Live from Conference at UCAR, Boulder, CO

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I’m currently attending a conference at UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research) put together by Dr. Roger Pielke, and sponsored by the National Science Foundation titled: Detecting the Atmospheric Response to the Changing Face of the Earth: A Focus on Human-Caused Regional Climate Forcings, Land-Cover/Land-Use Change, and Data Monitoring. UCAR is in Boulder, tucked right up against the front range of the Colorado Rockies. It’s quite an interesting place.

You can view the conference agenda here

About 50 climate science professionals are attending, Dr. Pielke invited me to make a presentation.

I’ll be presenting my preliminary results of station quality analysis for the 27% of the USHCN stations surveyed thus far by surfacestations.org volunteers in my presentation tomorrow. Depending on how that s received I’ll then decide whether or not to release that data publicly on this blog and other outlets, or to wait for the station surveys to be more complete. I’m really looking forward to getting feedback on this project so that I can identify weaknesses, and improve the final result. Having 50 climate scientists critique my work will be a very good test.

I have Internet connectivity in the conference room, and I’m blogging this entry from there. I’ll keep you updated. So far, some very interesting papers on land use as it relates to climate have been presented.

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4 thoughts on “Live from Conference at UCAR, Boulder, CO

  1. Good Luck, Anthony.
    Remember, if you get nervous just picture everyone in the audience in their underwear…

  2. Anthony, You have been preparing for this for some time, you will do great as the facts support your position. Please keep us posted on the results.

  3. Anthony, as one of the volunteers, I’d like to see the early results, but given the political extremes everything gets taken too, it would be wisest to keep the public release more qualitative than quantitative at this point. Otherwise, it is likely you will be diverted correcting misunderstandings – unintentional and deliberate – that come from it. 27% of the sites are too few to rely on, especially with big chunks of the midwest missing.

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