@CBS tries ridiculous scare tactics with nearly non-existent west coast hurricanes

From the “lack of understanding about the cold California Current” department, comes this bit of excessively stupid reporting, via NewsBusters. A bit of history helps too: Since 1850, only seven tropical cyclones have brought gale-force winds to the Southwestern United States, making hurricanes an improbable event.

CBS Scares Viewers With Predictions of Climate Change Causing West Coast Hurricanes

Even as NBC’s Today show recently reported that climate change would actually cause fewer hurricanes in the Atlantic during the 2018 season, on Saturday, CBS This Morning warned viewers that warming ocean temperatures could potentially lead to hurricanes in the Pacific hitting the coast of California.

“Hurricanes are well known in the Atlantic and in the Caribbean, but scientists in California are concerned that changing climate conditions could soon bring hurricanes to the west coast,” proclaimed fill-in co-host Elaine Quijano as she introduced the segment. The headline on-screen blared: “Gathering Storms? Warmer Oceans Increase Risk of West Coast Hurricanes.”

Correspondent Jamie Yuccas began her report by invoking images of deadly east coast storms: “Irma, Harvey, and Katrina are among the hurricanes that have ravaged the east coast and Gulf of Mexico. But here in California, hurricanes are virtually unheard of.” She acknowledged hurricanes that regularly form in the Pacific, but pointed out that such storms “usually don’t make it past Baja California,” in Mexico, and that “only one managed to reach as far as San Diego in 1858.”

Sounding the alarm, Yuccas continued: “However, there’s now the potential this rare event could strike the San Diego area again.” Scientist Art Miller, a researcher for the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, fretted: “It could happen, especially if the ocean temperatures continue to stay in this anomalously warm state.”

Yuccas noted: “Scientists at the Scripps Pier have been recording historic temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, as high as 79.5 degrees. That’s about ten degrees above normal.” Miller argued: “That potentially increases the likelihood that a hurricane might track just a little bit further north than it would have.”

After Yuccas concluded her report, co-host Anthony Mason worried: “Those rising ocean temperatures are startling.” Quijano agreed: “Startling. And when you think about ten degrees difference, as she pointed out, you think about it’s been a year since Hurricane Harvey. It was this time last year, right? And it was warm ocean waters fueling that as well.”

In August of 2017, CBS repeatedly blamed climate change for causing Hurricane Harvey and intensifying it’s devastation in Texas. In November of that year, Mason, while serving as temporary anchor for CBS Evening News, bemoaned that a lack of environmental activism from the Trump administration meant “saving the world has been harder.”

It’s one thing to claim climate change as the cause when a severe weather event actually occurs, it’s quite another to preemptively argue that any potential future storms would be the result of global warming.

TRANSCRIPT:

8:30 AM ET

ELAINE QUIJANO: Welcome back to CBS This Morning: Saturday. Hurricanes are well known in the Atlantic and in the Caribbean, but scientists in California are concerned that changing climate conditions could soon bring hurricanes to the west coast. Jamie Yuccas has the story.

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINES: Gathering Storms? Warmer Oceans Increase Risk of West Coast Hurricanes]

JAMIE YUCCAS: Irma, Harvey, and Katrina are among the hurricanes that have ravaged the east coast and Gulf of Mexico. But here in California, hurricanes are virtually unheard of.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN [CALIFORNIA RESIDENT]: What do you do in the case of a hurricane? I don’t know. I can’t imagine that type of devastation hitting the shores here.

YUCCAS: Hurricanes that form in the eastern Pacific Ocean usually don’t make it past Baja California. Only one managed to reach as far as San Diego in 1858. However, there’s now the potential this rare event could strike the San Diego area again. Oceanographer Art Miller.

ART MILLER [RESEARCHER, SCRIPPS INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY]: It could happen, especially if the ocean temperatures continue to stay in this anomalously warm state.

YUCCAS: Scientists at the Scripps Pier have been recording historic temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, as high as 79.5 degrees. That’s about ten degrees above normal. What has the temperature gauge showed you over the last week or so?

CLARISSA ANDERSON [EXEC. DIR., SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA COASTAL OCEAN OBSERVING SYSTEM]: It’s shown that we have been right at or outside the record temperatures that were already set back in the ’30s, so we know that we are experiencing a very extreme temperature event.

MILLER: That potentially increases the likelihood that a hurricane might track just a little bit further north than it would have.

YUCCAS: Even though California has been battle-tested by fires, mud slides, and earthquakes,  the widespread impact of a hurricane on lives and property is still unknown.

MILLER: The risk associated with those high-wind events might be surprising since we really haven’t been tested for that type of natural phenomenon.

YUCCAS: The National Weather Service has found even higher temperatures even in other parts of the Pacific. That’s because the ocean absorbs more heat than it does on the land. Also, the normal southern California winds have not been picking up, which would allow cooler waters to mix in. Scientists believe the warming trend will continue. For CBS This Morning: Saturday, Jamie Yuccas, along the southern California coast.

ANTHONY MASON: Those rising ocean temperatures are startling.

QUIJANO: Startling. And when you think about ten degrees difference, as she pointed out, you think about it’s been a year since Hurricane Harvey. It was this time last year, right? And it was warm ocean waters fueling that as well.

DANA JACOBSON: Yeah, I mean, you also think all of the disasters, as Jamie mentioned, that they have to deal with already. That on top of it? I cannot imagine the destruction.

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Tom Halla
August 20, 2018 1:59 pm

Hurricanes and cyclones require warm ocean waters, and anyone who has ever been in the Pacific north of Santa Barbara will agree the water is rather cold. As in surfers in wetsuits.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 20, 2018 2:12 pm

Exactly

Ken
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 20, 2018 2:37 pm

North of Santa Barbara? Heck, San Diego water is not exactly even warm.

Matthew Thompson
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 20, 2018 2:49 pm

Wetsuits, naturally. It’s sooooo obvious. The glaciers are melting and chilling the water. It’s just more undeniable proof that global warming has been making the world cooler since surfing was invented.

commieBob
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 20, 2018 2:53 pm

The temperature of the water isn’t precisely the most important thing.

… the equator-to-pole temperature difference is the primary energy source of the extratropical storm tracks … link

The warmer the arctic, the less likely the hurricanes. I’m assuming any meteorologist knows that. I’m not so sure about climate scientists.

Reply to  commieBob
August 20, 2018 4:38 pm

Well… weathet isn’t climate… /Sarc

Reply to  commieBob
August 20, 2018 7:30 pm

Who said anything about “extratropical storm tracks”? The article, as ridiculous as it is, is about *tropical* storm tracks…not extratropical. Besides, water temperature doe not impact the steering of the tropical storms, deep atmospheric wind flow does.

commieBob
Reply to  JKrob
August 20, 2018 9:56 pm

The article is about the possibility of hurricanes hitting the west coast. That’s not tropical. The tropics end near the tip of Baja California.

nobogey
Reply to  JKrob
August 21, 2018 9:17 am

Join the discussion…Mr. Gulf Stream would disagree with you…

McComber Boy
August 20, 2018 2:00 pm

Watch out!!! We might have a never before seen weather event! Just like the one in 1858. Face Palm!!!

kenji
Reply to  McComber Boy
August 20, 2018 3:02 pm

Huh? imagine that … “we don’t know what to expect from a potential CA hurricane” … because it would be so much “different” than Florida Hurricanes? Texas Hurricanes? Puerto Rico Hurricanes? Ohhhhhhhhhhh mammmmmmaaaaaaaaa … a “new” type of hurricane

John Harmsworth
Reply to  kenji
August 20, 2018 3:49 pm

I would expect a lot of wind and rain…but in a laid back kinda way and with fake boobs and lots of bleached blonde hair flying around!
What am I missing?
Oh yeah! It’ll be more intense and newsworthy than anywhere else in the world.

HotScot
Reply to  John Harmsworth
August 20, 2018 5:07 pm

John Harmsworth

does this mean the “fake boobs and lots of bleached blonde hair” will be moving to the east coast? 🙂

John Endicott
Reply to  HotScot
August 23, 2018 10:48 am

let’s hope not. We prefer real boobs on the east coast, as can be seen with the real boobs we elect to office. 😉

hunter
Reply to  kenji
August 21, 2018 4:55 am

It is well known that the hurricanes caused by human CO2 will spawn Sharknados!

John Endicott
Reply to  hunter
August 23, 2018 10:50 am

It’s worse than that, human CO2 also makes for more intense and more frequent Sharknados

MilwaukeeBob
Reply to  kenji
August 21, 2018 6:54 am

Yes, you probably do not know that all hurricanes that form in the Atlantic, Caribbean or the Gulf are conservative. This is true… They are open and their intent is obvious, although they do keep their path to their goal somewhat hidden. These “new” California hurricanes are elitist Socialist types that come in a bubble that appears benign, but they are ALL actually Category 7 and the destruction they leave behind is far greater. /Sarc

Robert W Turner
August 20, 2018 2:02 pm

Gotta have something to scare the simpletons when it looks pretty bleak for having any named Atlantic hurricanes any time soon, might as well resort to imagination and fantasy when your target is really special.

August 20, 2018 2:03 pm

Sometimes in the morning, the TV is on with the local news as background noise.

This morning, among this “background noise”, I heard the phrase, “climate change”, for the first time ever in a local news cast.

The infection, sadly, seems to be spreading.

kenji
Reply to  Robert Kernodle
August 20, 2018 3:05 pm

Here in N.CA … the local morning newscast Fox, Channel 2, KTVU … “climate change, global warming, sudden catastrophic climate change, extreme weather”, etc. are mentioned with EACH and EVERY block of news. Probably mentioned 30x in a 2hr newscast.

marque2
Reply to  kenji
August 20, 2018 3:17 pm

I pine for the ancient days of Elaine Corral and Dennis Richmond with Pat McCormick on the weather.

kenji
Reply to  marque2
August 20, 2018 3:21 pm

Laura Zimmerman … my 5th grade classmate

Carbon Bigfoot
August 20, 2018 2:04 pm

There is a special type of STUPID in news broadcasting these days.

beng135
Reply to  Carbon Bigfoot
August 21, 2018 6:08 am

Especially from Correspondent Jamie Yuccas, first cousin of a Joshua Tree. Yuck, yuck, yuck….

Richard Kiser
August 20, 2018 2:06 pm

I just happen to live in San Diego and watched this scare crap on CBS last night. No mention of water temperature in 1858. No mention of near identical water temperature in 1934. No mention of current water temperature below 20 feet. Pure and blatant lying by omission. I can’t believe they didn’t throw in the number of leopard sharks congregating in La Jolla right now and the very real possibility of a sharknado.

Red94ViperRT10
Reply to  Richard Kiser
August 26, 2018 7:23 pm

…and the number of pirates. That correlates… somewhere… somehow. Right? I mean like totally…

BillJ
August 20, 2018 2:10 pm

In two days the water temp dropped by almost 5°F at Scripps. The water gets very deep very quickly off the coast of San Diego so all it takes is a little upwelling (which is caused by weather) and the water temp drops quickly.

For a hurricane or tropical storm to hit SoCal it has to move quickly before the cooler water can rob it of energy. That’s the real key, it has to be moving north extremely quickly.

I think the last tropical system to cause serious problems in California was Kathleen in Sept 1976.

marque2
Reply to  BillJ
August 20, 2018 3:21 pm

You might have a point. Two weeks ago in Oceanside it was like bath water. This weekend at Pacific Beach it seemed relatively cold. I thought it had something to do with the La Jolla peninsula, but you could be right, extra upwelling.

John Harmsworth
Reply to  BillJ
August 20, 2018 3:55 pm

Is there any chance of a “negative hurricane”? Like where the vortex is inverted into the ocean. “Cause that could be the beginnings of one those sharknados !

Reply to  John Harmsworth
August 20, 2018 4:39 pm

+42… quantity squared!

ResourceGuy
August 20, 2018 2:12 pm

It’s the “Divide and Conquer the Minds” strategy.

kenji
Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 20, 2018 3:07 pm

The science is settled … journalists are; pro-socialist, pro-centralized government, anti-freedom, anti-capitalist, anti-human, anti-God.

Reply to  kenji
August 20, 2018 4:40 pm

You forgot dumber than bags of hammers… 😎

HotScot
Reply to  David Middleton
August 20, 2018 5:11 pm

David Middleton

I’ll have you know my hammers are exceedingly intelligent. Each one knows how to target my thumb with unerring accuracy.

Reply to  HotScot
August 20, 2018 5:23 pm

+42… ouches!

Ron Long
August 20, 2018 2:14 pm

That’s nothing, I just read on Breitbart.com that Stevie Wonder believes Global Climate Change caused Aretha Franklins cancer.

Craig from Oz
Reply to  Ron Long
August 20, 2018 7:50 pm

Nearly.

Stevie Wonder believes she died (partly) because people didn’t believe in Global Warming.

So if only we BELIEVED it was starting to get hotter Aretha would still be alive.

Which is sort of what you said, only stupider.

beng135
Reply to  Craig from Oz
August 21, 2018 6:12 am

Stevie should heed his own song — “If you believe in things you don’t understand, then you suffer”.

John Endicott
Reply to  Craig from Oz
August 23, 2018 10:53 am

So does that mean Aretha was really Tinkerbell?

ResourceGuy
August 20, 2018 2:15 pm

So a sizable earthquake is more likely.

kenji
Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 20, 2018 3:10 pm

As I commented above … the lateral forces of an earthquake on buildings are virtually identical to the lateral forces from high winds. The resisting elements of buildings are virtually identical. But we’re dealing with “journalist” grads here. Can’t expect them to know much about the real world … such as how building codes and Capitalist WEALTH makes California’s buildings so much safer that that of a shithole country such as Meheekko.

Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 20, 2018 4:07 pm

If a major earthquake struck, I GUARANTEE you that Climate Change would be blamed – the stupidity of the masses always combines with their superstitions so that everything is Climate Change, every storm, drought, hangnail and bunion is evidence of bad behavior of other tribes…

drednicolson
Reply to  Dave Stephens
August 20, 2018 4:18 pm

Climate change is the new witchcraft.

hunter
Reply to  drednicolson
August 21, 2018 4:59 am

indeed.

Tom
Reply to  Dave Stephens
August 21, 2018 2:36 am

…..And they cling desperately to their easy answers which they can believe while remaining terminally ignorant, especially about any of the hard natural sciences.
If “ignorant” is the word for having little or no real knowledge, what is the word that fits “knowing” a lot of stuff that’s not really true?

drednicolson
Reply to  Tom
August 21, 2018 6:21 pm

Mania.

We don’t like for ideas we’ve emotionally invested in to be contradicted or held up for scrutiny. Most of us get over it. For those who don’t, they’re pet ideas eventually become a mania, and a Jekyll-and-Hyde complex emerges. Cross an object of their mania, and they’ll go from more-or-less decent behavior to raving indignance so fast you’ll get whiplash. Think Don Quixote and knight errantry. Tell him the giants he sees on the hill are actually windmills at your peril.

ResourceGuy
August 20, 2018 2:22 pm

Things could be a lot worse—like being a Tesla supplier and trying to get paid.

Ken
Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 20, 2018 2:41 pm

If I could give you 500 plus votes, I would. Musk is one of the most effective rent seekers in the history of the US.

brians356
Reply to  Ken
August 20, 2018 3:13 pm

And now Tesla is “too big to fail” and would warrant a bail-out if She Who Would Be Queen were on the throne. Sobering?

drednicolson
Reply to  brians356
August 20, 2018 4:22 pm

That was likely his plan all along. But you know what they say about the best laid plans of mice and men.

MarkW
Reply to  drednicolson
August 21, 2018 9:55 am

Or musk and men?

Alan Kendall
Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 21, 2018 12:29 am

should have put my spectacles on sooner, I misread your post as
“Things could be a lot worse—like being a Tesla supplier and trying to get Laid.”
Made sense

Latitude
August 20, 2018 2:23 pm

Bryan A
Reply to  Latitude
August 20, 2018 9:53 pm

It’ll only be the last until SyFy makes Sharknado vs Pirhanahcane
Trust me, that one will really bite

drednicolson
Reply to  Bryan A
August 21, 2018 6:49 pm

With special guest stars, the Barracunami and Octocano.

John Endicott
Reply to  drednicolson
August 23, 2018 10:57 am

and cameos from Mansquito and Gatoroid. With a special Surprise appearance by Mega Shark forming the heart of a Mega Sharknado.

marque2
August 20, 2018 2:25 pm

It is a self fulfilling prophecy. Eventually San Diego will be hit by another low level hurricane, and whether it is this year next year or 30 years out, when it hits, it will be called “global warming” rather than natural random probability.

kenji
Reply to  marque2
August 20, 2018 3:11 pm

natural PREDICTABLE probability

Tom Abbott
August 20, 2018 2:35 pm

From the article: “Sounding the alarm, Yuccas continued: “However, there’s now the potential this rare event could strike the San Diego area again.” Scientist Art Miller, a researcher for the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, fretted: “It could happen, especially if the ocean temperatures continue to stay in this anomalously warm state.”

This anomalous warming of the ocean was caused by a persistent high-pressure system that was situated over California and the waters off its coast. This is what caused the unusually high ocean temperatures.

This high-pressure system has subsequently moved away from California and is no longer causing excessive heat over California.

So this anomalous warming is a temporary thing that might not be back for a while, so don’t get too excited about hurricanes off California.

taxed
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 20, 2018 3:18 pm

Yes these persistent high pressure patterns are also called “blocking highs”.
There is a very good reason for that, they block off any weather system from entering the area.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  taxed
August 20, 2018 6:59 pm

Yes, the high-pressure system blocks weather fronts from entering the high-pressure area. Instead, the fronts will travel up and over high-pressure systems and down the other side. That’s why we are getting lots of rain in the central U.S. where normally it is pretty dry about this time of year.

A persistent high-pressure system causes the heat to rise underneath it and prevents moisture from entering the area. Hot and dry is the result. The unknown factor is how long the high-pressure system will sit there in one place. The longer it sits there the hotter and drier the affected area will become.

Red94ViperRT10
Reply to  taxed
August 26, 2018 7:29 pm

…which will block any hurricanes. QED, problem solved.

John Harmsworth
Reply to  Tom Abbott
August 20, 2018 3:58 pm

You’re spoiling my fun! They’ve had so many fake emergencies they deserve had a real one.

August 20, 2018 2:47 pm

I heard the reoccurrence period for Sharknadoes has exponentially increased during these unprecedented temperatures.

J Mac
August 20, 2018 2:47 pm
kenji
Reply to  J Mac
August 20, 2018 3:12 pm

I expected this story to be a WATTSUPWITHTHAT headliner today …

John Harmsworth
Reply to  J Mac
August 20, 2018 4:00 pm

Ah yes! Stevie Wonder! Sees all! Tells all!
Wait a minute…

DeLoss McKnight
Reply to  J Mac
August 20, 2018 7:59 pm

Reminds me of a logic joke from college.
God is Love.
Love is Blind.
Stevie Wonder is Blind.
Therefore, God is Stevie Wonder.

August 20, 2018 2:49 pm

Not much to see there, let’s move onto something a bit more intimidating
https://www.ventusky.com/?p=20.9;-141.9;3&l=wind-10m
p.s. it is moving slowly away from the coast

kenji
Reply to  vukcevic
August 20, 2018 3:17 pm

Nice map! I see that if we could only install 250m tall wind towers in the Gulf of Alaska … we could supply ALL the cheap, clean, abundant, energy for the entire continental USA … we could refit all our DIRTY oil tankers with Elon Musk flammable battery packs and sail them (retrofit with sails) into SF Bay and plug an extension cord into the tankers. And if they spontaneously combust … it will be out in the bay … safely away from our homes

rbabcock
Reply to  vukcevic
August 20, 2018 6:27 pm

Another website with basically the same thing.. water temps off the SoCal coast have dropped back to relative normal https://www.windy.com/?namConus,temp,37.527,-116.642,6,m:eBjacQF

markl
August 20, 2018 2:52 pm

They will be unprecedented, totally unsustainable, become the new normal, and be on the wrong side of history. Did I miss anything?

brians356
Reply to  markl
August 20, 2018 3:16 pm

Yes, you missed “historic”, “biblical”, “game-changing”, and “represents a sea change”.

kenji
Reply to  markl
August 20, 2018 3:19 pm

yes … “EXTREME” (weather, hurricanes, damage, etc.). EXTREME !!!

oh … and …

“the children” “think of the chillllllldrennnn”

HotScot
Reply to  markl
August 20, 2018 5:22 pm

markl

You got “unprecedented”. There are no scarier terms than that in modern ‘climate science.’

Jack Miller
Reply to  HotScot
August 20, 2018 6:55 pm

You forgot “CATASTROPHIC”. I’m not sure which frightens me more

kenji
August 20, 2018 2:59 pm

Ironically … the seismic restraints mandated by rigorous CA building codes are equally as effective in resisting wind loading … such as in a hurricane or “hurricane-force winds”

Even though California has been battle-tested by fires, mud slides, and earthquakes, the widespread impact of a hurricane on lives and property is still unknown.

We already (mostly) know the impact, since it is quite similar to the lateral forces imposed by earthquakes. However, I wouldn’t expect ANYONE in the FAKE newsrooms to have such knowledge. Their BA in propaganda didn’t prepare them with such relevant information.

Tom Halla
Reply to  kenji
August 20, 2018 4:29 pm

Definitely. Withstanding any racking effect on frame construction would give protection against both quakes and wind. Once all the properly sized and nailed sheathing, and tie-downs are in place, the fact it was done to resist earthquakes does not mean that it will not also withstand high winds.

MarkW
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 21, 2018 10:00 am

The one big difference would be how strong are the tie downs that connect the roof to the walls. Hurricanes pull up on roofs with a lot of force. I don’t know if the lateral forces from an earthquake would be comparable.

GaryH845
August 20, 2018 3:02 pm

There is so much blatant ignorance/lies in these CBS reports that it’s difficult to know where to start. 1st of all, that large areas of the Atlantic turned colder this year is certainly not because of climate change – even more so, not because of man-made CC, which is what they are implying. This sudden cooling change in Atlantic SST is not because of the fact that there’s been less melting of snow and ice in Greenland or the Arctic for the past several years.

Baja. Most hurricanes which form off the West coast of Mexico make it past Baja – only they are generally on their normal track heading out to the NW, then turning more westerly. The small area of unusual SST off the SW coast of CA (weather north of there is colder than normal) has to do with current weather patterns; especially a pattern of more stationary high pressure ridges – which will be a steering force blocking a due northward path of the hurricanes, should the occasional one try to make a run this way.

Reply to  GaryH845
August 21, 2018 3:28 am

Thanks, GaryH845. It’s nice to hear a discussion that takes a wider view of the factors controlling the pattern.

Another thing that the CBS myopia failed to notice was that, besides the warm, +10 of normal degree water off San Diego there was a blob of cold, -10 degree of normal water off the SW tip of Baja California. A hurricane would likely weaken crossing that water.

It is interesting to try to figure out how that 1858 hurricane managed to survive all the way up to San Diego. If we are going to ready ourselves for worst-case-scenarios it seems wisest to study what actually occurred. The BS of CBS contains too much wild speculation.

I imagine the biggest problem would not be the wind, but rather ten inches of rain in six hours.

Mumbles McGuirck
Reply to  Caleb Shaw
August 21, 2018 5:32 am

Here is the original paper on the 1858 San Diego hurricane. Unfortunately, weather records back then were sparse and trying to understand the weather conditions to the south that allowed the storm to reach southern CA is beyond our ken.
https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/BAMS-85-11-1689
Sorry, but the AMS journals are pay-walled.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  GaryH845
August 21, 2018 11:38 am

“Baja. Most hurricanes which form off the West coast of Mexico make it past Baja – only they are generally on their normal track heading out to the NW, then turning more westerly. The small area of unusual SST off the SW coast of CA (weather north of there is colder than normal) has to do with current weather patterns; especially a pattern of more stationary high pressure ridges – which will be a steering force blocking a due northward path of the hurricanes, should the occasional one try to make a run this way.”

Very good point. The warm water caused by the stationary high-pressure system won’t be available to the hurricane because the high-pressure will block the hurricane from moving over the hot water.

brians356
August 20, 2018 3:05 pm

I doubt many will be frightened by the specter of a Pacific hurricane, even if they believe one will occur. Few SoCal folks can comprehend what a hurricane portends, never having experienced one. In fact, probably more people will be titillated than frightened by the prospect. Even in hurricane country, people who know better go outdoors to seek thrills in the teeth of the storm, and sometimes pay with their lives. (Thinking of the Kalifornia surfer culture.) Consider how many residents refuse to evacuate when so advised. Besides practical reasons to stay, many are proud and exhilarated to “ride it out”.

kenji
Reply to  brians356
August 20, 2018 3:26 pm

I seem to recall that in the seminal 1970’s book The Late Great State of CA … the gigantic, unprecedented Tsunami headed toward the CA Coast (which would inundate the entire Central Valley) … attracted millions of people to the coast to “wave watch” … and were summarily wiped out … as the gleeful writer described.

todal
August 20, 2018 3:08 pm

I’ve been to the beach twice in the past month. The water is amazing!! If this is global warming, sign me up. Also this highly likely is a rare event, however if hurricanes did become a normal thing, it would probably be a good thing because it’s very dry in the summer and the plants would probably appreciate a drink of water late in the summer.

GaryH845
August 20, 2018 3:10 pm

Eastern Pacific can be a very active region:

2009 Pacific Hurricane Season Animation [HD]

kenji
Reply to  GaryH845
August 20, 2018 3:27 pm

Last time I flew into Cabo … there was a Mexican volcano erupting … because of … global warming ?

hunter
Reply to  kenji
August 21, 2018 5:06 am

Of course. Volcanic eruptions are predicted to be worse and more frequent by human CO2.
Get with pthe program. 🙄

John Endicott
Reply to  hunter
August 23, 2018 11:06 am

It’s even worse and more frequent than we thought. human CO2 makes the use of the word “worse” and “more frequent” worse and more frequent.

Ed Zuiderwijk
August 20, 2018 3:10 pm

But even if a tropical storm would form over warm Pacific waters off the Californian coast and develop into a hurricane, the overwhelming odds are that it would move out into the ocean away from the west coast. That is what storms do which originate near the west coast of Africa. Over the last century no full-blown hurricane made landfall on that continent proper, as opposed to archipellagoes in the Atlantic.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_West_Africa_hurricanes

John Harmsworth
August 20, 2018 3:41 pm

Imagine how destructive those hurricanes must have been in the 30’s!
What do you mean there weren’t any?

Beachbum
Reply to  John Harmsworth
August 20, 2018 4:02 pm

As Johnnie Carson said: ” California has three seasons: fire, mud, and earthquakes”.

HotScot
Reply to  Beachbum
August 20, 2018 5:28 pm

Beachbum

Funny. It seems everyone ‘in the know’ understands climate change to within a fraction of a degree over the coming 100 years, but they can’t figure out where the next mudslide is coming from.

GaryH845
Reply to  Beachbum
August 21, 2018 3:52 pm

I remember that.

Tom in Florida
August 20, 2018 3:58 pm

79.5 F at depth would be the bare minimum temperature. Besides, they could use some rain in California and the desert Southwest.

Hey, at least they got the rotation of the fake storm in the correct direction this time.

Robert of Texas
August 20, 2018 4:17 pm

Sigh.

They want rain. All they ever complain about is how dry it is. Hurricanes BRING rain.

And yet still they complain? Do they not get it that this would end the drought?

(I do feel sorry for any intelligent/thoughtful people that live in California… They must feel under siege from all the SO-STUPID-IT-BURNS that surrounds them.)

Reply to  Robert of Texas
August 20, 2018 7:38 pm

The only issue with that is a fairly ‘wet’ tropical cyclone would bring alot of flooding, mudslides, etc. Like a major winter storm…without the snow.

drednicolson
Reply to  Robert of Texas
August 21, 2018 7:17 pm

A true drought ender is a long slow warm front rain that gives the water time to soak deep. Too much rain too quickly and the topsoil saturates, leaving the subsoil bone-dry and causing any further rain to run off it like a tarp. And if vegetation isn’t present or has been recently burned away, you have the threat of mudslides.

Pat Frank
August 20, 2018 4:39 pm

Relax folks, August is the Silly Season for news.

Late summer is when the bottom of the news barrel is typically reached, nothing important is happening anywhere, and man-bites-dog is the story of the day.

The only remarkable aspect to the current season is that the silliness evidently now extends right into the brains (/sarc) of news anchors.

Steve Lohr
August 20, 2018 6:22 pm

Many years of abalone diving(it’s cold) gives me sufficient information to conclude these people a past the dope smoking “tipping point”. I know, I know, I’m being unkind.

drednicolson
Reply to  Steve Lohr
August 21, 2018 7:34 pm

One toke over the line, sweet Cali!
One toke over the line.
Fake news makin’ at the TV station,
One toke over the line.
Waiting for your train to go home, sweet Jerry!
Hope the budget’s gonna be fine.
Fake news makin’ at the TV station,
One toke over the line.

(With apologies to Brewer and Shipley)

dodgy geezer
August 20, 2018 8:56 pm

… “That potentially increases the likelihood that a hurricane might …

Three deep in nested ‘ifs’ already….. That’s a Climate Change item….

Red94ViperRT10
Reply to  dodgy geezer
August 26, 2018 7:38 pm

Hey, maybe this can teach me something for my spreadsheets!

John F. Hultquist
August 20, 2018 9:11 pm

Maybe they confuse hurricanes with the “rivers” within the atmosphere, sometimes called the Pineapple Express. Unlike west coast hurricanes, the atmospheric rivers have strongly impacted California.
See: January 1862 ,/a>

August 20, 2018 9:58 pm

Warm water and large waves for surfing. Viva climate change!

https://binged.it/2vZG5YI

Tom
August 21, 2018 2:55 am

I think this one statement from above makes a very important point about the oceans absorbing more more heat than land: YUCCAS: “The National Weather Service has found even higher temperatures even in other parts of the Pacific. That’s because the ocean absorbs more heat than it does on the land.”
…..Two factors are at play to make that a true statement: Open water covers about 70% of the Earth’s surface and the albedo of open ocean water is about .05 or so while the average albedo of land is somewhere in the .3 to .4 range. See the table of sample albedo below.
…..But then bare land, such as desert, absorbs much less of the solar energy that reaches the surface but the energy that is absorbed is absorbed into a few mm that are near the surface where as the energy that’s absorbed by the oceans get distributed vertically for about 200 meters or so with the longest wave lengths being absorbed near the surface and the shorter, more energetic wave lengths penetrating much deeper into the water before the energy is fully absorbed. End result: The Sahara Desert has a much higher surface temperature in mid-afternoon even though the ocean is absorbing more energy per unit of surface area.

SampleSurface Typical
albedo
Fresh asphalt 0.04[4]
Open ocean 0.06[5]
Worn asphalt 0.12[4]
Conifer forest
(Summer) 0.08,[6] 0.09 to 0.15[7]
Deciduous trees 0.15 to 0.18[7]
Bare soil 0.17[8]
Green grass 0.25[8]
Desert sand 0.40[9]
New concrete 0.55[8]
Ocean ice 0.5–0.7[8]
Fresh snow 0.80–0.90[8]

hunter
Reply to  Tom
August 21, 2018 5:14 am

Read the CBS quote more carefully.
“….the ocean absorbs more heat than it does on on land”.
So the ocean absorbs more heat over the ocean than the ocean does over land….
Hilarious thoughtless deceitful badly edited crap.
I bet even The Grauniad editors would have caught that.

John M. Brown
August 21, 2018 4:45 am

I’m surprised that they don’t have hurricanes more often since they have Maxine Waters living there.

Reply to  John M. Brown
August 21, 2018 12:11 pm

Oh, did she cause the blob of warm water? :-o)

One thing alarmists like to take advantage of is rare events. So beware a hurricane type storm, called a cyclone IIRC because it was in the Pacific, trashed the OR and WA coast then did major damage in Victoria BC though diminished in strength when it got there. Early 1960s IIRC.

hunter
August 21, 2018 4:52 am

Apparently the climate obsessed are trying to practice the German version of “propaganda”, which involves applying the concept of changing the way people think.
For the purposes of the obsessed, this means making people dumber.

Richard Bell
August 21, 2018 8:17 am

https://www.weatherbell.com Check out Joe Bastardi and his post today for the real story !!!!!!!

Bob Denby
August 21, 2018 9:03 am

It’s sad that unqualified ‘talking heads’ are able to create such a ruckus (and stimulate so much ‘qualified’ response to their inanities). A better strategy would involve pointing out that the extent to which the talking heads are generally unqualified to separate truth from fiction — that is, the news (quasi-entertainment) reporting business needs to be exposed for what it is.

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