California Electricity Woes: More Intervention, Higher Prices, More Emissions (the back side of wind and solar)

[Note from Charles–Gavin is desperate to not have any more blackouts before the recall vote. What’s the over/under on a blackout the day of the recall?]

From MasterResource

By Robert Bradley Jr. — August 3, 2021

“We’ll be setting up a mitigation program and new funds will be made available above and beyond our existing air quality funding that will mitigate those impacts.” (Liane Randolph, chair. California Air Resources Board, below)

“This huge list shows that if you mess up a grid, you have to try everything to hope to save the situation temporarily. In the proclamation: Air pollution rules–suspended. Ships in harbor—don’t connect to shore power, use your engines. Big industrial users—we’ll pay you $2/kWh not to consume energy. And yet, keeping a nuclear plant operating is not on the list.” (Meredith Angwin, August 2, 2021)

One intervention leads to another and yet another …. The ‘law of increasing intervention,’ as UK energy expert Colin Robinson coined it, is alive and well in the Golden State.

Facing a 3,500 MW shortfall in power generation capacity to meet current peak demand, and predicting a 5,000 MW deficit next summer, California is adding regulation to regulation, reports Rob Nikolewski in his recent piece for the San Diego Union Tribune.

Nikolewski’s article, Newsom Issues Emergency Proclamation to Free Up Extra Sources of Power (July 30, 2021), begins:

With energy resources looking exceedingly tight amid a persistently hot summer that has seen a spate of wildfires burn across the West, Gov. Gavin Newsom issued an emergency proclamation Friday to free up extra megawatts of power to help make sure the state’s lights stay on in the coming months.

The proclamation–all 3600 words–is reproduced in an appendix below. But Nikolewski captured the four major pollution-related relaxations:

  • suspending licensing requirements to speed up the expansion of battery energy storage systems of 20 megawatts or more that can discharge for at least two hours by Oct. 31 and deliver energy when the grid needs it most
  • easing restrictions on using backup generators when the power system is squeezed
  • allowing natural gas power plants to use more fuel than typically allowed by air quality districts when the state’s grid operator has issued an emergency notice or a grid warning, and
  • exempting ships berthed in California ports to operate on auxiliary engines — which can mean using diesel fuel — instead of using shore power when the grid is strained.

“Our first attempt will always be to deploy clean energy,” Public Utilities Commission President Marybel Batjer told reporters during a conference call. “There will be some backup energy that will be from fossil fuels that (will be) used in very intermittent, very extreme and very rare occasions but the tools will be in the toolbox for us to deploy.”

————————–

That may be the aim, but results matter, not intentions or plans.

APPENDIX: Governor Newsom Signs Emergency Proclamation to Expedite Clean Energy Projects and Relieve Demand on the Electrical Grid During Extreme Weather Events This Summer as Climate Crisis Threatens Western States

WHEREAS it is necessary to take immediate action to reduce the strain on the energy infrastructure, increase energy capacity, and make energy supply more resilient this year to protect the health and safety of
Californians; and
WHEREAS there is insufficient ti me or supply to install new energy storage or zero-carbon energy projects to address the immediate shortfall of up to 3,500 megawatts during extreme weather events that is now projected for this summer; and
WHEREAS until additional clean energy projects are online, it is essential to minimize, to the greatest extent possible, emissions resulting from additional energy production needed to avoid the shortfall in 2021, and to promptly mitigate the effect of those emissions to protect the health and safety of Californians; and
WHEREAS wildfire, drought, and extreme heat events are likely to persist through this summer and recur next summer, and impact several Western states simultaneously, posing further threats to California’s energy supply and limiting our ability to import additional energy into the State; and
WHEREAS a second summer of extreme drought, heat, and fire in 2022 would pose an even more grave threat to California’s energy supply, unless additional actions to increase California ‘s energy infrastructure and capacity begin now; and
WHEREAS it is already too late, under normal procedures, to bring
additional sources of energy online in time to address the previously
unforeseen shortfall of up to 5,000 megawatts that is now projected for
the summer of 2022 given the now-apparent likelihood that trends of
drought, wildfire, and heatwaves continue into next year, making it
necessary to take further action immediately; and
WHEREAS in 2018, California enacted Senate Bill 100, a landmark policy requiring that zero-carbon energy resources supply 100 percent of electric retail sales to customers by 2045; and
WHEREAS in March 2021, the California Energy Commission, California Air Resources Board, and California Public Utilities Commission, released a joint agency report outlining paths to reach the goal of 100 percent clean electricity by 2045; and
WHEREAS even more rapid procurement and deployment of clean energy production is necessary to end the vicious cycle in which generating energy contributes to the very climate-impacted emergencies that threaten energy supply; and
WHEREAS actions to accelerate procurement and deployment of clean energy projects will help prevent future emergency shortfall situations, and advance the State’s progress toward achieving its clean energy goals, including the retirement of fossil fuel resources; and WHEREAS under the provisions of Government Code section 8558, subd. (b), I find that conditions of extreme peril to the safety of persons and property exist throughout California due to the combined effects of drought, wildfire, and extreme heat on the State’s energy system; and
WHEREAS under the provisions of Government Code section 8558, subd. (b), I further find that conditions of extreme peril to the safety of persons and property exist due to rapid, unforeseen, sudden, and severe energy shortages throughout California caused by these climate events; and
WHEREAS under the provisions of Government Code section 8558, subd. (b), I find that responding to the sudden and severe energy shortages requires extraordinary measures beyond the authority vested in the California Public Utilities Commission; and WHEREAS under the provisions of Government Code section 8625, subd. (c), I find that local authority is inadequate to cope with the magnitude and impacts of the conditions of extreme peri l; and
WHEREAS under the provisions of Government Code section 8571, I
find that strict compliance with various statutes, regulations, and orders
specified in this proclamation would prevent, hinder, or delay appropriate
actions to prevent and mitigate the effects of the conditions of extreme
peril.


NOW, THEREFORE, I, GAVIN NEWSOM, Governor of the State of
California, in accordance with the authority vested in me by the State
Constitution and statutes, including the California Emergency Services
Act, and in particular, Government Code sections 8567, 8571, 8625, and
8627, HEREBY PROCLAIM A STATE OF EMERGENCY to exist in California.
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED THAT:


1. All agencies of state government shall use and employ state personnel, equipment, and facilities or perform any and all activities consistent with the direction of the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and the State Emergency Plan. Also, all residents are to obey the direction of emergency officials with regard to this emergency in order to protect their safety.


2. All energy agencies shall act immediately to achieve energy stability during this emergency, and the California Public Utilities Commission is requested to do the same. In particular, the California Energy Commission is directed, and the California Public Utilities Commission and the CAISO are requested, to work with the State’s load serving entities on accelerating plans for the construction, procurement, and rapid deployment of new
clean energy and storage projects to mitigate the risk of capacity shortages and increase the availability of carbon-free energy at all times of day.


3. To provide incentives for large energy users to reduce their electricity demand when an extreme heat event, a sudden and severe reduction in transmission capacity (including reductions due to wildfire), or both, are projected to result in acute energy shortages this summer, the Department of Finance is directed to provide payments to fund electrical demand reduction programs to be established by California utilities, in accordance
with the requirements below. Payment shall be made to any investor-owned utility or publicly owned utility for the eligible costs of an incentive payment program, including reasonable administrative costs, that the Department of Finance, in consultation with the CAISO, the California Energy Commission, and the California Public Utilities Commission, determines, based on documentation submitted by the utility, satisfies the following requirements:


a. The utility must operate the program through and no later than October 31, 2021;
b. The utility must require that its participating customers, as a
condition of receiving incentive payments from the utility under the program, commit to reduce their electricity demand by a preset minimum number of kilowatts per hour for all periods of time as to which the CAISO publishes notice that load reduction under such programs is necessary, which periods shall be only within the time of a
CAISO Grid Warning or Grid Emergency;
c. The utility must permit participating customers to shift to back up generation (including any method of generation permitted by Paragraphs 4.a and 4.b of this proclamation) during the period specified in subparagraph (b) of this Paragraph;
d . The utility must pay participating customers $2 per kilowatt hour reduced during the period specified in subparagraph (b);
e. The utility must pay participating customers $0.75 per kilowatt hour committed if the CAISO has issued a day-ahead Alert and the utility has directed participating customers to prepare to reduce their load under the program, but then the CAISO does not ultimately publish notice that load reduction under such programs is necessary;
f. The utility must prohibit participating customers from participating in both the Emergency Load Reduction Program and this program, and participating customers may only participate with respect to an amount of reduced electricity demand that is incremental to an obligation to reduce load that the participating customer has agreed to under another demand response program providing compensation for reducing load;
g. The utility must require that participating customers, upon enrollment, report to the utility how much (if any) backup generation they intend to use during the periods of load reduction specified in subparagraph (b), and if available, information on whether the backup generation is portable or stationary, and the federal emissions tier for each
generator;
h. The utility must provide to the California Air Resources Board the information collected under subparagraph (g), plus an estimate of total load reduction achieved by ZIP code, each month; and
i. The utility must provide to the Department of Finance documentation establishing the utility’s procedures for verifying the amount of load reduced by participating customers for purposes of calculating payments as specified in subparagraph (d), and for confirming that participating customers are not also receiving compensation under the Emergency Load Reduction Program or other demand response program as specified
in subparagraph (f), and the utility must agree that determination of the sufficiency of the documentation required by this subparagraph shall be in the sole discretion of the Department of Finance, in consultation with the CAISO, the California Energy Commission, and the California Public Utilities Commission; and
j. The utility must agree to provide, upon request of the Department of Finance, necessary documentation evidencing the claimed costs of the incentive program for which the utility seeks payment. To the extent it would otherwise apply to actions under this Paragraph, Chapter 3.5 ( commencing with section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, is suspended.

4. Through October 31, 2021, on any day for which the CAISO issues a Grid Warning or Emergency notice based on its determination that, despite its reliance on all available resources, an imminent shortfall is projected because of an extreme heat event, a sudden and severe reduction in transmission capacity (including reductions due to wildfire), or both, the following subparagraphs shall be in effect. Beginning August 15, 2021, application of subparagraphs (a), (b), and (f) shall become limited to participants in a program instituted by a utility under Paragraph 3, and participants in the California Public Utilities Commission’s Emergency Load Reduction Program, Base Interruptible Program, and Agricultural & Pumping Interruptible Program.


a. For purposes of regulations concerning stationary generators, use of stationary generators shall be deemed an 11 emergency use” under California Code of Regulations (CCR), title 17, section 93115.4, subd. (a)(30)(A)(2) during a period running from two hours before the beginning of the ~ effective time of the CAISO Grid Warning or Emergency notice to one hour after the end of that effective time.
b. For purposes of regulations concerning portable generators, the period running from two hours before the beginning of the effective time of the CAISO Grid Warning or Emergency notice to one hour after the end of that effective time shall be an “emergency event” under CCR, title 17, section 93116.1, subd. (b)(l 4), and a loss of electrical service shall be deemed “beyond the reasonable control of the owner or operator” under CCR, title 17, section 93116.2, subd. (a)(l 2)(A)(2). In addition, the period running from two hours before the beginning of the effective time of the CAISO Grid Warning or Emergency notice to one hour after the end of that effective time shall be an “emergency event” under CCR, title 13, section 2452, subd. (j), and interruptions caused during those times shall be deemed an “unforeseen interruption of electrical power from the serving utility” under CCR, title 13, section 2453, subd. (m)(4)(E)( 1).
c. Restrictions on the use of prohibited resources adopted by the California Public Utilities Commission under Decision 16-09-056, Ordering Paragraphs 3 and 4[b], and as implemented in the tariffs of regulated energy utilities, are suspended for any non-residential customer who is enrolled in the Base Interruptible Program or Agricultural & Pumping Interruptible Program.
d. The provisions of Water Code section 13385, subd. (i) ( 1) (A) as they pertain to daily average and instantaneous temperature limitations in waste discharge requirements for thermal power plants are suspended for any thermal power plant that maintains operations to abate the
effects of this emergency. Any exceedance of the daily average or instantaneous temperature limitations resulting from maintaining operations during this time shall not constitute a violation for purposes of calculating mandatory minimum penalties under Water Code section
13385, subd. (i).
e. Permitting requirements or conditions of certification adopted by the Energy Commission pursuant to Public Resources Code, sections 25216.5, subd. (a) and 25500 et seq., as well as permitting requirements adopted by local air quality management districts, shall be suspended to the extent they restrict the amount of power that a facility may generate, restrict the amount of fuel that a facility may use, or impose air quality requirements that prevent the facility from generating additional power, for use in California, during the period running from two hours before the beginning of the effective time of the CAISO Grid Warning or Emergency notice to one hour after the end of that effective time.
f. Any other permit, regulation or law prohibiting, restricting or penalizing the use of stationary or portable generators during the period running from two hours before the beginning of the effective time of the CAISO Grid Warning or Emergency notice to one hour after the end of that effective time is suspended.
g. Any other permit, regulation or law prohibiting, restricting or penalizing any other conduct allowed by this Paragraph, other than conduct described in subparagraph (f), is suspended.

5. Through October 31, 2021, when the CAISO issues a Grid Warning or Emergency notice based on its determination that, despite its reliance on all available resources, an imminent shortfall is project~d because of an extreme heat event, a sudden and severe reduction in transmission capacity (including reductions due to wildfire), or both, and when the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services also publishes notice that this
Paragraph shall become effective, then:

a. In regulations concerning the use of auxiliary engines by ocean-going vessels berthed in California ports, the Grid Warning or Emergency notice shall establish an “emergency event” under CCR, title 17, section 93118.3, subd. (c)(l4).
b. This proclamation, the CAISO’s issuance of Grid Warning or Emergency notice, and the notice published by the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services shall together be deemed to provide notice to reduce use of grid-based electrical power under CCR, title 17, section 93118.3, subd. (c)(l4)(C). Expiration of the Grid Warning or Emergency notice, the CAISO’s issuance of a Cancellation notice, or notice of an end to the “emergency event” from the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services shall be deemed to provide notice under that same section that reduction
is no longer necessary. Ships that are berthed in California ports while the CAISO Grid Warning or Emergency notice is in effect shall not be required to use shore power until 11 :59 p.m. on the third day following the last consecutive day on which the CAISO issued a Grid Warning or
Emergency notice.
c. A ship operating on auxiliary engines pursuant to an “emergency event” under subparagraph (a) shall be deemed to qualify for an exemption under CCR, title 17, section 93118.3, subd. (d)(l)(E)(l)(a), and any visit occurring during the period described in subparagraph
(b) shall be counted towards compliance under CCR, title 17, section 93118.3, subd. (d)(l)(F)(l).
d. Any other permit, regulation or law prohibiting, restricting or penalizing the use of auxiliary ship engines or other conduct allowed by this Paragraph is suspended.

6. Any facility that operates in excess of permitting requirements or
conditions of a certificate suspended by Paragraph 4.e shall:

a. notify the relevant local air quality management district, the California Energy Commission, and the California Air Resources Board of its actions within 48 hours; and

b. report additional fuel use, additional hours of operation and times of operation, and energy produced by that additional use and operation to the relevant local air quality management district, the California Energy Commission, and the California Air Resources Board within 30 days of operation under this proclamation.

7. In order to help address any exceedances in emissions permitted under federal law and other federal obligations that result from acts taken under this proclamation, and to avoid jeopardizing public health or safety as a result of those acts, the California Air Resources Board shall develop by November 15, 2021, and then promptly implement, a State-funded plan to mitigate the effects of additional emissions authorized by this proclamation beyond ordinarily permitted levels. The mitigation plan shall include plans to invest in programs to improve air quality in communities, with a particular focus on disadvantaged communities, and to reduce risk to sensitive populations. To the extent it would otherwise apply to actions under this Paragraph, Chapter 3.5 ( commencing with section 11340) of Part l of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, is suspended.
8. As necessary to assist state agencies, local governments, utility companies, contractors, and others, the Department of Water Resources and the California Energy Commission shall enter into contracts to arrange for the procurement of materials, goods, and services necessary for projects likely to be online by October 31, 2021, that would expand energy supply and storage to respond to energy supply shortages caused by climate change. For contracts first executed through October 31, 2021, applicable provisions of the Government Code and the Public Contract Code, including but not limited to travel, advertising, and competitive bidding requirements, are suspended to the extent necessary to effectuate this Paragraph and Paragraphs 9 and 10.
9. With respect to all post certification petitions for changes in power plant project design, operation, performance, including geothermal generation and integrating solar generation and battery storage with appurtenant facilities on an existing site, the following statutes and regulations are suspended to the extent the California Energy Commission determines that the petitioned-for change should be granted and would reduce the energy shortfall resulting from this emergency by October 31, 2021:


a. California Environmental Quality Act in Public Resources Code, Division 13 (commencing with section 21000) and regulations adopted pursuant to that Division;
b. California Coastal Act in Public Resources Code, Division 20 (commencing with section 30000) and regulations adopted pursuant to that Division; and c. Title 20, section 17 69, of the California Code of
Regulations.

10. With respect to new emergency and temporary power generators of 10 megawatts or more that the California Energy Commission determines will deliver net peak energy before October 31, 2021, the provisions of Public Resources Code, Division 13 (commencing with Section 21000) and regulations adopted pursuant to that Division, are suspended to the extent that the California Energy Commission determines that such
generators should be licensed and that:

a. generation will be located in a previously disturbed site;
b. generation will use natural gas as soon after construction as practicable;
c. there is a secure water supply for the project; and
d. there is an available grid interconnection. Public Resources Code section 25500 shall apply to the issuance of a license under this Paragraph (notwithstanding the 50-megawatt limitation in Public Resources Code section 25120).

11. With respect to new, and expansions of, battery storage systems of 20 megawatts or more that the California Energy Commission determines are capable of discharging for at least two hours and will deliver net peak energy by October 31, 2022, the provisions of Public Resources Code, Division 13 ( commencing with Section 21000) and regulations adopted pursuant to that Division, are suspended to the extent that the Energy Commission determines that such systems should be licensed. Public Resources Code section 25500 shall apply to the issuance of a license under this Paragraph (notwithstanding the 50-megawatt limitation in Public Resources Code section 25120). The California Energy Commission shall implement the provisions in this Paragraph in consultation with local jurisdictions and state agencies.

12. The California Energy Commission shall establish a process to expedite all actions described in Paragraphs 9 through 11. The California Energy Commission’s implementation of and actions taken under Paragraphs 9 through 11 shall not be subject to the provisions of Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, and the California Energy Commission may delegate its authority under Paragraphs 9 through 11 to the Executive Director of the
California Energy Commission. The California Energy Commission shall maintain on its website a list of all activities or approvals for which it has relied on suspensions under this proclamation.

13. The California Public Utilities Commission is requested to exercise
its powers to expedite Commission actions, to the maximum extent necessary to meet the purposes and directives of this proclamation, including by expanding and expediting approval of demand response programs and storage and clean energy projects, to ensure that California has a safe and reliable electricity supply through October 31, 2021, to reduce strain on the energy infrastructure, and to ensure increased clean energy capacity by October 31, 2022. In particular, for purposes of expediting Commission actions, these emergency circumstances may be deemed an unforeseen emergency situation under Public Utilities Code section 311, subd. (d) & (g) and section 306, subd. (b); an event necessary for the preservation of the public health and safety or general welfare under Public Utilities Code section 311, subd. (h); an emergency situation involving matters upon which prompt action is necessary due to the disruption or threatened disruption of public facilities, allowing for an
emergency meeting under Government Code section 11125.5, subd. (a-b); and a circumstance in which the failure of the Commission to adopt a decision before the expiration of the 30-day review and comment period would cause significant harm to public health or welfare under the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure 14.6, subd. (c)(l 0).
14. The CAISO is requested to take all actions available and use best efforts, including seeking waivers to its existing tariff processes, to expedite the interconnection to the transmission grid of resources specified by the California Energy Commission for purposes of meeting the intent of this proclamation.
15. The California Energy Commission, in consultation with the California Air Resources Board, the CAISO, and the California Public Utilities Commission, shall identify and prioritize action on recommendations in the March 2021 Senate Bill 100 Joint Agency Report, and any additional actions, that would accelerate the State’s transition to carbon-free energy. The
California Energy Commission shall report its recommendations to me within 60 days.

——————

This proclamation is not intended to, and does not, create any rights or benefits, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity, against the State of California, its agencies, departments, entities, officers, employees, or any other person.

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Rob_Dawg
August 3, 2021 6:09 pm

King Canute

Steve Taylor
Reply to  Rob_Dawg
August 3, 2021 7:00 pm

No, NOT Canute. Canute’s point was that he COULDN’T hold back the tide, not that he could

StephenP
Reply to  Steve Taylor
August 3, 2021 11:40 pm

It was his courtiers who kept telling Cnut that he was all powerful. This sounds like what certain scientists are telling politicians in the modern world.
As for the Law of Intervention, it seems to be like the Law of Telling Lies, I.e. you have to keep telling bigger lies to keep the narrative going.

The Saint
Reply to  StephenP
August 5, 2021 12:44 pm

Advice for California: Build more dams and stop letting so much water out of the ones you have just to run into the ocean. There is already plenty of water in the Pacific Ocean.

Shoki Kaneda
Reply to  Rob_Dawg
August 3, 2021 7:07 pm

You are likely thinking about Xerxes scourging the Hellespont for wrecking his bridge.

August 3, 2021 6:22 pm

Another step back from the brink and backflip from Governor Gruesome.

Derg
Reply to  nicholas tesdorf
August 4, 2021 3:33 am

He can always eat maskless at the French Laundry.

Carry on Storm Troopers

beng135
Reply to  Derg
August 5, 2021 9:18 am

Yeah, but Darth Gruesome can’t last long without his mask. But he knows the power of the Dark-Green Side.

Last edited 5 months ago by beng135
Richard Page
Reply to  nicholas tesdorf
August 4, 2021 5:04 am

There is a man that is running scared. He’s trying to appease republican voters without alienating too many of the democrat voters. He’s walking a tightrope whilst wearing two different faces (one probably masked!) and issuing pronouncements from his backside – quite the circus performer.

Last edited 5 months ago by Richard Page
Robert Alfred Taylor
August 3, 2021 6:23 pm

When you’re in a hole you’ve dug for yourself, to get out, use a bigger shovel and dig harder.

John
Reply to  Robert Alfred Taylor
August 3, 2021 9:12 pm

I thought it was when you are in a hole stop digging
Please turn off the light switch when you leave so we can at least attempt to turn on the power

Ed Zuiderwijk
Reply to  Robert Alfred Taylor
August 4, 2021 1:01 am

Eco lunacy is very powerful voodoo medicine. If applied long enough you can conjure up electricity out of blue sky with a flick of your fingers.

Zig Zag Wanderer
August 3, 2021 6:27 pm

I love how they blame the Climate Crisis ™ and Extreme Weather ™ for an energy crisis of their own making

John the Econ
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
August 3, 2021 11:40 pm

But isn’t that the whole point of the “climate crisis” agenda? Simultaneously the universal excuse for the results of bad Progressive policy and the excuse for more bad Progressive policy.

His Majesty
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
August 4, 2021 6:28 am

Zig, I see what you did there™.

Drake
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
August 4, 2021 9:13 am

Can the governor be sued to void the “emergency” declaration due to the fact that the shortages were created by government actions, therefore were foreseeable but not planned for and thus this not an “emergency?

BillJ
August 3, 2021 6:33 pm

Newsome is smart enough to remember what happened to Gray Davis when CA couldn’t keep the lights on. With the recall election looming, he’s doing everything he can to avoid rolling blackouts this summer. Once the recall election is over, all bets are off.

California is one of the richest areas of the entire world and we can’t keep the lights on. Pretty ridiculous.

Devils tower
Reply to  BillJ
August 3, 2021 8:26 pm

Any body know why feather river has been at flood stage all summer as oroville was drained

Have an idea, but somebody local please comment?

https://www.actionnewsnow.com/content/news/Oroville-residents-wondering-why-Feather-River-is-flooding-local-beach-while-Lake-Oroville-is-dry-574963521.html

John
Reply to  BillJ
August 3, 2021 9:14 pm

all those Hollywood hills hypocrits will run their generators and airconditioners

beng135
Reply to  John
August 5, 2021 9:30 am

And then they also have their underground homes well-stocked w/food, water and weapons for when it all goes to heck.

Chris Hanley
August 3, 2021 6:36 pm

California joins the Third World.

Shoki Kaneda
Reply to  Chris Hanley
August 3, 2021 7:08 pm

Why not? We have Third World elections. Might as well live like them, too.

Joel O’Bryan(@joelobryan)
August 3, 2021 6:38 pm

“d . The utility must pay participating customers $2 per kilowatt hour reduced during the period specified in subparagraph (b);
e. The utility must pay participating customers $0.75 per kilowatt hour committed if the CAISO has issued a day-ahead Alert and the utility has directed participating customers to prepare to reduce their load under the program, but then the CAISO does not ultimately publish notice that load reduction under such programs is necessary…”

That’s some serious money going out the door for the utility if those reduction payments happen. Obviously those costs will be passed on to the customers by the utility company (PG&E, Cal Edison etc) under other regulatory actions not listed. Which means the customer’s bills for those payments won’t happen until the recall election is over. Reverse Robin Hood delayed. IOW, Stealing from the poor to give to the rich using delayed billing.

n.n
Reply to  Joel O’Bryan
August 3, 2021 7:39 pm

The Affordable Energy Act, with progressive prices and availability.

Steve Case
August 3, 2021 6:39 pm

exempting ships berthed in California ports to operate on auxiliary engines — which can mean using diesel fuel — instead of using shore power when the grid is strained.

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

WHEREAS it is already too late … to address the previously unforeseen shortfall…

If he followed WattsUpWithThat, he wouldn’t have that problem

NOW, THEREFORE, I, GAVIN NEWSOM, Governor of the State of
California … HEREBY PROCLAIM A STATE OF EMERGENCY to exist in California.
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED THAT:

If you apply the Duck Test, it looks like creating a state of emergency was the plan.

Corky
Reply to  Steve Case
August 4, 2021 8:11 am

Spot on in seeing the real solution to the reaction to the problem the political class makes.

It’s an emergency!

No one could have for seen this!

The people (especially children) are suffering!

We (political class) can solve this problem (temporarily) by taking more control!

And of course, we do not hold our political class accountable, other than the notion we can vote them out at the next election.

Felix
August 3, 2021 6:40 pm

“The ‘law of increasing intervention,’ as UK energy expert Colin Robinson coined it”

The lefties call it virtuous feedback and love love love it.

RickWill
Reply to  Felix
August 4, 2021 12:00 am

Australia’s NEM grid administration costs have risen at 12%pa for the last 4 years. Keeping lights on with weather dependent generators is demanding work. There is an endless stream of market notices and directions to keep the lights on:
https://www.aemo.com.au/market-notices

Managing millions of generators and millions of loads becomes a complex mix compared with managing a few coal fired generators; the occasional gas plant and a handful of aluminium smelters as it was 2 decades ago. Weather events did require attention when there were severe fronts that caused line dropouts but now every cloud and wind change has to be monitored and corrective action taken.

August 3, 2021 6:41 pm

Somehow, admitting that they were fundamentally wrongheaded does not seem a possibility in their weltanshaaung. Just telling the greens that their prejudices are destructive is something Newsom n and the rest of the California Democratic Party is incapable of doing.

AWG
Reply to  Tom Halla
August 3, 2021 7:06 pm

The Party is never wrong. You fail to meet their expectations.

Reply to  AWG
August 3, 2021 7:10 pm
  1. That is one of the reasons I left Calizuela.
John
Reply to  AWG
August 3, 2021 9:17 pm

here is a dictatorship
sell your property and leave while it has at least some value

Kenji
August 3, 2021 6:42 pm

It’s really sad … how declarations of “Emergency” are used to bypass all our laws, institutions, voters … bypass all the little-people. The only “power” which has no shortage is … “Emergency” Power

AndyHce
Reply to  Kenji
August 3, 2021 9:08 pm

The U.S has been running on non-ending declared emergencies since FDR.

TonyG
Reply to  AndyHce
August 4, 2021 9:39 am

Since the National Emergencies Act 1976 – 71 declared, 37 currently open.

Mike Ozanne
Reply to  Kenji
August 4, 2021 6:56 am

There was a joke about what kind of state the Austro-Hungarian empire was due to the frequent suspensions of it’s constitution.. “is it a democracy or a tyranny, neither it’s a state of emergency!!”

WR2
August 3, 2021 6:48 pm

A persistently hot summer? Seems to have been pretty mild in the bay area. But don’t worry, the mindless drones here won’t question anything coming from the ministry of truth.

AWG
Reply to  WR2
August 3, 2021 7:10 pm

WHEREAS wildfire, drought, and extreme heat events are likely to persist through this summer and recur next summer…”

So since the WX is written in stone for the remainder of this year and all of next, can California save some money by furloughing their meteorologists?

John
Reply to  WR2
August 3, 2021 9:18 pm

“…question anything coming from the ministry of mis- truth”.

Mike Smith
August 3, 2021 7:06 pm

“There will be some backup energy that will be from fossil fuels that (will be) used in very intermittent, very extreme and very rare occasions…”

As I write this, CAISO say that 59.4% of CA’s electricity is coming from Natural Gas. I thought the greenies considered this a fossil fuel but apparently, only when convenient to support the narrative.

Ed Zuiderwijk
Reply to  Mike Smith
August 4, 2021 1:06 am

Perhaps they finally figured out the ‘natural’ in natural gas.

Thomas Gasloli
August 3, 2021 7:07 pm

And backup auxiliary diesel will have much greater pollutant emission than if they just built a real base load fossil fuel fired generating facility. Fools!🤦‍♂️

Gary Pearse
August 3, 2021 7:27 pm

“…unforeseen shortfall of up to 5,000 megawatts that is now projected for
the summer of 2022…”

I guess Newsome doesn’t read WUWT. There have been several articles of late that ‘foresee’ frequent rolling black outs and brown outs for the easy peasy ‘foreseeable’ future for California.

Anthony, com’on man, your a Californian. Couldn’t you give Marybel some advice?

dk_
August 3, 2021 7:27 pm

I wonder how many of his opponents will ask why he didn’t do it sooner, or that the emergency declaration is required because of Newsom’s prior mismanagement?

Geoff Sherrington
August 3, 2021 7:50 pm

TURN ON NUCLEAR OR EXPLAIN WHY NOT.
Too many Californians seem not to understand the potential for politics to harm their health, wealth, jobs, understanding of life, education system, morals and ethics.
This pathetic action by the Governor is a band- aid, not a solution. It will fail in short time. Wait for the fullness of the arson season for a diversion of thoughts from electricity blackouts and fresh rounds of blame shifting. Geoff S

DMacKenzie
Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
August 3, 2021 8:37 pm

The profit motivated capitalist system that used to make sure people got electricity, has been taken over by governmentalists who feel its better to just charge taxes on electricity instead of providing it.

Kenji
Reply to  DMacKenzie
August 4, 2021 7:48 am

I have had large groups of people in PUBLIC Hearings … literally shout and spittle the word … Profffffffittttt!!! in my face … as though earning enough money to remain solvent is a bad thing. Thanks Public School Marxist Teachers … Thanks. Idiots.

Rhee
Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
August 4, 2021 11:36 am

Over the past 2 decades the AGW/CC cabal have convinced several governors in succession to allow nuclear power stations to be shuttered. It began with the San Onofre power station when a set of cooling tubes were found to be more brittle than tolerance specifications allowed. There wasn’t any leakage at all, just a new batch from Mitsubishi were thinner than allowed. Instead of letting Mitsubishi replace the shipment and replace all existing tubes with appropriate ones, the government pressured Socal Edison to decommission SONGS. It has now gotten to the point the station cannot be restarted, ever. Then they began to pressure PG&E to decommission Diablo Canyon power station, and that is now about halfway complete. In the midst of increasingly hot summers and unchecked illegal migration that exploded the population by up to 10m, there isn’t enough generation capacity to go around.

James H
Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
August 4, 2021 12:00 pm

Hypothesis: nuclear power plant parts are not sourced from China, so this form of energy is not allowed. All of the renewable energy parts are mainly made in China, and environmental regulations also tilt the scales so that the rare earths and such can only be mined in China, where there are no such regulations.

After thinking about this, a cynic might start to think that the whole purpose of CAGW/green energy is really just to shift money and power away from developed nations and centralize it into China. It’s hard to control distributed manufacturing across the globe which runs under many governments that have different power structures. Much easier to consolidate it all into a communist dictatorship, and once that is done, the rest of the world will be much more compliant. That’s just what a cynic would think, though.

Chakra
August 3, 2021 8:08 pm

Some people never learn.

They first make it unreliable by going for wind & solar energy. They keep fossil fired plants as back up. That is a costly and inefficient operation as the fossil plants will be under-utilized for at least 40-50% of times & at that time, their efficiencies will come down. (Thermal plants operate most efficiently and reliably at their 80-90% rated capacity).

Now they have come up with individual, small scale back ups which will be very less efficient as small backups can never have the efficiency of large scale plants.

AndyHce
Reply to  Chakra
August 3, 2021 9:11 pm

The left’s basic operating philosophy is ‘whenever something in their fantasy life doesn’t work, do more of it’.

Chakra
Reply to  AndyHce
August 4, 2021 12:35 am

Yes, Leftists do have a fascination for Models. They stick to their models of governance, economy and of course the Climate models irrespective of what ground reality suggests. Not unlike the religious fundamentalist, just replacing the religious prophets with their own ideological prophets and with a desire to “do good” without understanding the issue.

commieBob
August 3, 2021 8:19 pm

The sooner we have a full on train wreck the better.

The citizens of California need a serious kick upside the head before they can be brought to realize their foolishness. Even so, the return to sanity won’t be quick.

Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one.

AndyHce
Reply to  commieBob
August 3, 2021 9:13 pm

I have no belief that sanity ever returns to that type. History show that the minority have to force reality realization on them, THEN they gradually adapt.

Rusty
Reply to  commieBob
August 4, 2021 2:04 am

The UK needs one too.

Juan Slayton
Reply to  commieBob
August 4, 2021 2:14 am

The sooner we have a full on train wreck the better.

What you mean, “we“???

–Juan in Azusa

commieBob
Reply to  Juan Slayton
August 4, 2021 4:20 am

Most of the western world seems to think we can somehow replace fossil fuels with wind and solar. Some jurisdictions, like Germany, are pretending that they can make it work in the face of overwhelming evidence that they can’t. As a result, the problem isn’t obvious to the citizens. The greenies can still muster facts to show how cheap renewable energy is. They can find times when the whole grid is successfully powered by renewable energy for a few hours and claim that proves it’s viable.

The train wreck has to be big enough and disastrous enough that everyone in the world will notice and learn therefrom.

Yooper
Reply to  commieBob
August 4, 2021 6:51 am

Didn’t Texas just have such a train wreck? It doesn’t seem to have enlightened anyone.

commieBob
Reply to  Yooper
August 4, 2021 11:28 am

It’s too easy to write off as ‘just’ a natural disaster.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Yooper
August 4, 2021 12:57 pm

Note how quickly, and predictably, the propaganda pushing “media” instantly went nuclear (no pun intended) with “stories” insisting that wind and solar had nothing to do with the devastating blackouts in Texas in February.

And the deluded lap it right up – it was all down to lack of adequate “winterization,” not that little ol’ loss of 30% of power generation in the blink of an eye.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  commieBob
August 4, 2021 12:53 pm

You forgot quotes around “facts.”

Joe Wagner
Reply to  commieBob
August 4, 2021 5:09 am

> The citizens of California need a serious kick upside the head before they can be brought to realize their foolishness.

What in the world gave you the idea that they’re introspective enough to think that its their choices that brought them to this state? Its always Someone Else’s Fault.

oeman 50
Reply to  commieBob
August 4, 2021 8:13 am

This works out really well. With the power out, people in California won’t remember they they don’t have any bacon to cook! Problems solved!

Pat from kerbob
August 3, 2021 8:57 pm

It’s all about the use of language.

Does not matter how many times you use the word “extreme”, california is not getting hotter

Everything occurring in california now and in the future has occurred before.

This is all on the planners, such that they are
Drought and heat waves are the natural state there.

Same as here in the south western canadian prairies where we have enjoyed many years of cooler and wetter summers that may be coming to an end.
Hope not.

If it mirrors the early twentieth century a couple decades of rising temperatures was topped off by the dirty 30s, the most miserable time of recent existence.

John Sandhofner
August 3, 2021 9:13 pm

The state is a fool to go ahead with the shutting down of PG&E’s Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. For the greenies out there, nuclear power is the only way to go green and maintain adequate base load generation. There is not enough land to build enough solar, wind and battery backup to go100% green. It would be absurd to attempt that.

Rhee
Reply to  John Sandhofner
August 4, 2021 11:37 am

don’t forget that San Onfre Nuclear Generation Station was decommed a few years earlier and is currently being demolished.

John
August 3, 2021 9:24 pm

no power
no water
no food
tell google amazon etc to shut down silicon valley and those power hungry servers
good bye california
You must Check Out of HOTEL CALIFORNIA while you can still leave

RickWill
August 3, 2021 11:45 pm

suspending licensing requirements to speed up the expansion of battery energy storage systems of 20 megawatts or more that can discharge for at least two hours by Oct. 31 and deliver energy when the grid needs it most

Please do not cast an eye over the 450MWh battery at Geelong, Australia. Fire was an aberration that are rare events for batteries – after all Australia is a very hot place. Google only gets, 55,900,000 for the word combination “lithium battery fire”; not enough to warrant regulator attention.

JEHILL
Reply to  RickWill
August 4, 2021 4:49 am

I noticed that as well. They are chasing after a 20 MW battery with no available electricity to charge it. While needing significantly more than 5000 MW over next two years.

John
Reply to  RickWill
August 4, 2021 6:12 pm

Major hazards should be controlled
they are in every other energy business
just because they are batteries makes them no different

Ed Zuiderwijk
August 4, 2021 12:57 am

There will be lots to do for governor Larry Elder. I suggest his first action is to add to the list of ”relaxations’ the provision of black-outs first in neigborhoods populated by woke liberals. Let the eco-loons take the brunt.

4 Eyes
August 4, 2021 1:45 am

What a hypocritical cop out! Use fossil fuels to save their political skin.

Peta of Newark
August 4, 2021 2:49 am

https://www.adeltd.co.uk/diesel-generators/gensets.php?kvarange=1000%3E3001

Its what they’ve set up in the UK.
There’s an alphabettispaghettii for I but I cant be a$$ed

Slightly cross-threading from yesterday(?) – how do large Lithium batteries cope with high temperatures – as predicted to be coming.
(Damn well right High Temperatures if you persist in abusing trees)

Will the Big Batts need cooling, akin to how they need warming up when things are a bit chilly?

Wouldn’t that be sooooo Monty Python: the Green Energy Storage System burned the forest and the state to the ground. No more ‘Golden’, more like Blackened. pmsl
oh dear oh dear oh dear

It just lurches from Bad to Worse – what did go wrong to set this in motion – what was the Fatal Flaw, which Beijing Butterfly flapped its wings?
(Beijing??!! – that may be closer to the truth than I initially thought)
:-O

Last edited 5 months ago by Peta of Newark
AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Peta of Newark
August 4, 2021 1:02 pm

And unlike “wildfires,” the “battery fires” will be inextinguishable.

If they site those things just right, they’ll be able to get the whole damn state to burn – then they can blame it on “climate change.”

griff
August 4, 2021 2:52 am

California’s demand is constantly challenged because of extreme weather conditions… the heatwaves… that’s the main problem here

Graemethecat
Reply to  griff
August 4, 2021 3:14 am

Griffiepoo: Why were blackouts unknown in California until they started introducing Renewables?

Rhee
Reply to  Graemethecat
August 4, 2021 11:40 am

perhaps because the progressive elites hate seeing ugly renewable energy generating devices clutter their million-dollar-views off their balconies, so they relegate those to the wilderness, sometimes nearly a thousand miles away so they can feel good about using renewable energy, that has to be transmitted for those thousands of miles on extremely high voltage wires running through the forested wilderness back to their cities

Derg
Reply to  griff
August 4, 2021 3:43 am

It’s probably the fault of Simon’s Russia colluuuusion 😉

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Derg
August 4, 2021 2:25 pm

I heard it on CNN! It must be TRVTH!

Richard Page
Reply to  Carlo, Monte
August 5, 2021 2:51 am

I think the correct term is ‘Pravda’.

Krishna Gans
Reply to  griff
August 4, 2021 4:29 am

Heatwaves imply sun, so solar power should not be a problem. Where do you see the problems ?
😀

Last edited 5 months ago by Krishna Gans
Trying to Play Nice
Reply to  griff
August 4, 2021 4:47 am

If it happens all the time it is not extreme weather. The main problem here is you and your libtard friends.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
August 4, 2021 5:27 am

California has always had heat waves in the summer. The current ones aren’t any worse than past ones.
One difference is that the higher the percentage of renewables, the more unstable their grid has become.

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  griff
August 4, 2021 9:48 am

Heat waves creating massive earthquakes in California? Sure, griff, go for it!

Richard Page
Reply to  griff
August 4, 2021 10:46 am

You’re right. Heatwaves are caused by a large amount of hot air in one place. If Newsome and the California Democrats kept their mouths shut it’d certainly help solve that problem!

Tom Johnson
August 4, 2021 4:19 am

It appears that the Anointed follow two rules: 1) Green is crucial, except when it’s not. 2)When regulations fail, make more regulations.

MarkW
Reply to  Tom Johnson
August 4, 2021 5:28 am

The solution to every problem is more government. Even those problems caused by government.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  MarkW
August 4, 2021 2:26 pm

And when things go wrong blame Orange Man Bad.

JEHILL
August 4, 2021 4:29 am

Quote: “severe energy shortages throughout California caused by these climate events;”

These are yearly weather events. Nor are the energry shortages whether those be: capacity, generation or transmission, caused by either of them ( not that the two, weather and climate, are inexorably linked ). It the decades of misleading, mistaken understanding, and mismanagement — failed mitigation and planning of theses yearly events.

And yet they are still chasing the so-called “zero-carbon” energy sources. It could argued that coal, natural gas, and oil are long-term storage of solar energy that have gone through a geological process.

—–
They are going to spend a lot more money on the spaghetti junction of reporting requirements then actually “mitigating” the problem. If I had the time I would flow chart the reporting requirements. Anybody know what the State of California pays in Administrative cost on a per hour basis? Remember, these administrative cost are covered, paragraph 3. That’s taxes taken from the working class and redistributed to the government class.

SteveB
August 4, 2021 4:59 am

It seems this Emergency Order only applies if a) there is an extreme heat event or b) a transmission failure/problem. What if there is a shortage of power for other reasons – a power plant goes offline, the wind abates, there is heavy cloud cover, there is severe drought so hydro power is reduced.

Wade
August 4, 2021 5:22 am

Welcome to California!
No phone,
No lights,
No motorcar,
Not a single luxury,
Like Robinson Crusoe, it is as primitive as can be.

But plenty of taxes, and plenty of luxuries for the politicians and for the elites who bribe the politicians.

August 4, 2021 6:27 am

Only healthy and wealthy countries like the USA, Germany, Australia, and the UK can subsidize electricity from breezes and sunshine, and intermittent electricity at best. The 80 percent of the 8 billion on earth living on less than 10 dollars a day cannot subsidize themselves out of a paper bag. Those poorer countries must rely on affordable and abundant coal for reliable electricity, while residents in the healthy and wealthier countries pay dearly for those subsidies with some of the highest cost for electricity in the world.

ResourceGuy
August 4, 2021 7:00 am

I’m living among refugees from California who lost loved ones in wild fires. They don’t mention anything about climate change in their stories. Other refugees just talk about cost and taxes in California. The disconnect between what the people say and what leaders say reminds me of other authoritarian regimes with standard story lines and scripts. I guess the remaining Californians are either clueless or they are packing amid unchanged scripts from authorities.

Maybe there is a mathematical law that explains political scripts sinking to the points of uncheckable positions (low-energy regions) and that also explains the lack of movement out of those intellectual sinks.

Steve Case
August 4, 2021 7:04 am

California’s governor says the emergency is caused by climate change:

WHEREAS Californians are experiencing the impacts of climate change firsthand, from droughts to wildfires to heatwaves to floods to rising seas to mudslides to vanishing snowpacks; and …

Here’s the real cause:

Natural Gas Power Plant Retirement in California

John Garrett
Reply to  Steve Case
August 4, 2021 9:44 am

AND retirement of nuclear generating capacity.

ResourceGuy
August 4, 2021 7:05 am

I guess that means they can begin confiscating all the iron….

Battery Technology | Form Energy

Andy Pattullo
August 4, 2021 7:23 am

What will be interesting is to see how many lame, expensive, environmentally destructive and unreliable solutions they create for a problem that would simply go away if they gave up on their religious belief in a CAGW which has no objective scientific evidence to support it. In their minds the one thing they must not do is state the truth and admit their stupidity. But in time someone or some event will save them the trouble, and this will all collapse according to the laws of nature and the self interest of voters.

John Garrett
August 4, 2021 8:18 am

Nobody in their right mind will ever put another nickel into a California investor-owned public utility.

The risk of expropriation (constructive or outright) is far too high.

You’d have to be off your rocker to put capital anywhere near where the Socialist dictators who rule California can steal it.

drh
August 4, 2021 9:15 am

This may have already been pointed out by someone else, but the CA government is so desperate that they are bombarding Californians with PSA commercials that essentially say the blackouts are coming and it is up to each Californian to do their part to stop that from happening. It could not possibly be that the government has painted themselves into a corner with stupid green policies that have led to this. I cannot wait to move the hell out of CA, it really used to be a great state but now many middle class families that can afford to leave are leaving. It’s just a matter of time for me.

Gordon A. Dressler
August 4, 2021 9:38 am

From the above article: “There will be some backup energy that will be from fossil fuels that (will be) used in very intermittent, very extreme and very rare occasions . . .” — Public Utilities Commission President Marybel Batjer

Ummm . . . excuse me, but don’t those same use conditions apply to baseline energy supplied by “renewables”? Especially the intermittent part?

And remind me again the year that California is supposed to be totally independent of fossil fuels for its electrical power generation (except for emergency backup needs).

Last edited 5 months ago by Gordon A. Dressler
Burgher King
August 4, 2021 1:34 pm

In California, it doesn’t matter who casts the votes, it only matters who counts the votes. Gavin Newsom’s people will be counting the votes. He will win the September 14th recall election by hundreds of thousands of votes, if not millions of votes. Count on it.

Ulkair
August 4, 2021 7:16 pm

They should make a law decreeing that they are not allowed to import energy unless it is generated exclusively from wind or solar. The only way californians will learn is the hard way.

John Swallow
August 4, 2021 8:39 pm

Climate change will hit renewable sources with more unpredictability than nuclear. New Zealand is supposed to be over 80% renewable, but this year and next we will be importing record amounts of coal, because our hydro lakes are low. At sunset today, California’s batteries were running at 100% of capacity, and nuclear at 97%. Wind was running below 25%. Gas made up two thirds of the state’s power. Gas was over 65% all day, except for a few hours around midday, when it went down to just below 50%.
https://www.electricitymap.org/zone/US-CAL-CISO?wind=false&solar=false

.KcTaz
August 5, 2021 2:39 pm

“…unforeseen shortfall of up to 5,000 megawatts that is now projected for
the summer of 2022…”

Unforseen? Isn’t the same guy who said this the one who insists CO2 is going to burn planet Earth to a crisp? How could this be unforeseen unless, of course, he doesn’t believe his own BS?

Donald Whiteley
August 9, 2021 10:14 am

The Biden Admin. goal to have half of the new car production be EV by 2030 just exacerbates the problem. California is not building new hydro sites, in fact they would like to decommission existing hydro sites and tear down the dams. Most of their electricity is coming in from out of state coal fired plants, irony pause here. Environmentalists are adamant about stopping new solar and wind plants in the desert regions. I would like to see more natural, market solutions including photovoltaic on private houses and business rooftops. Wind power needs to be in windy areas, mainly along mountain passes. Don’t get me started on Cali cancelling nuclear power plants!

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