Green Energy Exploitation: A Child miner in one of Congo's Deadly Cobalt Mines. There is a good chance the child in this picture from two years ago nowadays suffers horrible, debilitating symptoms from heavy metal poisoning, or has died in one of the frequent accidents which occur in Congo's mines.

Green Group Accuses Europe of Climate Change Colonialism

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

According to the Equinox Initiative For Racial Justice, the EU Green New Deal is driving exploitation in poor countries.

Climate colonialism and the EU’s Green Deal

By employing corporate solutions for climate change, the EU’s Green Deal will entrench further European neocolonial practices.

Myriam Douo
Steering group member of Equinox Initiative For Racial Justice

Meanwhile, the push for greener sources of energy, particularly in the Global North, is driving the demand for metals like nickel, cobalt and lithium. Labourers in mining communities working to extract these metals face dangerous and degrading working conditions.

Although the end of colonialism was declared decades ago, its last effects in the form of these extractive industries are clear. The system of Indigenous land takeovers, resource extraction, labour exploitation and wealth transfer set up by European colonialists continues to operate and dispossess people in the Global South.

The European Green Deal also ignores the environmental impact of Europe’s drive for renewable energy and electric mobility on other parts of the world, where resources for this economic shift will have to be extracted. It also does not pay attention to how climate change and environmental degradation have disproportionately affected its own marginalised communities and the poor and destitute in the Global South.

Only by acknowledging that it is perpetuating colonial capitalism, and committing to ending this approach, can the EU’s Green Deal be truly effective in addressing climate change. For far too long, European governments and companies have wreaked havoc across the world. It is time for justice, accountability and a complete overhaul of economic systems. Our collective survival depends on it.

Read more: https://www.aljazeera.com/opinions/2021/6/23/the-eus-green-deal-could-propagate-climate-colonialism

I had a look at the Equinox Initiative For Racial Justice website, they haven’t got a lot of content, so I’m guessing the group was formed fairly recently. Their report Towards racial justice EU institutions mentions a few controversial policy positions, like decriminalising undocumented border crossing, and wanting more diversity in EU institutions. Their report Towards Climate Justice is very critical of “Racial Capitalism”, suggesting that Capitalism entrenches existing racist hierarchies, but it is not clear whether they are criticising the concept of Capitalism, or simply criticising the alleged brutality of African clean energy mineral mining companies.

They make some good points, like the massive rise in extractive activity needed to fuel the European “green transition”. From page 19 of Towards Climate Justice;

… The World Bank estimates that the production of minerals needed for a clean energy transition could increase by 500% by 2050.42 These materials include cobalt, lithium, copper, graphite and can be found in abundance on the African continent and in Latin America. These minerals are needed to build clean energy technologies, and the demand for these technologies is on the rise. As we have seen in the previous examples, clean technologies do not equate to ethical and equitable systems. The EU has demonstrated a techno-solutionist mentality, advocating that complex issues of climate change can be solved with technology, as long as the technology is sourced by renewable energy and is clean. This is far from the truth and reality. Creating solutions that build pathways to sustainable and ethical futures must not entirely rely on narrow science-based disciplines divorced from social realities. This limits the potential of building holistic solutions that address multiple aspects and impacts of clean technology. ….

It would be easy to write off Equinox Initiative For Racial Justice as yet another sad group of climate communists. But I strongly agree with their point that many rich country climate justice types seem to have a big blind spot when it comes to the ruthless exploitation of people in poor countries, to obtain the deluge of toxic minerals needed to supply their precious green energy revolution.

A reckoning for mainstream green groups over their neglect of genuine climate exploitation issues created by the green energy policies they promote is long overdue. Equinox is one of the few green groups I have seen which hilight such issues.

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dk_
June 25, 2021 2:12 am

The system of Indigenous land takeovers, resource extraction, labour exploitation and wealth transfer set up by European colonialists continues to operate and dispossess people in the Global South.

Sounds like the green goon’s platform to justify writing Africa off to me. Put this with giving South Africa the cold shoulder in favor of Dubai, elimination of banking and investment in African energy, and it is a sucker punch. Sino-African belt-and-road client states will hold control of essential minerals after the great climate reset of Western economies.

Loydo
Reply to  dk_
June 25, 2021 4:49 am

“The system of Indigenous land takeovers, resource extraction, labour exploitation and wealth transfer set up by European colonialists continues to operate and dispossess people in the Global South.”

That’s been the ‘system’ for hundreds of years. It’s made us rich.

MarkW
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 5:08 am

At least that’s what liberals want to believe.
The fact is that colonies cost the west more than they gained them. That’s why colonialism was abandoned.
Had the colonies actually produced the kind of wealth that liberals pant over, they never would have been let go.

bonbon
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 6:54 am

It has utterly bankrupted the transatlantic, about to implode which is why Mark Carney of the UN is desperate to reflate a green , and yes. colonial bubble.
To hear him say to Africa forget development, use carbon credits, is pure colonialism.
China’s BRI is diametrically opposed – development is a human right!

tonyb
Editor
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 8:20 am

the operative phrase is ‘continues to operate’. not, ‘did operate hundreds of years ago under colonial powers’.

MARTIN BRUMBY
June 25, 2021 2:28 am

I agree with much of what they say.

But, a tiny problem suggests itself.

They are hot under the collar about “Colonialism”. But whilst colonialism is now endemic and growing in Africa, it isn’t the wicked British Capitalists that drive it, but rather People’s Leader Xi Jinping and the Chinese Communist Party.

And, incidentally, I see little evidence that we should be ashamed of our colonialism, which despite many obvious problems, did far more for the average African than has done 60 years of ‘independence’ under a bunch of incompetent and malicious tribalist kleptocrat leaders.

I doubt that they will throw off their Chinese masters as soon or as easily. And that the average African will much benefit from their rule.

An experience that will be replicated across the West, unless our own Beloved Leaders can be replaced with people whose IQ scores are bigger than their hat sizes.

bonbon
Reply to  MARTIN BRUMBY
June 25, 2021 6:57 am

European colonialism meant no development, and the USA went to war over that. China is diametrically opposed to such quaint European habits. Development is a human right.

mcswelll
Reply to  bonbon
June 25, 2021 7:23 am

China is very good at colonialization, thank you. They just call it something else. (What they ought to call it, IMO, is the Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere.)

Dave Fair
Reply to  mcswelll
June 25, 2021 8:52 am

How many of you remember the history of the “Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere” and those involved?

MarkW
Reply to  Dave Fair
June 25, 2021 9:09 am

Not enough

MarkW
Reply to  bonbon
June 25, 2021 9:09 am

China is so opposed to colonialization, that it is currently the world’s biggest colonizer. By a huge margin.

The USA went to war over a lack of European development??????

Richard Page
Reply to  MarkW
June 25, 2021 6:41 pm

Nope. USA went to war because they got to the party too late and the best sites for colonial exploitation had already been taken.

Ruleo
Reply to  Richard Page
June 25, 2021 8:24 pm

Are you medicated at the moment???

bonbon
Reply to  Ruleo
June 26, 2021 7:59 am

Likely too much tea at the party.

Richard Page
Reply to  bonbon
June 26, 2021 12:49 pm

Sorry sweetie, we may be posting at cross-purposes here. The very first declaration of war by the United States of America was in 1812 over possession of the British colonial territories in Canada. What on earth are you referring to?

alastair gray
Reply to  MARTIN BRUMBY
June 25, 2021 7:24 am

Prescient Mark.

Britons ever ever ever shall be slaves!
Kan you Kow Tow – a worthwhile social skill for the future

Timo V
June 25, 2021 2:34 am

Europe this, Europe that, and not a half word about China🙄.

MarkW
Reply to  Timo V
June 25, 2021 5:13 am

Liberals are amazingly blind when it comes to the sins of their own.

For example, it turns out that Sen. Whitehouse a Democrat from the state of hypocrisy has belonged to a whites only beach club for decades.
Can you imagine the uproar had Whitehouse been a Republican?

ozspeaksup
June 25, 2021 2:47 am

remembering a pile of the supposed EU RE corps are chinese in disguise as well

June 25, 2021 3:20 am

Strongly agree with the Equinox Initiative.

https://tambonthongchai.com/2021/01/08/the-industrial-revolution/

bonbon
Reply to  Chaamjamal
June 25, 2021 6:59 am

Very good. The sun never sets on the British Empire because God would not trust them in the dark.

Alan the Brit
June 25, 2021 3:48 am

I regularly remind devout Climate Changers who drive electric or hybrid cars that their sense of piety is built upon thousands of children in Africa scrabbling around in the dirt (if they’re lucky or if not) digging away below ground in squalid Dickensian mining conditions extracting the rare-Earth elements to make the electric batteries in said vehicles, somehow it doesn’t seem to bother them much, or worse still, the inane belief that our masters in the EU, actually care about such trivialities (yes I am convinced that the UK still is required to dance to the EU tune).

Loydo
Reply to  Alan the Brit
June 25, 2021 4:52 am

But your laptop and phone are exempt? Glass houses…

MarkW
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 5:10 am

Magnitude.

mcswelll
Reply to  MarkW
June 25, 2021 7:24 am

One child instead of 10?

To be honest, I don’t know how much mined-in-Africa content there is in an average laptop. For all I know, none.

Bryan A
Reply to  mcswelll
June 27, 2021 8:22 am

The materials in a Laptop Battery are about 1/10,000 that in a Tesla EV battery pack
1 Tesla is worth about 10,000 Laptops or 30,000 phones
And Billions (tens of billions) of EV cars, trucks, busses, taxis, big rigs AND Ships & Airplanes & Trains are required to decarbonize the transportation sector

Last edited 1 month ago by Bryan A
Alan the Brit
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 5:17 am

Until the discrepancy is resolved, unlikely for some time with China (who want global domination) it’s a necessary evil, but tell me Loydo, presumably you have little or no pangs of guilt so enjoy the thought of those poor unfortunates in Africa!!! Pot calling the kettle black, so to speak!!!

bonbon
Reply to  Alan the Brit
June 25, 2021 7:22 am

Strange.
Britain openly proposes Global Britain, and Stoltenberg says clearly they lead NATO. The Blair Rules Based Order is unilateralism. Look at the new British national anthem, OBON, and hum along :
OBON Day – One Britain One Nation: Schoolchildren encouraged to sing ‘patriotic song’ on Friday | Edinburgh News (scotsman.com)
…Gleichschaltung anyone? Notice what is happening!
Now a British warship in the Black Sea, HMS Defender, was given a rude awakening by Russia. Britain obviously thinks the US is in the wake of the British man-o-war, and they might be right with Biden.

Alan the Brit
Reply to  bonbon
June 25, 2021 9:32 am

The current British guvment seeks a return of self-determination, freedom & democracy! There is only ONE British National Anthem!!!! This well intentioned 2nd rate one is pleasant enough, & could be sung by some if so desired!!!! Isn’t freedom & democracy wonderful??? Not sure I’d want to live in your Socialist dystopia, where freedom & democracy are mere tokenism, like many a totalitarian state before, just as the UN seek to achieve with their one-world globul guvment!!! I seem to recall that elections were held in the good old USSR, where voter turnout was compulsory, ( the candidates were all of the same view -by dictate) which in many ways sounded quite democratic, only the mentally ill were barred from voting, plus those who challenged the status quo – they desired to ” rock” the boat placed in their vast Siberian prisons by the authority in charge of everything – permanently!!! The current EU model is based upon the UN model – Agenda 21, full of un-elected, un-democratic, un-accountable, & UN-SACKABLE bureaucrats who desire to dictate policy upon the non-electorate, or people!!! Wake up if you’re a democratic self-thinking freedom lover, before it’s too late, & we’re very close to it!!! Personally, I like the fact that people are allowed to disagree with me, I love healthy debate, dictatorship not so much!!! Perhaps you do, bucko!!!

Last edited 1 month ago by Alan the Brit
Richard Page
Reply to  bonbon
June 25, 2021 3:02 pm

Lets have the rest of that quote, sweetie – Jens Stoltenberg said, while discussing UK’s contribution (GDP and commitment) to NATO with Theresa May, that the UK leads Europe by example. He was referring to the fact that aside from USA, only 3 countries had complied with the 2% GDP contribution – Greece (2.4%), UK (2.1%) and Poland (2.0%).

Where did you learn to cherry pick parts of a comment from? A watermelon?

bonbon
Reply to  bonbon
June 26, 2021 8:12 am

C’mon – listen to OBON, the youth singing it – if you can bear it.
Shades of 1934. Weird deja vu.
As for Stoltenberg in Portugal recently on HMS QE : “From these decks, the Queen Elizabeth projects power to keep us all safe,” Stoltenberg declared. “She carries U.S. Marines. She is protected by a Dutch frigate and she is on her way to the Pacific. So this is a perfect example of Europe and North America working together in NATO for our collective security.”
Charming fellow – due for a CBE, I venture.

John Bell
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 7:16 am

Alan the Brit is not claiming a climate crisis, you are.

Dave Fair
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 8:55 am

No, just people who recognize the tradeoffs inherent in any economic endeavor.

Loydo
Reply to  Dave Fair
June 26, 2021 1:44 am

My point is we are all complicit on the issue ofsqualid Dickensian mining conditions”, that includes Alan.

Redge
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 9:59 am

And what are you using to respond to Alan?

Glass houses…

Lrp
Reply to  Loydo
June 25, 2021 2:42 pm

The hypocrisy is the problem, Loydo. You want to exploit the children of Africa to save the children of Sweden. And ignoring the scale factor is a problem, of logic, for you; the batteries in laptops and phones cannot be compared with EV batteries, or “grid scale” batteries.

alastair gray
Reply to  Alan the Brit
June 25, 2021 7:28 am

You don’ need rare earths in car batteries , but you do for high torque in car motors. God knows why you need them in wind turbines They should operate fine with copper induction dynamos. Maybe someone can elucidate me why a turbine needs a permanent magnet.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Alan the Brit
June 25, 2021 9:45 am
Observer
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
June 27, 2021 9:57 am

…yet

tonyb
Editor
June 25, 2021 3:49 am

Michael Shellenberger makes exactly the same point about exploitation of the poor in his book ‘Apocalypse never”.

I have pointed out to people numerous times the manner in which the rare earths are extracted, the environmental degradation, the child slavery and the fact that China has a stranglehold on these materials.

However most greens don’t seem to acknowledge the many disadvantages as the word ‘green’ trumps every iniquity.

Alan the Brit
Reply to  tonyb
June 25, 2021 5:18 am

As said before, being green simply means being gullible & naive!!!

John in Oz
Reply to  tonyb
June 25, 2021 6:53 pm

I have pointed out to people numerous times

The issues raised here have been pointed out not only many times but for many years.

Why is it that the do-gooders are only now able to see the result of their utopian wishes?

A dollar short and a day late

Peta of Newark
June 25, 2021 4:38 am

and what next..
Headline: “The valuable car part gone in 60 seconds
BBC

As regards electric cars, we’d all be much much better off adding the Lithium to our drinking water/food. Just 1mg per day for everyone but especially the kids.
Cobalt also

Last edited 1 month ago by Peta of Newark
bonbon
Reply to  Peta of Newark
June 25, 2021 7:15 am

Much better to use lithium in fusion reactors. I wonder are the EV auto activists trying to block that?

mcswelll
Reply to  bonbon
June 25, 2021 7:26 am

IIRC, a fusion reactor using lithium (not all do) uses a miniscule amount of it and (if you could get to break-even…) would produce a huge amount of energy.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  mcswelll
June 25, 2021 10:05 am

I thought I remembered reading that commercial designs would use a blanket of lithium to absorb neutrons, and produce tritium, while reducing the number of neutrons escaping outside the reactor.

bonbon
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
June 26, 2021 8:13 am

That is one good use.

MarkW
Reply to  bonbon
June 25, 2021 9:12 am

Do you have fusion reactor or two that you could spare?

saveenergy
Reply to  MarkW
June 25, 2021 4:41 pm

I’ve got a spare in the shed, dusty & some rust, just needs a coat of paint to look like new. Cash on collection.

bonbon
Reply to  MarkW
June 26, 2021 8:19 am

There are many worldwide. Have a look at
Plans unveiled for private U.K. fusion reactor powered by ‘smoke rings’ and pneumatic pistons | Science | AAAS (sciencemag.org)

  • a Canadian project. ITER EAST and WEST, Wendelstein 7X, lot more.

No one said it was easy – do it because it is hard. PV/Wind are easy, a damning quality alone.

Observer
Reply to  MarkW
June 27, 2021 9:59 am

… any day now!

It must be true as I’ve been reading they’re only 10 years away for the last 40 years.

Megs
June 25, 2021 4:40 am

Proponents of renewables proudly proclaim how cheap this form of energy is, they are making insane amounts of money rolling it out in Western, so called civilisation. It is cheap off the backs of third world nations and slave labour and because the Chinese have no scruples. With the current push for further reductions in emissions and promises made for 2050 it is only going to get worse.

Australia will soon join the ranks of third world nations. We are the only developed nation that doesn’t have nuclear power. The fools running the states want to shut down the coal mines and think they can run the country on renewables alone. They don’t even know the extent that these mines are own by the Chinese. They simply turn a blind eye to the humanitarian issues and the environmental degradation being caused accross the planet, all for naught.

The politicians making the decisions about future energy for our country are speaking only to proponents of renewables, and they believe everything they’re told. They do not have a clue.

Reply to  Megs
June 25, 2021 2:28 pm

“Chinese have no scruples”…..One of the greatest understatements of all time….the CCP is fully equivalent to the nazi party.

Lrp
Reply to  Megs
June 25, 2021 2:50 pm

The RE cost to Australia is 7 billions/ year in subsidies and 10 billions in wind and solar installations.

Gary Pearse
June 25, 2021 5:12 am

A little simple research would correct the usual gross errors by commenters and groups in the provenance of minerals involved. It’s hard to even show outrage effectively if you don’t do this simple research.

Rare Earth metals – their are 17 of them (some specialists don’t count scandium and Yttrium, although they are in the same column in the Periodic Table and they occur in associated minerals. Only two, neodymium and dysprosium are generally used for windmill generator magnets). China produces over 90% of the rare earths used in this and countless other uses and yes, it is an ugly toxic industry the way it is done in China. RE are abundant around the world but not available at predatory prices set in China.

Cobalt is one of the cathode materials used in lithium batteries, but others like the cheaper, long-lasting lithium iron phosphate (LFP) is very widely used. Cobalt is produced in Canada, Russia and other countries but is particularly abundant near Lubumbashi, DRC. The big secret never revealed in these types of reports is that 90% of the cobalt produced is produced in modern mines and plants by international companies like Glencore and the Chinese of course. Far and away, the majority of workers are Congolese working in safe clean mines and plants. The other 10% are local free mining operators, and many small holdings are worked by families. Regarding safety and health, it is the DRC mining department’s job to inspect and advise (go after them!) Everywhere in the world where there are valuable mineral resources, you find these small holdings and the people who engage in this are comparatively well off.

Lithium occurs in DRC and dozens of other countries. A couple of operations have been producing lithium for ¾ of a century or more. But Chile, Argentina (both lithium brines) and Australia (hard rock) produce more than 90% of the world’s lithium. They are clean and safe ops. I hope some of you read this.

bonbon
Reply to  Gary Pearse
June 25, 2021 7:02 am

And Bolivia? Look at the color revolution that was pushed recently.

alastair gray
Reply to  Gary Pearse
June 25, 2021 8:25 am

Gary, You are obviously well informed on mining matters. Maybe you can answer my question abour why wind turbine generators need rare earth permanent magnets

John J. A. Cullen
Reply to  alastair gray
June 25, 2021 1:37 pm

GENERATORS AND PERMANENT MAGNETS

Hello Alastair, permanent magnets in wind turbines offer advantages such as:-

  1. Higher power density (at ordinary operating temperatures) compared to the induction or asynchronous generators that I think you are referring to.
  2. Induction generators take their ‘magnetising current’, that is they take the electric current needed to create their internal magnetic field from the network into which they generate their power. This magnetising current takes very little [real] power (measured in watts) since it is mostly taken at ‘zero power factor’ in the jargon i.e. the magnetising current is mostly taken in volt-amps reactive (VAr). [[In algebra the ‘complex power’ is simply the voltage (V) times the current (I), while the real power is V.I.cos(phi) [watts], and the reactive power is V.I.sin(phi) [VAr], and where ‘phi’ is the so-called ‘phase angle’ between the V and I phasors. Phasors are just vectors of constant magnitude that rotate at constant angular speed or frequency. Thus the ‘magnetising current’ has a phase angle of almost 90 degrees so that its real power is close to zero.]]
  3. (a) It is largely because the permanent magnets (PM) have this built-in magnetic field that PM generators have the aforementioned power density advantage over induction machines. (b) For the same reason PM generators offer the advantage of ‘black start’ capability i.e. when the electrical supply or network has been lost (i.e there is no voltage, current or frequency), it is simply a matter of turning the PM generator shaft at the right speed for volts of the right frequency to appear at the generator’s terminals. While there are ways to self-excite induction generators using their ‘remanent magnetism’ it is usually a cumbersome affair.
  4. Sorry this has been rather maths and jargon heavy!

Regards,
John.

bonbon
Reply to  John J. A. Cullen
June 26, 2021 8:35 am

The irony is, as TX found out, they require reliable backup power, which is why they could use power magnetics anyway. Looks to me the RE magnetic designers thought no backup power needed. That is the problem of using algebra….

Gary Pearse
Reply to  alastair gray
June 25, 2021 1:56 pm

The permanent magnet does not need electricity to create the magnetic field usually employed in other types of generators, say diesel ones. This makes this extra electricity available as part of the power supply. It also dispenses with the need for a gearbox which is a source of mechanical failure. Finally the magnet is essentially maintenance free – overall optimum engineering.

Jan Benes
Reply to  Gary Pearse
June 25, 2021 8:35 am

Thanks, Gary. Where does your info come from ?

Gary Pearse
Reply to  Jan Benes
June 25, 2021 2:26 pm

I’m a geologist, mining engineer and metallurgist. As a consultant I have had projects in DRC (Li, Sn, RE, Not cobalt!) Nigeria (Geological Survey of Nigeria), Benin, Togo, (Au, Sn) Tanzania, (building stone) Nevada (Li, B,K), Brazil, Portugal, Sweden (latter three all Li)
I have also worked from coast to coast on mining projects in Canada.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Gary Pearse
June 25, 2021 10:07 am

Gary, thank you for adding some sanity and facts to the debate.

Megs
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
June 25, 2021 3:26 pm

Clyde i don’t think that anyone would argue the extraordinary value of mined materials and the ways they have changed the lives and standards of living of mankind. But renewable energy is not suitable as a base power, and that is what they are trying to do with it. It is short lived and intermittent, useful for camping, outback properties and such. It will never run industries.

The work that the likes of yourself and Gary have committed your lives to have helped shape our modern society and you most definitely deserve accolades for that. I’m not sure why you get defensive at the outcry against the use of mining in regards to renewable energy. The scale of resources required to attempt the 2050 emissions reduction farce is and a criminal waste of resources and land. It’s the fools that are pushing renewables the hardest that think we need to shut down the mines. They think that wind, solar and batteries appear magically. And they haven’t even cottoned on to the fact that it delivers only around a third of the energy of traditional forms of power, sometimes. They also don’t understand that they need to plan for its duplication years before end of life to ensure continuation of whatever power it delivers.

It’s not even about the mining Clyde. We live the life we do due to mined materials. Thank you. But there is nothing good to be said about wasted resources in the name of greed. Nor the lack of regulation and human degradation that is tied to the renewables mining sector.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Megs
June 25, 2021 5:09 pm

I’m not sure how to respond because I agree completely with you that renewable power is not suitable as base power.

If I said something (which you didn’t quote) that gave you the impression that I was advocating renewables, I was probably responding to something that was inaccurate.

I consider truth to be of the utmost importance, even if it is inconvenient.

Megs
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
June 25, 2021 10:20 pm

No I get that you don’t support renewables, I just felt that you and others in the mining ‘community’ sometimes feel that mining is being attacked in its entirety. Which of course it isn’t. No ill intent was meant on my part and I apologise if it came across that way. I guess I’m just feeling the frustration of the utter waste of resources in regard to renewables. But at the same time I, and anyone with an ounce of common sense, can only be supportive of mining. It is an intrinsic part of our society.

I shall endeavour to present future comments more clearly. I guess the assumed tone can impact a message too. The original message was simply conversational, though if read as antagonistic it could have felt like an attack.

I think I’ve been fighting renewables for too long now, though not without some success. 🙂

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Megs
June 26, 2021 8:13 pm

Without intonations of voice, facial expressions, and general body language, a lot gets lost in written communication. Early internet Flame Wars are legend. Some, like Mark Twain, can turn the written word to their advantage. However, even he found personal commentaries to improve communication. A ‘pregnant pause’ or wry smile can be worth dozens of words.

Us mere mortals have to take great pains to not be misunderstood!

Megs
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
June 26, 2021 10:13 pm

Thanks for the response Clyde.

I have just this minute found out that a 400MW solar plant with backup batteries has been approved around eight kilometres from our home. It will have 800,000 to 900,000 panels. It will see 18 square kilometres of prime agricultural land bulldozed and fenced off. This will add to the 87MW, 3.2 square kilometre solar plant just four kilometres up the road.

There is another large solar plant in the pipeline eight kilometres in a different direction plus a large windfarm and new 180 kilometre transmission lines.

Our beautiful historic mining town dates back to the Gold Rush and has a small community of just 2,700 people.

I am absolutely gutted Clyde…

Christian
June 25, 2021 5:31 am

Everybody seems to think it is the West’s fault that, some 60 years after creating independence for African countries, we are still to blame for very poor governance in many of them. Furthermore, that many countries are run by largely non-democratic rulers. At what point does independence mean you take responsibility for the governance of your own people?

I find the attitude expressed inconsistent with treating Africans as equal citizens of Earth, with all that that implies.

bonbon
Reply to  Christian
June 25, 2021 7:09 am

Look at a night satellite picture of the globe and the areas totally devoid of electric power.
Africa need more than 6000GW of power immediately, as the South African Nuclear expert Dr. Kem says. There is no way green power can ever handle that.

dnb_land_ocean_ice.2012.720x360.jpg
John in Oz
Reply to  bonbon
June 26, 2021 4:48 pm

It looks like the last Australian and USSRian turned the lights off, even though they are not totally devoid of electric power

Bryan A
Reply to  bonbon
June 27, 2021 8:33 am

Unfortunately the Uber Green don’t intend for that capacity to be built. Their preferred method of attaining a Green Utopia is through DePopulation…Global DePopulation.

MarkW
Reply to  Christian
June 25, 2021 9:14 am

According to liberals, anyone who doesn’t believe that minorities need to be led around by the nose by white liberals, is a racist.

Reply to  MarkW
June 25, 2021 1:58 pm

Africa’s great leaders of the past…Idi Amin of Uganda…Mugabe of Zimbabwe…Qaddafi of Libya…. all rejected colonialism….and Africa will no doubt reject any belt tightening and road extension from Xi Jinping.

Observer
Reply to  Christian
June 27, 2021 10:05 am

Like the Muddle East (look up Sykes-Picot), the retreating colonial powers deliberately created African state boundaries across tribal lands so that the resulting polities would comprise a fractious mix of competing cultures, thereby ensuring the new rulers would be reliant upon outside help to stay in power.

Rich Lentz
June 25, 2021 5:42 am

How long is it going to take for someone to do the research that Lithium is going to cause the exact same problems, mess and cleanup costs as Lead has?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Rich Lentz
June 25, 2021 10:12 am

With the probable exception of lead-based interior house paint, I think that the problem of lead has been overstated. Since people quit drinking heated wine from lead containers, as the Romans did, and largely replaced turn of the century lead plumbing with iron and copper, lead has not been a serious problem for most.

Reply to  Rich Lentz
June 25, 2021 2:02 pm

There is an attempt to open a lithium mine in Nevada….but an endangered plant is blocking it so far,,,will the green plant sacrifice for a green energy future? The lithium stuff is fairly abundant but not so much in concentration for mining…tends to be found around old volcanic sites.

Gary Pearse
Reply to  Anti-griff
June 25, 2021 4:36 pm

I worked on the Nevada site a decade ago. Li is not super rich 1500-2500ppm but it was believed to be the second largest Boron deposit and sizable potash resource. Also it is approx. 2mi long ~200 -300ft wide and in two layers each about 25-30 ft thick, separated by 20 feet of rhyolite tuff and another 20ft of tuff on top of this.

The deposit is mineable using soil scrapers – very cheap and with the brown tuff and white salt is cleanly mineable.

The actual mine material is an unique Li-B-K silicate ‘salt’. I found it soluble in both sulphuric acid and sodium hydroxide. The presence of gypsum mines near Carson and another closer to the project, gave me the idea of using anhydrite (calcium sulphate), a waste product of gypsum mining as a substitute for expensive sulphuric shipped from Utah. I roasted the ore with anhydrite and found the Li-B-K extractable at 94% for Li and 85-90% for the other two using just water. I never got the chance to try solar evap ponds to recover product sulphate as it was purchased by a company from Oz.

A geologically interesting sidelight is the deposit has tiny cephalopods in the ore! Talk about tough ecology. The formations crystallized in a lake, fed by hot springs along the collapsed caldera oh a huge rhyolite volcano with some intermittent ejecta of tuff. This is information overload Anti-Griff, sorry!

Gary Pearse
Reply to  Rich Lentz
June 25, 2021 2:42 pm

Lithium mining and processing is rather a benign activity environmentally. It is crystallized as LiCl from brines in the very arid “Alto Plano” of Chile and Argentina in solar evaporating ponds. Li from hard rock is from lithium pegmaties which are essentially composed of granite minerals -quartz, feldspar and mica, 80% with garnet, magnetite and other trace minerals 2-5% and the lithium aluminium silicate spodumene, the concentrate of being 6-8% Li20.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Gary Pearse
June 26, 2021 8:23 pm

The pegmatites also commonly carry triphylite/lithiophilite (lithium iron-manganese phosphates), and the lithium mica, lepidolite.

Michael in Dublin
June 25, 2021 6:12 am

There is an irony in the name of this group calling themselves “Equinox Initiative.”
How in earth are they going to get nature to co-operate with them in their equality efforts? There are only two equinoxes in a year when the length of day and night are equal. If we had all year round equinoxes Antarctica would be much warmer and lose its ice. Just imagine a new inhabitable green continent twice the size of Australia. However, consider a world without seasons and all the havoc this would unleash on our climate zones. This is the stuff of science fiction.

Last edited 1 month ago by Michael in Dublin
bonbon
June 25, 2021 7:10 am

Night at Equinox :
Note Africa after centuries of colonialism :

dnb_land_ocean_ice.2012.720x360.jpg
bonbon
Reply to  bonbon
June 25, 2021 7:37 am

In a 1952 interview, on or about his 80th birthday, which can be viewed on YouTube, Bertrand Russell said, “It’s very difficult for anybody born since 1914, to realize how profoundly different the world is now from what it was when I was a child…. A world where ancient empires vanish like morning mist… We have to accustom ourselves to Asiatic self- assertion…It is an extraordinarily difficult thing for an old man to live in such a world.”

Interesting summary of the China bashers – they yearn for a vanishing empire. Dirty Bertie’s various tracts are peppered with this stuff. This guy demanded a preemptive nuclear attack on the Soviet, Czara Bomba stopped that. The insane attempt to start another nuclear war with HMS Defender in the Black sea this very week, after both Biden and Putin publicly agreed such cannot ever be fought, is Dirty Bertie’s ghost of times past.

Richard Page
Reply to  bonbon
June 25, 2021 12:53 pm

There was no attempt to start a nuclear war in the Black Sea. BoJo the clown thought he could score some cheap political points by tweaking Putin’s nose over Crimea – why else was a Daily Fail reporter and BBC film crew on board the warship at that point? So far it’s fizzled because Russia was more on the ball than the UK was. But, and this is the important point, anyone who thinks the UK did all that without getting permission from the USA, it’s senior partner in NATO, is clearly an idiot. Biden would have had to clear this in advance or BoJo would never have done it at all.

Reply to  Richard Page
June 25, 2021 2:14 pm

Sorry to inform you that Joey “Ice Cream” Biden mixed up Syria with Libya recently….odds are now even money that Joey will not complete his term in office.

Richard Page
Reply to  Anti-griff
June 25, 2021 2:34 pm

George dubblya did much the same, although with less blank staring into space looks or rambling off into disjointed confused monologues; I think you underestimate the tolerance of a lot of Americans towards their POTUS. It does, however, provide an excuse, should it be necessary, to switch horses in midstream!

Reply to  Richard Page
June 25, 2021 7:16 pm

Haven’t you heard it’s the hardest job in the world? Joey appears to be exposing it as the easiest job in the world. The demrat party wants to become America’s CCP.

bonbon
Reply to  Richard Page
June 26, 2021 8:26 am

On the ball? Now that sure take the biscuit. Russia lobbed 4 bombs on the path and fired warning shots. Britain then invented a ridiculous story, and he BBC guy blew the story out of the water – I wonder if he will survive the trip…
Russia says next time the targets will be more precise.
I do believe Berlin and Paris view this with alarm. Has Britain gone MAD?
Notably Biden seems not to have followed orders, for once. And he gave NordStream 2 the go ahead.

Richard Page
Reply to  bonbon
June 26, 2021 10:45 am

Hey – don’t confuse BoJo’s actions with those of the rest of Britain. BoJo has been trying to push Britain on the world stage as a slap in the face to the EU, and to be as successful as possible. COP26, hosting the G7 and tweaking Putin’s nose are all his ideas of things to do to accomplish this whilst signing us up to trade deals around the world. God knows what his next stunt will involve but consider what he did when he was just Mayor of London – now he’s got the resources of an entire country to play with!

bonbon
Reply to  Richard Page
June 27, 2021 3:27 am

Not sure that BoJo even knew about the naval antics .
Sure he has heard the ominous statement from a Russian official that “I have to warn the ex-‘ruler of the waves,’ that next time such a decision is taken, bombs will be dropped not ahead of the target, but on the target.”

Trump was not in control either of his forces, numerous examples. And Biden is chief of the armed forces chief????

Observer
Reply to  bonbon
June 27, 2021 10:08 am

I find that highly unlikely. Bertrand Russel was a campaigner for unilateral nuclear disarmament.

Olen
June 25, 2021 7:46 am

Who made them the arbiters of anything let alone deciding how energy is procured. As far as colonialism is concerned Europeans did a lot of good for the colonies but wanted out because the colonies cost too much money. The were slow moving out to prevent the USSR from moving in.

n.n
June 25, 2021 7:49 am

And for this, post colonials murdered native people (e.g. colonials, dissenting indigenous) and called it progress… “good”.

Social justice anywhere is injustice everywhere.

Diversity [dogma] (i.e. color judgment) breeds adversity.

The wicked solution is just that: wicked, and denies women and men’s dignity and agency, and the lives of their Posterity.

The conditions that preceded colonialism and persist in Africa created a slave market and changed the global calculus.

Emigration reform to mitigate catastrophic anthropogenic immigration reform and collateral damage at both ends of the bridge and throughout.

Use Green in the niche markets where its intermittent/renewable energy is economical, but be wary of the Green blight and its progress. To green the Sahara, and develop their economies, they should free the CO2 and other natural resouces. Emit responsibly.

That said, hold a pride parade: lions, lionesses, and their unPlanned cubs playing in gay revelry, and don’t spare the trumpets: elephants, to restore perspective and a sustainable future.

Observer
Reply to  n.n
June 27, 2021 10:09 am

Intriguingly gnomic. Well done.

Anon
June 25, 2021 8:21 am

This issue is what caused Caleb Rossiter to switch sides:

Caleb S. Rossiter: Sacrificing Africa For Climate Change

I’ve spent my life on the foreign-policy left. I opposed the Vietnam War, U.S. intervention in Central America in the 1980s and our invasion of Iraq. I have headed a group trying to block U.S. arms and training for “friendly” dictators, and I have written books about how U.S. policy in the developing world is neocolonial.

But I oppose my allies’ well-meaning campaign for “climate justice.” More than 230 organizations, including Africa Action and Oxfam, want industrialized countries to pay “reparations” to African governments for droughts, rising sea levels and other alleged results of what Ugandan strongman Yoweri Museveni calls “climate aggression.” And I oppose the campaign even more for trying to deny to Africans the reliable electricity–and thus the economic development and extended years of life–that fossil fuels can bring.

The left wants to stop industrialization–even if the hypothesis of catastrophic, man-made global warming is false. John Feffer, my colleague at the Institute for Policy Studies, wrote in the Dec. 8, 2009, Huffington Post that “even if the mercury weren’t rising” we should bring “the developing world into the postindustrial age in a sustainable manner.” He sees the “climate crisis [as] precisely the giant lever with which we can, following Archimedes, move the world in a greener, more equitable direction.”

I started to suspect that the climate-change data were dubious a decade ago while teaching statistics. Computer models used by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to determine the cause of the six-tenths of one degree Fahrenheit rise in global temperature from 1980 to 2000 could not statistically separate fossil-fueled and natural trends.

https://www.thegwpf.com/caleb-s-rossiter-sacrificing-africa-for-climate-change/

Or should I say, publishing that article in the WSJ got Rossiter cancelled.

The Left will continue down its present road until the social and environmental consequences of what they are doing manifest and the donation money dries up. And once that happens, they will switch positions and raise money to protect Africa from the “evil” mining companies exploiting Africa for rare earth elements, which they previously encouraged.

What I find most amusing is the tremendous amounts of money spent on raising the CAGW alarm verses the shoe-string budgets websites like WUWT operate on. It is amazing what can be accomplished, with little or no money, when you have truth on your side.

Last edited 1 month ago by Anon
Dave Fair
Reply to  Anon
June 25, 2021 9:07 am

The average Western taxpayer will eventually slam the brakes on the Leftists’ grand social and economic engineering schemes.

MarkW
Reply to  Anon
June 25, 2021 9:20 am

I have headed a group trying to block U.S. arms and training for “friendly” dictators

The problem with most liberals is they actually believe that every choice involves a decision between good and bad.
That is, had the US not backed the “bad” dictator, that the country would have developed into a thriving democracy with freedom for all.
The reality is that in most of these times, the choice was between bad and worse. That is, had the US not intervened, the person who ended up in charge would be much worse than the person that the US backed.
Was Vietnam better off after the communists took over? Millions who died trying to flee the country didn’t believe so.

Observer
Reply to  MarkW
June 27, 2021 10:13 am

Every time the US intervenes in some other polity because they don’t like the politics there, it’s practice for doing the same thing back home.

Enjoy.

Michael in Dublin
Reply to  Anon
June 25, 2021 9:45 am

Should one have compassion on people living in third world countries?
Certainly.

Should one give billions in aid?
Certainly . . . . . not!

Should one find volunteers with the practical experience and insight to help locals set up feasible and workable projects teaching them simple skills?
Certainly for a couple of years with adequate support for the small projects they can manage.

Here are the types of problem most westerners are unaware of or ignore

  1. A brand new hospital with 181 beds is completed near Johannesburg South African and handed over on 14 May 2021. Despite the desperate need for hospitals at present five weeks later the hospital is still unused.
  2. The situation in 90% of South African municipalities are in a total shambles. R186 billion (over €11 billion/$13 billion) has gone missing in their auditing over 10 years – and the amount may be much higher. This is more than ten times the foreign aid received and is less than a quarter of government spending.
  3. Central Africa could be producing a huge amount of hydro power and helping all its neighbors but because of civil strife, corruption, greed, mismanagement this is highly unlikely to happen any time soon.

Corruption, fraud, mismanagement and incompetence are universal problems but these hurt third world countries the most. Colonialism ended decades ago and is not responsible for the current mess in countries say of Africa.

Last edited 1 month ago by Michael in Dublin
Lrp
Reply to  Anon
June 25, 2021 3:09 pm

Big lies call for big money

Kenji
June 25, 2021 8:26 am

Yeah … Communist Chinese colonialism

Dave Fair
Reply to  Kenji
June 25, 2021 9:09 am

Shush! The ChiComs are the good leftist sort of colonizers.

MarkW
Reply to  Dave Fair
June 25, 2021 11:53 am

They aren’t capitalists, therefor it’s impossible for them to exploit people.
Or at least that’s what the exploitive communists keep telling us.

saveenergy
Reply to  Dave Fair
June 25, 2021 4:51 pm

Do you mean they are the right leftist sort of colonizers ?

Observer
Reply to  Kenji
June 27, 2021 10:16 am

They’re “communists” in name only. They’re not even socialists anymore, now that they allow the private ownership of the means of production.

Clyde Spencer
June 25, 2021 9:36 am

,,, the ruthless exploitation of people in poor countries, to obtain the deluge of toxic minerals needed to supply their precious green energy revolution.

If there were a conscious effort to solely depend on artisanal miners to supply the ‘renewable revolution’ with all the materials it needs, then I would agree that it was a “ruthless exploitation.” However, if it is just an unfortunate side effect of not having mineable deposits of sufficient tonnage or grade to convince the accountants in mining companies to recommend developing an infrastructure to support mechanized mining, then I would say that the characterization is hand waving. I see no facts in evidence that there is any conspiracy to ‘enslave’ poor people to support the ‘woke’ elitists.

If those behind the “green energy revolution” wanted it to fail, a good plan would be to depend on unorganized, undependable, artisanal miners without geologic or mining engineering educations, and inadequate capital to mechanize. Although, most ‘woke’ activists take a dim view of any mining, even though they enthusiastically adopt the fruits of the work, such as smart phones and EVs.

As I have stated previously, I see the unfortunate circumstances of artisanal miners as being evidence of desperation on the part of poor people, unfortunate enough to live in corrupt countries like DR Congo, suffering under an inept government and dealing with civil wars and local war lords. Many times they work deposits that have been played out and abandoned by major mining companies (cobalt), or work deposits so limited in size that they do not lend themselves to mechanization, such as alluvial ‘coltans’ deposits adjacent to streams and small rivers.

Mining has historically been dangerous, hard work, which is why in the US it was often immigrants who worked in the mines. In Roman times, it was slaves and political prisoners who were relied upon to do the dangerous, life-shortening work. It wasn’t really until mechanization, largely made possible by fossil fuels, that the safety record materially improved. If social justice warriors are really concerned about the welfare of those who resort to artisanal mining to put food in their mouth, then they would be supporting mechanization and organized, corporate mining that can afford to implement safe working conditions.

Philip
June 25, 2021 10:17 am

Where you find the Chinese engaged in Africa pursuing infrastructure aid programs, you find countries experiencing generational debt commitments to China that are tied to real property as loan collateral. Debt failure means China owns a large physical piece of these African countries they proport to be giving aid to.
Economic colonialism or just a nasty land grab?

Smart Rock
June 25, 2021 12:42 pm

Unsafe working conditions and child labour in artisanal mines of the DRC are a consequence of a semi-failed state not managing its mineral resources properly.

Plus, the willingness of Chinese companies to buy the product.

But carry on blaming the western democracies. They are being blamed for everything else, so join the club; it avoids having to think about complex issues.

Jeffery P
June 25, 2021 1:13 pm

Sure, why not? If black holes are racist then free markets must be as well.

bonbon
June 26, 2021 8:44 am

Lake Chad-Transaqua | Africa and the World (lawrencefreemanafricaandtheworld.com)

Africa need major projects like the above, and China is onboard. This has been on the EU tables for decades, and only Italy pushed it.
It would be very revealing to hear what Equinox says about this.

Lake-Chad-Transaqua.jpg
Last edited 1 month ago by bonbon
observa
June 26, 2021 8:52 am

Very patronizing of Equinox. Enjoy the fruits of our ancestors giving up hoeing taters for the higher rewards of the Dark Satanic Mills in the cities and its concomitant savings and investment with greater productivity but that’s to be denied now to Africans. Get thee back to hoeing yams and mud huts you lot and no Industrial Revolutions for you. Bask in the warm inner glow you’re not being colonized by Equinox and like minded concernees wanting to blacklist the fruits of your labours by all accounts.

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