Critical Rock Theory

Guest “Surely you can’t be serious” by David Middleton

“I am serious and don’t call me Shirley!”

H/T to Willie Soon for the article and the catchy phrase: Critical Rock Theory!

Critical Rock Theory?

UW-Madison to remove 70-ton boulder some view as reminder of campus’ racist past
From the Chamberlin Rock: Rediscovery and removal series

Erin Gretzinger Aug 5, 2021

Erin Gretzinger
UW-Madison will remove a 70-ton boulder from the heart of campus Friday morning following calls over the past year from students of color who view the rock as a symbol of the university’s racist past.

Chamberlin Rock, located on top of Observatory Hill, is named in honor of Thomas Crowder Chamberlin, a geologist and former university president. But for some students of color on campus, the rock represents a painful history of discrimination.

[…]

Wisconsin State Journal

I don’t know if this deserves a Larry the Cable Guy or a Ron White award?

Or maybe, just a Tommy Lee Jones…

Although, I have to admit that I am surprised that it took them this long to cancel T. C. Chamberlin… He’s probably the main reason why geologists tend to be skeptical of Gorebal Warming and all other dogmatic hypotheses.

When I was studying geology, way back when The Ice Age Cometh in the 1970’s, we were taught to avoid getting hooked on paradigms or “ruling theories”. Geology, as a science, has very few unique solutions. Climate “science” has an even larger susceptibility to “non-uniqueness”.

This is why we were were taught to embrace Chamberlin’s Method of Multiple Working Hypotheses:

The following is a modern reprise of T.C. Chamberlin’s famous paper on Multiple Working Hypotheses. Chamberlin’s paper is too long, too high-blown, and too sexist for modern students, but Chamberlin’s idea of multiple working hypotheses is, in my opinion, more important than ever (see Geology 1990 v. 18, p. 917-918.) If you want to generate paper copies, there’s also a PDF file. The text below was written in about 1990, was made available on-line in the mid-1990s, and was published in the Houston Geological Society Bulletin (v. 47, no. 2, p. 68-69) in October 2004 at the request of the editor of that publication.

T. C. Chamberlin’s “Method of Multiple Working Hypotheses”: An encapsulation for modern students

L. Bruce Railsback

Department of Geology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-2501 USA

Introduction

Scientific study designed to increase our knowledge of natural phenomena can follow at least three different intellectual methods. These can be called the method of the ruling theory, the method of the working hypothesis, and the method of multiple working hypotheses. The first two are the most popular but they can, and often do, lead to ineffective research that overlooks relevant data. Instead, the method of multiple working hypotheses offers a more effective way of organizing one’s research.

Ruling Theories and Working Hypotheses

Our desire to reach an interpretation or explanation commonly leads us to a tentative interpretation that is based on relatively hasty examination of a single example or case. Our tentative explanation, as such, is not a threat to objectivity, but if we then begin to trust it without further testing, we can be blinded to other possibilities that we ignored at first glance. Our premature explanation can become a tentative theory and then a ruling theory, and our research becomes focused on proving that ruling theory. The result is a blindness to evidence that disproves the ruling theory or supports an alternate explanation. Only if the original tentative hypothesis was by chance correct does our research lead to any meaningful contribution to knowledge.

Seemingly less insidious is the working hypothesis. The working hypothesis, we are told, is a hypothesis to be tested, not in order to prove the hypothesis, but as a stimulus for study and fact-finding. Nonetheless, the single working hypothesis can imperceptibly degenerate into a ruling theory, and our desire to prove the working hypothesis, despite evidence to the contrary, can become as strong as the desire to prove the ruling theory.

Multiple Working Hypotheses

The method of multiple working hypotheses involves the development, prior to our research, of several hypotheses that might explain the phenomenon we want to study. Many of these hypotheses will be contradictory, so that some, if not all, will prove to be false. However, the development of multiple hypotheses prior to the research lets us avoid the trap of the ruling hypothesis and thus makes it more likely that our research will lead to meaningful results. We open-mindedly envision all the possible explanations of the phenomenon to be studied, including the possibility that none of explanations are correct (“none of the above”) and the possibility that some new explanation may emerge.

The method of multiple working hypotheses has several other beneficial effects on one’s research. Careful study often shows that a phenomenon is the result of several causes, not just one, and the method of multiple working hypotheses obviously makes it more likely that we will see the interaction of the several causes. The method also promotes much greater thoroughness than research directed toward one hypothesis, leading to lines of inquiry that we might otherwise overlook, and thus to evidence and insights that single-minded research might never have encountered. Thirdly, the method makes us much more likely to see the imperfections in our knowledge and thus to avoid the pitfall of accepting weak or flawed evidence for one hypothesis when another provides a more elegant solution.

Possible Drawbacks of the Method

The method of multiple working hypotheses does have drawbacks. One is that it is impossible to express multiple hypotheses simultaneously, and thus there is a natural tendency to let one take primacy. Keeping a written, not mental, list of our multiple hypotheses is often a necessary solution to that problem.

Another problem is that an open mind may develop hypotheses that are so difficult to test that evaluating them is nearly impossible. An example might be where three of our hypotheses are testable by conventional field work, but a fourth requires drilling of a deep borehole beyond our economic resources. This fourth hypothesis need not paralyze our research, but it should provide a reminder that none of the first three need be true.

A third possible problem is that of vacillation or indecision as we balance the evidence for various hypotheses. Such vacillation may be bad for the researcher, but such vacillation is preferable to the premature rush to a false conclusion.

An Example

The field discovery of a breccia provides an excellent example of the application of the method of multiple working hypotheses. A breccia may form in many ways: by deposition as talus, by collapse after dissolution of underlying evaporites or other soluble rocks, by faulting, by bolide impact, or by other means. Each of the possibilities can be supported by various field evidence, for which we could look if we were evaluating all these hypotheses. However, if we chose just one hypothesis, we might ignore other evidence more clearly supportive of a different hypothesis. For example, if we hypothesized that our breccia was the result of cataclasis during faulting, we might find that the breccia occurred along a fault. We would then accept our single hypothesis and quit looking for additional information. However, if we were using multiple working hypotheses and looked for evidence supporting or disproving all our hypotheses, we might also notice that the breccia was localized in a circular pattern along just one part of the fault. Further examination might show that it was accompanied by shatter cones. Armed with this additional information, we would be more inclined to an interpretation involving an impact that was by chance coincident with a fault. By looking for evidence supportive of a variety of hypotheses, we would have avoided an incorrect interpretation based on coincidence.

Summary

In using the method of multiple working hypotheses, we try to open-mindedly envision and list all the possible hypotheses that could account for the phenomenon to be studied. This induces greater care in ascertaining the facts and greater discrimination and caution in drawing conclusions. Although our human tendencies lead us toward the method of the ruling theory, the method of multiple working hypotheses offers the best chance of open-minded research that avoids false conclusions.

T.C. Chamberlin and the method of multiple working hypotheses

The geologist Thomas Chrowder Chamberlin (1843-1928) was president of the University of Wisconsin, director of the Walker Museum at the University of Chicago, president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the founder and editor of the Journal of Geology.

Chamberlin read his paper on “The method of multiple working hypotheses” before the Society of Western Naturalists in 1889, and it was published in Science in 1890 and the Journal of Geology in 1897. It was reprinted in several journals during the subsequent seventy years.

This is a short modern encapsulation of some of the ideas in Chamberlin’s original paper, and it should not be considered an adequate substitute for the original paper. This encapsulation is based on a version of the original paper republished in Science in 1965.

Chamberlin, T.C., 1890, The method of multiple working hypotheses: Science (old series) v. 15, p. 92-96; reprinted 1965, v. 148, p. 754-759.

Chamberlin, T.C., 1897, The method of multiple working hypotheses: Journal of Geology, v. 5, p. 837-848.

To a web-based copy of Chamberlin’s paper (apparently from the 1965 reprint)

Back to Railsback’s main page

Back to the UGA Geology Home Page

L. Bruce Railsback

Now that I think of it, Chamberlin was probably cancelled back in the 1990’s or early 2000’s, when CO2 suddenly became the long-term driver of Phanerozoic climate change… Because… Models!

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shrnfr
August 11, 2021 6:07 pm

Obviously a case of rock it science.

Ron Long
Reply to  shrnfr
August 12, 2021 6:37 am

shrnfr, add trees to the racist list. A Portland, Oregon school has delayed the changing of their mascot name to “Evergreen” because the principle is concerned trees are racist because they used to hang african americans from them.

MarkW
Reply to  Ron Long
August 12, 2021 8:42 am

Please tell me that you are making a joke.

Mark D
Reply to  shrnfr
August 12, 2021 7:17 am

I wasted spent an hour sipping coffee and trying comprehend what the stink was all about. This is a problem with this site – a very seductive time suck. From my limited education I must learn many new things and gratifying as that is I’ve got maybe a decade or so of quality life remaining and is this what I should be doing? LOL

No matter today I learn somebody likely long dead said something that has offended someone with the mind of a two year old and so an evil rock must be moved to rearrange the deck chairs on the Titanic.

While jumping link to link trying to make sense of the nonsensical I learned about the origin of “knockers” and “tommyknockers” and that “knockers” referring to woman’s breasts likely arises from mechanical device the door knocker. A swinging objected slapping against a fixed object making perfect sense as I watch my bra-less wife pick up her slippers exiting the bed this morning.

I never know what I will learn from Watts Up With That!

Last edited 2 months ago by Mark D
Don
Reply to  Mark D
August 12, 2021 10:57 am

Knockers up!

John Tillman
August 11, 2021 6:07 pm

Somehow MWH theory has survived postmodern consensus, GIGO computer game “science” to survive into the deepest, darkest 21st century, even in the highly corrupted Royal Society:

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.200231

A modern method of multiple working hypotheses to improve inference in ecology

John
Reply to  John Tillman
August 11, 2021 10:12 pm

The Royal Society has always been circumspect
Bunch of individuals who were more political than scientific but had money
Err Gore

August 11, 2021 6:14 pm

The old name for an erratic boulder was quite rude, and would result in a woke jihad against anything associated with it. But as they were probably English Lit or Woman’s studies majors, they should be ignored as a matter of good practice.

Alexy Scherbakoff
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 11, 2021 6:57 pm

Not rude at the time. Simply a description.

Reply to  Alexy Scherbakoff
August 11, 2021 7:06 pm

The word was generally low class,and therefore rude.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 11, 2021 7:35 pm

It was not too low class for a good joke in the movie The Young Dr. Frankenstein with Gene Wilder.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 11, 2021 7:06 pm

Which came first? The field description or the alternative meaning?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 11, 2021 7:38 pm

For those who don’t have a clue, and because this is about geology:

In this manner, where did knockers come from?

The name comes from the knocking on the mine walls that happens just before cave-ins – actually the creaking of earth and timbers before giving way. To some miners, knockers were malevolent spirits and the knocking was the sound of them hammering at walls and supports to cause the cave-in.

https://findanyanswer.com/why-do-they-call-them-knockers

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 12, 2021 4:24 am

thank you
I had heard of “tommyknockers” in mines
guess its just a variation

mkelly
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 12, 2021 6:25 am

So King was being a racist/sexist when he wrote “Tommy Knockers”?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  David Middleton
August 12, 2021 9:16 am

I got my field training in California, where the term “knocker” (as in large, ornate, door-knocker) was used for large boulders or blocks of weathering-resistant rocks in the common coastal melanges. My professors, Berkeley graduates from the ’40s and ’50s, probably learned the term from their professors, before the alternative ‘sexist’ slang term became entrenched in the language. I took my field training in the ’60s, and I don’t remember any snickering or other indications that the students (largely male) recognized any kind of sexual connotation to the term. And, knowing the personalities of the professors, I doubt that they intended any kind of sexual or sexist meaning.

We have poorly-educated ignoramuses dictating what, in their eyes, constitutes acceptable geologic vocabulary, based on modern slang. It is a sad state of affairs when the ‘snowflakes’ are in a position to influence our vocabulary.

Editor
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 13, 2021 7:32 am

Let’s just hope they never come to understand the meaning of “les grand tetons”. Imagine the effort involved in trying to have those removed…

rip

D Clothier
Reply to  ripshin
August 13, 2021 3:01 pm

There are local streets in my city named after national parks. One of them is the Tetons. I laugh every time I drive by it. I am such a juvenile.

MarkW
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 12, 2021 11:08 am

If you are of European extraction, then no matter who long ago you lived, your actions are to be judged by 21st century standards.
If you are not of European extraction, then judging your actions is racist, no matter when you lived.

Steve Case
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 11, 2021 7:21 pm

I was confused about what this was about. Yes I heard the term years ago and had forgotten it. So the woke liberals have unearthed the memory for me and a few others. I hope they are proud of themselves. if it weren’t for Tom’s post, I would have never put Two and two together.

Trying to Play Nice
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 12, 2021 4:35 am

It wasn’t the name. It was a description from one newspaper article. Some fool really had to dig to find this one.

Sara
August 11, 2021 6:16 pm

Ah, well, those who forget the past tend to repeat it. So it looks like these bozos who are afraid of “symbols” want to dismember, hide, squelch, paint over (etc.) the past so that they can repeat it. I hope that they confine their repeats to themselves and that they leave behind no traces of their own existence. 🙂

Oh, the times, they are a-tryin’….!

MarkW
Reply to  Sara
August 11, 2021 7:24 pm

From the article that I read, these shining examples of social justice found a single reference to the rock in a 100 year newspaper article.

David Blenkinsop
Reply to  MarkW
August 15, 2021 1:00 pm

Somebody used the “n word” to describe a large dark rock back in the 1920’s, so the rock is therefore an offensive symbol to be removed? This is essentially a kind of magical belief system, or else it’s insanity, or a bit of both!

I really don’t like to put ideas in the heads of these people, but what the heck, nothing *I* could say could possibly amount to anything worse than whatever it is they decide to do anyway, so here goes! When you think about it, shouldn’t we absolutely ban the sale of *brazil nuts*, everywhere? Just saying!

Doc Chuck
Reply to  Sara
August 11, 2021 8:17 pm

I don’t know, Sara, something that’s rubbed off on that rock from the 1800’s has offended me for as long as I can remember, and I can tell you I’ve never been anywhere near it. Heck, I’d never even heard of it before now, but I can just imagine how galling it could be to have to pass by it crossing the campus.

And don’t get me started about those odious ‘pet rocks’ once treasured by all those earlier rockists. For that matter the Rocky Mountains just make my blood boil! I say throw all ‘dem rocks into the sea where they’ll raise its level that has been laggard to my rising expectations. Anyway it’s clear the resolution is at hand now that the woke administration has bowed to the Shirleys to run their asylum.

Sara
Reply to  Doc Chuck
August 12, 2021 4:17 am

OH, how sad that certain composite rocks do offend thee, m’Lord! (snirk!)

I do have sitting upon my desk a piece of an ancient sand bar wormholes and all, and an iron ore concretion that is cracked. I call that one Crackpot the Rock. I was advised to not try to crack it open, despite the crack line. You never know what might jump out at you and seize you by the nose hairs, after a peaceful slumber of 330 million years. (snork!)

N.B.: All squawking herein is catatonic and snarky by intent. 🙂

Weekend’s coming up. Enjoy the overt humidity and freely floating clouds in the air, and remember: only YOU can prevent That Stuff from being seen in public again. 🙂

Last edited 2 months ago by Sara
ozspeaksup
Reply to  Doc Chuck
August 12, 2021 4:30 am

strewth! so does that mean all the Terry Pratchett “people” of rock will also have to be excised as well?
they might have a view on that;-)
heavens they might even TROLL that idiot Uni

Hasbeen
Reply to  ozspeaksup
August 12, 2021 7:37 pm

We have a rock on Magnetic island, just off Townsville, north Queensland, inside the Great Barrier Reef. It is very conspicuous & has been used for a couple of centuries as a navigation aid, so much so that it is mentioned in the Sailing Directions, used for navigation before sat nav & Radar removed the necessity for proper navigation.

It is a favored resting place for shags as they pause in their fish hunting, & thus it’s name, WHITE rock, & over the decades the shags have done their job of painting it white.

Some time back an aboriginal activist, a European man with some indigenous heritage started to stir up a movement to change this “RACIST” name. It went on for years locally, but did not gain national traction, hence white rock slumbers on as it has for centuries, thank heaven.

nailheadtom
Reply to  Sara
August 12, 2021 7:02 am
Yes, symbols: https://nailheadtom.blogspot.com/2021/07/the-most-evil-of-symbols.html
DrEd
Reply to  Sara
August 12, 2021 4:48 pm

Those who respect or even acknowledge the position of the offended, ignorant, immature loudmouths aren’t smart enough to even ignore them. These children should be “taken behind the woodshed” and told to STFU until they become educated and mature enough to join polite society. But where can they get really educated these days? Not in what passes for a college or university.

rbabcock
August 11, 2021 6:36 pm

Getting a crane that can lift and a trailer that can haul a 70 ton boulder is a task in itself. Maybe the better thing would be to split it into pieces, scatter it around the area and tell everyone they took it away. Or dig a big hole and roll it into it.

WXcycles
Reply to  rbabcock
August 11, 2021 6:47 pm

Reminds me of the term, “If thine eye offend thee, pluck it out.” Which is kinda fundamentalist and a bit self-defeating. Some guy said people tend to give to the poor in public, “to be seen of others”. Otherwise known as virtue-signalling. And then there’s the saying, “Justice must not only be done, it must be seen to be done.” [… not Judge Judy].

So an alleged injustice must be irrationally made into a proper farce to undo a totally imaginary ‘injustice’. Advanced Virtue-Signalling: 101

Still think they should stick with plucking out their eyes.

Have no idea why a lump of Granite is the bad guy.

Last edited 2 months ago by WXcycles
IAMPCBOB
Reply to  WXcycles
August 11, 2021 7:08 pm

Only in the minds eye of these ‘victims’! By the way, how long has it been since the campus was ‘racial’? I doubt whether ANY of the current crop of would-be scholars was around then! Prove me wrong on that?

Trying to Play Nice
Reply to  IAMPCBOB
August 12, 2021 4:41 am

I don’t know the current statistics but UW Madison used to have the lowest percentage of black students of all major US universities.

MarkW
Reply to  Trying to Play Nice
August 12, 2021 8:50 am

That could have something to do with the low number of minorities in Wisconsin.

anthropic
Reply to  David Middleton
August 12, 2021 1:03 am

Well, some people take it for granite.

Ken Irwin
Reply to  David Middleton
August 12, 2021 1:27 am

Now that’s funny right there.

Made my day.

Last edited 2 months ago by Ken Irwin
ATheoK
Reply to  rbabcock
August 11, 2021 7:51 pm

Or have a sculptor contest.
Have them submit sketches and plans, choose the most beautiful sketch, (Not the most woke), and have that sculptor do the job.

Should be cheaper than having some crane and truck remove the granite rock.

The etch into the bottom “In Memoria Thomas Crowder Chamberlin”

Dave Fair
Reply to  rbabcock
August 11, 2021 7:54 pm

As long as they don’t call the smaller rock pieces picka….ies.

Dave Fair
Reply to  David Middleton
August 11, 2021 8:26 pm

A good, well-rounded vocabulary is handy in any situation. Now, wit is a little harder to come by, David.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Dave Fair
August 12, 2021 4:39 am

well fairly soon they wouldnt BE offended cos literacy etc wont be an issue
https://www.zerohedge.com/political/oregon-suspends-need-high-school-graduates-be-proficient-reading-writing-and-math

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  ozspeaksup
August 12, 2021 7:49 am

What’s the point of “schooling” that leads to no useful “proficiencies?”

Might as well just have them start rehearsing “Do you want fries with that?” when they’re 4, and put them to work in the only field they are likely to be able to hold a job when they’re 16.

MarkW
Reply to  AGW is Not Science
August 12, 2021 8:52 am

If they don’t have to worry about providing useful “proficiencies”, schools can return to their primary purpose. Providing paychecks to teachers and administrators.

sturmudgeon
Reply to  Dave Fair
August 12, 2021 5:36 pm

On a roll…

ozspeaksup
Reply to  rbabcock
August 12, 2021 4:35 am

roll it in front of the cave the students live in?
or the principal that shouldnt be allowed out for agreeing to this?

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  rbabcock
August 12, 2021 7:45 am

Or tell those who are “offended” by a boulder that they are free to remove it themselves. Then let’s see if they have the courage of their convictions.

Rory Forbes
August 11, 2021 6:36 pm

You’ve over stayed your welcome, son and righteously deserve the universal opprobrium of this community. Clearly you haven’t even familiarized yourself with what WUWT is about:

About Watts Up With That? News and commentary on puzzling things in life, nature, science, weather, climate change, technology, and recent news by Anthony Watts”

No one is forcing you to stick around.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 11, 2021 8:31 pm

They are because I’m banned literally everywhere.

You seriously need some introspection. Ask yourself why everyone is banning you. If you can’t immediately work out the answer, you need to take a break from the internet until you can.

Once again: No one is forcing you to stick around.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 11, 2021 10:28 pm

I could spam my “blog” BUT I’d get banned.

There you go again … coming up with the childish reaction. Why do you feel the need to post spam at all?

I think you need to go stand in the corner until you learn how to play nicely with others.

Jeroen B.
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 12:05 am

As much as I appreciate you trying to nudge him in the right direction I think it’s time to apply Formosa’s Law.

Last edited 2 months ago by Jeroen B.
Rory Forbes
Reply to  Jeroen B.
August 12, 2021 12:27 am

I guess it’s wrong of me to succumb to argumentum ad misericordiam, but the guy is practically on his knees begging to be shunned. It’s a class act of its type, n’est ce pas?

I doubt even Formosa’s Law is appropriate for someone asking to be banned.

MarkW
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 8:47 am

Obviously he’s being banned because the masses are jealous of his brilliance.

Last edited 2 months ago by MarkW
Rory Forbes
Reply to  MarkW
August 12, 2021 10:34 am

Obviously he’s being banned because the masses are jealous of his brilliance.

That must be it. Why didn’t I think of that?

MarkW
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 11:09 am

So even you can’t stand your behavior.

John
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 11, 2021 10:16 pm

because you are obnoxious

Rusty
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 2:48 am

Why does that not surprise me?

joe lynch
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 3:26 am

i hope you aren’t wondering why!

John Endicott
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 4:26 am

 because I’m banned literally everywhere”

And literally nobody is surprised that is so.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 4:32 am

gee we would’nt have to work hard to guess WHY would we?

Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 6:01 am

With good reasons 😀

Nick Schroeder
August 11, 2021 6:40 pm

Meanwhile back at the ghetto:

Rights come with responsibilities, expectations, behaviors.
Obeying the laws is big one.
Disobey the laws, lose some rights.
In a capital case, the right to breath.
Civil behavior is another.
 
Chicago, Heyjackass.com:
YTD 470 shot & killed!!!!!! Every 10 h 42 m.
YTD 2,275 shot & wounded!!!!!!!!!!!! Every 1 h 56 m
WTF?!
83.3% BLACK!!
WTF^2!!!
Chicago, where black lives really do not matter.
Same in Detroit, Baltimore, KC……

Shot by police: 4 dead, 8 wounded. Police shot, 11.
I guess not newsworthy enough for the fake news MSM woke talking heads to foment riots.

If Garfield Park, Austin, Englewood, Humboldt were plantations the Massa would roll through with shot guns and dogs and put an end to that shit – it’s bad for the bottom line.
Maybe blacks NEED slavery!
Kaepernick, Rahm and Obama should hold a “cease fire” kneeling celebration.
Ballistic vest and helmet recommended.
 
FBI Table 43 & US Census
Blacks are about 13% of the US population yet commit 27% of the violent crimes.

BLM & SJW should be be collectin’ guns

commieBob
Reply to  Nick Schroeder
August 11, 2021 8:06 pm

On the one hand, it’s easy to come up with facts like the ones you have presented.

On the other hand, it’s easy to come up with a theory about how blacks are oppressed and the facts you present don’t matter.

When I listen to either side, I am reminded of what Mencken said:

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem—neat, plausible, and wrong.

link

A study of history shows a long string of attempted solutions to problems. When these Social Justice Warriors (SJW) look back on history, they judge those in the past as evil, not as people trying to solve problems and deal with life. That blinds the SJWs to the fact that they are probably, in whole or in part, also wrong. Their simplistic solutions will almost certainly lead to more problems than they solve.

Educators pride themselves on teaching thinking skills. How many of them are even aware of the Multiple Working Hypothesis Method? This should be inculcated starting in preschool. It would cause people to be mistrustful of simple solutions.

He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them. But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion… Nor is it enough that he should hear the opinions of adversaries from his own teachers, presented as they state them, and accompanied by what they offer as refutations. He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them…he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.

link

Somehow I get the feeling that the idea of real critical thinking has been abandoned and forgotten. Defund the universities.

anthropic
Reply to  commieBob
August 12, 2021 1:06 am

Anyone familiar with Dr Stephen Meyer’s works on Intelligent Design will recognize the Method of Multiple Working Hypotheses. He uses that extensively to argue that the information processing systems & machinery we observe in life is best explained by a mind, not an unguided natural process.

Mark D
Reply to  anthropic
August 12, 2021 6:47 am

I keep asking where said mind originated an all I get is circular logic.

H.R.
August 11, 2021 6:43 pm

That was really good, David Middleton. I learned a lot from such a short read.

That’s why I’m a loyal WUWT reader.

I’m just a dumb ol’ engineer (retired) so I really enjoy getting exposed to ideas that I didn’t and wouldn’t encounter in my schooling and over my career.


I’m trying to think of an equivalent to the multiple working hypotheses for my field. The best I can come up with is when a piece of equipment goes wonky. Sometimes, something just snaps and breaks and the solution is obvious. Other times, you’re chasing an intermittent failure and the question becomes animal, vegetable, or mineral electrical, mechanical, or digital.



As to the r-a-a-a-a-c-i-i-i-s-t nonsense, that kid need to get slapped upside the head with a 2 x 4 clue stick.

I’m willing to bet that student never had to walk 3 miles to school, uphill both ways, through two feet of snow, while carrying his little brother on his back with a lard sandwich in one hand to share with his brother at lunchtime… and stopping by the railroad tracks in hopes of finding a lump of coal to bring home to heat the shack for the night.

We’ve had the immigrants and pioneers who built America, followed by “The Greatest Generation”, followed by the greatest educated and well off generation, followed by the greatest whiners and wussies who got everything they wanted generation.

What’s next?

Alexy Scherbakoff
Reply to  H.R.
August 11, 2021 6:59 pm

Sheer luxury. I had to do that without feet.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Alexy Scherbakoff
August 11, 2021 7:41 pm

The first liar doesn’t have a chance!

MarkW
Reply to  H.R.
August 12, 2021 8:55 am

You forgot to mention the howling blizzard.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  MarkW
August 12, 2021 9:19 am

With wolves hiding behind the trees.

H. D. Hoese
August 11, 2021 6:48 pm

One of my favorite books is C. E. Warren, BIOLOGY AND WATER POLLUTiON CONTROL. 1971. W. B. Saunders Company. He quotes Chamberlin, along with Darwin, Aristotle, Thyucydides, Pasteur, even Malthus in the proper context. Many others who I won’t mention should someone from there happen to read this, but the book is rare, hard to get and beyond cancel types’ comprehension. I have been on the campus, they produced lots of real ecologists concerned with, guess what, real ecology. My best friend educated there always said he was going to “ go check on things.” Problem solver. Great agricultural stuff also like cheese and ice cream.

Warren’s point was that MWH are just as applicable to other real sciences, he didn’t say real, back in those days, taken for granted. I got a copy of Chamberlin’s paper buried somewhere, also completely quoted in Walcott’s SOURCE BOOK IN GEOLOGY, inherited from my geologist uncle, under Internal Structure of the Earth. He was given a whole chapter from pages 604-630.

Scott
August 11, 2021 6:50 pm

I grew up in Madison and attended the University of Wisconsin. This degree of stupid has been cooking for a long time It was inevitable that it would boil over.

Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 6:53 pm

That is a very selective quoting from the article. Reading the linked article it clearly gives a good reason for removing the rock. And also notes that it is being moved elsewhere on the University grounds. Finally the article states that “The university plans to erect a plaque in Chamberlin Hall to honor the former university president”
so nobody is trying to cancel Chamberlin but just remember him in a non-racist way.

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 7:32 pm

Referring to a rock, 100 years ago, in a racially insensitive way is grounds to spend thousands of dollars so that social justice warriors can sleep comfortably at night, knowing they have once again saved the world from sanity.

That you agree with and champion such nonsense is hardly a surprise.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  MarkW
August 11, 2021 7:54 pm

I am guessing that it is an ongoing issue and not just something that happened once 100 years ago. Beyond that it is just a rock and if people are happier with it being moved then why not move it?

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 8:59 am

“I am guessing”. So once again, you didn’t bother to actually study the issue before commenting.

Who are we going to make happier? Why does only one side of any controversy have the right to have government do whatever it takes to make them happy.
Where does it stop? If you bend over backwards to make every oversensitive nut case happy, then it will never end, because the reality is that they will never be happy and nothing other people can do will ever make them happy.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 9:27 am

Something that would be worth your time to read would be “Democracy in America” (de Tocqueville, 1835). In it, he expresses concern for what he termed “tyranny of the majority.” He needn’t have been concerned. Today we deal with “tyranny of the minority.”

To put it in perspective, if one person took exception to the Statue of Liberty, for whatever reason, would you advocate moving it?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 7:44 pm

I take it that you advocate expunging anything that has become offensive in modern slang, regardless of the original meaning or alternative meanings. You are a liberal through and through!

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 11, 2021 8:02 pm

Clyde,
It is a rock. If moving it makes people happier then why not move it?

Interested Observer
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 8:25 pm

Make the people complaining about it move it themselves… preferably by hand. Let’s see how happy it will make them.

If they are too weak to do that, as they most assuredly are, then let them use their own money to remove it. Let’s see how happy that will make them.

If you have to dig up a hundred year old newspaper article that used a racial slur to describe the rock but everybody today calls it by its official name, then you are being a disingenuous, virtue signalling twat and should be thoroughly ignored.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Interested Observer
August 11, 2021 8:33 pm

Hi,
Did you read the article. Again it states that “The university estimated this winter that removal would cost between $30,000 and $75,000 — an amount that officials said at the time would be covered with private or gift funds.”

so as you suggested they are using their own money to remove it.

Trying to Play Nice
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 4:49 am

So instead of those funds being used for something useful, they will move a rock because of an article in 1925. Wow, you need help.

John Endicott
Reply to  Interested Observer
August 12, 2021 4:32 am

Not ignore. Pointed and laughed at is the appropriate response to  disingenuous, virtue signalling twats like Izaak.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 8:52 pm

I find Izaak the Idiot offensive, so to make me happier you should move out to elsewhere.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 12, 2021 9:31 am

Yes, that is the logical conclusion to Walton’s illogical recommendation! But, his liberal blinders prevent him from seeing the consequences of his shallow thinking.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 8:57 pm

The reason given to move it is the very reason NOT to do it. It serves no practical purpose. Hurt feelings is not a valid reason for such an undertaking.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 11, 2021 9:12 pm

Rory,
the rock serves no practical purpose. Moving it is nothing other than basic politeness. If moving a rock doesn’t harm anybody, doesn’t cost the University anything (they have gotten the money from donations) and makes some people feel welcome then it seems like a good thing to do.

Hurt feelings are a valid reason for doing some things. It is why in polite society you apologies when you hurt somebody accidentally.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 10:22 pm

Except the entire exercise was founded on nothing. There were no hurt feelings and no purpose other than CRT and pandering to a very dangerous precedent. As for having “no cost to the University”. The money raised could have gone to something worthwhile and might actually benefit people.

The connection to “racism” arose when; in a 1925 news article the rock was referred to by a common euphemism using the “N” word (usually referring to a rock sticking out of a crude road). No fault can be attached to the rock. It was NOT racist.

It was a political victory for real racists and cancel culture. If they can force the removal of a rock for no apparent purpose. It demonstrates their power. If you want those cretins in power you’re you’re irrational.

John Endicott
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 4:33 am

+42

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 9:35 am

Maybe the protestors should be taking issue with the newspaper that used the insensitive word, instead of the object it referred to.

BrianB
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 7:41 am

What about the people whose feelings are hurt that it’s being moved?
Hurt feelings and assuaging them are generally best left to individuals to deal with.
When society is asked to assuage collective [or more accurately collectivist] hurt feelings, small, often activist and extreme groups are given veto power over the public square.
People who support the whiners think that’s just fine. The rest of us don’t.
Public apologies and appeasement should be reserved for only those with relatively broad and bipartisan support toward the most egregious and direct effronteries. To do otherwise is to increase division, not reduce it.
This met none of those criteria.

niceguy
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 8:24 am

What if rock defenders are hurt by this moving?

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 9:02 am

Funny how basic politeness always requires everyone to bend over backwards to accommodate the latest left wing nuttiness.

TonyG
Reply to  MarkW
August 12, 2021 10:25 am

Notice how “basic politeness” always seems to work in only one direction?

MarkW
Reply to  TonyG
August 12, 2021 11:16 am

Leftists always redefine words so that they benefit.

Like bi-partisanship becoming Republicans and Democrats working together in order to pass the Democrats agenda.

Or when Republicans flee a state in order to prevent the legislature from having a quorum, the Republicans are thwarting the will of the people (regardless of what polls say the feel about the issue).
On the other hand when Democrats do the same, that’s democracy in action.

Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 9:13 pm

University of Wisconsin, commuter cost of attendance – $17, 210.

If moving that rock doesn’t cost at LEAST that much, I would be very surprised.

How about paying for a year of attendance by some deserving black person from Madison? Or even seed a continuing scholarship called “Fund the Rock”?

Nope. Have to waste the money on “making people happier,” not educating them.

(“People” = half a dozen loud “social justice warriors” – whites from the upper middle class – who get their kicks from making other people do stupid things. Not that they’ll be “happy,” they’ll just move on to the next stupid trick to teach their trained seals in the university administration.)

Rory Forbes
Reply to  writing observer
August 11, 2021 10:36 pm

You’ve hit the nail right on the head. There is nothing racist about the rock. The entire thing comes from a 1925 news story when the rock was referred to by a contemporaneous euphemism for a protruding rock in a road. If you check the period, there were possibly 100s of similar references across America.

Your solution would have been a positive and permanent reminder. Theirs was one point on some imaginary political score card … soon forgotten.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 4:46 am

COON cheese here got rebranded cos of morons like this
(named after a chap called Coon who developed the process.)
so now?
its Cheer
and its NOT selling
been watching the stock on shelves locally
when its OOD I figure it will be good cheap dog treats;-)

Rory Forbes
Reply to  ozspeaksup
August 12, 2021 10:24 am

When people find ways to start adjusting language on any pretense, no good will come of it and here’s no end in sight. How our language is used depends on inference and context. Without that it has no meaning, so cancelling words is pointless.

TonyG
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 12:58 pm

“The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible.”

We’re witnessing it live.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  TonyG
August 12, 2021 1:56 pm

We’re witnessing it live.

(Now you’ve gone and caused the hair to stand up on the back of my neck.)

… and with ever increasing frequency.

TonyG
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 4:00 pm

Rory, just wait until they get to the part about “all the statues have been torn down…”

Rory Forbes
Reply to  TonyG
August 12, 2021 4:43 pm

I can’t remember how often I’ve quote ‘1984’, Animal Farm, Brave New World and Samuel Butler’s Erehwon, over the past year and a half. It’s like they’re using a century and a half of dystopian literature as their script.

One of the disadvantages of being literate and widely read is: … it’s all coming true. It was supposed to be fiction.

TonyG
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 13, 2021 7:07 am

And don’t forget Atlas Shrugged.

It’s almost like they’ve chosen to use them as a guide rather than a warning. Those writers look like prophets, but I think were simply just more observant of the direction things were going.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  TonyG
August 13, 2021 9:58 am

Yep, that does seem to be what’s happening, doesn’t it? To my aging eyes, it looks like these people are trying to destroy arguably the best and most benign periods in human history. Humans have never been so well off.

sturmudgeon
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 5:54 pm

now your reference to hair-raising will have Indians in an uproar.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  sturmudgeon
August 12, 2021 6:35 pm

Titter – titter … I laugh in your general direction.

sturmudgeon
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 5:52 pm

That is a definite difficult ‘booger’ for me…words matter (or, they used to), and it is ‘sorry hard’ to keep up with the nonsense we oldsters are viewing.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  sturmudgeon
August 12, 2021 6:40 pm

it is ‘sorry hard’ to keep up with the nonsense we oldsters are viewing.

I’m pushing 80 … and each day I despair a little more at what I’m witnessing. What I once took to be intelligent people are swallowing this crap by the bucket full. We’re pandering to madness.

Yesterday I watched a woman, walking alone in the park with two masks, a plexi face screen and an umbrella. I kid you not.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 9:41 am

And, how about asking that the newspaper contribute to the education fund for using the language of their time?

Do we boycott “Brazil Nuts” because they once had a common name that is now found offensive?

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 12, 2021 10:29 am

Oddly, once the context of the epithet became clear, my mind shot back to the nut bowl, at Christmas. Who could extract a perfect, unblemished “N”-toe from its shell? Good times. Thanks for the reminder.

sturmudgeon
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 5:57 pm

that was easier than an intact walnut, imo.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  sturmudgeon
August 12, 2021 6:41 pm

Not all nuts were created equal … (and I should know).

sturmudgeon
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 12, 2021 5:56 pm

“nuts” is now offensive? well…come to think of it…

MarkW
Reply to  writing observer
August 12, 2021 9:04 am

Nope. Have to waste the money on “making people happier,” not educating them.

The governor of Oregon quietly signed a bill removing proficiency requirements for high school graduation.
Apparently too many minorities were failing to meet the existing requirements.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  MarkW
August 13, 2021 9:34 am

Given the loon Oregon has as a governor, not a surprise.

They should just send “recruiters” to the Junior High Schools from McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy’s, Pizza Hut, Dominos, etc. so the kids can start “cashing in” on the only “opportunities” they’re ever going to have earlier. You know, like quitting school early to join the NBA, but for the height and coordination challenged.

AndyHce
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 12:48 am

What people? Most likely only a very few people, at most. Then there will be a few dozen virtue signalers who will sing about anything if it makes them feel part of the group. The majority probably resent the nonsense but have gotten tired of having rocks thrown at them for pointing out such stupidity.

MarkW
Reply to  AndyHce
August 12, 2021 9:06 am

There is a class of people, who simply aren’t happy, unless they are upset about something.
Being upset gives their otherwise useless lives, something to feel good about. Once the rock is removed, they will immediately start looking for something else to be upset about.

joe lynch
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 3:41 am

Because that’s called Pandering to idiots!

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 7:59 am

What if it makes other people happy to leave it alone?

And if “people” want it moved, let them do it themselves. Then we’ll see exactly how “important” it is to them.

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 9:00 am

1) It costs a lot of money.
2) It never ends, it’s a rock this week, it will be something else next week. Better to tell them to grow a pair and get over themselves.

Craig from Oz
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 8:13 pm

Reading the linked article it clearly gives a good reason for removing the rock. And also notes that it is being moved elsewhere on the University grounds.

Sorry, but that is a very selective quoting from the hymn book.

The simple fact they moved the rock somewhere else means the powers that be did not believe the rock to be at fault, so they in real terms spent a bucket load of money and reputation to shift the so called Racist Rock (remember, ONE SINGLE OFFENSE FOUND) from public display to a different public display.

The way the Woke have been crying you might expect that in Ye Olde Days the racial group A would round up members of racial group B and force those people to carry the rock around on their backs as a reminder of their inferior place in the social structure, plus face painting for the kids, and that this historical activity was still openly celebrated.

Nope.

ONE.
SINGLE.
OFFENSE.

This entire thing has been a massive waste of money and a massive waste of professionalism.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Craig from Oz
August 11, 2021 8:45 pm

Again it is just a rock. The university has gotten private money in order to remove it and by doing so they make their students feel welcome. The net effect might actually be an increase in student enrolment since students want to go somewhere where their concerns are listened to and acted upon. Which makes the whole thing a smart business move.

Ron
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 11:30 pm

In the past students were going where they got the best education. Times clearly have changed.

Lrp
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 3:02 am

Rubbish . No, it’s not just a rock, or, otherwise they wouldn’t gone to the trouble of moving it. And, by the way, a progressive making a smart business move means he’s worked out another way to steal something.

Trying to Play Nice
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 4:51 am

Were those funds given for the express purpose of moving that rock? If you don’t have evidence then you are lying.

niceguy
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 8:17 am

Isn’t Izaaaaak Walton some kind of Russian interference, or something?

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 9:09 am

1) That money would have been used for something else had it not been wasted moving the rock.
2) Why do you assume that the pantywaists that were upset about the rock was the only group that matters?
3) Or a net decrease in enrollment as students and parents rightly conclude that the university is more interested in pandering than it is in educating.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 9:43 am

Rationalizing speculations!

bigoilbob
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 10:00 am

Apparently Mr. M has LOTS of time on his hands. And if you check out the lack of activity by his current (or ex) employer, and their current market cap death spiral, you can see why. Enough extra time to spend days looking for inconsequentialities to whine about….

MarkW
Reply to  bigoilbob
August 12, 2021 11:18 am

Being successful really does bug those who have never had any.

Doonman
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 12, 2021 10:50 am

The good news is that only non fossil fuel was used to perform the work needed to move a 70 ton rock that was at rest for 15,000 years for no particular reason. If you look close enough at the pictures, you can see the solar panels on the crane and the flatbed that are moving the rock. I’m certain the excavator was solar powered as well. Plus all the steel used was smelted using renewable power.

This shows the commitment that UW Madison has to maintaining their pledge to reducing the use of fossil fuels whereever and whenever possible.

For more information on environmental sustainability programs, contact the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies.

Last edited 2 months ago by Doonman
AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Doonman
August 13, 2021 9:39 am

An encouraging side note is that we may, possibly, have reached “Peak Stupid” with this episode.

But maybe not.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Izaak Walton
August 11, 2021 8:45 pm

Izaak the Idiot weighs in, trips and does a face-plant in the sand.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 11, 2021 10:39 pm

He simply doesn’t get it. That’s why he, in the face of all reasonable science, remains doggedly an AGW true believer and proponent of a pointless precautionary principle.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 6:03 am

He should be made to wear earphones.

Ed Hanley
August 11, 2021 6:56 pm

I was given Chamberlin’s paper to read as an assignment in Freshman year geology at Boston College. It served me well for more years than I can count in a career as an economic geologist. If you’re going to do science, do science. If you’re going to reject a single piece of evidence in order to preserve your hypothesis, rather than modifying your hypothesis then repeating the experiment to account for the evidence, you’re not doing science. Period.

I’m glad this little piece of woke stupidity has at least brought Chamberlin back into the limelite for a few minutes. Even bad publicity is better than none, and “fake science” can be reminded once again how REAL science is done. If they’ll pay attention.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Ed Hanley
August 11, 2021 7:14 pm

The requirement for reading Chamberlain’s masterpiece as an undergraduate is probably the defining difference between geology and the other sciences, which tend to resort to appealing to authority. It may also help explain why there seems to be an inordinate number of geologists on this blog.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 11, 2021 9:00 pm

Geology is, after all, the foundation science to the entire question of climate. Of course it’s well represented here. Geologists have all the best arguments.

anthropic
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 1:11 am

Well, at least they’re well grounded.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 8:17 am

Geologists have perspective – “climate” is about long term changes over time, and about the entirety of the Earth’s climate history, not just some “recent” period, while the post modern so-called “climate science” is mostly CO2 fetishism propped up by models that assume their pet “working hypothesis” is the be-all and end-all regarding “climate,” which they can only manage by doing exactly what Chamberlain warns of – willfully disregarding, or not looking for, contrary evidence.

That’s why so many geologists are in the skeptical “camp” – because there is simply too much evidence that CO2 is not the “control knob” of climate to ignore, if you actually bother to look – and geologists are by their nature going to be looking at it.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  AGW is Not Science
August 12, 2021 10:16 am

I’m in your debt for fleshing out my rather terse comment. The most important thing missing with contemporary “climatology” is time. Of course, their “working hypothesis” has never been more than flashy visual aid to fool the public. It has all been politics from the start. Phil Jones let the cat out of the bag in the emails … it’s all about “The Cause”.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 13, 2021 9:44 am

Yes. Once “scientists” have a “cause,” they no longer have the right to assume the “mantle” of being “scientists,” because they have lost their objectivity – and are therefore, by definition, no longer “scientists.”

What the climate pseudo-scientists do today is activism, not science.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  AGW is Not Science
August 13, 2021 10:30 am

What the climate pseudo-scientists do today is activism, not science.

Amen to that.

sturmudgeon
Reply to  Ed Hanley
August 12, 2021 6:04 pm

The big “if”

Clyde Spencer
August 11, 2021 7:04 pm

What was the rationalization for associating Chamberlain with racial discrimination? Did he have a preference for rhyolite over basalts?

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 11, 2021 9:05 pm

Who gives a schist?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 9:47 am

The Anti-Schist, Walton.

Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 11, 2021 9:17 pm

From the Madison paper:

“Chamberlin Rock, named for former university president and geologist Thomas Crowder Chamberlin, was at least once referred to as a “n——-head” rock in a 1925 Wisconsin State Journal story. University historians have not found any other time that the slur was used.”

John Hultquist
Reply to  writing observer
August 11, 2021 10:22 pm

Correct and it is just 42 tons.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  writing observer
August 11, 2021 10:43 pm

In fact that isn’t even a real “slur”, but just a rather common euphemism for such a rock from long before the “n” word became such a sensitive issue. Hell, the same term was also a reference to a capstan winch on a ship.

AndyHce
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 1:06 am

It seems to me the term was incorrectly applied to this particular rock — by one person 95 years ago. If anything needs to be censured it is that dumb article writer of yesteryear.

sturmudgeon
Reply to  Rory Forbes
August 12, 2021 6:08 pm

Rory.. a wealth of information… thanks so much!

Robert of Texas
August 11, 2021 7:09 pm

I hate racist rocks. I had one out back for a while – I bashed it with a hammer.

Steve Case
August 11, 2021 7:13 pm

Off Topic:

Tomorrow is the 40th birthday of global warming in the popular press. Thames TV ran a documentary titled “Warming Warningl 12 August 1981.

If you Search that on the you tube, it will come right up.

TonyL
August 11, 2021 7:20 pm

Anther take in this mess, if you will.
The term in question is “niggerhead”, for those who did not know.
I came across this term within a history of sailing and sailing ships.
By 1750, the term was commonly used in the British Navy. It referred to a reef or a sunken rock, especially one that could punch a hole in your hull, as opposed to a reef or shallows you would simply go aground on. As such, this term was a term of art for navigators and helmsmen, and of sailors in general. In short, there was no racial connotation attached to it. The term was used to describe many things over the years.

Another history goes all the way back to about 1300. Then, it is said, the term referred to the type of a winch on a ship we now call a capstan.
Somewhere along the line, geologists adopted it for their use.
Reading the history of the term now, it appears that the racial connotation was “back fitted” or retrofitted to the term to provide the required “That’s Racist” narrative.

Pariah Dog
Reply to  TonyL
August 12, 2021 12:50 am

Exactly. Meaning doesn’t mean anything to the woke, it’s all about outrage points. Just try telling a wokester that you “sniggered” when you heard about this story and see if you don’t make the news.

Bruce Cobb
Reply to  Pariah Dog
August 12, 2021 7:34 am

Or “niggardly”.

MarkW
Reply to  TonyL
August 12, 2021 9:12 am

A few years back, a city councilman somewhere became upset and was demanding the firing of a department head who used the term “niggardly”.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  TonyL
August 12, 2021 10:08 am

Somewhere along the line, geologists adopted it for their use.

I don’t know that your assertion is true. I have never heard it, or read it in any geology text. Can you provide a citation?

It is true that prior to ‘The Enlightenment,’ the term was commonly used for several things by common people. I suspect that the infamous ‘N-word’ is a corruption of the Portuguese word for “black” by uneducated people in the Americas.

Another history goes all the way back to about 1300.

That is surprising, because the trans-Atlantic slave trade of kidnapped Africans, which the Portuguese called Nigers (“blacks” in Portuguese) started in the 1400s, with most of it after 1526, after the 1492 discovery of the New World.

Clyde Spencer
August 11, 2021 7:22 pm

Why would the sensitive critics want to remove such a gneiss rock?

Rick C
August 11, 2021 7:23 pm

Actually, to be fair, the removal of the rock has nothing to do with T.C. Chamberlin as far as I know, The issue is that the rock had been referred to as the n—-head using the taboo word until some time around mid-1900s. It was later named for Chamberlin in the hope that its previous moniker would be forgotten. But the PC crowd never forget and never forgive.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  David Middleton
August 12, 2021 10:16 am

Forged in iron.

Richard Page
Reply to  Rick C
August 11, 2021 8:13 pm

They did forget. Until some kind soul unearthed an article from the beginning of the 19thc that mentioned THAT word. Without that article, no-one would have been any the wiser, no-one would have been offended or triggered by the rock. Should’ve cancelled the article, not the rock.

MarkW
August 11, 2021 7:27 pm

Leftists really do get their panties in a wad whenever facts emerge that they don’t want to deal with.
This guy really does remind me of those students who petitioned to have the rock removed.
He’s been triggered, and he will make everyone’s life miserable until everyone acknowledges his feelings.

Regardless, the rock was only the first couple of sentences. The rest was about science.
Either you stopped reading at the picture, or you aren’t able to recognize real science when you see it.
Though I do have to acknowledge that both may be the case.

Smart Rock
August 11, 2021 7:28 pm

The rock in question was stolen from Canada in an act of Pleistocene cultural appropriation. It must be returned to its home and given a proper burial among its own kin.

And then we can talk about restitution for past acts of colonial oppression.

And don’t forget, to cross the border, it will need two vaccinations and a negative covid test.

Thomas Gasloli
Reply to  Smart Rock
August 12, 2021 7:49 pm

👍we have a winner! best comment.👍

John in Oz
August 11, 2021 7:28 pm

When seeing the outputs and predictions of their multiple models the ‘climate scientists’ do appear to be using multiple working hypotheses.

Unfortunately, they then tend to average them in order to announce that they are all correct.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  John in Oz
August 12, 2021 8:22 am

Nah, they all pretty much use the same hypothesis, and an incorrect one at that. Hence their inability to reflect the real world by an overrun of about a factor of three.

Abolition Man
August 11, 2021 7:38 pm

Aaaah, the cult of victimology!
I can not recall ANY great religion or philosophy from history that teaches that becoming a perpetual victim is beneficial! Every one that I have read or studied deems being a self-made loser a harmful personality trait! It does rather make one easier to program and manipulate, as one’s emotions must always be atwitter at the injustice of it all!
The ChiComs must be laughing with glee as they, one of the most racist criminal organizations in history, teach the children of the Anti-slavery Movement to be ashamed of their past! The CCP can buy US politicians and even elections apparently; now they are financing nihilism and societal suicide!

Smart Rock
August 11, 2021 7:57 pm

We’re just having a bit of fun tonight; it’s the only sane response to the self-adulatory insanity that passes for progressive opinion these days. If you don’t like it, you can always click on the little “x” at the top right corner of your screen. That usually works for me.

joe lynch
Reply to  Smart Rock
August 12, 2021 3:31 am

Peak Renewables was about 1850, then came fossil fuel and nuclear, a tremendous improvement, except to the Amish. Stuck in the Past much?

MarkW
Reply to  Smart Rock
August 12, 2021 8:50 am

Just a few hours ago, you were proclaiming this site was utterly irrelevant and useless.

jorgekafkazar
Reply to  Smart Rock
August 12, 2021 5:55 pm

Aha! You are make joke, Mark-the-Cracker! I laugh ha-ha at your funny joke.

lee
Reply to  jorgekafkazar
August 13, 2021 2:41 am

Damn I think I have lost my humurus.

Last edited 2 months ago by lee
jorgekafkazar
Reply to  lee
August 13, 2021 3:26 pm

See if it’s hiding among the Four Bodily Humors.

Gary Pearse
August 11, 2021 8:45 pm

The removal is actually destroying scientific evidence if the boulder came to rest naturally at its location. Mapping boulder trains for locating mineral deposits that the continental glacier traversed over (plus taking glacial till samples “up ice” for washing and picking mineral grains, gold flecks, diamond mineral associates etc.). Maybe the boulder is from a graniodiorite intrusion that is the locus for mineralized veins in surrounding rocks.

Anyway, was it the look of the rock or the name of the rock. Will non-white geology students refuse to use multiple hypotheses? I don’t quite get it.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Gary Pearse
August 13, 2021 9:49 am

The nickname given the rock in a journal article nearly a century ago, before the word in question even had the racial connotation to offend anyone.

Ron
August 11, 2021 11:27 pm

A lot of what the woke get “offended” about is easily explained by their lack of history classes and context.

So it is in general an education crisis. And sadly one of people with bs college “degrees”.

MarkW
Reply to  Ron
August 12, 2021 9:16 am

Oregon no longer requires students to achieve any level of proficiency in high school. How long till this progresses to the college level?

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  MarkW
August 12, 2021 2:32 pm

Quest for Fire is the end goal.

RoHa
August 11, 2021 11:39 pm

“Surely you can’t be serious”
“I am serious and don’t call me Shirley!”

How often must this lame joke be recycled before Americans get tired of it?

AndyHce
Reply to  RoHa
August 12, 2021 1:28 am

Think of the children!

John Endicott
Reply to  David Middleton
August 12, 2021 4:37 am

Truer words were never spoken.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  John Endicott
August 12, 2021 6:08 am

Indeed.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  David Middleton
August 12, 2021 10:20 am

In most cases it will fly right over their heads!

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  RoHa
August 12, 2021 6:08 am

As this is one of the classic all-time great comedy lines, up with Abbott and Costello, this poast gets a minus-one.

John Endicott
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 12, 2021 7:52 am

Looks like RoHa picked the wrong week to stop sniffing glue.

MarkW
Reply to  John Endicott
August 12, 2021 9:18 am

What do you make of this?

MarkW
Reply to  RoHa
August 12, 2021 9:17 am

Just because Europeans don’t have a sense of humor, don’t blame us.

Julian Flood
August 11, 2021 11:48 pm

While understanding that a large number of students are or pretend to be hurt by seeing the rock, perhaps the best thing about bringing this fact to worldwide attention is that it makes us remember the multiple hypotheses technique.

Let’s commemorate Chamberlin by applying that technique to the hysterical nonsense that is climate science. I have heard (but cannot trace the attribution) that a climate scientist once said ‘it must be CO2, we can’t think of anything else’. What a dull scientist!

Let’s think of something else.

I can, for example, think of an alternative explanation for warming which includes the isotope signal. And, come to think of it a further warming explanation that doesn’t do the isotopes.

Perhaps our gracious host could run a thread seeking to harness the combined intellectual might of WUWT

JF
(Ocean smooths, Willis, ocean smooths)

Ed Zuiderwijk
August 12, 2021 12:13 am

‘Too high-blown … for modern students’. Meaning they are just utterly dumb. An accurate assessment, unfortunately.

Eric Vieira
August 12, 2021 12:34 am

Could it be that it’s not about racism, but to discredit “white priviledged” Chamberlain, who certainly did not embrace groupthink …

MarkW
Reply to  Eric Vieira
August 12, 2021 9:19 am

I doubt those who are protesting ever even heard of Chamberlain, much less knew anything about his work.

griff
August 12, 2021 1:14 am

Perhaps some of the skeptics here might like to include ‘climate change is real’ as one of their set of working hypotheses?

Richard Page
Reply to  griff
August 12, 2021 4:33 am

I know that’s how I started off. It didn’t take long before I realised that it was a failed hypothesis with no merit. The weight of scientific research and observation is against it. This ‘Climate Science’ that you are so fond of referring to is no more than misinformed opinion and fear – the advocates of this view are simply preying on the fears of the population to advance their political agenda. Perhaps you should practice what you have just preached and include ‘Climate Change is not real, just an unscientific failed hypothesis with no merit’ as one of YOUR working hypotheses – it might open your eyes, Griffy.

Bruce Cobb
Reply to  griff
August 12, 2021 5:21 am

Of course climate change is real, you nincompoop. The climate has always changed, and always will.

Don Perry
Reply to  griff
August 12, 2021 5:57 am

Most do accept climate change as real. You might try including, as part of your working hypotheses, that skeptics are skeptical of catastrophic anthropogenic global warming.

John Endicott
Reply to  griff
August 12, 2021 7:56 am

Pretty much all skeptics include “climate change is real” as pretty much no one on the skeptic side denies that the climate changes, always has, always will regardless of what man does or does not do. It’s you alarmists that deny that climate changes without man to cause it to change.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 12, 2021 9:22 am

Climate change is real, and has been going on since the earth first formed an atmosphere.
CAGW as a hypothesis has already been ruled out by the evidence.
BTW, if it isn’t catastrophic, it isn’t worth doing anything about.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  griff
August 12, 2021 10:22 am

The issue is the quantitative contribution that humans make to the ever-changing climate.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
August 13, 2021 9:52 am

Which is completely unknown and certainly not significant enough to be actionable, as any of the proposed actions will be far more damaging to humanity that the imaginary “crisis.”

Richard Saumarez
August 12, 2021 4:30 am

Congratulation to UW-Madison on removing the most intelligent thing off the campus!

Mark Whitney
August 12, 2021 4:54 am

How the menacing rock looks to the woke…

rock monster.jpg
Last edited 2 months ago by Mark Whitney
James Donald Bailey
August 12, 2021 5:30 am

How one asks questions often determines the answers one will receive or develop. If you are Albert Camus, you would rather ask ‘if life has meaning’ than ask ‘what that meaning is’. That second question implies that life has meaning. Even the choice of ‘if’ instead of ‘does’ puts any possible meaning on shaky grounds. If you are more upbeat, you might instead ask ‘how can I make my life meaningful’. Note all the changes in hidden assumptions.

A test of a hypothesis is basically a wording of a question. One should also take care to examine one’s tests to make sure that biases aren’t interfering with possible answers. Unfortunately, honesty at this stage may cut your funding, or prevent your publication. Because wrong answers won’t be tolerated.

Often, these biases are moved straight to the hypothesis. But they are easier to call out from a hypothesis. So hiding them in tests unless you need to waive them openly to be accepted.

Both hypothesis and tests are full of implications from prior knowledge and from assumptions. Laying these out and identifying them is also important in making sound hypotheses and tests.

There even assumptions that go into the creation of mathematical theories. Take geometry. If one changes the ‘one and only one’ assumption of lines through a given point not on a line that are parallel to the first line to ‘no’ one moves from Euclidean Geometry to a geometry more like the surface of a sphere. It took thousands of years to make that change thinkable.

As scientists, we think that making sure the test is measurable is all we need to do to be fact based. But we often forget that our language and our use of language has a dominant role in our thinking. And we are quite frequently expanding our language to express our scientific thinking.

The thoughts above were the result of someone examining the limitations of preexisting ways of thinking and creating an alternative while also examining that alternative. We should expand such examination to all parts of the scientific process. Especially our questions and tests.

DHR
August 12, 2021 5:44 am

I have read the Wikipedia entry for Chamberlin and reread the article but I can nowhere find a reason for why minorities would find him a symbol of racism. Perhaps it is because he was President of the university at a time of rampant racism? If so, keep the rock as a symbol of his science and eliminate the university.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  DHR
August 13, 2021 9:55 am

Had nothing to do with Chamberlain, had to do with a previous nickname (in a nearly century old journal article) for the rock subsequently known as Chamberlain Rock.

Bruce Cobb
August 12, 2021 5:50 am

What a bunch of bull schist. What else can they dig up from the past to be “upset” about?

Carlo, Monte
August 12, 2021 6:06 am

You should be made to play tennis against a giant blancmange while wearing full tartan garb.

Olen
August 12, 2021 8:08 am

Not grateful for what they have. And how much money did that cost to remove the rock?

How do they remove the spot where the rock was placed for a long time. And change how stupid this looks to the world.

By that line of thought the entire Earth should be removed because slavery of all races were committed on it in the past and exists now in some parts of the World.

Ridiculous Yes

Coach Springer
August 12, 2021 8:09 am

Ascribing one’s grievances to inanimate objects and expecting everyone to cave to your singular perception. See also, Confederate Flag, Abraham Lincoln and the Cleveland Guardians..

Steve Z
August 12, 2021 9:05 am

[QUOTE FROM ARTICLE]”Our desire to reach an interpretation or explanation commonly leads us to a tentative interpretation that is based on relatively hasty examination of a single example or case. Our tentative explanation, as such, is not a threat to objectivity, but if we then begin to trust it without further testing, we can be blinded to other possibilities that we ignored at first glance. Our premature explanation can become a tentative theory and then a ruling theory, and our research becomes focused on proving that ruling theory. The result is a blindness to evidence that disproves the ruling theory or supports an alternate explanation. Only if the original tentative hypothesis was by chance correct does our research lead to any meaningful contribution to knowledge.” [END QUOTE]

This sounds like an excellent description of Anthropogenic Global Warming theory. In the late 1980’s (shortly before the above quote was written), some scientists noted that between about 1970 and then, average global temperatures had risen, as had the CO2 concentration in the air, so that a “tentative explanation” was that the additional CO2 was absorbing IR radiation and “causing” the warming. This later became a “ruling theory”, and “research [became] focused on proving that ruling theory”, to the exclusion of all other possible causes, such as sunspots, El Nino / La Nina, cosmic rays, etc.

So, in order to “prove” the ruling theory of warming due to CO2 (and scare people away from fossil fuels), computer models were developed that were calibrated on the 1970 – 1989 climate change, and temperature records since then were fudged to “hide the decline since 1989” for over 30 years in order to cling to the “ruling theory”. Never mind that actual temperatures are rising much more slowly than what the theory (climate models) predicted–the theory must be guarded at all costs!

Even though Thomas C. Chamberlin probably never heard of global warming theory in 1889 (Svante Arrhenius’ original work was published in 1896) and worked in a different field of study, he was about a century ahead of his time in predicting how a “tentative explanation” can morph into a “ruling theory” that blinds researchers to other possible explanations for what is observed in nature.

A 70-ton boulder placed at the University of Wisconsin in his memory represents a huge stumbling block to the promotion of global warming theory. I wonder how much CO2 was emitted by the crane and truck used to move this huge boulder somewhere else (couldn’t they just leave the boulder there and remove the plaque that dedicates it to Chamberlin?).
But you gotta be woke in Mad-town, and who cares about hypocrisy?

Mike Smith
August 12, 2021 9:16 am

I think they should remove every rock on campus. This to mitigate the very real risk other rocks could be mistaken for this Very Bad and clearly Racist rock. And just to be safe, prohibit the playing of any Rock and roll music.

Tom
August 12, 2021 9:44 am

Since I went to school there, I was in the vicinity of that rock many times without knowing any of its history. The fact that partially buried black roughly round rocks were referred to in the past as @iggerheads is just a historical fact which cannot be expunged. Bringing it up in the way they have and making a fuss about it is no more than stirring the schist to see if it stinks.

PaulH
August 12, 2021 9:44 am

Maybe they misunderstood when someone called it rock-schist?

Carlo, Monte
August 12, 2021 2:19 pm

I’m still laughing at the title, thanks DM.

Truth Be Told
August 12, 2021 5:04 pm

This website has really started down the tubes. Retard flame wars, lame enabling woktard articles like this one that can be found on a dozen other sites, myopic inspection of parochial data sets that are inane and boring really have little to contribute.
Near-Earth influences from solar cycles, flares, magnetism, huge interstellar radiation bursts, Earth Ice Age Cycles are ignored in almost all analyses.
I am a long-time reader and despite these few minor foibles, “I’ll be back!”

MarkW
Reply to  Truth Be Told
August 12, 2021 7:53 pm

So an article about Chamberlain’s theory’s regarding multiple hypothesis has your panties in a wad?

jorgekafkazar
August 12, 2021 6:55 pm

Trigger warning: the seriousness of what we’re facing calls for strong language, and you will find it below aplenty. Turn back now, if you are easily offended by historical analogies.

Of course, this is not about rocks or science or racial epithets or logic. Or even history. It’s about deliberately making trouble, spreading and maintaining dissent between one group and another.

Colonial troops had a cruel pastime: tying two cats together by their tails, and dangling them over a clothesline. The cats would fight it out, each one thinking the other was the enemy and was intentionally clawing him. They would fight thus until one was dead. The real enemy, the soldiers, would pay off their bets and look for two more cats.

Every faction, every minority, every group and camp in America is being tied to its opposite and exhorted to fight by emotion-based propaganda. The blacks are told that whites are the enemy, and vice versa. There is little current truth to these exhortations, which is why the evils of 100, 200 and 300 years ago must be constantly brought up in the media, and why “microaggressions” are “a thing” to be taken seriously, no matter how minuscule.

The real enemy is not the other cat; it’s whoever is promoting this demonic, evangelism, along with the media who uncritically, even enthusiastically, report it without even a token attempt at competent analysis.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  jorgekafkazar
August 13, 2021 9:57 am

Nicely put. The “politics of division” is disgusting.

Perry
August 13, 2021 1:13 am

That boulder looks like an “Erratic”, which (according to Wikipedia) is a glacially deposited rock, differing from the size & type of rock native to the area in which it rests. There are many Erratics on & around Rügen in the Baltic Sea. The Schwanenstein is linked to far more ominous legends & stories than the subject of this article. Should it be craned out?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwanenstein

otsar
August 13, 2021 5:50 pm

Perhaps I have become too cynical. It would not suprise me at all if the removal of the rock is to place a parking lot or a building in its place without the usual opposition.

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