Canada pulls the plug on the U.S. Keystone Pipeline – will send oil to Asia

Approves Asia Supply Route, Ignores US Route

H/T Eric Worrall and Breitbart – Obama’s inability to make a decision on Keystone has finally yielded a result – Canada has made the decision for him.

Breitbart reports Canada has just approved the Enbridge Northern Gateway Project – a major pipeline to ship Canadian oil to Asia.

The Canadian oil will still be burnt – in Asia, instead of America.

All the jobs and energy security which Canadian oil could have delivered to America, will instead be delivered to Asia.

Rather than purchasing crude from a friendly and allied neighbor, the United States will most likely need to continue its reliance upon hostile sources like Venezuela. Energy analysts had hoped that construction of Keystone could have replaced almost half of the current U.S. daily crude purchases from that volatile, anti-American dictatorship, depriving Venezuela of the resources it relies upon to stay in power and fund its Cuban allies.

You can’t say Canada didn’t give America a chance – they waited years for the American administration to come to their senses. But in the end, they couldn’t wait any longer, and have put the interests of Canadians first.

Below is a helpful timeline of Keystone events, courtesy of Al Jazeera.

http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/the-stream/multimedia/2013/multimedia/2013/12/a-history-of-keystonetimeline.html

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233 Responses to Canada pulls the plug on the U.S. Keystone Pipeline – will send oil to Asia

  1. Ashby says:

    What a waste. Hard to think of a better trading partner than Canada.

  2. policycritic says:

    Wo. There goes the price of gas here. Canada was selling us their oil for below the global rate.

  3. MrX says:

    This is what Obama wanted anyhow. He’s anti-colonial. He’s against the notion that any country, especially the US, should have power over others. So the US will keep siphoning money to those countries.

  4. David Davidovics says:

    It will be an uphill battle to get that pipeline through BC so I have my doubts that this will happen anytime soon.

  5. Jesse G. says:

    Will Obama ever make a decision that actually makes sense? It doesn’t seem likely. It will be a miracle if the US survives this community organizer who thought he could be president.

  6. Bob Diaz says:

    Thanks Obama, I sure our people didn’t need jobs! :-((

  7. Robert in Calgary says:

    …yes, but the usual whiners are out to hold up Gateway via Native land claims and approvals

    And there’s American money funding them.

    Federal Liberal and NDP leaders have promised to kill Gateway.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/industry-news/energy-and-resources/northern-gateway-decision/article19180594/

  8. As a Canadian I’m both happy that Northern Gateway was approved but sad that Obama purposely delayed Keystone to no end. They are both very separate projects though, both have been in the pipeline (pun intended) for many years. I’ve heard nothing about Keystone being dead…it never had anything to do with Northern Gateway.

  9. LewSkannen says:

    I victory for stupidity, inefficiency and anti-Westernism.
    Well done obama.

  10. lee says:

    Won’t make Buffet happy. With those oil carrying Rail tankers of his.

  11. cnxtim says:

    The “Little o” does it one more time

  12. lorne50 says:

    As a cunuck I’m sorry but suck it USA you should have to pay world price for all your oil from us and after we sell to the east you will have too . Good thing you stoped the pipeline now you will have to pay use frostbacks world price for our oil and gas not 1/2 price tank you obummer ;>)

  13. lorne50 says:

    poop spelling sucked
    lol

  14. James in Perth says:

    Well done, President Obama! I’m glad we can at least claim to take moral high road on ‘carbon pollution’. It’s the only consideration that really mattered (to you). After all, jobs in America only create more carbon pollution. Soon enough we can all be sitting at home watching the grass grow while twiddling our thumbs. The lucky ones will have no-show, no-work government jobs. God bless America!

  15. Boydo3 N. Albany says:

    The oil was never going to be used here anyway. We are already sending away our own fracking juice. Fine with me. Petrol prices remain the domain of the oil mafia.

  16. nc says:

    The Canadian government approved Gateway, they did not cancel keystone. Keystone will go ahead as soon as Obama man’s up and grows some stones.

  17. Mac the Knife says:

    Our Dear Leader continues the path outlined by Cloward and Piven: Weaken the USA by every method and means available. Then overwhelm it with every crises you can manufacture. Expand the welfare state… and then invite all of central and south america to come to the US to enjoy ‘the socialist democrat benefits’, no questions asked.

    Think of it as ‘wealth redistribution’, the Obama way…..

  18. stuartlynne says:

    It will definitely be an uphill battle to get North Gateway actually built.

    But at least one (or two or three) of Kinder Morgan (double the existing pipeline), the reversal of the Enbridge pipeline going East, one of the other proposals to build a pipeline to the coast and build an oil refinery….

    And of course every where and any where there are a pair of steel rails oil will flow in ever increasing amounts.

    For Keystone Enbridge is on record saying they will just use rail to get south of the border and then hook back into pipelines there.

    What won’t happen is leaving the oil in the ground.

  19. Lee Leeman says:

    Oil is in demand. If China gets it from Canada, it will be produced and transported in as environmentally sound a fashion as can be done. If Northern Gateway is not built, China will be in touch with its friend Vladimir Putin, and tell him it needs crude. Putin will say ‘SURE!!’ and eventually will drill the Arctic seabed in order to supply. Now THAT is an environmental nightmare remeniscent of the BP blowout in the Gulf but in the frozen Arctic with no resources at hand.

    Stalling or cancelling on Keystone is, of course, extreme posturing. Much of the damn pipeline is already or almost in place, and will eventually start carrying oil. O needs to suck on the environmental left FIRST to secure the next election for his party and friends. In fact, there is the Northern Gateway project, but there is also another pipeline in process to the west coast as well. Kinder Morgan operates an existing pipeline from Alberta to Vancouver and is in the process of jumping through the environmental hoops to triple its capacity.

    It is, however, very true that much American money is being funnelled into the Canadian arms of Sierra Club, WWF, Greenpeace ..etc.. to fund activities to block both pipelines plus Keystone. This has been documented by Canadian journalist Vivian Krause ( read about it on her website [.http://fairquestions.typepad.com/rethink_campaigns/%5D. It wont be an easy fight for either side and the green strategy is to stall the approvals and construction until the next Canadian federal election (October, 2015). If the old Liberal party gets in, you’ll see the pipelines complete but a few years down the road after they have sucked in the Green vote.

  20. Jim says:

    As an American working and living in China, this reenforces my belief that you would have to be mental to hire Americans and build a business in the US these days. The only exceptions are in some service industries/ positions, bare-bones management, and industries tied to massive political rents (accounting, law, auditing, clean tech, finance, insurance, and whathaveyou). And this is coming from an extremely patriotic, involved citizen.

    The US is my country, but that monstrosity isn’t my government. Three cheers for Canadian crude. This is good news for our 200 Chinese workers and their families.

  21. crosspatch says:

    I have never in my life been so dissatisfied with a US President. It is one thing to disagree on policy but I see this President as going out of his way to do things to hurt this country. And this isn’t being done in a vacuum, either.

  22. revanche00 says:

    It isn’t just Canadian oil affected. Ninety percent of Bakken oil will move by train in 2014 for lack of pipelines.. Yep, that’s ten 100 car unit trains rolling through small town America each day. After what happened in Quebec, how is this safer than a brand new, state of the art pipeline built to the highest standards in history?

  23. Mike McMillan says:

    You take a guy from Indonesia with no experience, no accomplishments, and average intelligence and put him in the White House, then you expect leadership?

    Time to give Biden a chance.

  24. Rob says:

    Absolutely disgusting.

  25. ConfusedPhoton says:

    The Greens will only be happy when they have driven the economy back into medieval times.
    Presumably the mass starvation, huge increase in disease and freezing to death of people, is a price worth paying to “save the planet”!

  26. Lars P. says:

    There was this interesting post at Zero Hedge not long ago:
    “Meet The Man Who Killed Keystone”
    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-16/guest-post-meet-man-who-killed-keystone
    “One man stands in her way. No, not President Obama, but the billionaire environmentalist Thomas Steyer. The leftwing Steyer undoubtedly is sincere in his green beliefs but sincerity on an issue is easier if you also stand to make a fortune from it.”
    Is the “Enbridge Northern Gateway Project ” not the TransMountain expansion mentioned there? Just curious…

  27. Otter (ClimateOtter on Twitter) says:

    Oh!Bummer! for the LOSE!

  28. JamesNV says:

    Northern Gateway is just a bargaining chip. The wacky-west-coast-greens will be able to see the Keystone deal as a small victory (if the Enbridge thing doesn’t happen), and the threat of the Enbridge pipeline should help convince Americans that there is no benefit to saying ‘no’ to Keystone.

  29. Olaf Koenders says:

    Haha.. love it!

    Wouldn’t surprise me if Tony Abbott suggested it in passing. In any case, Canada jot got fed up with Obama’s head up his own unscientific chocolate starfish.

  30. Londo says:

    What would you expect from the Keystone President? He had to f..k this one up. America is next.

  31. X Anonymous says:

    From what I can gather from the original source, the US Keystone pipeline is still a very real possibility, so I think this post is misleading (especially if you consider the economic competiveness of each proposal). I remember a similar tactic used by mining companies in Australia, saying that if taxes were too high, they’d move to Canada. Of course, if you actually look at the numbers, the Canadian option was a drop in the ocean compared to reality (about 10 fold in production). Same case here probably.
    XL Door still wide open for Obama….or the next president.

  32. pat says:

    speaking of Asia, read this and weep:

    29 June: UK Daily Mail: David Rose: BBC spends £500k to ask 33,000 Asians 5,000 miles from UK what they think of climate change: Corporation savaged for ‘astonishing’ campaign survey on global warming
    BBC under fire after spending hundreds of thousands on survey in Asia
    Taxpayers’ money used to ask 33,000 people their views on climate change
    More than £500,000 spent by little-known BBC Media Action for survey
    It was immediately condemned yesterday as a flagrant abuse of the Corporation’s rules on impartiality and ‘a spectacular waste of money’ by a top academic expert.
    Every year, BBC Media Action gets £22.2 million from the taxpayer via the Foreign Office and Department for International Development…
    The report ends with advice, apparently written for climate activists: ‘Do not talk about scientific or technical abstractions. Talk about the problems they face in their daily lives… Speak in language that makes sense to people in terms of how they experience climate change.’…
    BBC Media Action has a £40 million annual budget, and the proportion not funded by the taxpayer is paid by the European Union, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the US government…
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2673654/BBC-spends-500k-ask-33-000-Asians-5-000-miles-UK-think-climate-change-Corporation-savaged-astonishing-campaign-survey-global-warming.html

  33. Rhys Jaggar says:

    Does this increase the risks of the US invading any oil-rich dictatorships before 2016??

  34. richard verney says:

    pat says:
    June 29, 2014 at 1:28 am
    //////////
    O/T but Sunday morning is always a good time for some BBC bashing.

    I do not understand why the ‘forced’ payment of the licence fee is not a human rights issue. Surely it is a basic human right to be able to watch TV (and also thereby be informed as to what is going on in the world) without being forced to donate to a particular political sect (Champagne drinking Leftwing/Liberal/Guardianista sect) which may hold and espouse polictical views and dogma at odds, or even offensive, to the individual.

    The BBC should be scrambled and if people want to watch it, they pay a licence fee for the decoding card. All other free to air channels will be available for those who do not wish to pay the BBC subscription which supports the left wing/liberal/guardianista view of the world and seeks to indoctrinate people into their way of thinking.

  35. son of mulder says:

    I bet Russia is not happy about this.

  36. Hmmm.. this could be a debilitating problem for our countries future. Only time will tell if this procrastination from Obama will doom us or help us.

  37. peter says:

    I expect that approval for Keystone might be given after next years elections. I would be very surprised if there is a shovel in the ground on Gateway before then. There are times when I wish our Government would copy India, and look at all the foreign money that is being pumped into our country to restrict development, with an eye of pursuing criminal charges.

    The west/east pipeline will likely be in operation long before that.

    In the seventies we built a pipeline to carry oil-sand oil to the east coast. When OPEC crashed the prices, the flow was reversed and it was used to carry cheaper mid-east oil from tankers to the west. Approval has been given for it to reverse flow once again and after a certain amount of refurbishment, to start carrying oil to the east again.

    Many Canadian’s wish they’d build a proper refinery in Alberta itself, instead of just shipping our raw natural resources out of the country to have value added via refining. Problem is, they’d still be stuck shipping all those finished products to markets thousands of miles away.

  38. TBear says:

    Unbelievable stupidity of Obama. Is he really intent on destroying the USA?

  39. Brian says:

    Not so fast:
    1. Keystone XL is still a desired option and is ready to begin if the Americans make up their mind. The Northern Gateway is just a separate means of selling oil to other customers. The approval of Northern Gateway does not preclude Keystone XL.
    2. If the Liberal Party of Canada form the next government in next years federal election, Liberal leader Justin Trudeau has promised to scrap the Northern Gateway Pipeline….although he then said that he approved of selling oil to Asia, but didn’t say how it was to get there. Was Justin playing politics to gain the support of the voters that opposed Northern Gateway or was he being his usual obtuse self?

    One can expect that millions of dollars from Middle Eastern and Russian official sources will continue to be invested in the propaganda of various Environmental groups (such as the The Tides Foundation) that oppose the Oil Sands, Northern Gateway and Keystone XL.

    Has there been an article or two posted here about the foreign investment in the Environmental lobby to undermine the economies of North America?

  40. commieBob says:

    nc says:
    June 28, 2014 at 11:38 pm

    The Canadian government approved Gateway, they did not cancel keystone. Keystone will go ahead as soon as Obama man’s up and grows some stones.

    I would bet that, if any pipeline is built at all, it will be Keystone.

  41. William McClenney says:

    Feeling better yet McKibben et al.? These bitumens will be burned. What does it matter to the Canadians if a chunk of it gets burned on the way to Asia et al.?

    The stupid, it hurts……………

  42. Tom in Florida says:

    Mike McMillan says:
    June 29, 2014 at 12:21 am
    “You take a guy from Indonesia with no experience, no accomplishments, and average intelligence and put him in the White House, then you expect leadership?
    Time to give Biden a chance.”
    ———————————————————————————————————————-
    It has been history that President’s always tote along a VP that appears to be worse then themselves, a little extra insurance against opponents who might consider removing a sitting President (one way or the other). However, in this case perhaps you are right.

  43. Eric Worrall says:

    A few commenters have suggested the Canadian decision is not the end of Keystone. I maintain it very likely is – my evidence is the following quote from the original source referenced by Breitbart:-

    http://bigstory.ap.org/article/canada-oks-oil-pipeline-pacific-coast

    … Meanwhile, China’s growing economy is hungry for Canadian oil. Chinese state-owned companies have invested more than $40 billion in Canadian energy in the past few years.

    “They are watching this very, very closely,” said Wenran Jiang, an energy expert and special adviser to Alberta’s Department of Energy.

    “They told us as recently as a couple of weeks ago that further investment will depend on whether there will be at least opportunities to ship some of this crude to China. Currently all of their investment and production goes into the U.S. They are currently living with that,” he said. …

    If this expert opinion is correct, the Canadian decision must be seen in the context of being part of a larger commitment to allow Chinese companies more ownership and control over Canadian oilfields.

    Whoever owns the oilfields controls where the oil goes, and so far, China is the key investor. If Keystone had been built, America might have had more incentive to invest, but once the Enbridge project is completed, the Chinese owners of the Canadian oilfields will have no reason to ship oil to America, regardless of whether a Keystone pipeline is eventually constructed – China will consume all the oil Canada can produce, and pay top dollar for it.

    There might still be a window of opportunity for America to get in on the action, but that window is closing fast.

  44. Igor Karlić says:

    Let the man finish his job. If you have food stamps the one and only logical step forward are gas stamps.

  45. CodeTech says:

    Eric, it’s really not that simple. The plan always was for Keystone AND the Gateway to be built. We have a LOT of petroleum in Alberta – something like 3.5 to 4 Trillion barrels. The current estimate of oil recoverable economically using today’s tech is 180 billion barrels, which is a 4900 YEAR supply at current extraction, 500 year at the planned rate.

    Pretty surprising numbers for the “peak oil” crowd, many that I talk to simply can’t wrap their heads around the numbers and think they’re somehow fabricated. The numbers are real.

    Keystone or it’s successor WILL eventually be built, the moment the democrats are kicked to the curb.

    China’s 40 billion, while a gigantic number, is still just the proverbial drop in the ocean compared to the real money going into the Sands. There are a lot of people here complaining that China is getting too big a piece of the action, but I hardly think so.

    Also, Alberta is currently going through somewhat of a government crisis, when it was revealed that the currently In-Power “Progressive Conservatives” have completely ignored the second word and are calling themselves the first. We recently hounded our Premier right out of office and they already had one incident of completely screwing up the oil industry by demanding “fair share” on royalties.

  46. ddpalmer says:

    “depriving Venezuela of the resources it relies upon to stay in power and fund its Cuban allies”

    Well not really. The oil marketplace is global and obviously Asia wants to buy more oil. If Keystone had gone to the US then the US would buy more Canadian oil and less Venezuelan oil while Asia would have bought more Venezuelan oil and less Canadian. Without Keystone the US buys more Venezuelan oil and less Canadian while Asia buys more Canadian and less Venezuelan. Either way both Canadian and Venezuela sell about the same amount of oil.

    Now I know it is not quite that simple. Shipping costs and trade agreements and tariffs and such change the simple economic model I described. So with Keystone Venezuela may have made less profit and the US may have paid less for the oil from Canada versus oil from Venezuela. But with or without Keystone I don’t believe Venezuela would see a significant change in their oil revenue.

  47. Eric Worrall says:

    CodeTech
    Eric, it’s really not that simple. The plan always was for Keystone AND the Gateway to be built. … Keystone or it’s successor WILL eventually be built, the moment the democrats are kicked to the curb. …

    Why? Imagine Gateway is complete, and Canada is shipping all the oil it can to China. The only economic incentive to build keystone would be if the Chinese market was saturated – if America was prepared to pay so much more for oil than China was already paying, it made economic sense to do so.

    Its much easier to expand the capacity of an existing pipeline, than to build a new one.

  48. SAMURAI says:

    Obama seems to go out of his way to destroy the US economy…

    This pipeline would have helped keep energy prices down and the pipeline would have created many thousands of jobs..

    I can’t believe America elected Obama Bin Lyin’…TWICE!!

  49. dipchip says:

    If the latest new record Ice Anomaly (2.07 million sq km, 27 June) in the SH is any indication of things to come; perhaps freezing in the dark in Wash D C or Chicago will be a common annual event. Colder temperatures will require more energy and support higher prices.

  50. Maureen Matthew says:

    Actually Canada hasn’t pulled the plug because Keystone is a private project, any government involvement has to do with approvals which have been done. The private company might abandon it but I doubt that.

    Gateway has also been approved by the federal government but there is the need to get First Nations on side. Opponents think that First Nations will stay on side with them but once real money is on the table First nations will become supporters of Gateway

  51. TAG says:

    There is no guarantee that the Northern Gateway pipeline will be built. it has gained approval with conditions from the Canadian Federal government. However the pipeline takes oil from Alberta to a port in British Columbia. The BC government has not yet given its approval and is demanding much higher compensation than Alberta wants to give. as well, there is a legal obligation to “consult” with the First Nations (aboriginals) along teh path. The duty to consult came from a Supreme Court ruling but as yet no one knows just what the duty to consult really means. So any decision on this is, with any sense of reality, going back to the courts for litigation.

  52. John W. Garrett says:

    Mr. Watts,
    I am a big fan but you need to proceed carefully with this. While the Canadian government recently approved the Northern Gateway pipeline, I see no reports or evidence that TransCanada has abandoned its plan to complete construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.

    http://transcanada.com/
    http://search1.bloomberg.com/search/?content_type=all&page=1&q=transcanada%20keystone%20xl

    Respectfully yours,
    JWG

  53. TAG says:

    Part of the NAFTA agreement is that Canada is compelled to “share” its oil and other resources with the US. So in the case of an oil shortage, Canada is compelled to ship oil to the US.

    I’ve hear many right and left wing Americans whine about NAFTA. Actually it is a pretty good deal for the US. Canada got access to US markets by becoming absolutely economically dependent on it.

  54. TAG says:

    The reality of the Keystone pipelines is that it is connecting stranded oil in the US with world markets. Previously teh price for North American oil was lower than the world Brent price because it was difficult to for North American oil to be shipped to world markets. With Keystone that problem is solved and the North American price will converge with the world price. That is why the southern portion of Keystone has been approved.

    The problem with the northern portion of Keystone is that it will bring in Canadian oil to compete with US oil in US markets. That is the real source of the opposition to it.

  55. Eric Worrall says:

    TAG
    Part of the NAFTA agreement is that Canada is compelled to “share” its oil and other resources with the US. So in the case of an oil shortage, Canada is compelled to ship oil to the US.

    I’ve hear many right and left wing Americans whine about NAFTA. Actually it is a pretty good deal for the US. Canada got access to US markets by becoming absolutely economically dependent on it.

    If exporting oil to China rises in importance, NAFTA may seem like less of a priority. Don’t forget, Canada pulled out of Kyoto when Kyoto became inconvenient – when Kyoto got in the way of exploiting the tar sands. If China becomes the more important trading partner, then agreements with America may be set aside.

    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2011/12/12/kyoto-in-the-past-for-canada/

  56. emsnews says:

    The Keystone pipeline was NOT for US consumption. It was to take oil to the Gulf which is still polluted from the offshore explosion a few years ago…refine the oil and then ship the contents to Europe! This is all part of the ‘isolate Russia’ scam.

  57. Jim James says:

    And the price of gasoline at the pumps at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave remain at 0.00 and 00/10!

  58. rogerknights says:

    JamesNV says:
    June 29, 2014 at 1:13 am

    Northern Gateway is just a bargaining chip. The wacky-west-coast-greens will be able to see the Keystone deal as a small victory (if the Enbridge thing doesn’t happen), and the threat of the Enbridge pipeline should help convince Americans that there is no benefit to saying ‘no’ to Keystone.

    I think so too.

    ddpalmer says:
    June 29, 2014 at 4:24 am
    “depriving Venezuela of the resources it relies upon to stay in power and fund its Cuban allies”

    Well not really. The oil marketplace is global and obviously Asia wants to buy more oil. If Keystone had gone to the US then the US would buy more Canadian oil and less Venezuelan oil while Asia would have bought more Venezuelan oil and less Canadian. Without Keystone the US buys more Venezuelan oil and less Canadian while Asia buys more Canadian and less Venezuelan. Either way both Canadian and Venezuela sell about the same amount of oil.

    Now I know it is not quite that simple. Shipping costs and trade agreements and tariffs and such change the simple economic model I described. So with Keystone Venezuela may have made less profit and the US may have paid less for the oil from Canada versus oil from Venezuela. But with or without Keystone I don’t believe Venezuela would see a significant change in their oil revenue.

    No, because both Venezuelan & Canadian tar sands oil are “heavy” (viscous) crude that only the refineries in Louisiana can handle. It helps that they’re in a hot climate, too.

  59. Kevin Kane says:

    I doubt the Enbridge pipeline to the west coast will ever be built. If it is completed, it will be under another company’s project. Keystone will probably be done under another President. The most sensible pipeline project for Canada is Energy East. Feed light oil to Canadian refineries and some heavy oil for export from the east coast.

  60. ralfellis says:

    Hey, wake up. Hussain Obama is not working for the Americans, he is working for the East. Only a Sunni would bow before the Sunni King.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CseUglupmZk

    Why do you think Hussain Obama wants to arm the Sunni rebels with $500 million of US arms? — arms that will trickle into the hands of the Sunni ISIS rebels.

    R

  61. mrmethane says:

    Yeah, but first, we have to reverse the years of bribes paid to “First Nations” groups along the proposed pipeline route, by the green money laundering machine, AKA Greenpeace, Suzuki, Moore, Hewlett, Packard, Tides et al.

  62. ralfellis says:

    The really bad thing about this decision, is that Hussain Obama has reduced American energy security by a large margin. If there is a war in the Middle East (likely) or people’s revolt in the north of S America (possible), you need as many energy routes and sources as possible, to keep the lights on.

    What Hussain Obama has ensured, is that when ISIS moves into southern Iraq and then Iran, and the whole region goes up in flames, that there will be petrol rationing and economic stagnation across the entire USA.

    R

  63. mrmethane says:

    I also remember the dramatic cessation of anti-logging activity by the well-organized rowdy left, when Canada’s McMillan Bloedel forestry company was acquired by Weyerhauser, from the USA. Instantly, they all went home. Once the USA get their guaranteed access to Canadian supply, the Asian supply route will be dead.

  64. rogerknights says:

    PS: Probably I should have said that that “only the refineries in Louisiana can handle ECONOMICALLY.”

  65. JohnWho says:

    Mike McMillan says:

    June 29, 2014 at 12:21 am

    You take a guy from Indonesia with no experience, no accomplishments, and average intelligence and put him in the White House, then you expect leadership?

    Time to give Biden a chance.

    Whoa! Not so fast.

    Remember, it was the “guy from Indonesia with no experience, no accomplishments, and average intelligence” who choose Biden for the job.

  66. Jeremy says:

    No surprises that the US currently has 41 lawyers graduating per 1 engineer!

    A society totally gridlocked & obsessed by legal red tape and obstruction.

    A society that has almost totally forgotten its roots and what once made it great.

    China can’t wait to fill your shoes .Greece welcomes you to the club.

  67. Eric Worrall says:

    I think some Americans are being seriously complacent about what the tar sands means to Canada.

    Regarding difficulties building the Enbridge Gateway Project, as CodeTech said, there are 3.5 to 4 trillion barrels of oil on the table. At $100 / barrel, thats around $350,000,000,000,000 – $400,000,000,000,000 worth of oil.

    Even if the profit per barrel is only $10, thats still a minimum of $35,000,000,000,000 on the table.

    If you had to pay $1 billion dollars each to 1000 people who got in the way of the project, to convince them withdraw their objections, that would still leave $34,000,000,000,000 (at the $10 / barrel profit margin – more if the profit margin is higher).

    If all the profit (at $10 / barrel) from the tar sands was evenly distributed, amongst each of the 35 million people who live in Canada, thats just under one million dollars, for each and every Canadian – so several million dollars for a household with kids.

    Nobody is going to prevent Enbridge from being built, if Canada is determined to build it.

    As for Canada’s relationship with the USA – I think there is a lot of complacency on America’s part. Canada is feeling deeply disappointed, and probably offended, at America standing in the way of the greatest windfall they’ve ever had the opportunity to land. Harper said so – they have waited years, when they could have been building hospitals, schools, pensions, Swiss bank accounts, whatever.

    If China offers every Canadian alive today the opportunity to be a millionaire, why should they give a f*ck what America wants?

  68. MattN says:

    I’m sure that was his plan the whole time. Stall, make Canada decide and they look like the bad guy. Can’t blame Canada one bit. They have a resource they want to sell. Somebody will buy it.

  69. Mac the Knife says:
    June 28, 2014 at 11:44 pm

    Think of it as ‘wealth redistribution’, the Obama way…..
    ——————–

    I think of it as, ….. the Obama way … for the Muslim Islamic fanatics to defeat and destroy the Western world infidels without “firing a shot”.
    ===========

    TBear says:
    June 29, 2014 at 3:31 am

    Unbelievable stupidity of Obama. Is he really intent on destroying the USA?
    ———————-

    “Yes”, he is.

    His claim to “Fundamentally change America” is his one (1) and only pre-Election promise that he is intent on and committed to insuring that it happens.

  70. Col Mosby says:

    Now the question becomes : will the bilionaire moron who promised the Dems $100M if the Keystone was not built now pay up? Regardless, he, along with those he bribed (the Dem party) are going to catch flack from both sides. Let’s see what the Dems who have to stand for re- election do – will they try to sell this turn of events as a good thing or turn on Obama? Or perhaps somehow blame the Canadians? Decisions, decisions. My guess, Obama will continue his Pollyanna technique and his fellow Dems will have to back him up.

  71. hunter says:

    Feckless. Unfaithful. Disloyal. Deceitful. Irresolute. Immature. Extremist. Failure. Self-Absorbed. Corrupt. Out of touch. So many ways to describe our President.

  72. Scarface says:

    King Abdullah will be so proud. Obama finally achieves what he promised, when bowing to him.

  73. Nigel Harris says:

    I’d strongly question the interpretation of this news.

    First, there is ample supply potential in Alberta to fill both a pipeline to the west coast and another pipeline south across the USA. They’re also talking about a pipeline east across Canada to the Atlantic coast. It’s not an either-or issue. All of these pipelines could potentially be built and filled with oil.

    Second, Keystone XL is not all about supplying the USA with more crude oil. It’s at least partly about finding another export route for Canadian crude oil via the US gulf coast ports. US crude generally can’t be legally exported (other than within NAFTA), but Canadian crude can.

    Third, the USA is not short of crude oil at the moment. In the areas that would be reached by Keystone XL, there is the opposite problem. A huge glut of crude has depressed prices at the key Cushing OK market since 2010. After massive efforts to find ways to transport the excess to somewhere it can be refined, by reversing existing pipelines, converting gas pipelines to oil pipelines, building new pipelines and putting oil on rail, the industry has succeeded in moving some of the glut away from the midcontinent and down to the Gulf Coast. But even there, refiners are struggling to use it all, and there is serious speculation in the international trading community that the USA may start to allow some exports of unrefined material.

    The USA is now making more gasoline than it can consume itself, and has become a net exporter in the past few years – an astonishing turn around for European refiners who have seen the USA as a reliable buyer of their excess production for decades. So even if Canada’s crude does head to China, it won’t make a jot of difference to the US supply of gasoline, or the price at the pumps.

  74. Robert in Calgary says:

    Once again, they’re Oil Sands.

  75. The oil will move by train.

    “Shipments of oil by rail from Western Canada are expected to more than triple in the next two years, as the sector heads into a severe shortage of pipeline capacity by next year, according to a new forecast by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.

    Oil transportation by rail is expected to jump to about 700,000 barrels per day by 2016 from 200,000 bpd in late 2013″

    http://business.financialpost.com/2014/06/09/canadas-oil-industry-cuts-long-term-production-growth-forecast-to-4-8m-bpd/?__lsa=ce2a-e189

  76. Reblogged this on gottadobetterthanthis and commented:
    Another one of the President’s policies that we’d be better off had it failed. Gasoline prices will go up for this.

  77. Robert in Calgary says:

    Between 2015 and 2025, (11 construction seasons) I expect all four projects to be completed.

    The big caveat from the Canadian side – a change in Federal government.

    Trans Mountain expansion
    http://www.transmountain.com/

    Energy East to Quebec and New Brunswick
    http://www.transcanada.com/energy-east-pipeline.html

    Northern Gateway – in some form
    http://www.gatewayfacts.ca/

    And finishing the Keystone XL.
    Need a new President, ideally Republican.
    http://keystone-xl.com/

  78. Robert of Ottawa says:

    Again, it’s “oil sands”. Nature’s largest oil spill on the planet that Canadians are cleaning up.

  79. policycritic says:

    Lee Leeman says:
    June 28, 2014 at 11:49 pm

    It is, however, very true that much American money is being funnelled into the Canadian arms of Sierra Club, WWF, Greenpeace ..etc.. to fund activities to block both pipelines plus Keystone. This has been documented by Canadian journalist Vivian Krause ( read about it on her website [.http://fairquestions.typepad.com/rethink_campaigns/%5D.

    Vivian Krause is excellent. She’s a single mother and researcher who works out of her kitchen in Vancouver, a former UN employee and environmentalist. Everybody in B.C. is an environmentalist; they’re born that way, it’s God’s country. But she’s a killer when it comes to reading the fine print on tax returns and in grants. She is the one who uncovered that Bill McKibben’s 350.org was funded by the Rockefellers to the tune of $10 million from inception through its various organizations, and forced him to own up to part of it on his website.

    Canadians on this board will appreciate this local Vancouver interview. American charities are attempting to get 40% of Canada’s wilderness areas declared off limits to Canadian development; ‘natch the areas are where Canada’s greatest resources are located. The question is why?

  80. Rud Istvan says:

    Upthread posters have once again confused resource (oil in place) with technically recoverable reserves (how much can be gotten out at any price using any known method). The Athabascan TRR is about 280 Bbbl according to CAPP. Of that about 100 is presently economic to recover with Brent at about $110/bbl. That number has to be further downgraded by about 10% because not all the bitumen can be upgraded into syncrude. And that fact is why this ‘oil’ will always sell for less than WTI or Brent. WTI is ‘medium heavy’, Brent is ‘light’ crude. Without the added cost of hydro treatment (using hydrogen reformed from natural gas), bitumen isn’t even technically crude oil. It’s asphalt.

  81. SCheesman says:

    At this point the odds of the Northern Gateway project being completed are probably less than Keystone. Barely seen (if at all) in this entire thread is the fact the Gateway project would pass through a fairly large number of aboriginal lands, whose peoples’ rights to consultation and accommodation have just been boosted by an important decision of the Supreme Court of Canada:

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/globe-politics-insider/ruling-should-remind-ottawa-of-unfinished-business-with-first-nations/article19362935/#dashboard/follows/

    From media reports, the opposition in Canada to the Northern Gateway is far more visceral and deeply felt than what has been seen towards Keystone by Green or Democratic forces in the U.S. Look for dangerous blockades and armed standoffs if the Canadian government attempts to push this through. The Harper government knows this, and deliberately downplayed the decision to approve.

  82. ferdberple says:

    good thing the US is moving to stop using its vast reserves of coal. this will surely help the oil industry deal with the glut of oil. far be it for me to suggest that reducing prices might be a solution to oversupply. much better to get rid of the competition.

  83. Posted one week ago at:
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/06/22/weekly-climate-and-energy-news-roundup-138/#comment-1667423

    RE item 3. above:
    Canadian Government Approves Enbridge’s Northern Gateway Pipeline

    Project to Transport Oil-Sands Output From Alberta to Pacific Coast
    By Paul Viera and Chester Dawson, WSJ, Jun 17, 2014
    http://online.wsj.com/articles/canada-government-approves-enbridges-northern-gateway-pipeline-1403041104

    A good decision, although for oil tankers I still prefer the port of Prince Rupert to Kitimat. Look at the two locations and routes-to-the-sea on Google Map and I think you will agree.

    Canada will be able to export our crude oil via the Atlantic and the Pacific and we will receive world price.
    ____________

    Meanwhile, Iraq is coming unglued and Iran is its best friend – and both countries have Shia majorities.

    Keystone XL pipeline, anyone? Barack? Anyone?
    ____________

    George Carlin explained much of the nonsense we see today, when he said:
    “You know how stupid the average person is, right?
    Well half of them are dumber than that.”

    Best regards to all, Allan

  84. EW3 says:

    TBear says:
    June 29, 2014 at 3:31 am
    Unbelievable stupidity of Obama. Is he really intent on destroying the USA?

    Yes. Remember these people do not like the USA.
    Remember that his wife said that (on him getting the nomination) it was the first time she was proud of this country. Guess she wasn’t aware of the moon landings etc….

  85. ferdberple says:

    canada needs to take a lesson from india. NGO’s like tides canada are largely US funded entities that use green policies to hurt the canadian economy to the benefit of their US backers. the end result is US investors get to buy up canadian assets at fire sale prices, using profits from inflated US prices due to restricted competition from canadian suppliers. the mac blo takeover showed how it could be done.

    foreign backed NGO’s are engaged in economic treason within canada and should be dealt with by the full force of the law. as we used to say, hangings too good for them.

  86. TomRude says:

    First the US think that the oil sands are theirs. It is in their controlled zone of influence, so far managed by Canada, a blip on their militray radar. The US does not need this oil yet so goes the KXL pipe. As for Northern Gateway, US Foundations are playing hard ball agitating the greens, buying off natives in order to make it so difficult almost impossible to build and sell oil to THE enemy, China.
    US is simply controlling the resource; the rest is window dressing to let Canadians believe they rule their land…

  87. Coach Springer says:

    The fact that environmentalists will eventually block the Gateway project using courts, NIMBY, scare tactics and self-righteous condemnation doesn’t mean that Obama hasn’t blown it both economically and environmentally. Let the oil trains and the off shore drillings in Cuba begin.

  88. Monroe says:

    American and Canadian environmental groups give paola to individual native leaders in Canada. The politically passive majority on the Rez never sees a penny. That could explain how the good economic benifits from resourse developement on native land is passed over time after time again. It will be intereasting to see how this plays out now that BC indians have title to all land outside the rez as opposed to the requirment before of developers and government to only “consult” . That desion came down on thursday. BC natives have claimed 140% of BC.
    Yikes.

  89. policycritic says:

    Robert of Ottawa says:
    June 29, 2014 at 7:29 am
    Again, it’s “oil sands”. Nature’s largest oil spill on the planet that Canadians are cleaning up.

    Exactly. Mother Nature’s Oil Spill. No different than what BP did to the beaches of Florida, only massively bigger.

    To see before-and-after pictures of Alberta’s land reclamation laws in effect; http://www.earthmagazine.org/article/reclaiming-albertas-oil-sands-mines

    Some of the oil companies have to stay, contractually, at least 15 years after a ‘mine’ is exhausted (meaning all the oil is extracted by steam from the charcoal-colored sand) to ensure that the land reclamation plan they drew up and that was approved by the Province before they started is completed properly. Under penally of fine and possible jail.

  90. pwl says:

    As a Canadian and someone who lives in BC I’m all for the pipeline coming through BC. Bring it on! It makes economic sense to keep the abundant resources of The Great White North flowing to those that want to buy it.

  91. nc says:

    Allan M.R. MacRae on June 29, 2014 at 7:50 am

    Allan I live near that area and having an oil pipeline from Terrace to Prince Rupert would be a disaster in waiting because of the topography. This is a steep mountainous area which is prone to slides with a major river. Have a look.

    There is a natural gas pipeline running down this valley and has been damaged numerous times by slides.

    The Douglas channel out of Kitimat has had heavy shipping for decade’s with no incidents that I can find.

    The channels navigation aides are being upgraded along with real-time traffic control. The tankers double hulled, inspected, two pilots and escorted by two tugs, one tethered.

  92. Obama bin Kenya says:

    Government control from the cradle-to-grave and air we breathe

  93. policycritic says:

    Rud Istvan says:
    June 29, 2014 at 7:38 am

    Why are the reserves growing?
    http://statshb.capp.ca/SHB/Sheet.asp?SectionID=2&SheetID=318

    Incidentally, don’t they have to dilute the bitumen to put it in pipelines; hence: dilbit?

  94. brent says:

    The official numbers for Alberta’s petroleum endowment are lined below

    ST98: Alberta’s Energy Reserves & Supply/Demand Outlook
    http://www.aer.ca/data-and-publications/statistical-reports/st98

    From page 19 of the 2014 ST98 report
    Table 1: Reserves, Resources and Production Summary
    For crude Bitumen (Billion Barrels)

    Initial in-place resources 1845
    Initial Established reserves 177
    Cumulative Production 9.6
    Remaining Est Reserves 167
    Annual Production 0.761

    Ultimate Potential
    (Recoverable) 315

  95. Lance says:

    Northern Gateway will not happen for many many years. Liberal’s and NDP have stated they will can it, and the Natives in Canada just won a Supreme Court of Canada ruling basically giving the say whether anything happens on their land, and they will say no. Keystone will be built long before Northern Gateway.

  96. hunter says:

    emsnews and the other ignorati pretending that Keystone would not have benefited the American market are not only uninformed, they insult those whom they try to persuade by assuming they are as stupid.
    America is being damaged, in a long term manner, by someone whose world views were shaped by reactionary hatred of the American culture and our national interests and a complete ignorance of how science and industry works.

  97. C.M. Carmichael says:

    The ongoing confusion at all levels between oil and tar is amazing, walk out to your car, open your hood and pull out the dipstick, the stuff that drips off is oil, the driveway it falls on is tar (asphalt=tar plus sand and gravel). If you can not tell your dipstick from your driveway, you should refrain from pointing it out to others. Tar is a man made byproduct of coal and oil processing, once all the lighter distillates are gone, no one would put up with northern Alberta’s brutal winters or fly infested summers to get tar.

  98. Corey S. says:

    It’s not a done deal yet.

    “Environmentalists and Canada’s native tribes could delay approval all the way to the Supreme Court, and the tribes still hold title to some of the land the pipeline would cross. That means the government will have to move with extreme sensitivity.

    Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs Grand Chief Stewart Phillip said aboriginal people will blockade any attempt by Enbridge to start work.”
    http://bigstory.ap.org/article/canada-oks-oil-pipeline-pacific-coast

    It could be just as bad up north as it is here. Maybe more so because of the native tribes. Time will tell.

  99. Dennis Cox says:

    Doesn’t change a thing. News flash boys and girls; the damned oil is already flowing, and being transported by rail. And since those tank cars are all brand spankin’ shiny and new, we can expect that any pipeline construction, Gateway or Keystone, will be delayed until these tank cars are worn out, or have been in service long enough to have produced a decent return on some filthy stinkin’ rich guy’s investment.

  100. Doug says:

    To get that oil to Asia, it will have to go in tankers. All the pipeline fear mongers ought to think about that……hmm I remember more oil spills from tankers than pipelines.

  101. Shawn from High River says:

    Keystone is not dead.
    We are still working on land titles and crossings right up to the U.S. border.
    Obama may just be stalling until the next election

  102. Joe Sixpack says:

    CodeTech, 180 Billion barrels recoverable is about 5.5 years of total global consumption. brent, 315 recoverable is less that 10 years of global consumption. Canada is good for now but it’s only temporary.

  103. Ursa Felidae says:

    Please, Oh Canada, do not let obama win this one. We need each other for the long term. Help us defeat obama the destroyer.

  104. brent says:

    John Hofmeister was President of Shell until a few years ago when he retired
    Prior to retirement he was on a 50 city tour communicating his message(what i would call a charm tour)
    Here’s one of his presentations and it’s worthwhile to scrutinize carefully.
    (I have another of his presentations downloaded. It was at City Club of Cleveland on Aug 25, 2006 however it’s no longer archived at CCC website)

    View From the Top: Shell Oil President John Hofmeister
    This entry was posted on Wednesday, June 27th, 2007 at 11:52 am
    http://www.podtech.net/home/3452/view-from-the-top-shell-oil-president-john-hofmeister

    Carefully note his comments from about 3-8 minutes.
    Per John, we are past the tipping point of easy available affordable energy. He says conventional easy oil has peaked.
    He then goes on to say don’t worry , be happy we’ve got, deep water, we’ve got A Trillion Bbls of kerogen In Colorado alone. He says we’ve got A Trillion Bbls of Bitumen in Alberta oil sands. Another Trillion Bbls Orinoco in Venezuela.

    I’m an old downstreamer, a supply and refining guy. I’m not unfriendly to the industry. However I’m also not prepared to be an ostrich. Throwing out these wild number without telling the audience what they represent gives me a severe case of heartburn.
    So when Hofmeister talks about a Trillion Bbls in Alberta oilsands, that’s more than 3 times the official number of 315 Billion Bbls for ultimate Potential recoverable.

    Shell has of course abandoned yet again their efforts wrt Colorado kerogen, so that Trillion Bbls he talks about still seems rather elusive : )

    At about 14 Min into speech he said Shell abandoned Silicon based photovoltaic because they concluded they couldn’t get more energy out than energy in .
    In the case of silicon phototvoltaic I believe the primary energy input is electrical (I stand to be corrected) as is the output . This makes a nice clean comparison.

    However he sure didn’t disclose the energy balance for their oil shale (kerogen) efforts :)

    He also comes out strongly for mandatory government imposed CO2 limits :)
    Says time for voluntary efforts is past

    Enjoy

    P.S. also discusses coal gasification (Shell has their own gasification technology) and CO2 sequestration

    PPS.. This speech was slightly before the latest panacea (tight oil) was officially proclaimed.

  105. Ian H says:

    Well if the story is from Breitbart it must be true. I remember their awesome reporting of Paul Krugman going bankrupt and their great investigation into Friends of Hamas. I would put the credibility of Breitbart right up there with The Onion and The Daily Currant.

    I like WattsUpWithThat but referencing Breitbart? We criticize alarmists for being gullible, let’s not join them.

  106. Steve Oregon says:

    Right when the US is on the precipice of energy independence the extreme left has waged a climate war on CO2 to block it from happening.

    Obama is leading the insane push to prevent the very Energy Independence that we have been told why the US Dept of Energy has existed and spent billions over decades.
    The impact of this ultimate madness will pale all other wrong turns by magnitudes with even government being needlessly hobbled with unnecessarily higher energy and fuel prices.

    Imagine what a boom this country would be in, or approaching, if the climate fraud were not infecting every potential with festering sores of dysfunction.

  107. CodeTech, 180 Billion barrels recoverable is about 5.5 years of total global consumption. brent, 315 recoverable is less than 10 years of global consumption. Canada is good for now but it’s only temporary.

  108. Monroe says:

    Taking oil by rail, good. Tanker trucking, good. Just remember the new right given to natives in BC also include oceans. All they have to do to prove title is to have canoed on it at some point in time before europeans came.

  109. Richard says:

    Keystone is not dead by any means. A republican win in the next election could lead to approval and construction in a heart beat. Northern gateway faces too many hurtles ie natives etc. meanwhile look for vast increases in train transport and it’s inherent problems.

  110. Robbespierre says:

    I am very disappointed. I think this and the apparent self-destruction of the United States in general goes way beyond Obama however. He is just a puppet.

  111. Chuck Nolan says:

    Nigel Harris says:
    June 29, 2014 at 7:03 am
    I’d strongly question the interpretation of this news…Second, Keystone XL is not all about supplying the USA with more crude oil. It’s at least partly about finding another export route for Canadian crude oil via the US gulf coast ports. US crude generally can’t be legally exported (other than within NAFTA), but Canadian crude can.
    ————————————————————–
    Does that mean the oil Buffet’s trains are hauling is currently being exported from the Gulf Coast?
    cn

  112. brent says:

    Pipeline preferable, but still could consider Rail to Prince Rupert and export from there

    CN Rail floats idea of shipping Alberta bitumen to Prince Rupert: documents
    CN Rail, at the urging of Chinese-owned Nexen Inc., is considering shipping Alberta bitumen to Prince Rupert, B.C., by rail in quantities matching the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline, documents show.
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/cn-rail-floats-idea-of-shipping-alberta-bitumen-to-prince-rupert/article14456470/

  113. ferdberple says:

    in the category of “hanging is too good for them – unless it is by the nuts”
    First Nations chief received $55,000 from Tides Foundation …
    http://www.torontosun.com/2014/01/17/first-nations-chief-received-55000-from-tides-foundation
    Jan 18, 2014 – A left-wing lobby group in San Francisco wired $55,000 to the bank account of an Indian chief in Northern Alberta, paying him to oppose the oilsands.

    And sure enough, that chief – Allan Adam, from the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation – earned his money. Last weekend, he flew to Toronto to sit on a stage next to Neil Young, the folk singer who was in town to demonize Canada’s oil industry.

    Now, $55,000 might sound like a lot of money to pay, just to rent a politician for a day if all the chief did for his money was to appear on stage in Toronto beside Neil Young. But to the Tides Foundation, it’s well worth it. Think of Adam as an actor, hired to play a part in an elaborate theatrical production.

    Neil Young had his role: he’s the American celebrity who can draw crowds of fawning Baby Boomer journalists. But at the end of the day, he’s just another millionaire celebrity. When he talks about the oilsands, he quickly reveals himself as a low-information know-nothing.

    Adam brings what Young can’t: authenticity. Young likes to wear an Indian-style leather vest, but Adam really is an Indian, and he really lives near the oilsands.

    Adam didn’t do a lot of talking in Toronto. He was more of a prop than an actor. See, the Tides Foundation is from San Francisco. And Neil Young lives on a 1,500-acre estate near San Francisco. Without Adam, this would have just been some California millionaires coming up here to boss Canadians around. That’s why they had to hire Adam, to aboriginalize their attack on Canada. It was political sleight of hand, to distract from the fact that this was a foreign assault on Canadian jobs.

    Tides could have hired an actual actor, like maybe Lorne Cardinal, who played the Aboriginal policeman in the comedy series Corner Gas. But they didn’t hire an actor. They hired an elected public official. That’s the problem.

    Adam’s official title is “chief.” But it’s not a religious or cultural title. Under the Indian Act, that’s just the legal title given to the elected mayor of an Indian Band.

    The Tides Foundation put $55,000 into the bank account of a mayor to get him to take a particular political position. Depending on what Tides was getting the Chief to do, the payment might well have been a bribe. But we won’t know, because no one is talking about the $55,000 payment.

    How is it acceptable that a foreign lobby group can simply deposit cash into a bank account of a Canadian politician? Who else is being paid cash to oppose the oilsands?

  114. Rebel says:

    Honestly I’m surprised Canada waited as long as they did. Too bad they can’t hold out until 2016 because I’m pretty sure as soon as a Conservative steps into that office the Pipeline would be approved. This administration is killing America. We can’t afford gas. We we’re so close to cutting our costs. I don’t know if this country can survive this administration and if we do it’s going to take decades to get back on our feet…and God forbid if a Democrat wins 2016…America might as well just split and go it’s separate ways while we still have a chance – let the liberals sink their sections.

  115. Gamecock says:

    “Obama’s inability to make a decision on Keystone has finally yielded a result – Canada has made the decision for him.”

    Inability to make a decision?!?! Obama made the decision in January 2012.

  116. Tom J says:

    Well folks (‘he’ uses that word too, but ‘he’ uses it in the ‘they’ sense, not the ‘we’ sense). It’s only a wee bit over 4 months away. Time to give ‘em a “shellacking.” Let’s see someone other than Reid as Senate majority leader. Meet your House reps at the Townhalls and get ‘em prepared for a career change. Get that tar heated up and pluck those feathers.

  117. Reblogged this on Public Secrets and commented:
    This makes me so mad, I could chew nails. Tens of thousands of good jobs lost, a needed economic boost from cheap oil thrown away. Heckuva job, Greens.

  118. ferdberple says:

    how to make money yankee style:
    1. short coal stocks
    2. buy US oil and gas stocks
    3. bankroll legislation to end use of coal for US power generation
    4. fund opposition to development of canadian oil, forcing down canadian dollar
    5. use resulting US shortages to force up price of US oil and gas
    6. use profits to buy canadian oil stocks at fire sale prices
    7. defund groups opposing canadian oil development
    8. sell canadian oil to US and pocket a fortune

  119. genomega1 says:

    Reblogged this on News You May Have Missed and commented:
    Canada pulls the plug on the U.S. Keystone Pipeline – will send oil to Asia

  120. Betapug says:

    Keystone will likely eventually be built because, as Warren Buffett says, “I just believe it’s a useful pipeline.” He would give it approval even though his Burlington Northern and Union Tank car are now profiting from rail transport of tar sands crude.

    In the same MSNBC interview he notes the killing he had made in disaster insurance.
    “I love apocalyptic predictions” on climate change, Buffett told CNBC on Monday, because they probably do affect rates.”
    “The public has the impression that because there’s been so much talk about climate that events of the last 10 years from an insured standpoint and climate have been unusual,” he continued. “The answer is they haven’t.”
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/101460458

    Seems like the archetype of the (mythical?) honest, practical Midwesterner. Too bad he is not president.

  121. nc says: June 29, 2014 at 8:38 am

    Thank you for your comments.

    Good to hear about Kitimat’s shipping safety record.

    In my previous career, I specialized in detecting, preventing and managing large slope failures.

    I would expect that I could help design a pipeline system which would, once properly buried, experience NO slope failures that would impact its continued operation,

    However, this discussion is academic – Kitimat is the chosen destination.

  122. Robert Doyle says:

    Winners & Losers
    Trans Canada corporation was funding XL.
    Enbridge owns the “Alberta Clipper”. It has been in place and pipes oil from the tar sands into the U.S. Type Alberta Clipper Map into your favorite browser. Then you can better appreciate the political, eco-green, get votes, marketing hype of hate XL.

  123. albertalad says:

    See a lot of gloom and doom in reference to the British Columbia recent treaty in reference to Enbridge. First, this treaty is not even close to the pipeline route. Two, the majority of Canada has treaties and have for 100 plus years. Here in Fort McMurray we are very familiar with treaty natives and have agreements in place – for instance our workforce has agreements that natives to supply 10% of the workforce in the sands. We also build community schools, community halls, and so on. In essence all business needs to know is surety. In other words, who do we negotiate with. Which means this British Columbia treaty only make the process easier as opposed to before where the ownership of said land was in limbo.

    Next – we produce OIL from bitumen. NOT TAR! I know that is extremely difficult for illiterates and watermelons to grasp.

    Oil – yes, we have enough production to do the Canada east/west route, and the Keystone when it eventually gets approval. And it will.

    The US – here in Alberta there is a sense of deep disappointment and quite anger at this US government. For the first time since 1812-1814 we are treated as enemies of this administration. NOT the American people, the US government. Not only the Keystone is in jeopardy, but also a realization that Canada itself must chart a new course for itself in the world. Consequently, the billions involved with the F-35 fighter jet purchase is also in severe question in this country. We are now looking to Europe and beyond – and I for one am pushing for European fighter jet purchase, along with other military purchases costing US jobs and billion of dollars lost. Moreover, we are clamping down on any fresh water, and we have 20% of the world’s fresh water in this nation. Canada is no longer the little buddy next door – the Keystone saga finally woke us up to our own possibilities as a nation. As anyone here knows nations have no friends – we only have interests. Indeed, this has been quite the learning experience for Canada as a whole.

  124. Scott Basinger says:

    I have friends who work at TCPL. Keystone hasn’t been cancelled yet, this article is simply wrong. Keystone is largely in place already with assets already in laydown yards and engineering pretty much completed. All that has to be done is the ‘ok’ being given by the US State Department and the final leg can start field construction.

    All this being said, Obama has fundamentally damaged Canada / US relations with all his jerking around on the subject. This project is of key importance to Canada economically and Obama has clearly demonstrated that the US will screw Canada over at a political whim, essentially over nothing, since the US State Department report said clearly that it wouldn’t have a significant impact on carbon emissions. This has led to an increasing Canadian strategic alignment with China, who doesn’t seem to be playing such stupid games; including moves to increase trade between the two countries.

    It’s sad, really, what the US is doing to Canada at this point. But it’s ok, karma’s a real bitch.

    This will end up costing the US dearly in the long run.

    Say there’s a massive conflict in the middle east and oil supplies get tight (like that could _ever_ happen…), I can see a scenario Canada will simply keep its supply contracts with China and turn down the taps to the US.

  125. RobRoy says:

    Ferd, Neil Young is a Canadian and “a Southern man don’t need him around anyhow.”

  126. kramer says:

    Anthony, I’m pretty sure that the bulk of that oil was already earmarked for China.

  127. MarkG says:

    “After what happened in Quebec, how is this safer than a brand new, state of the art pipeline built to the highest standards in history?”

    But that’s what the ‘Greens’ want. A few oil train crashes burning down towns, and they’ll be shouting in the media about how dangerous oil trains are and how they must be banned.

    The left’s standard policy for the last century has been to create problems and then exploit them to push their true agenda. This is no different. The last thing they want is safe oil transport.

  128. Arno Arrak says:

    This is what you get when your government is hostage to special interest groups. In this case, radical, anti-science global warming advocates. They are anti-science because they will not listen to scientific arguments against their dogma. They are anti-science because they suppress any scientific research that promises to expose their errors. They are anti-science because they have seized control of scientific societies and forced them to regurgitate their dogma as science against the wishes of the membership. They are anti-science because they have taken control of scientific publishing and thereby have stopped papers they consider hostile to their cause from being published. And they are totally opposed to our national interest in energy security by forcing Obama to stop the Keystone pipeline from being built. I predict they will also attempt to stop the other Canadian pipeline the same way. That would be interference in the internal affairs of a friendly nation and should be stopped by U.S. authorities before international incidents start. Private interest groups have no place in international affairs. Greenpeace was doing similar interference in India and got stopped by Indian authorities. We and the Canadians should also stop any further interference by warmist groups in our joint interest in energy security. The insanity of these groups derives from their religious belief that burning fossil fuels will cause the world to overheat, oceans to boil, and life to perish, as the fake “scientist” Hansen who lied about discovering the greenhouse effect in 1988 has put it.

  129. empiresentry says:

    Boydo3 N. Albany says: June 28, 2014 at 11:22 pm
    The oil was never going to be used here anyway. We are already sending away our own fracking juice. Fine with me. Petrol prices remain the domain of the oil mafia.

    Wake up. Oil exports from the US are banned and have been so for 40 years. Two (2) permits were allowed a week ago.
    The Canadian oil was coming to us at half the price. The Middle East terrorist cartels and OPEC does not rule all the oil prices.

  130. BillinCA says:

    It’s just sicking, that’s all I can say.

    This administration just let a perfectly good opportunity go to waste just to play to it’s liberal base while sticking it’s finger in the eye of America’s public and best interest. What was gain from it? absolutely nothing, The oil will be burnt anyways.

  131. David Ball says:

    I would like to add 2 points to this discussion.

    Firstly, Harper warned a long time ago that if America didn’t want our product, we would sell it elsewhere. Anyone paying attention is aware of this.
    Secondly, there are oil sands in Saskatchewan that rival or are greater than the Alberta deposit. That, coupled with the Bakken deposit, there is a lot of oil here.

    Obama can go ahead and spend vast amounts of money stopping ISIS to preserve the flow of blood oil, or he can get cheaper, safer, non-conflict oil from Canada. Seems like a no brainer.

    I won’t say what I think of the current US administration. But it is quaint that the mentally handicapped can reach such lofty positions of power in America.

  132. Gregory says:

    This was a filibuster, exactly what the Obama administration was hoping for.

  133. Gregory says:

    David Ball, why would Obama spend money trying to stop ISIS when he had them trained?

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2014/06/20/the-u-s-trained-terrorist-group-isis-in-2012/

  134. David Ball says:

    Sorry to the American people, but I think if we are to sell our oil to you now, it should be at world prices. The bargain oil has left the station. It pains me to say that.
    I used to look up to you, America, until you put your “big brother” in charge.

  135. David Ball says:

    Gregory says:
    June 29, 2014 at 12:17 pm

    History repeats itself once again. Sad that we don’t learn from previous mistakes.

  136. Gunga Din says:

    (Im)plausible deniablility.
    It was Canada’s fault!

  137. Gunga Din says:

    Scott Basinger says:
    June 29, 2014 at 11:35 am

    All this being said, Obama has fundamentally damaged Canada / US relations with all his jerking around on the subject.

    ========================================================================
    Hopefully Obummer’s enablers will be ejected next election.
    (I’ve nothing against Canada. I kinda like gravy with my fries. Tastes like mashed potatoes and gravy.)

  138. chuck says:

    Robert of Ottawa says:
    June 29, 2014 at 7:29 am

    ” Again, it’s “oil sands”. Nature’s largest oil spill on the planet that Canadians are cleaning up.”
    ..
    ..
    Technically the Orinoco Belt deposit is larger than the Athabasca oil sands.

  139. milodonharlani says:

    Gregory says:
    June 29, 2014 at 12:17 pm

    VT is an anti-Israel site.

    The US didn’t train ISIS. We defeated its antecedent al-Qaeda in Mesopotamia & killed its leader. We did however release its current leader & other officers from captivity in 2009. And our client Saudi Arabia is backing them as a foil against Iranian influence, which support may come back to bite them.

  140. Gary Pearse says:

    David Davidovics says:
    June 28, 2014 at 10:31 pm

    “It will be an uphill battle to get that pipeline through BC so I have my doubts that this will happen anytime soon.”

    lf Harper remains in power to make the decision, it will be done, although I agree its a battle. He has chopped the environmental assessment timelines in half and passed legislation that fast tracks them. The Liberals and NDP (both social-ists, now) would cancel it in a heartbeat because this would conform to UN A21 and eurosocial-ist ‘principles’. China, the real socia-list in the room, will brush the gnats out of the way with their trading power: no oil? then stuff your potash and iron ore.

  141. Richard says:

    “The Canadian oil will still be burnt – in Asia, instead of America.”

    Yes, exactly as Obama wants. Truthfully, he cares nothing carbon dioxide “pollution”. The whole global warming issue is his means of screwing up energy delivery to people of this country. Based on his actions, he cares nothing for this country or its people.

    He promised to fundamentally change America, and that is the only promise he is fulfilling. By skyrocketing debt, alienating friendly nations, emboldening unfriendly nations, allowing Iran to become nuclear, opening borders, making a mess of health care insurance, having his guard dogs at the EPA make rules that will eventually cause a radical increase energy prices, banning drilling offshore and in some two million western acres, etc, etc, etc, this country will be not be the America in which we grew up.

  142. milodonharlani says:

    Richard says:
    June 29, 2014 at 12:46 pm

    Impoverishing America & bringing it down several notches so that it’s a pale imitation of the ill begotten spawn of France, Sweden, Cuba & Venezuela, creating whole new victim classes dependent upon government while trading in its current electorate for a new one does indeed appear to be the administration’s goal.

  143. brent says:

    @David Ball says

    “Secondly, there are oil sands in Saskatchewan that rival or are greater than the Alberta deposit. That, coupled with the Bakken deposit, there is a lot of oil here. ”

    Please quantify and substantiate the above

    If you listen to the Hofmeister link I posted above at about 16 min, he says

    “lots and lots is a political science term. You may know them differently as technologists” :: ))

    Best Regards
    brent

  144. Steve R says:

    The solution for Keystone XL is easy. Built the pipeline on both sides of the border to within about 60 feet. Then unload the pipeline onto a railcar straddling the border which sits on a single section of rail. Reload the pipeline on the southern end and continue the journey to the GOM. replace the section of rail once the president has left office.

    Also, I think from some of the comments that people are mixing up Enbridge’s planned “Northern Gateway” project with Kinder Morgan’s “Trans-Mountain” expansion.

  145. Jimbo says:

    Canada pulls the plug on the U.S. Keystone Pipeline – will send oil to Asia

    This is one of the easiest predictions I have ever made. You don’t need to be an Einstein to know what was going to happen. Even without Asia there are many, many countries who want and need oil.

  146. realisttheorist says:

    This does not mean they’ve pulled the plug on Keystone XL. Also, this is just one step in a long process. Now it is the turn of people in Canada, e.g. some of the “native” “nations” to object. The people in the town planned as the port are already objecting. Many more years to go. Meanwhile, if Keystone gets approved in another 4-5 years, it may be the preferable option once again.

  147. Martin Katchen says:

    Keystone’s biggest problem right now appears to be Nebraska, which has to provide a route for the pipeline but has no oilfields of its own along that route. Nebraska gets the risk of spills but gets nothing in return. Far better to build along the route of existing pipelines from Montana to Colorado and expand those popelines. A pipeline there not only accesses the Bakken Field but the Niobrara and Wattenberg oilfields (also being developed via frakking) and then into the Texas popeline network via the Andarko and Permian Basins. It looks to me like Trans-Canada had a tin ear when it came to US politics. They looked at the US map and all they saw was a belt of Red or near-Red states across the Great Plains and Colorado and Montana tending “purple”. And they didn’t want to work with any other pipeline company. Now they are having to work with another pipeline company to get some oil across Illinois and Missouri to Cushing OK and the Colorado plains are tending so “red” that their elected officials explored leaving Coloardo and creating their own state. The most the Greens can muster in Colorado is support for letting communities like Longmont and Ft. Collins say no to frakking under their cities. Colorado is NOT saying no to the Wattenberg Field.
    And there is another alternative to Northern Gateway if the First Nations keep blocking it. A railway has been proposed from Alberta to Alaska. If British Columbia proves totally uncooperative, it (or a pipeline or both) can be built north from Hay River to Norman Wells thence over the Canol Route into the Yukon before crossing the border either past Dawson or backtracking a bit to the Tanana Valley. Thence to the Alaska Pipeline and the underutilized Port of Valdez to Asia. The Yukon and Northwest Territory First Nations are far fewer and far less “Green” than British Columbia First Nations.
    And then there are even more alternatives: A trans-Canada Pipeline to Nova Scotia. A pipeline to Churchill, Manitoba along the railroad that is already starting to ship crude (only open 5 months of the year, so far, but extendable with better icebreakers) and simply building refineries in Alberta and shipping refined products by truck and rail, from gasoline to plastics resins. Build the same infrastructure in Alberta that we see in Texas and Louisiana, which will mean more jobs for Canadians. The US CANNOT say no to refined products and petrochemicals without completely agrogating NAFTA. One way or another, that oil will get used.

  148. Jimbo says:

    As has been noted before MORE co2 will now be released due to transportation issues etc. Obama now needs to ask himself this: How has my failure to decide helped reduce co2 emissions?

    Warmists: will you now cheer? We told you that fighting the pipeline cannot possibly help your carbonphobia cause. Can you see the point now?

  149. David says:

    Northern Gateway being build has nothing to do with Keystone. When Obama approves Keystone after the November election (why hurt democrats with this issue when he can wait), you will see the two project run together, plus another pipeline going East (reversing an existing pipeline). Canada will need all these routes to ship its oil, and there will be room for all of them. So lets not panic, odds are Northern Gateway would have happened even with Keystone.

  150. Keith Sketchley says:

    Well, Northern Gateway has not been fully approved – only one substantial approval in the total picture. The BC government has to agree that its five conditions are being satisfied, and there are questions of land jurisdictions involving tribal groups (that I’m not familiar with). Progress with more rocky road ahead.

    BTW, sands oil is now flowing in the Keystone pipeline to the US Gulf Coast, as extension of the existing Keystone pipeline south of Cushing OK was completed. XL is to be a substantial shortcut and probably a bigger pipe.

    Key people in the Canadian oil transportation industry have pointed out that they’ll try whatever they can to move oil that their customers the oil producers want moved – in including expanding use of railway cars.

  151. davidgmills says:

    At Crosspatch. Where were you when Bush started a war that cost us trillions? How you guys can compare a lost pipeline to 10 years of war is beyond me.

  152. Keith Sketchley says:

    Someone mentioned the “TransMountain Pipeline Expansion Project” or such.

    Be careful with terminology, company vs project names, changing routes, and changing partnerships.

    I think the Northern Gateway project is by a consortium of pipeline company(s) and oil companies, to build a new oil pipeline from AB to the NE coast of BC. An pipeline company called “Enbridge” is leading.

    Transmountain is an existing pipeline owned by Kinder Morgan, running across southern BC, which supplies a refinery and an oil tanker loading terminal near Vancouver BC. as well as refineries in NW WA state. The plan is to twin/enlarge it (depending on portion – see http://www.transmountain.com/proposed-pipeline-corridor), to increase the volume shipped by tanker.

    The Keystone pipeline system is owned by TransCanada Corporation, a pipeline company. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TransCanada_Corporation (ConocoPhillips is no longer involved).

  153. Keith Sketchley says:

    And for further confusion, there are at least two proposed natural gas pipeline projects to the north coast of BC. Those would take natural gas from NE BC, tapping into pipeline(s) that already run from NE BC past Prince George to the lower mainland of BC and onward to the US.

    (Terminus of the various oil and gas pipelines are Kitimat (which is at the end of an inlet thus protected) and Prince Rupert (which already has a cargo port). Both already have natural gas supply by pipeline, for local consumption, the main line of that supply may have been twinned.)

    Many of the existing pipelines go back several decades – circa 1963 I worked on the NG pipeline from NE BC., the TransMountain oil pipeline may date to 1969.

  154. WhyMeLord says:

    The original business plan was to transship to Texas the ship out of the country. As to jobe the original PR announcement was 20K jobs but the reality the refinery was 100% staffed *(the only turn is by death of workers) temporary jobs < 1000K permanent new jobs much much less.

  155. Saren says:

    As others have pointed out the two projects are not related at all.

    Imagine that the Canadian government was actually using the approval of one project as a bargaining chip for the other. Enbridge would have a case against the government for all the preliminary fees it’s paid and applications it’s submitted – this would be a huge liability for the government in the tens if not hundreds of millions of dollars. There’s also the public embarrassment of the government caused by such unethical behaviour.

  156. dbstealey says:

    davidgmills says: [ "..." ]

    Are your arguments so tired that you have to repeat the Bush canard?

    I clearly recall Hillary, Kerry, Bill, and many other Democrats enthusiastically promoting the Iraq war. Why did you leave them out? Leftist politics? Very few politicians refused to support the war. In retrospect it was a mistake. People and countries sometimes make mistakes. Why are we still in Afghanistan? That is 100% Obama at this point. Compared with Obama, Bush is outstanding. Obama is either completely incompetent, or he is maliciously destroying the country. At this point I am not sure which. Maybe both.

    GW Bush is a class act. He could be constantly unloading on Obama [like Obama does on him]. Instead, he has made only one comment about Obama since leaving office: “He deserves my silence.”

    Compared with GW Bush, Obama has no class at all. He’s an empty suit with not a drop of slave blood, who failed upward as America’s act of contrition for slavery. The war was a mistake. Electing Obama was a much worse mistake. Especially the second time.

  157. Khwarizmi says:

    Venezual, according to the CIA factbook – has elections.
    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ve.html
    Probably more transparent that the “black box” elections conducted in the U.S. dictatorship.
    I live under the oppressive boot of the U.S.. I don’t like it. I want it to end.
    Get your military bases out of my country, now. Thanks.

  158. Frank says:

    So how come the Canadian government has not announced this? Nor has the company that will the new pipeline has announced this? ALL LIES!!!

  159. Louis says:

    ConfusedPhoton says:
    June 29, 2014 at 12:33 am
    The Greens will only be happy when they have driven the economy back into medieval times.

    The “Greens” will never be happy. Never have been. Never will be. That’s why it’s useless to try to placate them. It’s better to ignore them.

  160. CodeTech says:

    Frank – what are you talking about? It was ALL OVER THE NEWS in Canada last week.

  161. Are you going to build a pipeline to Asia???

  162. JamesD says:

    “The oil was never going to be used here anyway. We are already sending away our own fracking juice. Fine with me. Petrol prices remain the domain of the oil mafia.” Try learning a few minimal basic facts. The oil is already being used here. However it is being shipped by rail on Warren Buffet’s trains. And he is profitting $5 per bbl. on it. Keystone just takes it off his trains.

  163. sunsettommy says:

    Breathless stupidity because America would have burned that oil more cleanly than smog ridden China would.

    How did that help you stupid democrats?

  164. phlogiston says:

    In opposing economic growth and growth of energy infrastructure the greens are trying to erect a barbed wire fence around the human race.

    They dont get it that economic growth reduces population growth eventually to below replacement and leads a cleaner environment through better technology.

    Its driven by subconscious racist anxiety about countries that our parents taught us were inhabited by grass-skirted savages achieving economic and technical parity with a disappearing “west”.

  165. ullr1998 says:

    Obama delende est.

  166. Jake2 says:

    Plug? I didn’t read about a plug being pulled, just that there was a second pipeline being built. They’ll probably still push for and use XL if it does get built. And the sourthern XL portion is already done.

  167. BruceC says:

    Frank;

    The Canadian government approved Enbridge Inc. (ENB)’s Northern Gateway pipeline, eliminating the final major regulatory obstacle for the conduit that would move Alberta oil to the Pacific coast for shipment to Asia.

    The approval of the C$6.5 billion ($6 billion) project by Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s cabinet is subject to Enbridge satisfying the 209 conditions placed on the proposal by a regulatory review panel in December, Natural Resources Minister Greg Rickford said in a statement today from Ottawa.

    Bloomberg, June 18th, 2014

  168. Jake J says:

    Breitbart? Oh please. Their article vastly overstated Canada’s action, which is far from final.

  169. David Ball aid on June 29, 2014, 12:09 pm
    “I won’t say what I think of the current US administration. But it is quaint that the mentally handicapped can reach such lofty positions of power in America.”

    David, we Canadians live in a glass house on this issue. We should not mock our American friends regarding the intellect of their President.

    Our current Prime Minister Stephen Harper is a notable exception – he is clearly intelligent and capable. Nevertheless he is behind in the polls, as Canadian apparently tire of government competence and economic stability – our economy is by far the strongest in the G8.

    Need I remind you of recent Canadian Liberal Prime Ministers like Jean Chretien, and others who squandered Canada’s future for narrow political and personal gain? Remember the many Chretien scandals – AdScam, Shawinigate, etc etc that diverted huge sums of public money into Liberal pockets?

    Provincially, remember Liberal Premier Doltan McGuinty who wrecked Ontario’s manufacturing economy by adopting nonsensical green energy policies that drove up energy prices?

    Or future hopefuls like Liberal Justin Trudeau, who has his mother’s looks AND his mother’s brains? Justin is clearly an intellectual lightweight who appeals to other such imbeciles, but he leads in the polls and may become our next PM.

    I worry for our children.

  170. john says:

    Canada is already one of our biggest sources of oil imports. Because CAnada has no other customers other than our midwest refiners we can demand a 30% discount when buying oil from Canada The Keystone was designed so that Canada would have access to the world market and no longer have to accept selling only to the USA. Why would anyone be in favor of a pipeline to export North American oil to the rest of the world? Posters better take a google at where our oil currently comes from apparently they have not already done so

  171. Flint says:

    Er, folks, the oil in the proposed Keystone pipeline was never meant for US-consumption. Yes, our refineries in NE and TX would get some business but the oil was and is slated for export.

  172. Danny V. says:

    john@6:36AM
    Your logic does not work. US currently imports oil at higher than Canada crude prices. Why would refiners export lower priced Canadian oil to buy higher priced imported oil?
    Makes no sense unless you assume the refiners are run by a gov’t agency?
    PS US oil comes from – in order – US sources, Canada, and then Venezuela and other similar odious locations.

  173. tim maguire says:

    Obama will approve Keystone after the mid-term elections. He can’t afford to before as pipeline opponents are some of the Democratic Party’s hardest workers. After the election, when the useful idiots cease to be useful, he will approve it. I’m sure he’s let the Canadian government know what he plans.

  174. bandit says:

    MSM will get a headache ignoring this

  175. richardscourtney says:

    Danny V.:

    At June 30, 2014 at 7:00 am you ask

    Why would refiners export lower priced Canadian oil to buy higher priced imported oil?

    They do it to obtain a blend which provides products in proportion to market demand.

    A refinery separates crude oil into its component parts for sale. The refinery makes a loss if its obtaining an amount of e.g. petroleum provides too much or too little e.g. benzene. Crude oil from different places contains different proportions of the components. Therefore, blending different crude oils from different places prior to refining can maximize profits from sale of refined products.

    Richard

  176. pyeatte says:

    The XL will still get built when Obama leaves office. This just means the Canadian oil will be going to Asia in addition to the US. Don’t forget, there already is an existing Keystone Pipeline that has been pumping oil to us for several years from the same oil sands. The XL will double the amount and then some.

  177. David Ball says:

    brent says:
    June 29, 2014 at 1:12 pm

    Look it up yourself. As Willis says, I’m not doing your homework for you. Thankfully, you can no longer get misinformation from “the oil drum”.

  178. Resourceguy says:

    By the time any pipeline is built or expanded the flow of crude oil from Alaska to its effective bottleneck in California will be greatly reduced. Thus CA will be competing for Canadian crude oil with the Asians and it will be safer transport than the trains in the mid continent.

  179. Keith Sketchley says:

    A major problem with Trans-Canada pipelines is its dishonesty in using the legal doctrine of “eminent domain”.

    That’s an immoral process that violates individual property rights for some claimed common good, but even if it were valid it has been widely abused. (That’s what happends when you give the collective power to initiate force. The Kelo case fought by the Institute of Justice, http://www.ij.org, publicized the process.)

    Trans-Canada’s use of that process is one reason their XL expansion of the Keystone pipeline has been blocked.

  180. Keith Sketchley says:

    Er, “Flint, my understanding is that US Gulf Coast refineries want Canadian oil sands crude oil because they are accustomed to processing sands oil from Venezuela, which is politically and economically risky (their production is declining as is inevitable with government control, including because their tech experts are bailing out to places like Calgary).

    The challenge with heavy oil is dealing with the bottom of the stack, the heavy components. (There is much work being done in AB to find better ways of processing that bottom. Publisher David Black plans to use a process that produces diesel fuel from that bottom, using natural gas to add hydrogen, for the refinery he wants to build at Kitimat BC.)

    As for oil from sands, there is much from an area on the AB/SK border east of Edmonton. It is not as heavy as the Athabaska sands from NNE of Edmonton.

    Too many people herein running on assumptions, just like climate alarmists.

  181. Steven Kopits says:

    Here’s the situation as I understand it:

    - The Canadian government approved the Enbridge Northern Gateway project on June 14th.

    - TransCanada has not withdrawn its request that the US Administration approve the cross-border segment of Keystone XL.

    - The Enbridge pipeline will have to cross First Nations territories to the west, as well as the province of British Columbia. Neither has been a proponent of the project, and approval is not at all guaranteed.

    - US gasoline prices are Brent-linked, that is, the international benchmark price based on the output of the UK/Norway North Sea. US gasoline prices are linked to neither WTI (the US benchmark West Texas Intermediate) nor WCS (Western Canadian Select, the Alberta benchmark price). Therefore, neither the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, nor the failure to do so, is likely to materially influence retail gasoline prices in the US.

    - Lifting the US crude export ban could reduce US gasoline prices. US refineries are primarily geared to process heavy crude, that is, crude from places like Canada, Venezuela and Mexico. Shale oil is very light, and not the right fit for Gulf Coast refineries. Therefore, lifting the crude export ban (of which we see small steps forward recently), would allow light and heavy crude to be processed where it can be done so most efficiently, and this could have the effect of reducing US gasoline prices modestly (Yergin says by up to 8 cents a gallon; figure half that in reality).

    While I support the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, I find this article to be materially misleading, and it should be modified accordingly.

  182. Alexius Comnenus says:

    Musobama wants to destroy America and is not interested in its wellbeing. He is much preoccupied to help the islamism and the perverts than to preserve the moral standard of this nation for 200 years. He will go down the history as an anti-American president, an enemy of Christianity and of common sense.

  183. Jake J says:

    @Alexius, could you shorten that? Too many words for the bumper sticker.

  184. Justin Crowe says:

    The article is woefully incorrect. It is not Ob*ma’s “indecision.” He’s made his decision years ago:

    In January, 2008, candidate Ob*ma said: “Under my plan of a cap and trade system, electricity rates would necessarily skyrocket.”

    Impeach the traitor. Everything Ob*ma has ever done has been against America’s interest. Now he’s opened the border so the North American Union can become reality and our freedom and the US Constitution distant memories.

  185. Flint says:

    Keith, you are correct and that was my point. The US refineries would get business refining the tar sands crude into various products but the product will be exported. I was responding to many of the comments here that incorrectly assumed that the products would be consumed in the United States.

  186. brent says:

    Fuel for the future?
    March/April 2014
    The provincial government is pushing the long-term potential of Saskatchewan’s oil sands
    Saskatchewan’s Minister of Economy Bill Boyd travelled to London in November to muster European interest and investment in the province’s as yet undeveloped billion-barrel oil sands reserves.
    Speaking at the Canada Europe Energy Summit, Boyd pitched the opportunity that the estimated 1.2 to 2.3 billion barrels of oil locked up in the province’s northwest represent for long-term investors.
    http://magazine.cim.org/en/2014/March-April/special-report/Fuel-for-the-future.aspx

    Hope lives for Saskatchewan oil sands
    http://business.financialpost.com/2012/02/13/hope-lives-for-saskatchewan-oil-sands/

  187. Sun Spot says:

    by pipeline or by rail going south, north, east or west the Oil Sands oil will get to market. our civilization isn’t powered by happy Green Unicorn farts

  188. brent says:

    Canada’s National Energy Board
    Canada’s Energy Future 2013 – Energy Supply and Demand Projections to 2035 – An Energy Market Assessment
    http://www.neb-one.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rnrgynfmtn/nrgyrprt/nrgyftr/2013/nrgftr2013-eng.html

    Crude Oil and Bitumen Resources
    Canada has abundant resources of crude oil, with an estimated remaining ultimate potential of 53.9 109m³ (339 billion barrels) as of December 2012. Of this, oil sands bitumen accounts for 90 per cent and conventional crude oil makes up 10 per cent. Alberta currently accounts for all of Canada’s bitumen resources. Efforts are ongoing to assess bitumen deposits in Saskatchewan, but an official estimate of resource size is not yet available. For conventional crude oil, 72 per cent of the estimated remaining resources are found in the frontier regions that include East Coast offshore, northern Canada and other frontier basins that are still relatively unexplored.[22] The more developed conventional light and conventional heavy oil deposits in the WCSB account for the remaining 28 per cent
    Resources become reserves only after it is proven that economic recovery can be achieved. Canada has remaining oil reserves of 27.2 109m³ (171 billion bbls) as of December 2012, with 98 per cent of this attributed to oil sands bitumen, and the remaining to conventional oil sources. According to the Oil & Gas Journal,[23] Canada ranks third globally in terms of proven oil reserves, behind Saudi Arabia and Venezuela
    http://www.neb-one.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rnrgynfmtn/nrgyrprt/nrgyftr/2013/nrgftr2013-eng.html#s5_1
    http://tinyurl.com/nmnd2yu

  189. SethinVancouver says:

    With respect, those are two very different and not mutually exclusive projects. This article misrepresents the impact that Gateway will have on the Keystone pipeline.

  190. brent says:

    @Flint

    The primary reason why access to Gulf Coast Refineries is highly desired for Canadian Heavy feedstock (eg Dilbit ) is because Gulf Coast refineries already have substantial bottoms upgrading capability. What unconstrained access for the Canadian feedstock would do is displace heavy crude imports to USGC (eg Venezuelan Heavies).
    The situation has evolved that Northern tier refineries are already running as much heavy feed as they can, so that’s why canadian produces want to debottleneck the transportation system. Unfortunately for producers up in Canada (unless one can segregate markets effectively) the incremental bbl sold set the price and depresses returns for all bbls, and this is reflected in current crude discounts.
    So that’s why Canada needs other outlets eg Northern Gateway, Energy East to tighten up supply and raise prices to World levels from the currently heavily discounted ones.
    That being said, the USCG is still a good fit technically because the bitumen Dilbit is a heavy crude, and USGC refineries are well equipped for heavy feeds.

  191. KokoOfKanada says:

    Good luck getting that pipeline through liberal land British Columbia. Those green liberals hate oil as much as Comrade Obamaski hate coal. There will be a new President in the White House long before that pipeline’s construction permits are ever issued. When all is said and done, a new Republican president will sign the pipeline’s construction permits.

  192. Robert W Turner says:

    Boydo3 N. Albany says:

    June 28, 2014 at 11:22 pm
    The oil was never going to be used here anyway

    That’s an ignorant post because there is a big difference between the raw commodity and end product. The oil would most definitely be used in Illinois, Oklahoma, or Texas. The crude is used to make an entirely different product, refined products, just like any other raw commodity that is used in manufacturing. The crude is refined into new products that greatly increase the value of the product. The process provides jobs and a tax base where it is refined just like any manufacturing process.

    As far as actually selling an appreciable amount of DILBIT to Asia, I’ll believe this when I see it. As far as I know no Asian country has the capacity to refine this much DILBIT and to be able to would take a very large investment. To get this done, not only would Canada need to actually build their Northern Gateway pipeline but they would need to make guarantees to China on supply and sell it at probably an even larger deduction than it is currently sold in the U.S because more and more light crude sources are opening up to China.

  193. Hal says:

    Can’t blame Canada at all. They gave the U.S. every opportunity to access this oil and only Obama is to blame!

  194. steve mcdonald says:

    The President and his billionaire friends can distribute THEIR wealth right now.
    But their wealth will increase in the great plan.
    It’s the money of the middle class and
    poor that they want redistributed upwards towards the financial institutions through an ETS.

    There is not a banker, accountant, stock trader, or alarmist environmentalist who does not salivate at the thought of trillions of dollars that once belonged to the poor being stuffed into their pockets.

    All of this is being premised on a theory that is so hysterically exaggerated that the brilliant climatologist Kiminori Itoh when commenting on it said will eventually be exposed as a fraud and become the greatest scandal in the history if science.

    Kiminori Itoh once worked for the IPPC as an advisor ………. for a short time.

    The drivers of this plan will never ever redistribute one cent of their massive wealth.

  195. Beta Blocker says:

    If the North American price for gasoline and diesel were to rise high enough, could a business case be made for building heavy crude refineries in Alberta and Saskatchewan, with the refined product being shipped by rail either south into the United States or west to ports on the coast of British Columbia?

  196. “First the US think that the oil sands are theirs.”

    No, we think of them as belonging to our best, closest, and most sensible friend. And that’s how we thought of Canada even BEFORE the oil was found.

  197. brent says:

    @Beta Blocker
    Some for example labour movement in Alberta will from time to time ask why don’t they upgrade more in Alberta and ship product to add more value locally.
    One might be able to make a case to ship product to Asia rather than feedstock.
    However for the Canada US trade, what I see at present is that USA has more than adequate refining capacity, and in fact US exports of product are going up
    So if one already has adequate refining capacity in a region why build more?
    Remember that many of the companies operating In Canada are affiliated with the majors. For example Imperial oil is 70% owned by Exxon. Exxon and Imperial oil are both involved in oilsands. Why would they want to build a major heavy crude refinery in Alberta to export product into a market in competition with their own refineries.
    It is not capital efficient to build “excess” refining capacity, and these big companies think globally in their capital allocation processes.

  198. David Ball says:

    Nice work, brent. I have had occasion to chat with many geologists working on this very subject. The estimates you posted are very low, according to everyone that I have spoken to.

  199. cminerincalgary says:

    KokoofKanada@1:03
    Fortunately, it’s not up to the province. Pipelines fall under federal jurisdiction, so a straight NIMBY by the province will not work. The bigger risk is in dealing with each of the independent Indian bands. Most of them have no treaties (unlike on the prairies) so each will line up for what they think is “fair”. Many of the reserves in that area, where I grew up, have no idea what makes a functioning economy. That’s why I’m now an Albertan – I went to a place in Canada where I could use my skills, work, and prosper. The reserves back around “home” are content to make sure that nothing gets developed unless they get “their share” on the basis of them being here before us, and our ancestors not being willing to countenance a genocide. Once the chiefs are promised a share that they think is sufficient (and that they think is bigger than the other chiefs will get – expect a lot of confidentiality demands on the parts of the reservations), the pipeline will have no problems.

    (general comments follow)
    I’m not mining oil at the moment, but know enough about the area to know that the oil miners aren’t too worried about how the product will get to market. Given the money already in play, the Oilsands output will likely double within 15 years. Pipelines or rail or trucks, there are lots of ways to move the product. There is a multi-tiered royalty set-up in Alberta that gives the province some money based upon how much is mined, but even more based on the profits of what is mined. This gives the province a vested interest is spurring development – that’s even the purpose of the Alberta government’s AER – Alberta Energy Regulator – mandated to maximize extraction of energy resources as part of the licencing process. There is also a lot more oil there than are listed on any statement of resources – the listed levels of geologic certainty for any statement of resources is dependent upon drill spacing and complexity of the deposit. If you already have 50 years worth of mining planned in your reserves then why spend the money drilling to expand your resource base now? Underground oil will probably be different, but in surface mining it’s common that the minable reserves are around 30% of the resources (the difference between what is conceptually recoverable, and what the mine plan can develop). As long as you can keep the lease and have enough holes to know that there’s something there, you’re good.

    Particularly rich beds of bitumen come out of the ground like an area of beach sand that has had a crankcase emptied onto it – I remember the augers gleaming and running like thin molasses in the -30 dawn while we were sampling. I also remember how the not-so-rich areas did act like pavement – the augers were rejected, and the split spoon wouldn’t penetrate more than an inch after 50 reps with the hammer. The host material varied from a clean sand to what acted like bitumen impregnated till (with silt and/or clay as the matrix). We could tell the depth to the bitumen by the height of the pine trees: once the taproot hit the surface of the oil, the tree died. All run-off water from the swamp had a rainbow tinge naturally. If the water had passed through our dewatering pumps it had to be treated as hazardous waste unless it found a way back under the surface of the ground. The Oilsands really are a huge natural oil spill, and they have been draining into the Athabasca River and up to the Arctic Ocean for over 1000 years. Judging by some bitumen contaminated gravel beds we found, they’ve been more likely cut by rivers for the last 100,000 years. To me, opposition to mining the Oilsands really shows the watermelon leanings of some groups – they’re perfectly all right with leaving the area a poisonous wasteland with little biodiversity if the alternative is someone else making a profit.

  200. honesttalk says:

    What can we expect from Obama? Obama is “divisive and stupid.” The only other explanation is that Obama is deliberately undermining the USA.

    The following proves my point.

    On 6-25-2014 the NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION reported that the USA has been COOLING for the LAST TEN YEARS!

    THE SAME DAY Obama appeared at the “League of Conservation Voters Capital Dinner” and MOCKED – I repeat, MOCKED – global warming deniers.

    What is wrong with Obama? Is he mentally ill.

  201. FThoma says:

    Tar sands oil is very thick, as is Venezuelan oil. There are only a few refineries that can handle that feedstock, most being on the Gulf coast. I don’t think Keystone ever was strictly to reduce gasoline prices here in the US.

  202. davidgmills says:

    My bet is that there were far more roadblocks to this pipeline than just the present administration.

    Thirty five years ago, when I began my law career, I began it as an oil and gas right of way attorney. I can guarantee all of you that oil and gas pipelines are not something most people want running through their yards. A surprising number of people will litigate against a right-of-way taking they don’t like. When multiple and concerted litigation begins to develop to stop a pipeline running through people’s yards, it can get extremely expensive. No matter how big you are, you can’t litigate with every body.

    Moreover, states that don’t get much benefit from a pipeline but face huge damages if something bad happens don’t like the risk benefit ratios either and throw up their own roadblocks as well.

    This pipeline was going to be of little benefit to most of the people along it.

    From what I can tell, most of the loud complaining about this pipeline came from people who did not want the pipelines near them or running through their state. It seemed to be unpopular in nearly every state it was running through. Canada is having the same problem in a number of its provinces. Blaming Obama for this is a convenient excuse for something that was quite unpopular where people could throw up roadblocks.

  203. lorne50 says:

    For the last time all you humps It’s oil sand not tar sands tar sand’s is in LA Please get it together ;>)

  204. davidgmills says:

    @dbstealey. I left the Democrats out because there is a big difference in asking for war and going along with one that is asked for. I guess you forgot about Bush’s address to Congress, and the lie about the yellowcake in the address to Congress, and the lie about the weapons of mass destruction, and Colon Powell’s falsified address to the UN. And you must have forgot about how we were going to be seen as liberators and how the war would only last a couple of months and would pay for itself.

    I never let the Democrats off the hook for supporting the war, but when the commander in chief is saying we need to do it, and his generals are saying we need to do it, and his faulty intelligence (fraudulent really with Cheney’s in house intelligence Iraq War Group), comparing the complicity of the Democrats with the outright instigation of war by the Republicans is ludicrous. False equivalency of the worst kind. The buck stopped with the president who started it. Republicans will always own it. Comparing Obama to this $hit is utterly ridiculous. I have other suspicions as to the true reasons for your views but I will not start that here.

  205. Obamas Plan to destroy America continues with allowing Oil prices to increase;
    CONGRESSMEN: OBAMA USING ‘CLOWARD-PIVEN MANEUVER’
    ‘Attempt to flood the border with illegals’ part of infamous socialist strategy-, professors Andrew Cloward and Francis Fox Piven of Columbia University, Obama’s alma mater, devised a plan to provoke chaos by deliberately overwhelming governmental systems and the U.S. economy to the point of collapse, paving the way for state intervention that would ultimately replace America’s free-enterprise republic with a collectivist system.

    http://www.wnd.com/2014/06/congressmen-obama-using-cloward-piven-maneuver/

  206. Gas was $1.86 when OBAMA TOOK OFFICE. His plan to destroy America, by transfer of wealth is nearly complete.

  207. Clayton E. Cramer says: June 30, 2014 at 3:15 pm
    “First the US think that the oil sands are theirs.”
    No, we think of them as belonging to our best, closest, and most sensible friend. And that’s how we thought of Canada even BEFORE the oil was found.
    ******************

    Thank you Clayton.

    Today, July 1 is Canada Day, our National Holiday.

    In three more days, the USA, our closest neighbour and best friend will celebrate the Fourth of July, Independence Day.

    God Bless Canada!

    And God Bless America!

  208. dbstealey says:

    davidgmills says:

    The buck stopped with the president who started it. Republicans will always own it.

    You’re nuts. The current Administration promised Americans that we would be out of Afghanistan. Now, Obama owns that war.

    You are far too partisan to understand.

  209. Here is a good short video about the origins of the Athabasca oilsands industry.
    http://www.suncor.com/en/about/2629.aspx?id=2600

    Although there were predecessors, I believe that the individual most responsible for the founding of the modern Athabasca oilsands mining industry is J. Howard Pew of the Sun Oil Company of Philadelphia (now Suncor), the majority shareholder in the Great Canadian Oilsands project. Other mostly American companies followed with the development of the Syncrude project.

    The invention of SAGD extraction, largely through the efforts of AOSTRA, enabled the economic recovery of the much greater deposits of deeper oilsands, through in-situ recovery.

    The Canadian oilsands are now the economic mainstay of our country, and as a result we have the strongest economy in the G8.

    Our oilsands industry developed over many years with considerable difficulty, and has experienced periods of major progress followed by extended periods of inactivity, followed by revitalization.

    Politicians should tread carefully when intervening in energy policy. A few politicians have contributed greatly to our prosperity through their interventions, but the majority have utterly failed.

    Technically ignorant politicians who have dabbled in energy policy have caused enormous economic damage and needless waste.

    Cheap abundant energy is the lifeblood of a modern economy.

  210. Brandon N says:

    Good! We don’t want your damn pipeline. It would contaminate the Ogallala Aquifer, thus ending all irrigation for all farms in the Midwest. That would destroy all Midwestern farming, sending food prices through the roof and destroying the economy. It would rape my home state of Nebraska. Not just no, but HELL NO! It sucks that the oil will still be burned, but at least its not touching that aquifer. This project would have made my home state uninhabitable.

  211. dbstealey says:

    Brandon N,

    Your extremely emotional, wild-eyed comment is preposterous. You say:

    We don’t want your damn pipeline. It would contaminate the Ogallala Aquifer, thus ending all irrigation for all farms in the Midwest. That would destroy all Midwestern farming, sending food prices through the roof and destroying the economy. It would rape my home state of Nebraska… This project would have made my home state uninhabitable.

    That is such an over the top, swivel-eyed comment that it leaves you with zero credibility.

    A pipeline isn’t much different from rail. I suppose you would prefer 40 – 70 year old rolling stock to a new, state of the art pipeline with all the latest safety features.

    Why is it that enviro-nuts are such lunatics? Take an aspirin and lie down. Your head is likely to explode. Leave this discussion to rational adults.

  212. Ali Babba says:

    No one wants to sell to communists, you can’t trust them to be able to pay their bills. I am talking of course about the USSA. Au revoir, you commies.

  213. Just a minor technical comment: The objections made by the BC authorities seem reasonable, because the Heavy Oil blend they are shipping to the Pacific is likely to a be a “dumbell crude”. These crudes are characterized for having a large fraction of very heavy asphaltic crude and a blend material made up of naphta and possibly other light crudes. In other words, this material tends to be short on the middle chains. When this material is spilled the light fractions evaporate or get eaten. But the heavy molecules are the ones which make a mess.

    To solve the objections the crude needs to be a synbit, that is a mixture of the super heavy 8 degrees API with a medium weight syncrude (say 27 degrees API). To make the syncrude they do need upgraders. And as far as I can tell, the government needs to push to see if nuclear powered upgrading may not be a sensible option. It´s a far reach but these studies have already been carried out.

  214. davidgmills says:

    [snip - REPLY: I ask that you resubmit this without the name calling and derogatory tone - Anthony]

  215. davidgmills says:

    @dbstealey Don’t expect the people who are going to be asked to have a pipeline running through their front yard to give a damn as to whether you can drive your Suburban or not. Evidence of more political cluelessness on your part.

    As for the price of gas when Obama took over. It had been much higher before that. My house was down 40% by the time Obama took over, as were most of my stocks. Most prices and values were hugely depressed when this administration took over. Stocks (those things that the wealthy usually have in abundance that most of middle class America doesn’t) have done great during this administration. Unfortunately, real estate, which is often the major asset of the middle class has gone nowhere because jobs paying a decent wage don’t exist for much of America any more. Trickle down economics has been a total failure because it was always a sham, a lame excuse to justify unregulated greed.

  216. The Mackenzie Valley gas pipeline was proposed 40 years ago. The first version was torpedoed by Trudeau’s National Energy Policy. It was resurrected in 2004, but crashing gas prices made it uneconomic. The plans still sit there. Recently the North West Territorial government suggested the route be used to take oil north to a port; or even over to connect into the Valdez pipeline. There is also a railway proposal to take oil to Valdez. This is not a time sensitive project, but a dollar sensitive project. When the value is there, it will flow, one way or another.

    As for Keystone, it will likely take a change in US leadership. Companies can wait 4 or 8 or 12 years. As others have noted, the oil is going south and east anyway. Just less efficiently. When it does get approval, hopefully my dividends in my retirement funds will increase …

    For those who don’t want a pipeline, it is simply a matter of choosing your poison. Don’t like pipelines, you get rail

    Don’t like fossil fuels – stop driving, shut off your plastic computer and phone, forget about anything with steel (metallurgical coal don’t you know), go back to ploughing your own garden with your horse and wooden plough and lighting your home with tallow candles from the sheep you raise for wool clothing and the cotton you grow for the same reason. Yeah right. If people only knew how much of their surroundings were made using fossil fuels they might moderate their NIMBY positions.

    For davidgmills says: June 30, 2014 at 9:11 pm remember that all those people in Nebraska and other states that farm are using diesel fuel, using petrochemicals of all sorts, polycarbonates etc. etc. EVERYONE benefits from fossil fuels. They should be reminded.

    Wayne Delbeke

  217. Eric Worrall says:
    June 29, 2014 at 5:26 am
    TAG
    Part of the NAFTA agreement is that Canada is compelled to “share” its oil and other resources with the US. So in the case of an oil shortage, Canada is compelled to ship oil to the US.

    I’ve hear many right and left wing Americans whine about NAFTA. Actually it is a pretty good deal for the US. Canada got access to US markets by becoming absolutely economically dependent on it.

    If exporting oil to China rises in importance, NAFTA may seem like less of a priority. Don’t forget, Canada pulled out of Kyoto when Kyoto became inconvenient – when Kyoto got in the way of exploiting the tar sands. If China becomes the more important trading partner, then agreements with America may be set aside.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Various US politicians have been talking about killing NAFTA for years. Many want to renegotiate a sweeter deal for the US. Like the Columbia River Treaty, it seems when times change, politicians start using these things as sales tools, regardless of how well they have worked for both sides. Add softwood lumber and salmon to that. We are good neighbours, but we do bicker a lot like some married couples.

  218. Brandon N says:
    July 1, 2014 at 10:04 am
    Good! We don’t want your damn pipeline. It would contaminate the Ogallala Aquifer, thus ending all irrigation for all farms in the Midwest. That would destroy all Midwestern farming, sending food prices through the roof and destroying the economy. It would rape my home state of Nebraska. Not just no, but HELL NO! It sucks that the oil will still be burned, but at least its not touching that aquifer. This project would have made my home state uninhabitable.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    It is much more likely your home state will be made uninhabitable by over pumping of the Ogallala aquifer to produce ethanol and bio-diesel from irrigated crops, thus necessitating an oil pipeline when the corn crops fail due to lack of water. By the way, I have ridden on horseback across your entire home state and a few adjacent to it. Much better view on horse back than on those jointed bouncy concrete freeways. But at 50 miles a day, it takes a while. What a fossil fuel powered vehicle does in 45 minutes, takes a day on horse back. Want those farmers out there going back to horse farming and depending on rain? Big corn will ruin your home state way before big oil. Come ride with me sometime. 2015 is going to be a Pony Express year. 2000 miles from St Joe, Missouri to Carson City, Nevada on horseback. Great way to see your country and appreciate the 1 death per mile on the old Oregon Trail along the Platte River that your and my very tough forefathers opened up. I never want to have to go back to that, so I use a big diesel tractor at home and so do other farm and ranch folk, and I bet you drive to work too. I walk out my front door to my job.

    From your Canadian friend that loves riding horses long distances in the good ol’ US of A.

  219. dbstealey says:

    davidgmills says:
    July 1, 2014 at 5:33 pm [ " ... " ]

    Since my comment was about the war in Afghanistan and you completely avoided responding to it, I guess that point is scored. ☺

  220. Robert W Turner says:

    Brandon N says:

    “Good! We don’t want your damn pipeline. It would contaminate the Ogallala Aquifer, thus ending all irrigation for all farms in the Midwest. That would destroy all Midwestern farming, sending food prices through the roof and destroying the economy. It would rape my home state of Nebraska. Not just no, but HELL NO! It sucks that the oil will still be burned, but at least its not touching that aquifer. This project would have made my home state uninhabitable.”

    We needed a good example of ecolunacy on here. The Ogallala already has literally thousands of oil and gas wells drilled through it. In fact, the first hydraulic fracture treatment was conducted on a well that was drilled through the Ogallala and hundreds more have followed. There are already thousands of miles of oil and gas pipeline running through the area where the Ogallala is extant. Despite all of this oil and gas activity, that has been going on for more than 50 years in the region, Midwest farming has not been destroyed. Your comment is based entirely on fictitious fear-mongering that has been stamped into that space between your ears by the liberal media.

  221. davidgmills says:

    @dbstealy You just claim it to be Obama’s war. Please explain how it is Obama’s war since Bush put us in there in 2001. If you will recall, none of the 19 highjackers were from Afghanistan, yet the Bush administration insisted that we needed to invade a country that had done nothing to us. We were told needed to get the mastermind, Osama Bin Laden. Well, did Bush get him? No he left him for Obama to get and it took a build up of men and material to do it.

    Saying Afghanistan is Obama’s war is like saying Vietnam was Nixon’s war, when Nixon didn’t get us out of Vietnam right away. Do people call Vietnam Nixon’s war?

    Do I wish Obama had extricated us out of both of Bush’s wars as his first act of his presidency? Absolutely. Obama has not closed down Guantanamo either, another Bush disaster. I wish Obama had done that, as well as a whole host of other things he has not done, such as prosecute half of Wall Street, for the financial catastrophe caused by them during the lax and sleepy Bush administration.

    The simple truth is that there are a lot of people in the military industrial complex with lots of clout, and who made vast amounts of money on Bush’s wars and want them to continue. As General Smedley Butler, the most acclaimed Marine in history, eloquently stated in the 1930′s: “War is a racket.” Once the racket is in full swing, it is not easy to put a stop to it. Nixon could have told you that.

  222. tom says:

    Thank an environmentalist for the loss of good paying skilled labor jobs. Every union that supported Obama should be proud of themselves for cutting their own economic throats.

  223. davidgmills says:

    @ Robert W Turner. You can call it ecolunacy if you like, and rage against the NIMBY syndrome all you want, but people who do not have pipelines in their yards do not want them there. Hell, a pipeline running through my front yard would devastate my property values. It would do the same to yours. Any income you got from a forced selling of part of your property (which is what eminent domain/condemnation is) would in all probability be unsatisfactory compensation to you, even if you got fair market value or better. Roads and rails are already property that has been taken by eminent domain and is is not difficult to see how people who do not want to have their property seized would much prefer to have this oil trucked over the roads or shipped by train.

    But a thorium nuclear power revolution, (which should have been here a long time ago because the technology was invented at Oak Ridge in the 1960′s) and which is my particular energy favorite, would solve all of the world’s energy problems, including fuel transport. It might decimate the value of my Exxon stock, (which is a substantial portion of my retirement) but, so be it. Progress will go on even if Exxon opposes it.

  224. Anthony Watts says:

    OK Enough About war – Db Stealy and David G Mills you need to both be done on the wild off topic comments or the next comments from both of you end up int eh bit bucket

  225. Barbara says:

    policycritic,
    TIDESCANADA, Toronto & Vancouver
    Board of Directors includes:
    Alan Broadbent, Past-Chair
    Drummond Pike, Was Founder & CEO of Tides (U.S.) & Founding-Chair of Tides Canada
    http://www.tidescanada.org/about/who-we-are/board

  226. clipe says:

    President Obama’s choice of the United States’ new Ambassador to Canada says a lot about what he thinks about his northern neighbour

    WSJ

    http://business.financialpost.com/2014/07/01/the-u-s-tells-ottawa-o-canada-stop-pouting/

    It has been left to the Wall Street Journal’s redoubtable Mary Anastasia O’Grady to tell us (elsewhere on this page) what was really on display that night in Ottawa: President Obama’s contempt for Canada

    http://business.financialpost.com/2014/07/01/peter-foster-the-i-love-bruce-y-heyman-show/

  227. Barbara says:

    policycritic,

    Pembina Institute, Sept.9,2010

    “Dr. Marlo Raynolds of the Pembina Institute and Dr.Rick Smith of Environmental Defence made the the following statements following their meeting with U.S. Speaker of the House, the Honourable Nancy Pelosi, and the Honourable Edward Markey…”
    http://www.pembina.org/media-release/2071

    This meeting was in Ottawa, Canada

  228. Barbara says:

    policycritic,

    Pembina Institute Advisory Council includes:
    Preston Manning, Pres. & CEO, the Manning Centre
    http://www.pembina.org/about-pembina

  229. Today the USA, our closest neighbour and best friend celebrates the Fourth of July.

    Happy Independence Day to all my American friends!

    Best regards, Allan
    _____

    Historical Notes:

    The USA is by far the best neighbour Canada could ever ask for. Canada is now the largest foreign supplier of oil to the USA. We are still, I think, the largest bilateral trading partners in the world.

    We have managed to get along and prosper together for two hundred years since our last unpleasantries during the War of 1812-14, when our side burned the White House and the Yanks burned Toronto.

    Confidentially, people from all over Canada agree that Toronto ought to be burned from time to time, so we still think we got the better of that deal. :-)

  230. brent says:

    @David Ball

    David,
    The reason I challenged you, is because I remembered the following quote from an NEB report, linked above

    Crude Oil and Bitumen Resources
    Efforts are ongoing to assess bitumen deposits in Saskatchewan, but an official estimate of resource size is not yet available
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/06/28/canada-pulls-the-plug-on-the-u-s-keystone-pipeline-will-send-oil-to-asia/#comment-1673353

    My actual opinion is that one should not indulge overly in premature and idle speculation. One should wait for the people to do proper homework, and produce a report which is comprehensive, thorough, vetted and signed off.

    Then one has something reasonable to discuss.

    The other snippet I posted listing a certain estimate, was not “my” estimate
    as you inferred

    best regards
    brent

  231. To Barbara et al re the Pembina Institute

    In 2002 we engaged in a written debate with the Pembina Institute at the request of APEGGA, my professional organization, as published in their journal.
    PEGG, November 2002
    http://www.apega.ca//Members/Publications/peggs/WEB11_02/kyoto_pt.htm

    Our side consisted of Sallie Baliunas, Tim Patterson and Allan MacRae.
    [Our side of the debate was reprinted at the request of many professional journals, the Globe and Mail and la Presse]

    In 2002 we wrote:

    On Global Warming:
    “Climate science does not support the theory of catastrophic human-made global warming – the alleged warming crisis does not exist.”

    On Green Energy:
    “The ultimate agenda of pro-Kyoto advocates is to eliminate fossil fuels, but this would result in a catastrophic shortfall in global energy supply – the wasteful, inefficient energy solutions proposed by Kyoto advocates simply cannot replace fossil fuels.”

    These are just two of our eight (8) predictions. I suggest that all eight have come true in those jurisdictions that have fully embraced global warming alarmism.

    The Pembina Institute quoted the alarmist IPCC reports, and every one of their scary scenarios has failed to materialize.

    We knew with confidence over a decade ago that global warming alarmism was technically false, extremist and wasteful.

    We also knew with confidence over a decade ago that the green energy schemes proposed to “fight global warming” would not be green nor would they provide much useful energy.

    Since then, there has been no global warming.

    Since then, over a trillion dollars has been squandered on failed green energy schemes that have produced little net energy, but have caused energy costs to soar.

    There is no real global warming crisis.

    Cheap abundant energy is the lifeblood of modern society.

    Regards, Allan

    P.S. All these truths have not changed the Pembina Institute’s failed position.

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