaxed in recent months, but this easing has scarcely been enough as yet to overcome years, and sometimes decades of crippling restrictions on energy production. Here we can do little more than list some of the most glaring and important of these restrictions.

1 ) Most notorious have been the severe maximum price controls on natural gas, which have been imposed by the Federal Power Commission for two decades. As time went on, the gap between the low controlled price and the rising free market price became greater and greater, drying up the search for natural gas reserves, and leading to the current crippling shortage. Whatever natural gas remains is either sold in state, where the dead hand of the FPC cannot make itself felt, or else exported abroad. The latter is scarcely surprising, if we consider that the regulated price is approximately $0.25/1000 cu, ft., while natural gas can be sold for $1.00/1000 cu. ft. abroad.

Furthermore, when natural gas was made artificially cheap, it helped to put much of the coal industry out of business. In recent years, the shortage of natural gas has led to artificially increased demand for fuel oil, thus raising its market price.

Another consideration is that natural gas and crude oil are often found together. When the artificially low price of natural gas dried up exploration for new reserves, it also cut the supply of newly found reserves of crude oil, thereby lowering supply from what it would have been and raising the price.

Who was responsible for the economic insanity of the coerced low price for natural gas? As in so many other areas of government intervention, what we had was an Unholy Alliance of political pressure groups: left- liberal ideologues who generally favor government control and artificial rollbacks; along with public utility companies who wished to feast for a number of years on artificially cheap fuel. It is the all-too-common alliance of statist ideology and vested privilege.

2 ) The federal government is itself sitting on vast and virtually unused crude oil reserves of trillions of barrels, enough to last for many generations to come. It has been doing this sitting — and withholding of oil from the market, for many decades, thereby restricting oil supply and raising the price. These reserves are in the control of the U.S. Navy, and include the Elk Hills reserve in California, Teapot Dome in Wyoming, the North Slope in Alaska, and others. What is the Navy waiting for? Must we keep trillions of barrels unused, wasted forever, while the Navy waits until some battleship needs the oil in some unknown war of the future?

3 ) Similarly, the federal government, which owns outright the vast majority of all land in the Western states, owns almost all of the land in the Mountain States where enough shale oil exists to meet oil needs for the indefinite future. And yet the government has been holding this shale off the market, refusing to lease its land for purposes of developing the shale oil resource and producing the oil for the market.

4) For over forty years, the state governments, led by the Texas
Railroad Commission, and with the blessing and coordination of the federal government, have levied maximum quotas on the drilling of crude oil. In this “prorationing” system, each state is assigned a maximum production of crude for the following month, and then each oil well receives its fractional quota of that maximum. The result has been to restrict production and raise price of crude and of all petroleum products.

5 ) As a corollary to the domestic cartellization of the above point, the federal government has levied, for two decades, oil import quotas, placing maximum limits, and quotas for each firm as a fraction of such limits, on the importation of foreign crude. The resulting price increases have ratified and made possible the price rises due to prorationing.

6 ) There have been a great many complaints about the “failure” of the oil companies to produce new refineries in recent years, especially on the Eastern seaboard. But since, on the market, need and demand will create profitable opportunities for investment, further inquiry should have been: why have such refineries been unprofitable? The recession and low profits from 1969 helped; but another factor was the oil import quotas, which restricted and made uncertain a steady supply of crude oil, especially on the East Coast. Another recent problem, for refineries and for many other a r e a s of energy, has been the harassment and restrictions
on building any new plants imposed by the government under pressure from the environmentalists.

The environmentalists have two major gripes: air pollution, which may or may not be valid in particular cases, and “defacing the environment”, which imposes the environmentalists’ own particular and peculiar aesthetic values by force on the rest of the
public. If the environmentalists feel that a new factory or refinery
“defaces” the landscape, then let them buy the landscape and keep it undefiled, or forever hold their peace. Certainly it is unconscionable for them to force the rest of us to adhere to their esthetics, and to coercively prevent property owners from using their own property as they see fit.

7 ) The development of nuclear energy for peaceful uses has been held up for many years by the environmentalists.

8 ) The environmentalists have managed to delay the construction of the Alaskan pipeline for five years, including the importing from the north of Alaska of several million barrels of oil per day. The environmentalists were worried about two problems: ( a ) defacing the tundra (to these people, any man-made change in the environment, any alteration from pristine nature, is ipso facto “defacement.”)

It is instructive to note that the Alaskans themselves, up there close to the tundra, have no wish whatever to preserve it forever undefiled. Their fondest wish is to reshape the tundra and achieve some jobs, income, and economic development. It is affluent, comfortable New York intellectuals, for example, who are busiest at trying to preserve someone else’s tundra.
And (b) they worried about the migratory patterns of the caribou, who would not be able to walk across the pipeline. Even when the pipeline company, at considerable expense, agreed to build bridges over the pipeline so that the caribou could walk over them, the environmentalists continued to gripe about the fact that the caribou might still be reluctant to walk over a surface to which they were not accustomed.

All right, it is about time that we take our choice Americans: who should win out, humans or the caribou? Whereas the noisy minority of environmentalists will choose the caribou (or any other species, for that matter ) over man, we trust that enough sanity still prevails among the bulk of the population so that a resounding choice will be made for the human species. And if
this be “human-chauvinism”, so be it!

9 ) There is lots of crude oil off our coasts. But off-shore drilling has been restricted and crippled by the self-same busy body
environmentalists working as usual through government. Yes, you guessed it, the oil once in a while spills into the ocean, thus injuring the fish and other sea life. Choose America: humans or plankton!

10) The U. S. has an abundant supply of coal, as we have noted. But coal has suffered most from the dictates of government-environmentalism. Coal heating causes air pollution: but one might think that after centuries of such position we could struggle along for: few years more until anti-pollution devices were invented and installed on the chimneys. Instead, the meat-axe approach has bankrupted a lot of coal mines, disemployed many coal miners, and restricted our supply of heating fuel.

Furthermore, the relatively new technology of strip mining is less polluting, less expensive, and avoids such classic problems of old-
fashioned pit mining as black lung and mine cave-ins. There is lots of strip coal available in the Mountain States that remains untapped. But, once again, the environmentalists have come down especially hard on strip mining. Why? You guessed it: “defacing the environment.” If the incubus of the environmentalists is removed, and if the federal government unloads it strip coal resources into private hands, we could produce a great deal of fuel. Another boon is that the United Mine Workers, which have crippled the coal industry through pushing up wage rates, is weak in the Mountain Mountain States and could not succeed in blighting the coal industry there.

Thus, the federal government, and it alone, has created the energy mess in two sets of ways: 1) by a series of restrictions on production it has created artificial scarcities and thereby raised the free market price of energy sources; and ( 2 ) it has then greatly compounded the mess by imposing price controls below the free market price and creating the current shortages. The immediate cure for the shortage is simple: to abolish the price controls. The longer-range solution for the scarcities is to abolish all of its varied restrictions.

It is incumbent upon libertarians to take the lead in combatting the energy fascism being fastened upon this country. We must call for resistance to the totalitarian edicts telling us how much, what, and when we can use or purchase energy. We predicted the consequences of price controls: that controls would lead to shortages and then in turn to rationing and other acts of despotism.

We must point out that government is not the cure for the energy shortage but the cause of the disease: and the disease can only be abolished by getting government completely out of the energy field, and especially out of price-wage controls. One disturbing point is that, even among conservatives and libertarians who have written and spoken soundly and correctly on the energy crisis, there has been a certain torpor, a certain measured sobriety of tone, that ill befits our proper reaction to the latest acceleration of tyranny.

As citizens, even more as people with a passion for liberty and justice, we must respond with passion to the new crisis. So far no conservative or libertarian has matched the fiery and passionate instincts of left-liberal New York Post columnist Pete Hamill in his gut reaction to energy fascism.

Totally lacking any understanding of the market economy and hence of the true causes of the current crisis, Hamill yet saw unerringly the evil of government dictation that lay at the heart of the issue.

In his Post column of Nov. 12 (“The Phony Crisis”), Hamill searingly wrote: “Now they’ve even taken away our skyline. It had been ours since that day in 1945 when we all raced to the rooftops of Brooklyn to see those million lights blink on again , dazzling, joyous, triumphant and unbelievably beautiful, signalling to us that the war was over. I remember a woman crying on the rooftop that time, knowing that the long night of the Second World War was finished, that New York was blazing again with its electric beauty, that blackouts and dimouts were behind us, that the troopships would soon be home. The New York skyline: ours forever.

”And now it’ s gone again. Moving along the city’s highways, there is a joyless sense of defeat and loss in the town. It’s as if the malignant hand of Richard Nixon had reached out from the bunker in Camp David and pulled the light switch on all of us, spreading his personal darkness. The Empire State Building is a blinking red light in the dark. The great pile of downtown buildings, Truman Capote’s ‘diamond iceberg’, is a hole in the night sky . . . .

“It’s time to call their bluff. They might be able to fool a lot of farmers, but they shouldn’t get away with this hokey fraud in Our Town. We are overdue for a rebellion against the corrupt, criminal government in Washington, and now we have one opportunity to make that rebellion overt.

Turn on all your lights. Drive 65 miles an hour (will Rockefeller order air strikes on the Thruway to stop us?). Refuse to turn down thermostats. Let Washington know we’ve made them again for liars. And let’s get back our skyline.”

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August 16, 2021 6:29 pm

I lived through that hoo-has, and I am confirmed in my resounding contempt for Nixon (and Ford and Carter), Biden seems to be in some sort of contest to see if he can be remembered by history as The Worst President Ever.
Buchanan, Wilson, both Johnsons, FDR, and Carter will thus be regarded more kindly

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 16, 2021 6:56 pm

That’s assuming Biden IS the President and not just a place holder for whoever IS in power. We know it isn’t Cackling-Kamala. Is it a committee of Obamians left over from that phony regime? Is Michelle slipping in at night to assign tasks for the insiders and write Biden’s script for the next day?

What to think? Who holds the most powerful job on the planet?

Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 16, 2021 7:09 pm

I am using “Biden” as a synodeche, like The Kremlin. I have no good idea of who is actually running this clown show.

Derg
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 16, 2021 7:24 pm

Maybe Simon can shed some light on this clown show?

After all he must have been a MENSA candidate at one time.

Mike McMillan
Reply to  Derg
August 16, 2021 9:52 pm

Like O’bama, triple digit IQ !

Chaswarnertoo
Reply to  Mike McMillan
August 17, 2021 1:31 am

101?

MarkW
Reply to  Mike McMillan
August 17, 2021 9:48 am

Mine’s 4 digits.
If you count the decimal point.

Reply to  Tom Halla
August 16, 2021 7:33 pm

My bad, synecdoche. Anything adapted from Greek always looks weird.

pHil R
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 17, 2021 12:13 pm

Please ignore my reply. I should have read further…

Reply to  Tom Halla
August 16, 2021 8:03 pm

I liken Biden to Yuri Andropov who the Kremlin Politburo put in as a puppet leader after Brezhnev died. Andropov only lasted a couple of years before he died and Gorbachev finally came as the real wielder of Soviet political power.

Biden is just the puppet the Democrat’s central committee politburo chose in the 2020 primaries to face Trump. Biden was clearly cognitively impaired then. With the Dem’s politburo-like control of the news media they were just able to use the COVID lockdowns to keep Joe out of sight and minimize his camera time to keep the farce from unraveling.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
August 16, 2021 8:23 pm

It was a pretty obvious dog and pony show when you look at Biden’s popularity at rallies (tho, admittedly, Kackling Kamala’s was worse) it was the down ballot vote that told the real story of the last election.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 16, 2021 8:17 pm

Yes a useful observation, but in which way are you using the metonymy … a part for the whole or the whole for one of its parts?

SxyxS
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 17, 2021 6:19 am

The military industrial complex runs the show(watch Eisenhowers speech)
The MIC are the owners of the FED who highjacked the Dollar in 1913.
One of the owners of the FED (James Warburg)said in 1950 in front of the congress
“We shall have world government,wether we want it or not.
Either by consent(UN,AGW,covid)or by conquest(US / CIA wars)”
For a global government you need a global tax(co2),which can only happen with a global crisis.

2 of the owners of the FED sponsored Hitler(Rockefeller, Morgan)all the other owners belong to the exact opposite political spectrum of Hitler.

Ruleo
Reply to  SxyxS
August 17, 2021 6:17 pm

The fourth branch controls the other three. Which one is that? The Intelligence Agencies.

They also control the military.

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2021/08/08/the-fourth-branch-of-united-states-government/

There’s several parts. This is the first.

pHil R
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 17, 2021 12:12 pm

Synecdoche…

Michael S. Kelly
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 16, 2021 8:40 pm

Who holds the most powerful job on the planet?”

I’ll give you a hint: he’s a former U.S. President whose last name begins with the letter “O.”

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Michael S. Kelly
August 16, 2021 9:13 pm

But … but, but, that would constitute a 3rd term. Isn’t that unconstitutional? Wasn’t the 22nd amendment ratified in ’51? If they keep O’Biden on his feet for less than two years, Kamala only gets one kick at the can after filling his boots for more than 2 years.

Interesting times

Mike McMillan
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 16, 2021 9:58 pm

Not going to be a problem, Rory.

griff
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 17, 2021 1:45 am

Who is in power?

The lizard people. Or the masons. Or masonic lizards?

I can point you to websites providing the evidence, right next to the ones telling me there’s no climate change

M Courtney
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 3:03 am

From what I see in the news from Kabul it looks naive to think anyone is in charge.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  M Courtney
August 17, 2021 8:48 am

Democrats are in charge. That’s why things are so screwed up.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 8:29 am

Poor griff, his last brain cell has finally given up the ghost.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 10:10 am

The lizard people. Or the masons. Or masonic lizards?

No, Griffy, that’s very unlikely. I doubt any of your relatives have ever reached that level of power.

You can point me to the evidence for what … climate change? No one is in any doubt that the climate changes. Climate change is the effect. We’re interresed in the cause.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 17, 2021 8:44 am

“That’s assuming Biden IS the President and not just a place holder for whoever IS in power.”

I think this Afghanistan move by Biden is mostly of his own doing. As one pundit said, if you listen to Joe Biden talk about Afghanistan 10 years ago, he would sound the same as he does today.

Biden’s first impulse towards dealing with dictators seems to be surrender. He did it in South Vietnam, and in Iraq and now in Afghanistan. Biden is basically an appeaser of dictators. He has no stomach for confronting them, and if he gets in a situation where the U.S. is confronting dictators, he always looks for a way to get out of the situation. In the case of Afghanistan, he just packed the U.S. bags and left, and left thousands of Americans, European allies and Afghans who helped us, behind with no plan to get them out.

It could not have been handled any worse. It appears Biden ignored all the advice from his advisors and European allies. Biden was determined to get out of Afghanistan, and nothing else mattered.

I doubt he will run again in 2024, but if he did, he would lose badly, as would Kamala, or maybe any Democrats. That’s how politically damaging this is to Biden and the Democrats. Watch the next polls that come out on Biden. I bet they are not going to be pretty.

MarkW
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 17, 2021 8:55 am

Independents gave Biden an ‘F’ on his Afghanistan speech.
Even Democrats could only bring themselves to give him a ‘C’.

https://www.foxnews.com/media/biden-f-grade-independents-afghanistan-speech-lee-carter

Last edited 2 months ago by MarkW
Tom Abbott
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 2:43 pm

I saw that. It was pretty devastating.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 17, 2021 10:32 am

I confess to not knowing all that much about Biden before the present. Sure there are vague memories and of course I know the name. I’ve just never connected the dots. I’m still in doubt that he’s mentally competent enough to form any plan. A month ago he said this scenario couldn’t happen. Thank you for your assessment … definitely food for thought. I do agree that on the face of it Biden has created a real fiasco of enormous proportions. It will cost the Democrats the midterm and probably the next election. Their utter incompetence as a governing party is finally taking its toll. Maybe the pendulum is beginning to swing.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 17, 2021 2:47 pm

It’s just too bad Joe Biden and the Democrats are not as vicious and determined towards U.S. foreign enemies, as they are towards their domestic political opponents. If they were, the dictators of the world would be shaking in their boots, because the Democrats would give them no quarter. As it is, the dictators of the world are laughing it up, with not a care in the world.

MarkW
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 17, 2021 6:32 pm

During his recent speech, he blamed everyone including Trump, the military, the Afghanistan government, right after he proclaimed that as president, the buck stops with him.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 7:00 pm

I tried to watch it, if only as my duty to keep informed and be a witness to history. I couldn’t do it. The guy is so cringe worthy I fear continued viewing would jeopardize the safety of my TV and my ranting could alarm the neighbours.

Biden has been blaming everyone all his political life, for his own shortcomings. How does he keep getting reelected?

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 17, 2021 10:03 pm

East Coast corrupt political machines.

And this Simon clown is a big fanboi of Dementia Joe—go figure.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 11:34 pm

You’ve got to be kidding, Carlo. How can anyone NOT see what’s happening with that guy? I mean, dear gawd, he never was all that bright. Hell he was even caught red handed lying and plagiarizing another politician on one of his runs for president.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 18, 2021 7:23 am

I wish I was kidding. He was on the Senate Judiciary Comm. in the 80s for Bush II’s SC conformation hearings, the guy was a total @$$hole, would not treat any of them with respect. He became the model for SC nominations as was seen by the rats with DJT’s nominations.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 18, 2021 4:25 am

“How does he keep getting reelected?”

Good question. 🙂

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 17, 2021 4:02 pm

Here’s what I’m talking about with regard to Biden and Afghanistan:

https://www.newsmax.com/politics/withdrawal-taliban-vietnam-richardnixon/2021/08/17/id/1032743/

Biden in 2010 on US Duty to Protect Afghan People:
‘F That’
Yeah, Biden F’d them, all right.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 17, 2021 5:54 pm

The USA and all the people are fuxored while these clowns have offices in Wash DC.

Bill Powers
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 17, 2021 9:41 am

The Faceless Cultural Elite (.001% of the 1%ers) have been running the permanent bureaucracy for decades. They set their plan in motion during the Wilson Administration when they established their initial long range strategies for the Progressive Vision for America aka Central Authoritarian Rule by the Intellectual Class.

Today they place their poli-puppets in office and instruct them on who to appoint to said permanent bureaucracy. They took total control during Bush 1 and have so cemented their authoritarian control that when the deplorables threw them a curve and elected a Reality TV Star and NY Real Estate Mogul to be President they instructed their Propaganda Ministry, starting with the New York Times to throw a hissy fit for four years.

And when that didn’t work they re-worked their tactic to determine the outcome of elections by using a Chinese Made virus, funded in part by U.S. Tax dollars funneled through the NIH, as the cover to rig the last election with mail in ballots and behind close door counting, in favor of an Alzheimer suffered and a cackling fool who advanced in politics on the strength of her Jamaican/Indian ancestry.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Bill Powers
August 17, 2021 10:22 am

Yes, you could say that and there is an air of reality there, but it might be simpler. I don’t think it requires the powerful shadow figures in the background plotting for decades. Greed alone is enough of a common cause to give the appearance of a conspiracy and stupidity is enough of a bond to unite a party like the Democrats. When the goals of those two groups coincide, the rest of us are in danger.

Bill Powers
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 18, 2021 7:58 am

“…stupidity is enough of a bond to unite a party like the democrats.” You are suggesting the stupid people have Kinda stumbled into taking over our country and shredding the bill of rights. And that it was their greed that drove these stupid bumbling fools into pulling the wool over everyone’s eyes.

Rory, the biggest mistake many of my friends who are right of the center line make is that the two party system is made up of their freedom loving good guys and those other guys the evil Demoplicans. And that a battle is playing out right before our eyes, to prevent socialists from taking over our democracy.

The truth is that most of these politicians are stupid actors in this kabuki theatre play who need teleprompters to remember their lines. Why do you think these Poli-puppets earned the District of Columbia the moniker “Hollywood for Ugly People.”

The wealth holders being advised by the intellectual class have control over all Media: Print, TV, Social, Education: Universities, K-12 Public Schools (colleges benefactors of federal dollars through grants and the now federally controlled Student loan program at Prez Obama who also floated the concept of federal funded Public Day Care. No better time than infancy to begin the brainwashing program).

They have been successfully creating hive minded woke drones since the Bush 1 years. His sons advocate strongly for “Common Core” which is heavy into man is killing the planet and its your parents fault for driving SUV’s to run you to your woke soccer practice. Common Core favors Critical Race Theory and abandoning the need for correct answers on tests.

There are smart wealthy people lurking in the shadows with a long range plan designed for Central Authoritarian Control of the U.S. as a founding voting member in the UN with all the other Authoritarian Countries around the world and it is a mistake to think the people pulling the strings in DC are concerned about you liberties.

These are devious Puppet Masters funding and producing this Play being critiqued by Fox and CNN 24/7. Make no mistake the FCE own most of the Republicrats. The two party system is corrupt at the federal level and most Republicrats are ventriloquist dummies’ for the same lawyers on K Street as the Demoplicans.

If we want to take a first step at breaking the system we need to first advocate in every state for federal run-off elections for President and watch the Repubs run kicking and screaming because that will finally open the white house door for independents. And you will be able to monitor how effective he is by the level of conniption fit the critics raise 24/7..

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Bill Powers
August 18, 2021 10:00 am

Fascinating analysis. Thank you. Hell, I’m just an ignorant Canadian, relatively new at the intricacies of US politics. It’s a real eye opener and a rather sad education not that watching it play out in real time hasn’t been equally educational. You’ve certainly answered some of the key questions for why things have unfolded as they have.

To be fair, though, the entire Western world is suffering from the consequences of the heavy influence from the globalists, the Progressives, the radical Left, the misdirected Greens and the outright Marxists. Socialism is such an easy sell to youngsters who’ve been subjected to years of bad schooling (as apart from good education).

Simon
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 16, 2021 11:09 pm

Biden seems to be in some sort of contest to see if he can be remembered by history as The Worst President Eve”
No according to C-Span that goes to Trump (for the last 150 years anyway).
https://www.c-span.org/presidentsurvey2021/?page=overall

Derg
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 3:44 am

The moron arrives with his Trump Russia colluuuusion

Simon
Reply to  Derg
August 17, 2021 12:31 pm

Haha I’m not the one who is mentioning collusion every time the name Trump appears.

Derg
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 3:26 pm

No idiot…you are the one who still believes it.

Moron indeed.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 6:40 pm

I’m trying to decide if you are this clueless, or if you are just trying to change the subject.
Nobody here mentions collusion every time the name Trump appears.
We mention collusion every time your name appears.

Big difference, but one that appears to be beyond your ability to comprehend.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 10:10 pm

His TDS infection is near fatal, like the bull in the bullring charging at the cape, stabbed with 3 or 4 swords. But he is quite adept at changing the subject.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 11:07 pm

Nope. Derg every time.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 10:46 am

Yup, very good at changing the subject.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 7:53 am

The fact that the far left still hates Trump and blames him for everything is self evident.
As for the sane portions of the population, they have yet to be heard from.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 12:34 pm

The fact that the far left still hates Trump and blames him for everything 

Not everything. He got the vaccine thing right.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 1:43 pm

Did he really?

Think that shoulder jab is going to keep you from getting infected, CNN-Simon?

ADE and blood clots are not your friends.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 3:07 pm

I think it is going to save my life if I get sick. At least that is what the data is saying. But you go boy and keep taking that HCQ. Best of luck to you.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 3:44 pm

I recommend reading outside of the NIH/CDC/WHO.

And no, I’m not taking HCQ, silly CNN-Simon (or should it really be CCP-Simon?).

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 4:57 pm

https://www.freepressers.com/articles/hawaii-whistleblower-more-patients-dying-from-vaccine-than-covid

“I’ve seen 32 elderly people pass away immediately after taking the Moderna vaccine,” Abrien Aguirre told Hawaii Free Speech News. “None of that is being talked about on the news. It doesn’t fit their narrative.”

Last edited 2 months ago by Carlo, Monte
Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 6:02 pm

Complete and total Olympic level conspiracy theory BS. That is the very definition of fake news. No offical data that can be confirmed. Some wingnut making unprovable dangerous fake statements. Other than that totally believable.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 10:17 pm

So the whistleblower is lying, this is your lame explanation. Exactly what I expected (at least you didn’t jump to something else in your repertoire of leftist talking points).

There are many, many stories like this one all over the world.

Open your eyes (unless yer just a shill for the CCP of course which would explain your traitorous attitudes).

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 11:09 pm

So the whistleblower is lying, this is your lame explanation.”
Who knows what or who he is? But I’m not believing some random article that offers no data or references. My filter for bs is a lot better than that.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 7:25 am
Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 18, 2021 1:47 am

Has it ever occurred to you that if there was any truth in these”people are dying from the vaccine” stories, that their families would be screaming the news from the roof tops. Funny how they are all so quiet. Or…. maybe they have been silenced!!!!

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 7:26 am

Are these also lies?

https://openvaers.com/

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 7:54 am
Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 10:36 pm

Dr. David Martin:



Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 11:18 pm

Have you got a computer full of covid crazies?

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 11:27 pm

OK so I went to the youtube channel of this group. OMG. I can see why you think(being kind) the way you do. It is nothing but a load of right wing conspiracy nonsense. Wow, just wow.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 7:26 am

Yer a willfully blinded idiot.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 18, 2021 1:19 pm

Few more things on this nursing home nonsense.

  1. Why does he not name the company. If he was really serious about outing this fraud he would simple say it is…..
  2. Why have other news outlets not picked it up? There would be any number of right wing papers who would be delighted to report this if it were true.
  3. Why did it take him so long to report it?
  4. And like I have already said, why would their families not report the situation?

sorry but this does not pass the sniff test. The BS is strong on this one.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 4:35 am

There is an article in my local paper yesterday about a guy who credits Ivermectin with saving his life after he became infected with the Wuhan virus.

Just anectdotal evidence, but he’s convinced it saved his life after his condition improved from a very severe infection, after taking it.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 18, 2021 7:28 am

Anything that doesn’t jibe with the official C19 narrative is a lie by Simon’s accounting.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 18, 2021 2:26 pm

I’m going to correct that. “Anything that is created by crazy anti-vaxers is a lie(probably) by Simon’s accounting.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 1:41 pm

So how is Dementia Joe sitting with you now, CNN-Simon? Does Biden still make the hairs on your legs stick out?

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 3:08 pm

You mean Biden following through on Trumps agreement to withdraw. I think the whole thing is tragic.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 3:42 pm

Total spin and BS, CNN-Simon, your boy Biden shredded the agreement the day he mumbled his way through the oath of office for which he cares nothing. The democrat rats then turned their backs on the Afghanistanis, and blamed someone else for their failure.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 3:43 pm

“…oath of office for which he cares nothing.”
That my boy is laughable coming from a Trump supporter.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 4:33 pm

I see that you ignored my exposure of your previous lie and moved on to a new one, CCP-Simon.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 4:58 pm

You mean this lie?

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/gop-blames-biden-for-afghanistan-withdrawal-but-trump-brokered-the-deal-2021-8?r=US&IR=T

Your turn. Got any proof Biden “shredded” Trumps agreement with the Taliban?

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 6:02 pm
Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 7:51 pm

So two of your articles reference the criminal Flynn. Well done keeping things credible. The only variation on the plan Trump came up with was the date. The rest was pretty much as the liar in chief wanted it when he signed the deal with the Taliban. From the day the signatures went on the paper the chaos started.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 10:24 pm

Yer an idiot, CCP-Simon, Flynn did not lie to the FBI. He plead guilty on the advice of his corrupt DC lawyers who had bankrupted him and the Muller goons were threatening his sons with the same.

Sydney Powell exposed the US Dept. of Injustice and he changed his plea.

Idiot.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 4:44 am

“The only variation on the plan Trump came up with was the date.”

Wrong. The big difference between Trump’s deal and Biden’s deal was Trump insisted that the Taliban not be allowed to take over Afghanistan.

Trump set out several conditions before this agreement took place. Biden didn’t set any conditions, he just pulled U.S. forces out against the advice of everyone he talked to and let the chips (lives) fall where they may.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 6:48 pm

If you think that all it takes to withdraw troops is just schedule the plane flights, then you are as stupid as everyone says you are, and possibly even dumber than your idol in the White House.

Trump may have signed the agreement to withdraw, but it was up to Biden to carry out the details. And he failed miserably.

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 7:53 pm

If you think it so easy why did aTrump not it himself? Answer …. it was always going to be a nightmare. Easy for the Trumpeteers to say Trump would have done it better and maybe he would have but, we will never know because he is not president. At least on planet earth.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 10:49 am

As usual Simon, you contradict yourself. Everyone knew it was going to be difficult, which is why they were taking their time to do it right. Then your boy came in and just ordered everybody out.
Now that the BS is hitting the fan, you are desperately trying to spread the blame to everyone but the one in charge.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 4:41 am

That Business Insider must have a strong anti-Trump bias. I see an anti-Trump article out of them just about every day. They are not disinterested parties, but are rather seriously anti-Trump. They spend more time writing about Trump than about business.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 6:44 pm

Trump fulfilled his oath with great success.
Biden doesn’t seem to know that he is president from day to day.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 6:43 pm

If you think all you have to do to withdraw, is withdraw, then no wonder you come off as such an idiot.
Withdrawals have to be managed, and Biden couldn’t manage a one car parade.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 5:42 pm

Ummm got to Michael Flynn and well…. he’s hardly a straight guy is he. He lied to the FBI for goodness sake. Read most of what was a right wing opinion piece (propaganda rag) and didn’t see anything about Biden ripping up “Trumps agreement” with the Taliban to leave.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 6:02 pm

Another lie, CCP-Simon, he did not.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 6:08 pm

Got that link yet to Biden shredding Trumps deal to get out of Afghanistan.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 10:28 pm

Biden changed the date negotiated with the towel heads, you idiot. This invalidated everything, the entire deal. The whole country then went into the white throne while Biden watched cartoons in his basement.

Michael in Dublin
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 17, 2021 4:23 am

I found Nixon’s China trip disconcerting. It is one thing to have serious private talks with leaders like Mao but to give them a undeserved respectability like I believe Nixon did, neither helped the ordinary Chinese people nor the peoples of the countries where China has interfered.

We need to find a catchy name for the WPE award before BIden qualifies.

Last edited 2 months ago by Michael in Dublin
MarkW
Reply to  Michael in Dublin
August 17, 2021 7:54 am

Nixon’s trip to China was never designed to help the Chinese people.
It was designed to help the American people. And it did, by making China a counter balance to the Soviet Union.

Reply to  MarkW
August 18, 2021 6:28 pm

Yes! The world has been such a wonderful and safe place with the help of our good friends in Beijing!

Reply to  writing observer
August 18, 2021 6:30 pm

A different post, to separate reality from fantasy.

The saying of the fools: “The enemy of my enemy is my friend.”

The saying of the wise: “The enemy of my enemy is my enemy’s enemy. No more, and no less.”

Simon
Reply to  Michael in Dublin
August 17, 2021 12:36 pm

I found Nixon’s China trip disconcerting. It is one thing to have serious private talks with leaders like Mao but to give them a undeserved respectability like I believe Nixon did”
And Trumps worship of Putin and his “Fwendship” with Kim? Did that concern you?

Derg
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 4:35 pm

Russia colluuuusion;)

Simon
Reply to  Derg
August 17, 2021 5:43 pm

Yawn….

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 6:03 pm

Even CNN has seen the light about the disaster that the Biden crime family, CCP-Simon.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 6:52 pm

You find yourself as boring as we do?

Simon
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 8:51 pm

I find Mr Dergs repeated circling back to the same dreary comment time and time again pretty boringly infantile. Hence the yawn. I get that you on the other hand think it piercingly clever.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 17, 2021 10:30 pm

You need to check in with your CCP handlers to get some new material, CCP-Simon.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 11:13 pm

CCP. For the record I have nothing to do with the Community College of Philadelphia.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 7:31 am

Oh lookie, the YADA tries to be coy.

MarkW
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 10:50 am

It’s an argument that discredits everything you write and you haven’t even bothered to address. That you would wish to avoid answering is understandable.

Derg
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 4:13 am

Exactly even you don’t believe it…moron indeed

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Simon
August 18, 2021 4:52 am

“And Trumps worship of Putin and his “Fwendship” with Kim? Did that concern you?”

No, it didn’t bother me. I didn’t see where Trump ever worshipped Putin, I think that is a figment of your imagination, and I have no problem with Trump talking with Dictator Kim. As Winston Churchill said: “Talk, talk, is better than war, war.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 18, 2021 7:40 am

If a person is blinded with TDS as badly as Simon, everything Trump did must be wrong, by definition.

Simon
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 18, 2021 1:12 pm

No like I said he got the vaccines out quick smart. That deserves credit.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 18, 2021 2:16 pm

I think that’s the way all those TDS victims on the Left look at things. Trump is Hitler to them.

bigoilbob
August 16, 2021 7:23 pm

I hate to be Cliffie Claviney, but when you can’t even correctly spell the root word of your headline criticism…..

Reply to  bigoilbob
August 16, 2021 7:52 pm

I agree. That bugged me too.

I do remember this gas rationing as kid in the 70’s In Texas, they even went even/odd on license plates last digit could get gas on respective even/odd date.

And everyone was shocked when gas hit $1/gallon.

Last edited 2 months ago by joelobryan
Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
August 16, 2021 8:13 pm

they even went even/odd on license plates last digit could get gas on respective even/odd date.

Seems uneven. Odd numbers would get an extra 7 days a year.

Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
August 16, 2021 11:12 pm

who ever said such rationing was fair?
Like today, the wealthy always had a work around. Back then the affluent had several cars and moved the license plates around to whuchever car as needed if they needed a fill up.

griff
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
August 17, 2021 1:46 am

In other places where they tries similar licence plate restrictions (e.g Athens to reduce congestion) people simply bought another car with the complementary licence plate

John Endicott
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 3:12 am

Which is all fine and dandy for people wealthy enough to afford another car. No so good for the poor who need, but can barely afford, just one car.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
August 17, 2021 8:52 am

I remember right after the price controls were lifted, all prices went higher. Everyone was making up for lost time.

H.R.
Reply to  bigoilbob
August 16, 2021 8:12 pm

“A man must be a great fool who can’t spell a word more than one way.”

`~Marshall Brown, Wit and Humor, c.1880

(Later variation, most often quoted, attributed to Mark Twain)

MarkW
Reply to  H.R.
August 17, 2021 7:56 am

“It is a damn poor mind that can think of only one way to spell a word.”
Andrew Jackson

DonM
Reply to  bigoilbob
August 17, 2021 3:42 pm

Everybody makes mistakes.

I could tell you a joke about a framer that made mistakes, but I think you have already heard it.

PCman999
August 16, 2021 8:28 pm

Thank you for a historical example of the kind of government interference driven by stupidity we have today in various green policies. At least we have an example of how the stupidity will eventually collapse and not take everyone with it.

H.R.
August 16, 2021 8:39 pm

Excellent!

I was born in the early ’50s and lived the price controls and gas shortages of the ’70s. Well do I remember the lines and creative ways of getting around them.

The article didn’t mention the popular dodge of buying a $50 beater – yes, they were $50 or $100 back then – to have one car with even number plates and one car with odd number plates so you could get gas on any day. I’d bet dollars to donuts that some here did just that

I didn’t get any detailed macro and micro economic education until I was in my late 20s and early 30s. Still, I knew enough at the time, just picking up horse sense from the geezers of my day that wage and price controls were NOT the way to go.

This article not only brought back the memories of how it was, but also the wisdom of the old timers I listened to who just knew how things really worked.

Are any of the current youngsters listening to the hard-won knowledge and wisdom that we, the current crop of geezers, have to offer? Hopefully, a few kids have their ears and minds open.

Thanks for putting this article up, and 👍👍

H.R.
Reply to  H.R.
August 16, 2021 8:46 pm

After the page refreshed when I posted my comment, I see above that some others mentioned the odd-even plates. It wasn’t mentioned in the article, but it sure seems to have rung a bell with a lot of us.

Great Greyhounds
Reply to  H.R.
August 17, 2021 2:55 am

I grew up on a farm, and we used to get 500 gallons of diesel and gas delivered monthly, never had to sit in an gas lines, unless the tractor was parked in front of the pumps…

Michael in Dublin
Reply to  H.R.
August 17, 2021 5:27 am

As one of those oldies I am thankful for a father who despite limited education was an avid and widely read person. He gave me a love of books which I passed on to my children. He always said a good book is a good friend. Despite the explosion of knowledge and the easy accessibility on the internet, the inability of today’s youth to reason carefully, coherently and cogently is stunning. But even among the educated this shortcoming becomes obvious in their alarmism around climate and covid. Notice how they respond to dissenting views with straw men arguments, red herrings, ad hominem attacks and more. Thankfully there are a small number of bright young people who have a deep appreciation of past wisdom.

Last edited 2 months ago by Michael in Dublin
Michael S. Kelly
August 16, 2021 8:43 pm

I’ll have to figure out something to make, so that I can (briefly) join the National Association of Manufacturers. That way, at future gatherings of my substantial family, at an appropriate moment I can give a thousand-yard stare, and say: “I was in NAM.”

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Michael S. Kelly
August 17, 2021 8:56 am

That flashed through my mind, too, when I saw that.

eo
August 16, 2021 10:16 pm

The odd-even scheme is not restricted to gasoline rationing. It was also applied to curve car usage and road congestion. Mexico tried and abandoned it. However, a large number of countries are continuously using and expanding it even after it was shown as a failure. Today, the odd-even scheme is considered a prime example of unintended consequences of environmental policy. The odd-even scheme especially in areas with poor public transport system resulted to people buying a second car that are almost junk and highly polluting.The bigger impact is on the cultural change it makes in areas were car ownership is not widespread. Before the odd even scheme was in place, the family goes to school, market and work on one car with normally the father or mother driving. Now that the family has two cars, there is no reason for the whole family to ride together. As a result the car volume on the road goes up by 80 per cent and the increase is from the almost junk cars. The road becomes more congested and the air more polluted.

Earthling2
August 16, 2021 11:41 pm

A much more ominous event happened on August 15th, 1971, and that was when President Richard Nixon announced that the United States would no longer convert dollars to gold at a fixed value of $35 per ounce, thus completely abandoning the gold standard. That planted the seed for monetary inflation, something that is about to go astronomically parabolic with all the money printing and bond buying by the Fed. 

The final goal of the Democrats in the 21st century within the next 3 years is to completely crush the middle class who have some cash savings and basically make money worthless and totally dependant upon Gov’t for stimy and vote Democrat. That’s what happens to everyone who does this, whether it be Zimbabwe, Venezuela or the Weimar Republic of the 1920’s. While much damage has been done the last 50 years in dollar devaluation, hopefully Senator Joseph Manchin comes to his full senses and blocks this evil witless administration for the good of the USA and the entire world. 

John Endicott
Reply to  Earthling2
August 17, 2021 3:31 am

“A much more ominous event happened on August 15th, 1971, and that was when President Richard Nixon announced that the United States would no longer convert dollars to gold at a fixed value of $35 per ounce”

The problem with the fixed value (a price control, aren’t we talking here about how price controls don’t work?) was that the real value of gold was not $35 per ounce, and thus it wasn’t sustainable (Gold was flowing out of the US reserves). The US either had to significantly ratchet up the value target or abandon it.

Another point of interest, While that 1971 event gets the blame, the fact is it was inevitable from the moment LBJ removed the gold cover on March 19th 1968 which is the real seed for monetary inflation. Without the requirement for the gold cover, The government could borrow to fund ever increasing deficits, secure in the knowledge that their servants at the Federal Reserve, freed by LBJ from the weight of any necessary gold reserve to back their Federal Reserve notes, would simply create the money out of thin air and buy the debt obligations not absorbed by the credit market (the definition of quantitative easing). Moreover, banks, as a result of substantially reduced reserve requirements, courtesy of the Federal Reserve, could easily create even more money simply by making new loans

griff
August 17, 2021 1:44 am

!!!

I don’t know where to start – We can struggle along for a few more years of pollution from coal power plants? Strip mining is less harmful?

Derg
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 3:46 am

Why don’t you know where to start?

History is a fantastic teacher.

MarkW
Reply to  Derg
August 17, 2021 8:06 am

Only for those who are both willing and able to learn.
I doubt griff falls into either category.

H.R.
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 4:49 am

griff, I actually liked your “!!!” response.

Since the article is about government interference and edicts, with the outcomes being pretty much the opposite of what the government intended, I’m expecting a spirited defense of government-run economies from you.

The article gives a historical account of how the government botched the ‘oil shortage’ (actually extending it).

Maybe you could start with how the current government energy policies and edicts will have a different, positive outcome this time.

Go for it, griff! (Yes, you’re gonna get hammered, but that’s nothing new to you and doesn’t seem bothersome to you.)

griff
Reply to  H.R.
August 17, 2021 9:03 am

If the article contains such mind blowingly stupid stuff as I flagged up, I’m not sure any of the rest of it stands up.

Being a European I don’t have a fundamental objection to govt intervening in the market as perhaps US folk do. Energy in Europe is not seen as purely the concern of profit making companies (which leads to failures like that last winter in Texas, or Enron).

I don’t really think I do get hammered, as you put it… since most of the replies I get sadly don’t address points I make, but are simple abuse

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 9:53 am

No matter how many times government interventions result in bad situations, those who livelihood depends on a government check, will always find ways to blame the private sector.

John Endicott
Reply to  griff
August 18, 2021 3:22 am

Sadly whatever points you think you are making are nonsense. You link to articles that don’t actually support what you say when one actually reads them and/or are so out of date it isn’t funny (like your 1974 strip mining reference). The abuse you get it well earned.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 8:05 am

We can easily struggle with power from coal plants for at least 400 to 500 years.
Strip mining isn’t harmful. After the coal is dug up the land is reclaimed.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 9:03 am

Some years ago there was a small coal strip mine located a couple of hundred yards from my backdoor.

They dug up coal for a couple of years, and then decided to close the strip mining there, and they reclaimed the land and you could walk on that land now and never know a bulldozer had been out there scrapping soil.

I was impressed with the cleanup job they did.

griff
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 9:06 am

‘…land is reclaimed’

I don’t think it is, Mark

Opencast Restoration Research (gov.wales)

and
Environmental justice and coal mining in Appalachia – Wikipedia

‘The damage caused by mountaintop removal strip mining has had a calculable effect on the environment and communities in Appalachia..’

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 9:55 am

You don’t think, period, griffie poo.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 9:56 am

In griff’s world, if there are 10,000 instances of something, and in one of those, there is somebody unhappy with the result, that proves that only government can be trusted.

Derg
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 4:38 pm

Do you mean like windmills and solar panels?

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 8:30 am

Dear griff, please look up the term non-sequitur.

griff
Reply to  MarkW
August 17, 2021 9:06 am

I’m not following you there, Mark…

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 9:55 am

Your post had zero to do with the article.

H.R.
Reply to  griff
August 17, 2021 2:07 pm

@griff re strip mining: That quote was from 1974. You have a valid point… if this is 1974. But it’s not. Check the date on your calendar. Strip mined land has been reclaimed and coal power plants now have very strict pollution controls that really work.

Also, and I thought of this before giving my first reply, your perspective and knowledge may not exactly work to argue some of the points raised in the article because I believe you’re UK (am I remembering that right?) and the article is 1974 US.

Anyhow, I did see opportunity for you to present some arguments for government intervention in markets, such as mandating EVs or wind turbines for grid supply.

[♯♪♫ Sad trombone ♪♫]

Oh dear. I’m afraid you went for two things from the 1974 article that have been addressed years ago and are a nonissue today.

But thanks for playing and good luck in your future endeavors. We have some lovely parting gifts to send home with you.

Joe
August 17, 2021 7:21 am

How about the 55MPH national speed limit. Anyone remember that cluster.
Think about it, every interstate speed sign had to be replaced and then replaced AGAIN when the law repealed in the 80s I think. Was that a carbon neutral event?.

Doonman
Reply to  Joe
August 17, 2021 8:52 am

The 55 mph speed limit was another fake remedy to a fake crisis. Nobody observed it and it soon morphed into “55 Saves Lives” after gas prices rose and the fake crisis was over.

MarkW
Reply to  Doonman
August 17, 2021 8:58 am

“55 saves lives” wasn’t true either.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Joe
August 17, 2021 9:07 am

I remember it. I got a speeding ticket at 6am on a Sunday morning for going 65mph. The speed limit had been changed the day before to 55mph. Me and the Highway Patrolman were the only people on the road at that time. He cut me no slack.

H.R.
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 17, 2021 1:43 pm

I was in Ohio during that time and the joke was that Ohio was the only State with the death penalty for going 56 in a 55 zone.

It was so close to true that it was just barely a joke. You’d definitely get pulled over by Smokey (State Highway Patrol) for going 58. I think they just liked the revenue.

Cam_S
August 17, 2021 7:25 am

From 6 ) ….
“If the environmentalists feel that a new factory or refinery “defaces” the landscape, then let them buy the landscape and keep it undefiled, or forever hold their peace. Certainly it is unconscionable for them to force the rest of us to adhere to their esthetics, and to coercively prevent property owners from using their own property as they see fit.”

We now have the Nature Conservancy.

MarkW
August 17, 2021 7:49 am

I’m always amused by those leftists who proclaim that since Nixon was a Republican, he must have been an arch conservative.

whiten
August 17, 2021 12:23 pm

I am sorry, for my directness… and harshness.

But still got to ask.

Where are the 100 carat debils of this site hiding.

The sell outs, the whores there… or the clever prostitutes of this site.

Where are you debils?

God forsaken debils.

You know who you are dumb debils.

Show your self and be done, debils… weak or void of soul.

Do it clever debils.

Ok, it is what it is in the end of the day.

So let’s have it, wasted ones, just for the sake of record.

whiten
Reply to  whiten
August 17, 2021 12:49 pm

As far as I can tell, this is not a joke.

So let’s have it!

With all of what it curtails’ it!

For the best of whatever!
There.

whiten
Reply to  whiten
August 17, 2021 12:49 pm

Ready?????(

whiten
Reply to  whiten
August 17, 2021 12:50 pm

Steady?????

griff
Reply to  whiten
August 18, 2021 7:10 am

I’ll have a glass of whatever he was drinking…

whiten
Reply to  griff
August 18, 2021 12:54 pm

Who, really, is he…

griff?

Trust me, you never wished or wanting to drink, or wished to drink from that glass…

griff.

🙂

whiten
Reply to  whiten
August 18, 2021 1:15 pm

You know that, I still like you…😎

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  whiten
August 17, 2021 1:48 pm

Still on Mars, it seems…

whiten
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 2:24 pm

Well, there is the first winner… of the tittle… of Debil.

enjoy it.

A rather obscured Caro.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  whiten
August 17, 2021 3:46 pm

Too much LSD?

whiten
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 4:05 pm

you wish, dear Caro… don’t you!

MarkW
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 17, 2021 6:59 pm

Too little brain

Thomas Hamilton
August 17, 2021 9:00 pm

It is interesting that on Aug. 15, 1971 President Nixon also took us off the gold standard.

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