Ohio Eviscerates Preferred Siting, Accelerated Permission for Wind/Solar Developers (communities win!)

Reposted from MasterResource

By Sherri Lange — July 22, 2021

Many will accurately argue that if Ohio’s SB 52 were in place in their localities, they would currently be turbine free.

As Congresswoman and people’s politician, Shirley Chisholm wrote: “You don’t make progress by standing on the sidelines whimpering and complaining. You make progress by implementing ideas.” Seneca Anti Wind Union, bravo.

Ohio’s Senate Bill 52 is a game changer. Without comment or fanfare, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed into law a requirement that significantly raises the bar for new wind and solar projects, effective October 9, 2021.

More good news for community cohesion and property values. The Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB) killed the Republic Wind proposal. Heavy lifting by Seneca Anti-Wind Union Officers/members, Julie Johnson, Linda Hughes, Deb Hay, Chris Aicholz, to name a few, won the day for consumers, taxpayers, landowners.

Quote from the Toledo Blade:

 Not to sound overly caustic here, but government permitting authorities don’t always listen to critics of major development projects. They can’t, from a legal standpoint. It’s not a popularity contest.

Not quite. Industrial wind turbines and solar arrays are not just another development project. The W/S Bullies, whose bad economics is rescued by special subsidies, have long captured the legal system at the expense of the rest of us. Wind and solar have created their own legal framework, “popularity” through influence and coopting of approval agencies, spreading the (ill-gotten) profits by signing up impoverished farmers for about $8-10K per turbine per year, and neutralizing adjoining landowners with “good neighbor agreements.”

And at root, it’s all part of Al Gore’s “central organizing principle” of taking over the consumer-driven affordable, reliable energy system in the name of “rescuing” the climate.

Thank You, Bill 52

What proves exceptional, aside from the fact that Bill 52 provides for layers of consumer protection?

Foremost, the regular pattern of approvals is significantly jarred. Should we say, split open. Widely. This bill allows county commissioners to designate “restricted areas,” within the unincorporated parts of the county, “where economically significant wind farms, large wind farms, and large solar facilities may not be constructed.” 

We might summarize Senate Bill 52:

  • further review for future projects
  • public consultation
  • restrictions and areas restricted, can be PROHIBITIONS
  • plans subject to referendum, requiring approval from elected officers
  • Decommissioning plans required, before submitting an application to OPSB
  • Adds two more voting members to the Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB) to now include county and township government representatives or designees on solar and wind projects.

For a short synopsis of the Bill and its implications see here. Excerpts below.

On June 28, 2021, the Ohio General Assembly passed Substitute Senate Bill 52, a significant revision to Ohio’s power siting approval process for utility-scale solar and wind projects. Governor Mike DeWine is expected to sign the bill into law, with an expected effective date in early October 2021.

Sponsored by Senators Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) and Bill Reineke (R-Tiffin), S.B. 52 aims to increase local awareness and input from property owners – and to require approval from local county officials.

In short, the law requires a new upfront approval from the County Commission prior to the developer moving forward with the state siting process for certification of utility-scale solar and wind projects. This legislation has five major components:

– Grandfathers certain wind and solar projects already in development, not subjecting them to local approval mechanisms in S.B. 52.

– Subjects future projects to review by County Commissioners before developer submitting application to the Ohio Power Siting Board.

– Allows County Commissioners to establish restricted areas where wind and solar projects are prohibited, subject to referendum.

 – Adds two more voting members to the Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB) to now include county and township government representatives or designees on solar and wind projects.

 – Requires developers to submit decommissioning plans when applying to OPSB.

Past Mistakes Can Be Avoided

In many places, opponents spar and spend millions, in cases, to fight wind projects that they KNOW will be harmful to people and wildlife, well water, the fabric of their lives. These projects, they know, will leave a lifetime of misery and energy poverty.

Ontario Canada is a case in point. Community groups never could muster denial of a wind approval, over 40 huge and expensive legal fights, on the matter of human health. Only TWO ERTs (Environmental Review Tribunals) were successfully fought, one on the concern for the Blanding’s Turtle, the other due to concerns over human health but only as related to airport safety. Given the long-recorded 30-plus year history, anecdotal and data based, of harm to human health, the obvious misdemeanors in judgement are egregious. Matters not what quality of experts were called.  (Other denials of egregious and certain harm at these hearings were evident severally, and critics called these decisions whimsical and taxing, frivolous and vexatious.)

Many will accurately argue that if SB 52 were in place in THEIR communities, they would currently be turbine free. They could have preserved their families and community cohesiveness, their historical land uses, and ultimately, their health and economies too.

Conclusion

For a wind industry that has been overriding, even bull dozing, unwilling host communities, this new legal framework will be a significant brake. Some say, it is a death knell for Ohio’s “renewables.”  

Let the full implications gestate.  (We add that the LEEDCo, Fred Olsen proposal for offshore of Cleveland, under these prescriptions, still would not have a permit or application, since a decommissioning plan is not even yet in place. Among many omissions.)

This is, after all, a greed machine, where developers routinely put the cart of profit taking in front of the horse, the hobbling horse that only operates with massive subsidies, and tax relief.

Ohio’s motto is: “With God all things are possible.” The state argues that this is beyond a Christian expression and is an expression of hope, inspiration, and stick-to-it-iveness.  Works for me. On all fronts.

If you can hear the decanters crying about Ohio’s lack of “renewables” vision, you won’t hear the “whimper” long. Outperforming, is the universal “Congregational” song from wind warriors worldwide, and it’s voice is increasingly  powerful.

As Congresswoman and people’s politician, Shirley Chisholm wrote: “You don’t make progress by standing on the sidelines whimpering and complaining. You make progress by implementing ideas.” Seneca Anti Wind Union, bravo.

FURTHER READING

https://energynews.us/2021/05/24/ohio-bills-would-let-township-boards-block-wind-and-solar-power/embed/#?secret=1eSMNkT0nT

https://www.thenews-messenger.com/story/news/local/2021/06/30/sb-52-giving-counties-more-input-energy-projects-goes-governor/7809178002/

https://www.wtol.com/article/news/politics/state-politics/ohio-gov-mike-dewine-signs-bill-wind-solar-projects/512-643ddb27-ce1e-410d-9a52-8774b768f2a9

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2021/07/gov-dewine-signs-senate-bill-52-giving-counties-control-over-large-wind-and-solar-projects.html

https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/ohio-legislature-adopts-new-wind-and-2878693/

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July 24, 2021 6:08 pm

Kansas (40% of energy from wind), are you paying attention?!

MarkW
Reply to  Mike Smith
July 24, 2021 6:36 pm

That’s peak, not average. Secondly Kansas is connected to the rest of the country’s electrical grid so stability is provided by the rest of the country.

bigoilbob
Reply to  MarkW
July 24, 2021 7:04 pm

That’s peak, not average.”

No, you are confusing capacity with generation.

https://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/basic-ref/glossary/net-electric-generation.html

https://www.kansascommerce.gov/2020/04/kansas-continues-to-lead-in-wind-energy/\\”

  • “Wind energy as a percentage of total energy production40%, No. 2 in the nation”

Secondly Kansas is connected to the rest of the country’s electrical grid so stability is provided by the rest of the country.”

Tell it to ERCOT. Their current least cost way of avoiding another hundreds dead and 12 figures lost sub zero freezing event is to harden their natural gas to electric infrastructure . But they would have to do much less if they snap out of it, and join the rest of America. Maybe when Greg Abbott quits politicking against democracy and COVID health measures, he will admit that wind was NOT the cause of the avoidable 2/21 disaster.

JBP
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 7:41 pm

BigO,
My read of the article you linked only states that the capability of kansas’ wind power is 40%, not that that was achieved. Plus the article is a kansas press release, so just a bit of propaganda unless actual numbers are provided. They tout $11B invested, but that is another way of saying Kansas taxpayers were fleeced for crap technology that has to be subsidized to be ‘economical’. Then you ad hominem Abbott because the state idiotically allowed energy dependence on big electric fans while running a convoluted energy scheme. ‘He fought against democracy.’ Good one. Covid – ivermectin.

bigoilbob
Reply to  JBP
July 24, 2021 7:48 pm

How can you misread the parameter that is so plainly stated. What part of “total energy production” do you misunderstand.

Yes, they are touting their success, as well they should. I guess facts used in that service are therefore just “propaganda”. FYI, the EIA says the same. Oh yeah, in these fora they’re part of the Dr. Evil conspiracy as well. AGAIN, have to remind you all of the “Rule of Raylan”.

Drake
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 6:22 pm

Hey BOB, they first say 40% of electricity, then they “misspeak” and change it to “total energy” which is, of course, a crock.

So you are both off base.

Philo
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 26, 2021 10:14 am

YOU didn’t look at the actual information chart!!!! just below your “gem”.

Derg
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 7:56 pm

Sprinkle the ivermectin on dead people…see it doesn’t work 😉

n.n
Reply to  Derg
July 24, 2021 9:27 pm

To be fair, even a vaccine with a safety profile established over years, decades, would not revive people… persons with progressive viability, let alone the recently aborted. They provided doses of HCQ in and beyond the well-established toxic range to patients with progressive viability, and claimed… claim that a drug that has been used over decades, globally, for billions of people, and in current treatments for SARS-CoV-2 (with 80 to 90% success in early treatment), was not only ineffective, not only unsafe, but was a forcing of elective abortion.

.KcTaz
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 12:40 am

Your FDA release about Ivermectin is woefully short on facts and data. It is hardly convincing.
My own doc has prescribed Ivermectin to her 10 patients out of 11 who got COVID. They are all elderly. She prescribed is at first symptoms along with HCQ. All recovered, no hospitalization and are fine. Her 11th patient didn’t call her for 10 days after onset of symptoms. He called on day eleven from an ambulance while on his way to the ER. Nothing she could do at that point. He died. Many doctors have the same positive experiences with it. The question is, why is the gov. bureaucracy fighting it? Is it because it’s off-patent and cheap?

bigoilbob
Reply to  .KcTaz
July 25, 2021 10:19 am

So you take my data based link, pronounce it “short on data” with no backup, and then give us a second hand anecdote to substitute for it. Think fast – what is NOT the plural of anecdote?

ozspeaksup
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 2:12 am

fda link
ta for the chuckles
side effects listed are way excessive for normal dose and results
however large dose parasite infecteds could have that result
so do dogs WITH heart worm have issues doses need to be starting small and incremental rises or the worms all die and the patient is likely to as well, from the debris and damage OF the worms

George Daddis
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 8:07 am

Read both the GA SB202 and Abbott’s Texas law and cite ANY provision that can be remotely construed as “against Democracy”.
Don’t believe everything that Stacy Abrams, AOC and Demented Joe say.

Duane
Reply to  JBP
July 25, 2021 5:22 am

Nope – Abbott and the idiots who run Texas are responsible for that fiasco this past winter … in a combination of failing to harden all their energy systems for cold weather, which DOES occur in Texas every winter, to a totally deregulated power delivery system, which no other state stupidly does, even the reddest of the red states besides Texas understands that public utilities must be regulated as public utilities and not as competition driven private businesses.

MarkW
Reply to  Duane
July 25, 2021 7:52 am

Who cares what the EPA regulations are, if the governor is a Republican, he’s always the one at fault.
At least according to liberals.

Drake
Reply to  Duane
July 25, 2021 6:33 pm

OK Duane, what was the prime mover for all of the natural gas pumps? Electricity, due to Obama regulations.

If THAT change had not been made, the natural gas delivery would not have been as severely effected when the electricity shut down.

So Obama and EPA are almost as much to blame as the stupidity of installing all those bird chopping wind “generators”. Oh, so because his administration and the democrat controlled congress also provided the subsidies to make installation of solar and wind economically feasible, it is ALL Obama’s fault.

Derg
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 7:55 pm

Lol…where do they get power when the wind slows or stops…wind fairy indeed.

bigoilbob
Reply to  Derg
July 24, 2021 7:57 pm

“Lol…where do they get power when the wind slows or stops…wind fairy indeed.

In the main, they’ve had this figured out for decades now. Here, there, everywhere. I forget. How long did Rip van Winkle sleep for?

Derg
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 7:59 pm

Wind fairy indeed

MarkW
Reply to  Derg
July 24, 2021 8:12 pm

Like most liberals, bugOilBoob believes what ever his handlers tell him to believe.

.KcTaz
Reply to  MarkW
July 25, 2021 12:46 am

Or, whatever his handlers pay him to believe and spout.

n.n
Reply to  Derg
July 24, 2021 9:27 pm

Fairy, perhaps. In Stork They Trust

ozspeaksup
Reply to  n.n
July 25, 2021 2:13 am

nah stork was an early victim of shredding

.KcTaz
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 12:45 am

Those in the real world of energy delivery, solar, in this case, have proved it destabilizes the grid and increases pollution.
Wind is no different as it has the same problem as solar, it’s intermittent and unreliable.
Duke Energy application points finger at solar for increased pollution
August 14, 2019
https://nsjonline.com/article/2019/08/duke-energy-application-points-finger-at-solar-for-increased-pollution/

……“After committing $2 billion in tax credits, and more than $1 billion in electricity overpayments for solar power, we now learn from Duke that nitrogen oxides have actually increased, and that CO2 may be headed in the wrong direction,”
…“Renewable energy sounds good, but it performs terribly. If you want electricity available when you need it, you don’t want intermittent, unreliable, renewable energy,” Kish said. “It’s like a cancer on an efficient grid, with its ups-and-downs forcing other sources to pick up the slack in the most inefficient ways, which, in some cases, are more polluting.”

bigoilbob
Reply to  .KcTaz
July 25, 2021 10:17 am

So, a predominantly coal using company that has managed to communize billions in shirked coal ash clean up costs from them onto others, is telling us how polluting renewables are. Alert the media…..

Drake
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 6:44 pm

Go ahead and provide the link proving your never ending “everybody has to clean up” for fossil fuels.

BTW, the above post notes that the change in regulations are requiring wind and solar to provide a “clean up”, de commissioning plan. Nothing about any BOND to guaranty the removal.

I take that to mean, that has never been required before.

Isn’t that your #1 gripe about fossil fuels?

Haven’t I asked you repeatedly to tell us if wind and solar were required to have decommissioning plans?

Have you EVER answered that question?

No you have not.

John Endicott
Reply to  Drake
July 26, 2021 4:23 am

BigOilyBoob answer questions? never happen.

Last edited 5 months ago by John Endicott
Bill Powers
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 11:45 am

Who are they and what did they figure out years ago, bob?

And ‘in the main’ don’t you mean in the mainstream media?

Anyone paying attention can see that the MSM operate as Big Government’s Propaganda Ministry and the Publicity Department for the DNC. And that the whole Cabal is owned by and takes their direction from the Corporatocracy.

Drake
Reply to  Bill Powers
July 25, 2021 6:46 pm

That is the Cronycleptocorpratocracy, i.e. the oligarchs.

starzmom
Reply to  Derg
July 25, 2021 5:23 am

Funny you should ask. There hasn’t been much wind lately here. The Southwest Power Pool (www.spp.org) which includes Kansas, has been getting about 2000-5000 MW from wind over the past few weeks, out of a capacity of about 30,000 MW. On any given day that I have looked, 50% of the generation comes from coal, and 30-40% from natural gas. Wind is generally in the 5-10% range when the load is fairly high, maybe lower.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  starzmom
July 25, 2021 6:09 am

Yes, and all those windmills in the Southwest Power Pool stopped working in the February coldsnap, just like they did in Texas, and for the same reason: Little or no wind underneath a high-pressure weather system, and this particular high-pressure system covered half the United States from the Canadian border to the Gulf of Mexico. All the windmills in that area quit working or were barely working. Ten percent of Oklahoma’s windmills were working during that time.

Last edited 5 months ago by Tom Abbott
starzmom
Reply to  Tom Abbott
July 25, 2021 6:23 am

Many of them did go offline. Thank goodness I had a good wood stove, and lots of wood, so the dogs and I stayed pretty comfortable. And we didn’t lose power as they did in Texas. It was dicey for a while though.

MarkW
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 8:11 pm

What is it about liberals and there desire to repeat whatever their masters tell them to believe.
Asking people to show ID when the vote is working against democracy?
Also I just love the way you assume that anything printed by a left wing government is true.
Working against COVID measures that don’t work is hardly a crime.

Derg
Reply to  MarkW
July 26, 2021 3:00 am

No ID to vote, but you must produce your vaccine passport 😉

John Endicott
Reply to  MarkW
July 26, 2021 4:46 am

you really can’t make this stuff up. Democrat legislatures flee Texas to prevent a bill requiring photo ID passing by boarding a chartered plane (which requires they show their Photo ID), Checked into a hotel (which required they show their Photo ID) visited the capital and white house (which requires they show their photo ID) and got COVID tested at a clinic (which requires they show their photo ID).

TonyG
Reply to  John Endicott
July 26, 2021 9:13 am

Also, they were on the charter jet without masks (saying it wasn’t mandated) while arguing in favor of more mask mandates. I guess they’re not able to do something unless the government tells them to?

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 8:28 pm

“Wind energy as a percentage of total energy production: 40%, No. 2 in the nation”

So says a blog post. Look for the actual report online, and I can’t find it, just dozens of similar boiler-plate pre-written articles saying the same thing.

Follow the link given to the gov website, page not found.

The company awea is all about making wind turbines. No conflict of interest there, is there?

So, no actual data, blog posts based on a unfindable report by a company that makes wind turbines and wants to say that wind is successful. Also note the language selection on their website. One is Chinese as far as I can tell. Not even American I’d wager.

Last edited 5 months ago by Zig Zag Wanderer
bigoilbob
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
July 24, 2021 8:38 pm

So says a blog post. Look for the actual report online, and I can’t find it,”

You didn’t look very hard. Or at all.

https://www.eia.gov/state/analysis.php?sid=KS

“Wind surpassed coal in 2019 for the first time as the largest energy source for generating electricity in Kansas. That trend continued in 2020, when wind energy accounted for 43% of the state’s net generation.”

And AGAIN, not “capacity”. ~43% of Kansas electrons that year, came from wind.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 8:41 pm

You didn’t look very hard. Or at all.

https://www.eia.gov/state/analysis.php?sid=KS

That is not the report that was cited in the blog post you linked to.

I looked at the report you linked to now. I can’t find any actual data. Links seem to just return to that page. Searching for the cited reports yields more reports or puff pieces without data.

Can you cite any actual data, please?

Last edited 5 months ago by Zig Zag Wanderer
Graemethecat
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
July 25, 2021 12:55 am

A sudden silence from Big Oily Blob. Like Griff, he fails to read the articles he cites.

.KcTaz
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
July 25, 2021 1:10 am

Try this. I messed up posting the data above but you can find it here. All renewables, not just wind are nowhere near 40% of Kansas energy.
https://www.eia.gov/state/seds/data.php

Chris Hanley
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 9:28 pm

The other 60% or so comes from thermal including nuclear coal and gas.
Without imports Kansas needs thermal because wind needs thermal, thermal doesn’t need wind.

starzmom
Reply to  Chris Hanley
July 25, 2021 5:59 am

Lately coal and natural gas have been supplying 80% of the electricity in the Southwest Power Pool, of which Kansas is part. This morning coal is supplying 54%. Hasn’t been much wind in the region in the past few weeks.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Chris Hanley
July 25, 2021 10:43 am

Agree except “other 60%” is more like “other 79%.”

John Hultquist
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 9:59 pm

What is the difference if one considers what is used in Kansas and what is produced there?
That is, how much is imported?

.KcTaz
Reply to  John Hultquist
July 25, 2021 1:17 am

John, you have only to look at Calif. to learn how important not having to import energy is. I think it was just last summer during a heat wave Cal hit the wall.

Normally, Cal. PAYS AZ to take their excess renewable energy when they produce too much and PAYS AZ (and Nev. and Washington St.) to get electricity when their renewables don’t produce enough. Last summer, It was hot all over. No one, including AZ. which has nuclear, had any excess electricity to sell to Callf. It was needed for their own states and they kept it. Thus, in the middle of the heat wave, Cal couldn’t get electricity and had massive blackouts. AZ., Nev. and Wa. did not as they can produce their own and are not dependent on the unreliable wind and solar.

starzmom
Reply to  John Hultquist
July 25, 2021 6:29 am

I think it would be hard to tease out the exact source of power for Kansas customers versus other customers in the regional power pool. It is all interconnected, and there is generation in all states in the pool. You might be able to figure out how much is imported into the region, but you would have to be a lot smarter than me to know exactly where to go on the internet to get those numbers. I have not been able to find them on anything close to a real time basis, even at the pool’s website.

John in Oz
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 12:43 am

Do you have the date for time of generation?

‘Dispatchable’ is an important concept:

A dispatchable source of electricity refers to an electrical power system, such as a power plant, that can be turned on or off; in other words they can adjust their power output supplied to the electrical grid on demand.

Jim Gorman
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 4:42 am

As usual, averages don’t tell the story. Over the last 9 months, wind has done a monthly low of 33% and a monthly high of 62%. Everyone should know that variability is biggest issue behind wind and solar generation, not what they are capable of when conditions are great for their use.

That is a variability of almost 30% over a month’s time. I didn’t pursue looking at daily or hourly figures but I suspect the variation at that level is even worse.

The grid was originally designed for a single station falling off line where others could pick up the slack easily. That is simply not the case where variability means you can lose 30% of your generation at a single time. Backup’s must be kept on line in spinning fashion to do this. Terribly, terribly inefficient and costly. Especially when that backup could be providing the power to begin without the additional cost of wind and solar.

icisil
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 7:14 am

“Wind surpassed coal in 2019 for the first time as the largest energy source for generating electricity in Kansas. That trend continued in 2020, when wind energy accounted for 43% of the state’s net generation.”

Not all power is equal. A lot of that energy is produced at night when it’s not needed. and that can’t be controlled like it can be with coal.

I remember reading something about some wind consortium in the Mid-west getting their panties in a knot because TVA rejected their proposal to use its transmission lines as a corridor for wind power to southeastern states. One of TVA’s reasons was the excess power at night was not needed.

LdB
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 27, 2021 4:34 pm

No bob you own link reference is 65 and they say it is production but look at link 65 and it is summer capacity isn’t even the whole year

Here is the heading of link 65 … so your link is wrong, a lie or biased take your pick. The data it uses does not say what the claim made says.

Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2009 through 2019

Last edited 5 months ago by LdB
n.n
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
July 24, 2021 9:33 pm

Texas needs to divest from intermittent/renewable energy converters, electric compressors, and return to efficient energy production with reliable transmission technology. They can still invest in Green technology for niche markets where performance is not a factor, and reconcile the environmental blight on a case by case basis.

.KcTaz
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
July 25, 2021 1:07 am

I found this. If I can get it to post. It shows renewables are nowhere near 40% and that’s all of them, not just wind.
KANSAS
https://www.eia.gov/state/seds/data.php
Kansas   1,123.2   197.8   316.9   351.1   865.8   

State   Total
              Fossil Fuels   Renewable               
               Energy                     TOTAL TOTAL 
Kansas   1,123.2   197.8   316.9   351.1   865.8   238.0   

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 24, 2021 8:38 pm

Tell it to ERCOT. Their current least cost way of avoiding another hundreds dead and 12 figures lost sub zero freezing event is to harden their natural gas to electric infrastructure .

The desperation to blame gas for the failure in Texas is palpable.

The only reason gas. had a problem when pretty much all the wind generators failed, was because some green idiot (bit of redundancy there) decided that using gas itself to pump fluid, you know, gas that’s actually definitely going to be there, they should rely on electricity, you know, electricity that wasn’t there.

JEHILL
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 4:19 am

I lived in Texas when this happened. It was most assuredly because of too much wind generation capacity and little to no available base load and peak capacity. Furthermore, the pipeline gas compressor pumps were replaced with electric pumps that were directly tied to the wind farms. When the turbines froze or broke due to the temperatures the gas could longer be pumped to the power generation plants. Furthermore, they had to make a choice: keep the grid running, which consumes about 15% of the power generation or rolling brown and blackout. There are, my current knowledge, no blackstart generators left on the Texas grid.

bigoilbob
Reply to  JEHILL
July 25, 2021 7:18 am

 It was most assuredly because of too much wind generation capacity and little to no available base load and peak capacity.”

No one disputes that wind lost capacity in this 0.05% event. What is sad is that ERCOT thought it wouldn’t. There was plenty of natural gas to electricity capacity and “could have been” interconnected capacity to spare if simple plans – already recommended – had been implemented to use it. Also, freeze hardening wind turbine innards, as done everywhere else in the CONUS with significant cold weather, would have reduced turbine down times*. Yes, these measures – already rrecommended – would have cost a tiny fraction of the 12 figures and 100+ lives lost in the disaster, but Guv’s Goodhair** and Abbott made sure that didn’t happen. And it looks like you all are too caught up in nonexistent election fraud to snap out of it even now.

“Furthermore, the pipeline gas compressor pumps were replaced with electric pumps that were directly tied to the wind farm.”

Electrification of oilfield facilities, from the wellhead thru transmission and conditioning, has been an ongoing good thing for over 50 years. FYI, anything tied “directly to the windfarm” is, by definition, also attached to the ERCOT grid. This problem could have been solved, almost problem free, by prioritizing shut ins to ensure that those pumps (and their ancillary facilties) were kept on.

  • Blade freezing wouldn’t be helped. Time to feather them.
  • ** H/T to Molly Ivins – RIP.

bigoilbob
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 7:34 am

“nonexistent election fraud”

Bob, you’re being hyperbolic. You should work on that. The proper term is “practically nonexistent election fraud”.

icisil
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 11:16 am

On average maybe, but only a little bit in the right swing states is enough to swing the election.

Derg
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 26, 2021 3:07 am

Ha…you can hack a pipeline company but it is impossible to hack an election 😉

Loren C. Wilson
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 7:38 am

A lot of gas producers froze up during the Valentine’s Day Massacre. While natural gas does not freeze until you get past Neptune, there is always water in produced gas and that freezes at 0°C. They also had hydrate formation, which is a solid compound formed from water and methane (ethane and propane do it also but not important in this case) above 0°C at pressures above about 500 psi (3.4 MPa). Most gas producers in cooler climates of the USA and Canada have insulation and/or heaters to prevent freezing. Because the contracts these gas producers had did not require this, they didn’t spend the money to winterize their wellheads and surface collection lines. There was no financial penalty to dropping off the supply chain when they froze up other than lost revenue. A bit short-sighted of ERCOT.

bigoilbob
Reply to  Loren C. Wilson
July 25, 2021 8:08 am

True about ERCOT – and their political handlers – especially when the fixes would have been a tiny fraction of the losses from just this event.

I don’t blame the folks running the natural gas to electric infrastructure for going low bid. Rather, they should have been richly rewarded by ERCOT for spending a penny or 2 on the $ lost last February. to harden up their systems.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 10:56 am

Completely ignoring that the wind stopped blowing after the storm, which meant that, frozen or not, they would still be producing essentially nothing. And it was the sudden drop-off of the wind and solar that led to power stations going off-line to self-preserve of necessity.

You can twist yourself into a pretzel trying to blame anything else all you want – despite all the propaganda predictably trying to say the failure of “renewables” was not behind the Texas power debacle in Feb 2021, “renewable energy” absolutely was the domino that knocked everything down. And the “interconnection” thing is a good laugh – if the climate zealots get their way, the whole country (and every other country) will be in the same boat with excessive reliance on unreliable, weather-dependent electricity “sources” – guaranteeing more devastating blackouts. “Plugging in” to the “grid” won’t matter when the whole effing thing goes belly up.

How many need to die freezing to death and starving to death in the dark before we stop this “renewable” stupidity?!

Drake
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 7:00 pm

Nice post BOB, but as always with you envirowackos, you tell us that the problem could have been avoided if WE, the taxpayers and ratepayers had spent more money to provide more redundancy, when if no one had ever build the wind and solar the redundancy would have, and always has been, part of the grid.

So BOB, give me a historical account of when generation failed in storm like that one BEFORE there was unreliable, non-dispatchable wind and solar to disrupt the system.

Take your time, BOB, do the research, you might learn something.

paul courtney
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 26, 2021 10:04 am

Mr. bob: Not another self-reply??! You organize your thoughts before pressing “send” just as poorly as Molly Ivins writing a column.

NickSJ
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 25, 2021 4:35 pm

Does this look like natural gas was the problem?

Texas cold spell power production.jpeg
Philo
Reply to  bigoilbob
July 26, 2021 10:12 am

The first reference is for nuclear power and nothing else.
The second reference highlights 40% of power. However,
the second ref. also shows power production for every source.
“other renewable, not including biopower, shows KS has 22% of its electric power from solar and wind(renewables).
Kansas, like every other state, always tries to make a good impression.

Tom Halla
July 24, 2021 6:19 pm

Oh my! If I really wanted to stop something in the US, the two approaches would be zoning boards or liability lawyers. As neither has any real sense of setting priorities, subjecting some project to either would tend to kill it.
I used to live in California, and CARB and the PUC had the worst characteristics of both.

.KcTaz
Reply to  Tom Halla
July 25, 2021 1:30 am

Tom, I kind of feel like the current residents who are the ones who must live with the decisions made at the state level have every right to veto a zoning decision and the best place for that decision to be made is as the local level. The state bureaucrats and politicians may well be the ones enjoying monetary gain from their decisions, as I suspect they are (call me cynical, or realistic), but they don’t have to live with the results of their decisions, It’s the locals that do and they often suffer monetary loss as well as loss of quality of life.

Rich Lentz(@usurbrain)
July 24, 2021 6:39 pm

Appears as if the opponents to W/S have discovered the same tactics used by the Anti-Nukes. Every time a “Concern” by those against a planned Nuclear Power Plant was settled the plant owners were served papers on another “Concern/Problem? t be corrected. Three Mile Island had to pay a Biology Professor for Penn State to gather all of the dead birds around the cooling towers, perform a Necropsy,, classify cause of death and determine if the cause of death was from the towers and the numbers. To my knowledge this went on for the entire time TMI was licensed by the NRC. I remember because to me it was the most ridiculous. There were many of these. Basically kept a team of lawyers busy for years.

Last edited 5 months ago by usurbrain
michael hart
Reply to  Rich Lentz
July 24, 2021 10:55 pm

Yes. It’s certainly been one of the most successful strategies employed by the environmental/anti-nuclear lobby for many years. It’s nice to see the same tactics being used against their pet schemes.

It’s not intellectually satisfying to win this way, but they’ve been playing dirty for decades and it really is time to take the gloves off.

.KcTaz
Reply to  michael hart
July 25, 2021 1:32 am

michael, I could not agree with you more!

Drake
July 24, 2021 6:53 pm

Where is BigOilBob?

The fact that this new law requires a decommissioning plan tells me that previously there was no requirement for such. That is his big bugaboo about OIL!

It doesn’t say a bond is required to cover decommissioning though, something I think should be required for wind and solar. You know, systems that create miles and miles of relatively useless and non recyclable crap that will be very difficult and expensive to remove.

Derg
Reply to  Drake
July 24, 2021 7:58 pm

And all that buried concrete

John Hultquist
Reply to  Derg
July 24, 2021 10:03 pm

One plan was to remove the top 3 feet, cover, re-contour, and re-plant with native vegetation.
I think 5 feet would be better, but they didn’t ask me.

.KcTaz
Reply to  John Hultquist
July 25, 2021 1:38 am

I think the wind company should be made to dig up ALL then concrete, haul it off and recycle it, too! I don’t know if you can recycle concrete but that’s their problem. Also, they should, like OIL, have to pay 10 grand for every dead threatened, or endangered bird their windmills kill and their will be many. They should be required to pay a neutral 3rd party to look for and collect the carcuses daily, not every 2 or 3 months which is mostly done now, if it’s done at all, so they accurately count the carcuses before they are hauled off by scavengers. In addition, windmills can throw birds a very long way and they need to vastly widen the required search area. This is, also, true for all the bats they are killing.

Robert of Texas
Reply to  .KcTaz
July 25, 2021 11:02 am

The concrete can be used to build artificial reefs and sea walls if nothing else. The problem is then where to find dirt to put into the pits where the concrete was dug out and how to loosen the super compacted earth under the roads used to move heavy loads around. I suppose one could blast the road…

The what to do with the carbon fiber materials that you cannot recycle? Likely they will have to bury those somewhere.

starzmom
Reply to  Robert of Texas
July 25, 2021 3:31 pm

Moving huge concrete pads from Spearville, Kansas, to some area off a coast sounds like a very expensive operation. The realistic thing to do is bury or recycle the concrete. Burying the concrete and covering it with dirt to reclaim the land for agriculture will have about the same effect as using rocky land for crops–you can really see where the shallow soil is, because the crops don’t do as well both because they don’t have deep topsoil, and because they dry out fast.

Rich Lentz(@usurbrain)
Reply to  John Hultquist
July 25, 2021 7:46 am

Buried concrete may be alright for agricultural use but I would not build on it if I knew it was there. It should be completely removed, Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants Require “Return to as found”
My house is built on land that was moved from across the road to the low area on this side of the road. When i put up my Ham Radio antenna I drove an 8 foot ground rod into the ground. After it was in about 3 feet I could almost push it into the ground by hand. A few years later while working on the drop-off not far behind my house, I found large chunks of concrete pavement/sidewalk scattered around about a foot below the surface. I am sure this explains why every tree I have planted in the last 30 years just quits growing after 10 – 15 years, so I am sure the entire lot has scrap concrete about 3 feet below the surface.

Drake
Reply to  Drake
July 25, 2021 7:05 pm

I just came back to the site today, BOB never read past the first post and went on with his crap up there.

I asked him my questions up there, but I don’t expect a response.

markl
July 24, 2021 7:03 pm

Just another political power play, they’ll give in unless the people are really tired of tower, turbine, and panel farms.

John Hultquist
Reply to  markl
July 24, 2021 10:04 pm

facilities, not farms

.KcTaz
Reply to  John Hultquist
July 25, 2021 1:39 am

I like facilities much better than farms but I prefer factories even better.

Mark Kaiser
July 24, 2021 7:56 pm

I live in Ontario. When the McGuinty Liberals pushed through new wind farms there was little/no environmental regulations to speak of. I remember how hard it was to find legit data as to the cost. And the price the Ontario govt. offered to pay for wind contracts….obscene. Don’t quote me (I can’t find the article anymore) but I remember 80 cents kWh was the guarantee at first.

You can see the mess we are in with relation to electricity prices. The figures are a few years old but you get the idea.
http://www.windontario.ca/

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Mark Kaiser
July 24, 2021 8:18 pm

And Ontario sent the low cost solar sector leaders packing with their made-in-Ontario protectionist requirement. That confirms their high-cost bias for me.

Sommer
Reply to  Mark Kaiser
July 25, 2021 11:18 am

thank you Mark Kaiser for providing that link. To this day, most people are ill informed because the MSM has refused to expose this.

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  Sommer
July 25, 2021 9:13 pm

Parker Gallant did a series on this

observa
July 24, 2021 8:13 pm

Same deal for the watermelons with EVs and dispatchable power for them. They can’t have their Utopia without digging up lithium-
U.S. judge rules Lithium Americas may excavate Nevada mine site (msn.com)
Welcome to tradeoffs numpties.

.KcTaz
Reply to  observa
July 25, 2021 1:50 am

observe, interesting article.
“…The land that would be affected amounts to less than a quarter of an acre on a project roughly 18,000 acres in size, a factor which Du said affected her decision.”

I find only a quarter of an acre rather hard to believe given the mines in China, Chile and the Congo are way larger and, then, it seems they need a lot of water. Where are they going to get that in Nevada?
That said, since it’s the US who is the prime consumer of the products needing Lithium (and Europe), it’s only right we mine for it here instead of in out of sight, far poorer countries with zero environmental laws, or not poor countries, like China, with zero environmental laws.
We should remember it’s Lithium is not the only rare earth metal that is mined, too, and mining for all of it, at present, in these countries is a disaster. The US can do it much safer but at higher cost, of course.

Big Wind’s Dirty Little Secret: Toxic Lakes and Radioactive Waste
http://bit.ly/35yNHlf

Richard Mann
July 24, 2021 9:58 pm

Infra sound, low frequency sound below the threshold of hearing, has never been addressed.
Wind turbines need to stop due to documented, ongoing, and cumulative health harm from infra sound.
Please see the following talk,
September 12, 2019. University of Waterloo.
Mariana Alves-Pereira (Lisbon, Portugal). “Infrasound and Low Frequency Noise: Physics & Cells, History & Health”.
Livestream:
https://livestream.com/itmsstudio/events/8781285
Despite repeated attempts to contact government, no one has responded to my requests.

icisil
Reply to  Richard Mann
July 25, 2021 6:32 am

Humans and nearby wind turbines are incompatible. The next avenue that needs to be opened up is civil lawsuits against landowners who allow wind turbines on their properties for exposing neighbors to health-damaging infrasound. Educating the public about infrasound-caused vibroacoustic disease is key.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Richard Mann
July 25, 2021 6:37 am

Infrasound is probably not doing the whales and dolphins and other creatures in the sea any good, either.

starzmom
Reply to  Tom Abbott
July 25, 2021 6:49 am

I agree with you there. And to the extent that marine mammals suffer from infrasound, we probably won’t be able to tell for 50 years or so. I suspect it is pretty hard to accurately count whales and assess fertility.

ozspeaksup
July 25, 2021 2:04 am

wow well done! lets hope it now sets precedent for others to also get the right to say NO!!! to birdshredders and mass solar ugliness

JEHILL
July 25, 2021 4:35 am

The best part of this new law is the decommissioning requirement. That is using the greenblob’s own tactics. Decommissioning, speaks to the environmental and remediation aspects post project life. That money has to paid upfront.

Fran
Reply to  JEHILL
July 25, 2021 12:07 pm

It looks as if they require a “decommissioning plan”, not a bond.

Oatley
July 25, 2021 5:32 am

Long overdue, notwithstanding the fact that renewables in Ohio aren’t economic in the first place.

Tom Abbott
July 25, 2021 5:59 am

“Ohio’s motto is: “With God all things are possible.” The state argues that this is beyond a Christian expression”

God isn’t just a Christian expression. Other religions also look to God. If it is a universal God, a God of all Creation, then they are worshipping the same God.

Loren C. Wilson
July 25, 2021 7:24 am

How does wind power affect well water quality? When they make a statement like that, my whack-a-doodle meter jumps, and it’s harder to take the rest of their claims at face value.

icisil
Reply to  Loren C. Wilson
July 25, 2021 11:26 am

Turbidity issues from pile driving

July 25, 2021 7:43 am

the plan is working exactly as designed … flood the market with expensive sh!t that does not work .. then pass laws “protecting the citizens” effectively preventing things that do work … THE PLAN designed by GE and Siemens over two decades ago … and who are the real winners and losers … WINNERS GE AND SEIMENS whose core business is central company power … who flooded the market and pushed “GREEN” and “ALTERNATIVE” wind turbines that they knew did not work … end result … everyone clamoring against their “GREEN ALTERNATIVE” crap .. and the losers … the public which has never seen the real “alternative” solutions and who will be forced to purchase central power company electricity forever with the vague memory of the failed alternative energy industry

Sommer
Reply to  JAMES MCCANNEY
July 25, 2021 11:34 am

The question that needs to be answered in Ontario is why were these turbines allowed to be brought into this country? Federal Statutes are in place to protect us from products that cause harm. Thousands of reports of harm from noise emissions-both audible and inaudible- have not been resolved by government’s environment agents, whose mandate is to protect residents’ environment.
 “The next avenue that needs to be opened up is civil lawsuits against landowners who allow wind turbines on their properties for exposing neighbours to health-damaging infrasound.” Icisil is correct.

Reply to  JAMES MCCANNEY
July 25, 2021 3:58 pm

this is an ongoing battle from Oregon where a developer walks away with 1.2 billion subsidies and then in less that 9 years sells it to another who buys it at a 1.2 billion discount.Shepard Flats…..an legalized theft from ratepayers and tax payers with technology that works less than 20 % of the time…see stories on this site with the actual energy output by solar and wind farms….WHAT A JOKE!

Reply to  JAMES MCCANNEY
July 26, 2021 7:51 am

Look who sets on the boards of AWEA (American Wind Energy Association) and CWEA (Canadian Wind Energy Association) … GE and Siemens … to affect government policy, politicians, internet and news media bias, prevent opposing views from surfacing (why do you never see the Canadian citizen groups anger over their situation), subsidies, green new deals, (this blog is not long enough to list them all) and the kickbacks that go with it … Siemens and GE were both caught and are facing criminal investigations in dozens of countries (oddly enough except the USA and Canada) for bribing officials to push through the wind energy proposals … pushing through systems that they know do not work … suck up all the “alternative money” and suck the tax payers dry until the poor saps finally figure out that none of this crap works … and then GE and Siemens proclaim through a well orchestrated propaganda campaign (via michael moore and many others) that alternative energy does not work .. so doggonit we have to get back to that good old reliable central company power brought to you by GE and Siemens core business … the one thing that is missing … there are real alternative solutions that most people will never see of hear of … this was all part of the plan … it is working exactly as planned

Pat from kerbob
July 25, 2021 5:21 pm

Have to use the same tactics against these useless installations that the scientologists use against useful stuff, like oil and gas pipelines.

Litigate and delay them to death

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