Lomborg: New York Times environmental journalist Justin Gillis is wrong

Guest essay by Bjørn Lomborg Justin Gillis tells NPR how much sea levels will rise: “experts believe sea levels will rise at least 3 feet in the next century, and that number could be as much as 6 feet.” (91cm to 183cm, http://n.pr/ZOxRKF.) The leaked upcoming UN Climate Panel report will likely increase its sea…

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup

The Week That Was: 2013-08-03 (August 3, 2013) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project ################################################### Quote of the Week: “Half the harm that is done in this world is due to people who want to feel important. They don’t mean to do harm — but the harm does not…

The Marshall Islands and their Sea Level Changes

A short comment by Nils-Axel Mörner UPDATE: See the follow up post here: The Most Important Sea Level Graph This is the sea level graph (from Kwajalein) recently being circulated and claimed to show an alarming acceleration of a proposed general sea level rise. Yes, this curve rises fairly rapidly from 1990 to 2012. But for…

Invest in Nature, not infrastructure for storm abatement

I suppose maybe they didn’t see this study on how a long forgotten seawall helped save homes in New Jersey. The best defense against catastrophic storms: Mother Nature, say Stanford researchers Stanford researchers say that natural habitats such as dunes and reefs are the best protection against storms and rising sea levels along the U.S.…

New study: Antarctic and Greenland ice sheet melt may be natural event, no consensus on cause

Ice sheets are the largest potential source of future sea level rise – and they also possess the largest uncertainty over their future behaviour From the University of Bristol Continuous satellite monitoring of ice sheets needed to better predict sea-level rise The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, underscore the need for continuous satellite monitoring of…

2 feet of sea level rise at Annapolis, or, maybe not…

From the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, a claim of 2 feet by 2050, but tide gauge data from Annapolis doesn’t support it, showing it will take well over 100 years at the historic rate to reach 2 feet, and there is no hint of acceleration in the record: Source: NOAA Tides and…

NOAA exaggerates 2012 Greenland Ice Mass Loss by 10x

[UPDATE: Several commenters, including myself, have remarked on a mathematical error in the author’s work. I note this here in the expectation that the author will return to clarify and perhaps amend his claims. Having made such public mistakes myself, it’s embarrassing if true, but that’s the function of public peer review as practiced on…