New hurricane tracking map shows potential impacts on energy infrastructure

I’m sure the greenies will be following this closely, rooting for a hurricane to hit that nearby oil platform or coal power plant onshore.

U.S. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON DC 20585
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 9, 2013

EIA provides new website tool to keep users informed during hurricane season

With peak hurricane season approaching, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is introducing interactive maps that combine real-time data feeds from the National Hurricane Center with more than 20 map layers showing the nation’s energy infrastructure and resources. This new tool, available around the clock on the EIA website, allows industry, energy analysts, government decision makers, and the American public to better see and understand the potential impact of a storm.

“This new mapping capability combines detailed energy infrastructure information with real-time tropical storm information from the National Hurricane Center,” said EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski. “This is a great example of technology providing better service to the American public.”

Every year, hurricanes and other extreme weather events threaten life and property. Hurricanes also affect the nation’s energy infrastructure, especially when storm paths traverse offshore production rigs and pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico, coastal refineries, power plants, and energy import and export sites.

The new maps are at http://www.eia.gov/special/disruptions/. Right now, the public can see the current predicted path of tropical storm Chantal, moving from the Caribbean’s Leeward Islands toward the Atlantic coast of Florida. As the National Hurricane Center revises its predictions, the maps will be instantly updated.

The product described in this press release was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA’s data, analysis, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in the product and press release therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other federal agencies.

EIA Program Contact: Mark Elbert, 202-586-1185, Mark.Elbert@eia.gov

EIA Press Contact: Jonathan Cogan, 202-586-8719, jonathan.cogan@eia.gov

Energy Information<br /><br />                     Administration (EIA) Logo - Need Help? 202-586-8800

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18 thoughts on “New hurricane tracking map shows potential impacts on energy infrastructure

  1. I’m sure the greenies will be following this closely, rooting for a hurricane to hit that nearby oil platform or coal power plant onshore.

    I really think the impacts are on the ‘demand’ (starting with transmission, then distribution and then the local ‘service drop’ to the house) side of the equation, but yeah, the eco-loons aren’t really based in reality to start with …

    .

  2. When O’Malley’s windmills are in place offshore from Ocean City, Maryland, they will be perfect targets for hurricanes.

  3. “New hurricane tracking map shows potential impacts on energy infrastructure”
    Yeah. Well my new family tree shows the “potential” for unprecedented impacts on future generations from my having sex with the wrong girl. Now. Where’s my grant money?

  4. psion (@psion) says July 9, 2013 at 10:22 am
    Oh, this is terrific! Did Homeland Security have to approve this catalog for terrorism targets?

    They ‘kill’ some of the detail when zooming in …

  5. Notice the western Gulf States(AL, MS, LA, TX) carrying the oil load for the rest of the nation. Looks like Pearl Harbor before WW2. Thanks for nothing Florida!

  6. “I’m sure the greenies will be following this closely, rooting for a hurricane to hit that nearby oil platform or coal power plant onshore.”

    Actually they root for any kind of destruction, whether its an oil platform or anything else. I remember hurricane Irene a couple of years ago, it was barreling toward the east coast and then it fizzled when it hit the shore. The disappointment on the tv reporters faces was clear, the disappointment from the greenies was obvious as well. Irene demonstrated that these people actually hope and pray that a storm will cause huge destruction like Sandy did last fall. Somehow it makes them feel good, perhaps even happy. Wow.

    I don’t know how greenies can look themselves in the mirror each day, I really don’t.

  7. Why stop with “potential” impacts from hurricanes….
    might as well include tornadoes, earthquakes, drought/flood, wet/dry, rain/snow…
    little green men…and Teresa Heinz Kerry

  8. Interesting map…as I’m sure some will find, especially those looking for “targets”. Great job of organizing and identifying all in one easy spot.

    Not really sure how useful it will be to the general public.

    Everyone has a television, and the stations bombard everyone with storm info, as we all know. So who’s going to go to the website and get useful information from it?

    Jim

  9. Well that is another total waste of taxpayer’s money.

    By the way, they have the path of the tropical storm plotted as if anyone really knew where the darn thing is going to go. The hurricane models are all over the place, and they use the National Hurricane Center plot as if it were real. And if the ‘cane does go there; so what? What am I supposed to do over in Orlando? Worry?

    If my fox-tail palm gets blown over on my house I’ll call the insurance company. What good does it do to get all excited about the fact that oil companies have targets. I suspect they knew about hurricanes when they built the darn stuff. We have been having these storms for a while now. I remember one called Donna back in ’60 and some say there were ‘canes even before that! (if you can imagine)

  10. “… rooting for a hurricane to hit that nearby oil platform or coal power plant onshore.”

    More fun if it was a wind farm. Offshore or on.

  11. Jim from Maine says:
    July 9, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    Interesting map…as I’m sure some will find, especially those looking for “targets”. Great job of organizing and identifying all in one easy spot.

    Not really sure how useful it will be to the general public.

    Everyone has a television, and the stations bombard everyone with storm info, as we all know. So who’s going to go to the website and get useful information from it?

    Jim

    ===========================================

    I’m sure some terrorists will find it useful.. as our infrastructure is now easily targeted..

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