Norwegian ‘Ship of Fools’ is still developing into a silly case of poor planning.

From Friends of WUWT from Norway

he Norwegian privately owned expedition vessel «Lance» was used to ‘rescue’ two polar ‘explorers’, the well-known Borge Ousland and Mike Horn, from the arctic floating ice field. They rendezvous’ed with the vessel about 100 km from the ice edge, just north of Svalbard on 8th of December. The two ‘explorers’ had actually planned to be taken on board a sailing vessel, after having entered onto the floating ice, in August, north of Alaska.

The two guys had gone by skis to the North Pole and then continued towards the southern ice edge on the Atlantic side of the floating ice. However, they encountered storms that transported the floating ice against their planned direction, and arrived a couple of weeks later than planned. Therefore they hired «Lance» to pick them up instead of the sailing vessel. The whole idea with the expedition was to prove how thin the ice is in the polar ocean. This means that the objective was actually to underline climatic alarmism.

But, what they may have not known, is that this time of year is the time of most ice accretion in the Arctic ocean, and on their return voyage towards the ice edge and open water, the ice floes froze and became solid. The «Lance» became firmly stuck in the ice, about 80 kilometers from the ice edge and is now completely stuck.

The latest information from the lame vessel, is that the captain on board, Mr. Stig Roaldsand, according to the newspaper VG (see: https://www.vg.no/nyheter/innenriks/i/BR2Wd0/kaptein-paa-lance-vil-evakuere-mann-om-bord-faar-nei-fra-hrs?utm_source=vgfront&utm_content=row-6) has demanded that all ‘passengers’ and un-necessary people on board the vessel shall be lifted off by helicopter as soon as possible (Source journalist: Oda Leraan Skjetne, VG). However, the two ‘explorers’ refuse to leave the vessel by helicopter, probably as it destroys the narrative of their journey. There is a pending snowstorm coming to the area north of Svalbard around Christmas Eve, and this makes heli-transport impossible at that time.

All the best

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187 thoughts on “Norwegian ‘Ship of Fools’ is still developing into a silly case of poor planning.

      • Read the update you landlubbers!

        Ah, read some history too about, let me see, explorations in Polar areas, emphasize on survival and ships getting stuck in the ice.

        First time, eh? Lance have been up there plenty of times, getting frozen into the wicked ice.

    • How about leaving them there the rest of the winter? Why should everyone have to do what they want to preserve the narrative?

        • cant belive the captain and owners of the Lance allowed its use for such a risky trip to begin with
          the insurance and charges will be huge , if it even gets out unscathed

          • I live in Harrisonburg, VA. USA and went to a “climate class” they were giving for us Old Farts at JMU. I found out from the young man who organized the course, that there is a “guy” here in Hburg went on one of the Antarctic voyages to “see the melting in the Antarctic ice field. They got stuck and had to be rescued, and now the guy refuses to be identified, and won’t talk about it. Want to bet that they charged the fools on the trip for the rescue? I’ll bet the rescue was way more than the cruise in the first place.

        • This was asked at the start of the expedition and the captain, IIRC, stated the ship was up to the job of being stuck in an ice floe.

      • The captain is likely concerned about the amount of food on board. Might be enough to help his crew survive an extended time, but two extra loud-mouths who are no asset to the ship need to leave.

  1. The Lance is used to wintering over ice-bound in the Arctic. Question is why then is the Captain wanting everyone but essential persons to leave the ship? Is the request really in reference to their two unintended guests who are now refusing to leave?

    • The Captain is probably inventorying his food-water stores and fuel for surviving a hard Arctic winter.
      And it likely ain’t good.

        • Just leave and leave the two of them there alone. Give them the option to be Helevac’d or remain on a dark ship alone.

        • A lot depends on the range. To have enough fuel to carry passengers out, the helicopter might have to fly in as empty as possible.

        • Supplying a ship up there by helicopter would be both quite difficult and dangerous. What they need is an icebreaker.

          Unfortunately Norway’s newest and strongest icebreaker damaged herself trying to get through the ice in this very area in September, so they might not be inclined to try it now when the ice is even worse.

          I would recommend a Swedish, Finnish or Russian icebreaker. This early in the season there are still several in reserve.

    • One crew member is running out of heart medicine and the captain wants him rescued by Dec 19 but the rescue officials denied a rescue operation after consultation with a doctor.

      The captain also told that they had started rationing food since they have food for 10-12 days left. So maybe this is the reason since they are completely stuck and all their equipment to break the ice has stopped working. The captain seems to realize that they will not be sailing away for a loong time.

      • Need to avoid abandoning it to a salvage operator claiming it as well. Could be a very long winter. What a way to waste 4 or 5 months out of an 80 year life.

      • That captain is a bloody idiot. Who else would venture into the pack ice in late fall with food and medicine for a few weeks? Or with a crew member with a heart condition?

        • It was already a rescue operation when the ship was contacted. Failure to assist may not have been an option. Your assessment of the captain is inappropriate judgmentalism, especially while you sit there in your warm, dry room far, far away from the Arctic and the two demanding, virtue-signalling passengers.

          • “Failure to assist may not have been an option.”

            Perhaps not, but he could easily have stocked up with both food and medical supplies in Longyearbyen. It is a fair-sized town with several ship-chandlers (been there a couple of times).

            It was also extremely irresponsible to depend on an rescue ship that was apparently unable to wait for even a few weeks, and thus having to improvise another. That they would be delayed was a virtual certainty given the difficulty of moving over sea ice.

    • Guess he has no wish to be marooned on a ship, stuck in arctic ice for the winder with two dumb*ss irritating alarmists blabbing tripe day in and day out.

      • Eco-terrorists don’t have the best hygiene in the world either. Smelling all that B.O. is going to make for a loooooooong winter.

        • Borge Ousland is an experienced polar explorer, former special forces, and a Norh sea diver.
          He has done many expeditions in the polar regions. And have crossed both the Arctic and Antarctic alone.
          Mike Horn is a professional explorer and adventurer.
          Mike Horn became famous in 2001 after completing a one-year, 6-month solo journey around the equator without any motorised transport. In 2004 he completed a two-year, 3-month solo circumnavigation of the Arctic Circle, and in 2006 along with Norwegian explorer Børge Ousland, became the first men to travel without dog or motorised transport to the North Pole during winter, in permanent darkness.

          They probably sensed opportunity with the “climate cause”.
          And thers probably some money involved.

          • Hard to separate the science here from the “ego boosting machismo stunt posturing”.

            How much actual “science” stuff goes on with these guys?

            My brother is a volunteer fire-fighter (as they say, he does on his spare time for free what “real” fire fighters do for a living…).

            I’ve always said that heroes aren’t those who TRY to climb mountains.

            Heroes are those who RESCUE those who try to climb mountains.

            Seriously, the fines for these stunts aren’t high enough.

          • All their training… all their experience… all their accomplishments… why do they need any outside assistance? They have the skills & know-how to get out of a situation in which they put themselves, no?

    • The Captain may already see the signs of cabin fever developing around his “greener-than-thou” passengers and wants to prevent them from being tossed over the side when his back is turned.

      • Actually, unless they’re hypocrites (cough, cough) they’re probably vegan, or at least vegetarian, which means technically, they are grain-fed, free-range long pig.

        Which will make the inevitable cannibalism a bit more palatable.

        • One of them is a special forces, and have crossed both the arctic and antarctica alone!
          Are you a former special forces?? Have you crossed the arctic alone????????
          Its easy to sit infront of your computer with the x-box next to you, in your boys room, writing BS messages, while your mom serves you hot chocolate.

          • Calm down, son. I do not ever mean to disparage the training that these guys do and I actually didn’t.

            There are others on the ship, no? So I’m pretty sure that when the starvation hits, it will be the well-trained guys eating the others.

  2. On a related note about Ships of Fools, the Polarstern – the German icebreaker on a science expedition to understand how the “climate change” scam is affecting the Arctic, is now moored in total darkness and stationary in the drifting Arctic Ice Pack.

    This article in Science mag from last month is actually humorous to the predictable problems to tainted data from Urban Heat Islands like the Polarstern in a pristine environment.

    Here is just portion of a Science Mag essay on the Polarstern forays from last month (November 2019) :

    “The Polarstern’s generators, for instance, spew a steady plume of black smoke, complicating efforts to collect air samples. “We are going to be by far the biggest source of aerosol particles in the neighborhood, and that’s a problem,” says atmospheric scientist Matthew Shupe of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Colorado (CU) in Boulder. But, he adds, “It’s also an opportunity” to understand how the arrival of more ships might affect the Arctic in the future.

    Our encounter with the polar bears occurred just 6 days after the Polarstern locked itself in the ice near 85° north latitude on 4 October. The ship had left Tromsø, Norway, in September, then steamed north in search of an ice floe thick enough to support the scientists and their equipment for the next 12 months, as they drifted past the North Pole before returning to open water between Greenland and Norway’s Svalbard archipelago in the fall of 2020. By then, the some 300 scientists involved in the $150 million MOSAiC project, led by the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, hope to have collected a wealth of data that will help reveal how climate change is affecting the Arctic (Science, 23 August, p. 728).

    Once the Polarstern’s propellers had slowed to a stop, causing the ship to grow still and quiet, the dozens of researchers aboard the first leg of the journey wasted little time in setting up research sites—with names such as “Balloon Town” and “Ocean City”—on the surrounding ice. They graded tracks for roads, raised instrument towers, and strung power lines. (The cables would later become chew toys for the polar bears.) And they used the ship’s crane and helicopter to haul heavy equipment onto the icy seascape, including a robotic submarine that the researchers will drop into a hole carved through the 60-centimeter-thick ice.

    In some areas, however, they were careful to leave vast fields of untouched snow, where instruments monitor the floe from above and below. Expedition members—including the guards responsible for scaring away bears—were warned not to walk or drive snowmobiles across these sites. It is but one example of the ways MOSAiC scientists are working to minimize the so-called observer effect, in which the very presence of a scientist—or their vessel—can skew their observations.

    The Polarstern can’t be shut down completely, because it must serve as the expedition’s power plant, command center, and hotel—which some might call a five-star. There is a dining room that serves mouthwatering cakes every afternoon at tea time, a sauna, a swimming pool, a gym, a bar, and even small shops where you can buy sweets, tobacco, and alcohol. Although the ship is passively drifting with the ice, it will guzzle 15 tons of diesel fuel per day.

    Some of that fuel powers the ship’s many lights. When I learned that I would be aboard the Polarstern at MOSAiC’s start, I looked forward to experiencing the onset of polar night and seeing the North Star—which dangles just 40° above the horizon where I live in Colorado—twinkle close to the top of the sky. But the ship floods the ice with light to enable the researchers to work safely and efficiently, creating a powerful glow that blots out the sky. I did not see a single star during my 2 weeks aboard.

    For AWI biologist Allison Fong, the glow is a problem. She wants to better understand how microbial plant life survives in the Arctic winter, when there is no sunlight for months on end, but she can’t study samples that have been exposed to artificial light. So, once a week she plans to drive a snowmobile to what she calls the “dark zone” hidden behind a fortress of small ridges of snow and ice some 500 meters from the ship. There, researchers will don red headlamps (red light doesn’t affect most organisms) and collect ice cores that they will analyze back at the ship.

    Oceanographers, meanwhile, are dealing with the heat, turbulence, and wastewater produced by the Polarstern. “At the main site [around the ship], there’s sort of a dead zone” for collecting data, says Tim Stanton, an oceanographer at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. To avoid the issue, he and others have deployed a handful of autonomous instruments, which sit on the ice or float in holes, far from the ship.

    The expedition’s own noises, meanwhile, have forced atmospheric scientists to build special defenses. At a site called “Met City” a half-kilometer from the ship, a barrier nearly as tall as a person shelters an instrument that uses pulses of sound to measure the density of air, and thus gain insight into the structure of the atmosphere. The barrier is designed to deaden any artificial noise that might rumble across the seascape, such as blasts of the ship’s horn and the whine of snowmobiles and nearby electronics.

    Then there is the Polarstern’s sooty exhaust—a huge problem for the many MOSAiC scientists studying the Arctic’s unusually clean air. The researchers want to better understand the sources and fates of aerosols—tiny particles suspended in the atmosphere—that contribute to the formation of small ice crystals within clouds. The number of crystals can determine whether a cloud acts as a blanket to warm Earth or an umbrella to shield it from solar radiation. But scientists aren’t sure exactly where Arctic aerosols originate: Are they swept north from land, or are they formed by ocean organisms and sent skyward by breaking waves?

    To gain some insight, Lauriane Quéléver, a chemist at the University of Helsinki, and her colleagues will spend the next year pulling air samples through tubes mounted on a refashioned shipping container that serves as her lab. Instruments will parse the samples, analyzing and counting particles. Quéléver was astonished to find that the number of particles soared to 28,000 per cubic centimeter—a few thousand times greater than the typical Arctic level—when a second icebreaker arrived to swap instruments, personnel, and fuel. “I really hope that I’m going to get some very natural and pristine data,” she says. “Otherwise I can just go home.”

    A snowstorm or strong wind could help her and other scientists by clearing the air, but that rarely happened during my stay. When I visited CU atmospheric scientist Byron Blomquist, he was trying to collect air samples at a tower hanging off the ship’s bow. But his instruments weren’t sampling anything; they had automatically shut down after an alarm signaled that exhaust from the stern of the ship was enveloping the tower. Inside his container, pumps roared like vacuum cleaners as they pushed clean air out through his instruments, to prevent contamination by the smog.

    Yet the Polarstern’s soot presents an opportunity for some researchers. As the Arctic warms and sea ice melts, shipping in the region is expected to increase dramatically. Those vessels will likely release black carbon, an aerosol formed by diesel engines. When black carbon settles on snow or ice, it can hasten melting by reflecting less solar radiation and absorbing more heat, a process MOSAiC researchers hope to study in detail by sampling ice close to the ship and a planned aircraft runway.

    Less than 24 hours after the Polarstern settled in, the ship’s emissions were smudging the ice. I noticed a black flake as large as my fingernail within the icy floe, removed a mitten and picked it up, rubbing the flake between my fingers. It turned to an oily smear.”

    source: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/366/6467/792 (paywalled, unfortunately)

    So even stationary, the ship has to burn 15 tons of marine bunker oil/diesel fuel per day to provide heat, fresh water, and electricity for the crew and scientists on the Polarstern.

    And 15 tons of diesel is 18,000 liters every day, … day after day, months on end, as it is locked in the sea ice around it. The diesel exhaust is black carbon soot that settles in the very cold, dry Arctic air on the ice and snow around the ship for a radius of at least 3 km or more. When the sun returns the world will see what Climate Scientists do to “Save the Planet” from carbon.
    Those scientists will sheepishly do it with their own photo evidence when daylight finally arrives sometime in February via their drone-cameras flying high above the ship taking pictures of the blackened ice around the ship. With full daylight they will of course be shocked by the blackened ice around them as far as they can see. But don’t expect the MSM to cover that inconvenient science.

    I have no doubt Anthony and Charles will be covering the coming Polarstern’s Arctic carbon pollution story extensively… as it evolves in the next year when the Sun returns to Arctic, the Polarstern, and its Shipload of Fools and the world can see what climate science is up to.

    These Arctic ventures by modern day scientists fueled by their grants frequently remind me of Carl Weyprecht’s quote from the NASA PMEL webpage on the First International Polar Year of 1881-1884.

    Weyprecht observed:
    ““But whatever interest all these observations may possess, they do not possess that scientific value, even supported by a long column of figures, which under other circumstances might have been the case. They only furnish us with a picture of the extreme effects of the forces of Nature in the Arctic regions, but leave us completely in the dark with respect to their causes.””
    – Carl Weyprech, 1874. Scientist and co-commander of the Austro-Hungarian Polar Expedition of 1872-74.
    https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/arctic-zone/ipy-1/History.htm

    ProTip: Buy popcorn futures.

    • edit: that is the “NOAA PMEL”. Not NASA. My brain fart.

      Sadly, NASA ain’t honest enough to have something like Weyprecht’s quote on its servers.

    • Great post, Joel.
      Particularly liked the comments of Weyprecht! But I guess the general public has no way to form opinion on the real value, or otherwise, of this kind of stunt.

      • Bob,
        The SciMag essay is paywalled. sooo….
        For your (and everyone’s) full reading pleasure, here is the full Science Mag essay. It has so many nuggets of laughable science realities:

        “The flare cut through the sky like a firework, sending the polar bears into a panic. They sprinted across the snow, the mom checking to make sure her cub kept pace. Nearby, two polar bear guards—one who had fired the flare and the other armed with a rifle—stood on snowmobiles, making sure the bears posed no threat to the scientists and crew onboard this German icebreaker, which is spending 1 year here in the Arctic, frozen into the sea ice.

        The bears are an occasional threat to this unusual expedition, known as the Multidisciplinary Drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC). But the scientists are also contending with another, much larger intruder: their own ship. The 118-meter-long Polarstern is a sophisticated floating lab that allows MOSAiC scientists to study the atmosphere, sea ice, ocean, and life. But the vessel and the equipment it carries also produce noise, light, heat, and other forms of pollution that can ruin measurements in this pristine environment.

        The Polarstern’s generators, for instance, spew a steady plume of black smoke, complicating efforts to collect air samples. “We are going to be by far the biggest source of aerosol particles in the neighborhood, and that’s a problem,” says atmospheric scientist Matthew Shupe of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Colorado (CU) in Boulder. But, he adds, “It’s also an opportunity” to understand how the arrival of more ships might affect the Arctic in the future.

        Our encounter with the polar bears occurred just 6 days after the Polarstern locked itself in the ice near 85° north latitude on 4 October. The ship had left Tromsø, Norway, in September, then steamed north in search of an ice floe thick enough to support the scientists and their equipment for the next 12 months, as they drifted past the North Pole before returning to open water between Greenland and Norway’s Svalbard archipelago in the fall of 2020. By then, the some 300 scientists involved in the $150 million MOSAiC project, led by the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, hope to have collected a wealth of data that will help reveal how climate change is affecting the Arctic (Science, 23 August, p. 728).

        Once the Polarstern’s propellers had slowed to a stop, causing the ship to grow still and quiet, the dozens of researchers aboard the first leg of the journey wasted little time in setting up research sites—with names such as “Balloon Town” and “Ocean City”—on the surrounding ice. They graded tracks for roads, raised instrument towers, and strung power lines. (The cables would later become chew toys for the polar bears.) And they used the ship’s crane and helicopter to haul heavy equipment onto the icy seascape, including a robotic submarine that the researchers will drop into a hole carved through the 60-centimeter-thick ice.

        In some areas, however, they were careful to leave vast fields of untouched snow, where instruments monitor the floe from above and below. Expedition members—including the guards responsible for scaring away bears—were warned not to walk or drive snowmobiles across these sites. It is but one example of the ways MOSAiC scientists are working to minimize the so-called observer effect, in which the very presence of a scientist—or their vessel—can skew their observations.

        The Polarstern can’t be shut down completely, because it must serve as the expedition’s power plant, command center, and hotel—which some might call a five-star. There is a dining room that serves mouthwatering cakes every afternoon at tea time, a sauna, a swimming pool, a gym, a bar, and even small shops where you can buy sweets, tobacco, and alcohol. Although the ship is passively drifting with the ice, it will guzzle 15 tons of diesel fuel per day.

        Some of that fuel powers the ship’s many lights. When I learned that I would be aboard the Polarstern at MOSAiC’s start, I looked forward to experiencing the onset of polar night and seeing the North Star—which dangles just 40° above the horizon where I live in Colorado—twinkle close to the top of the sky. But the ship floods the ice with light to enable the researchers to work safely and efficiently, creating a powerful glow that blots out the sky. I did not see a single star during my 2 weeks aboard.

        For AWI biologist Allison Fong, the glow is a problem. She wants to better understand how microbial plant life survives in the Arctic winter, when there is no sunlight for months on end, but she can’t study samples that have been exposed to artificial light. So, once a week she plans to drive a snowmobile to what she calls the “dark zone” hidden behind a fortress of small ridges of snow and ice some 500 meters from the ship. There, researchers will don red headlamps (red light doesn’t affect most organisms) and collect ice cores that they will analyze back at the ship.

        Oceanographers, meanwhile, are dealing with the heat, turbulence, and wastewater produced by the Polarstern. “At the main site [around the ship], there’s sort of a dead zone” for collecting data, says Tim Stanton, an oceanographer at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. To avoid the issue, he and others have deployed a handful of autonomous instruments, which sit on the ice or float in holes, far from the ship.

        The expedition’s own noises, meanwhile, have forced atmospheric scientists to build special defenses. At a site called “Met City” a half-kilometer from the ship, a barrier nearly as tall as a person shelters an instrument that uses pulses of sound to measure the density of air, and thus gain insight into the structure of the atmosphere. The barrier is designed to deaden any artificial noise that might rumble across the seascape, such as blasts of the ship’s horn and the whine of snowmobiles and nearby electronics.

        Then there is the Polarstern’s sooty exhaust—a huge problem for the many MOSAiC scientists studying the Arctic’s unusually clean air. The researchers want to better understand the sources and fates of aerosols—tiny particles suspended in the atmosphere—that contribute to the formation of small ice crystals within clouds. The number of crystals can determine whether a cloud acts as a blanket to warm Earth or an umbrella to shield it from solar radiation. But scientists aren’t sure exactly where Arctic aerosols originate: Are they swept north from land, or are they formed by ocean organisms and sent skyward by breaking waves?

        To gain some insight, Lauriane Quéléver, a chemist at the University of Helsinki, and her colleagues will spend the next year pulling air samples through tubes mounted on a refashioned shipping container that serves as her lab. Instruments will parse the samples, analyzing and counting particles. Quéléver was astonished to find that the number of particles soared to 28,000 per cubic centimeter—a few thousand times greater than the typical Arctic level—when a second icebreaker arrived to swap instruments, personnel, and fuel. “I really hope that I’m going to get some very natural and pristine data,” she says. “Otherwise I can just go home.”

        A snowstorm or strong wind could help her and other scientists by clearing the air, but that rarely happened during my stay. When I visited CU atmospheric scientist Byron Blomquist, he was trying to collect air samples at a tower hanging off the ship’s bow. But his instruments weren’t sampling anything; they had automatically shut down after an alarm signaled that exhaust from the stern of the ship was enveloping the tower. Inside his container, pumps roared like vacuum cleaners as they pushed clean air out through his instruments, to prevent contamination by the smog.

        Yet the Polarstern’s soot presents an opportunity for some researchers. As the Arctic warms and sea ice melts, shipping in the region is expected to increase dramatically. Those vessels will likely release black carbon, an aerosol formed by diesel engines. When black carbon settles on snow or ice, it can hasten melting by reflecting less solar radiation and absorbing more heat, a process MOSAiC researchers hope to study in detail by sampling ice close to the ship and a planned aircraft runway.

        Less than 24 hours after the Polarstern settled in, the ship’s emissions were smudging the ice. I noticed a black flake as large as my fingernail within the icy floe, removed a mitten and picked it up, rubbing the flake between my fingers. It turned to an oily smear.

        It wasn’t the only preview of what lies ahead. Earlier, I stood on the deck of the Akademik Fedorov, a Russian research vessel that participated in MOSAiC’s first few weeks, with Jessie Creamean, an aerosol researcher at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. We watched as the Polarstern slowly approached, gliding across a sea of ice. The sky was gray, with a thin stripe of blue at the horizon in every direction—except at the spot where the Polarstern had just spent the night. There hung a thick yellow and brown cloud. “Just think,” Creamean said, “if we open the Arctic to shipping it’s all going to look like that.”

        author: Shannon Hall, aboard the Polarstern in the Arctic Ocean
        Shannon Hall is a science journalist in Boulder, Colorado.
        Science 15 Nov 2019:
        Vol. 366, Issue 6467, pp. 792-793
        DOI: 10.1126/science.366.6467.792

        So many nuggets of climate gold there in that essay.
        No wonder the scientists want to keep going there since Carl Weyprecht’s time.
        The mosquito and dengue, yellow fever, and malaria-infected tropics never change.
        But… the high polar latitudes are where the change is, + and -. Where the grant money lies.

    • I want to see the ship get permanently stuck. That would probably require a really cold winter with storms piling up ice in front of the ship so thick it can’t go forward. Fantasy, I know, but what a great monument to man’s foolishness that would be.

      • wonder how deep a snowdrift is required to allow bears to clamber up?
        and yes its going to be an ongoing source of much mirth as this continues.
        money and time wasted

        • Captain’s Log entry 3rd Feb 2020 –
          “Today shot 6 polar bears on the foredeck consuming Professor Grantminer. All crew and passengers still in lockdown. Photography of polar bears still verboten – NatGeo only publishing walruses. Scheduled visits to our ship by Messers Attenborough and Suzuki postponed indefinitely, as they will be conferencing in Tahiti for the remainder of this winter.”

      • Once daylight returns, the black carbon emitted by the ship will cause the ice to melt, this proving the Arctic ice is melting away due to CO2 emissions (sarc/).

    • It’s time for a little Kindergarten Kalculus based on the article…

      A 12-month expedition burning 15 tons of fuel per day to support the work of 300 scientists.

      365 x 15 / 300 = 18.25 tons per scientist

      In comparably rough numbers, I estimate that my wife and I use about 100 pounds (0.05 tons) of fuel per week.

      52 x 0.05 / 2 = 1.3 tons per person

      And let me speculate how this will probably end… after the expedition is over several of these scientists — who just burned through 14 years-worth of MY lifestyle’s fuel consumption in just one year to support THEIR lifestyle — will point their fingers and waggle their gums about how you and I have to reduce our use of fossil fuels.

    • Looks like none of the “scientists” actually stopped to consider how the ship they were staying on was going to impact the environment they were studying.

      I doubt much usable data will be collected this winter. Of course that won’t stop them from proclaiming that they have proven everything to be worse than they thought.
      Unprecedented even.

    • They should send Greta (and her father). She loves to be on boats for a long time. Maybe she can bring her dogs too.

    • “Those scientists will sheepishly do it with their own photo evidence when daylight finally arrives sometime in February via their drone-cameras flying high above the ship taking pictures of the blackened ice around the ship.”

      And let’s not forget “Admiral Brown”…

  3. “As the Arctic warms and sea ice melts, shipping in the region is expected to increase dramatically. ” Don’t expect this any time soon. Icebreakers are still getting stuck in Arctic ice. Only the Russians have icebreakers big and powerful enough to go anywhere they please.

    • In other words, its the old “I don’t believe it, it shouldn’t work in theory” but in reverse: “I believe it because the models tell me its happening so I’ll just ignore the ice”.

      Every year the MSM, in keeping with getting the biggest bang for the declining media buck, has an uneducated “writer” with a liberal arts degree but the title of “Senior Science Editor” re-type a press release from a cruise line saying that this year, for sure, one of their ships is totally going to make it through the “ice free” Northwest Passage….

      Count on it.

    • Let’s hope no one dies over these foolish forays.
      Dead people can become martyrs. Not to be mocked in polite circles.
      But “almost dead people” can be ruthlessly mocked for their foolishness.

      So almost dead works best.
      And there is no “Almost Darwin Award.”

    • The heat of the ocean melts the ice from the bottom up even when the temperature is well below freezing. The thickness of the ice depends on the air temperature, the colder the air, the thicker the ice.

      When I was going to the arctic, there was a steady stream of ‘explorers’ and adventurers. Since communication was by short wave radio, everyone could hear their desperate pleas.

      … the two ‘explorers’ refuse to leave the vessel by helicopter …

      I wonder who’s going to pay for the supply flights. Like 99% of freelance ‘explorers’ and adventurers, these folks are idiots or at least irresponsible.

      I suspect that sending a ship to rescue them was more expensive than sending a helicopter. It’s true that helicopters drink fuel at an amazing rate and are very expensive on a per hour basis but they get the job done relatively quickly. Ships, on the other hand, move much slower and have a crew which has to be paid. Depending on the size of the boat, the miles per gallon per passenger can be quite poor. I’m not even sure that a small ship has a smaller carbon footprint than a helicopter. I can’t quickly find the details but the Lance isn’t that small and probably eats fuel pretty quickly.

      • A helicopter from ship would be much more likely. Helicopters are notorious for poor endurance, fairly ordinary payload and short range.

        But some light to medium military logistics aircraft can land on snow covered ice as can civil fixed-wing aircraft.

        Alternatively, a light ski aircraft for moving humans, and air-drops by pallet for resupply flights.

      • That certainly not true with fresh water. the warmest water is on the bottom it at 4C. What next to the ice id a 0C yes it has more energy that the ice to change water to ice to move it from a liquid to a solid you need to remove 32 time the energy to transfer the water to ice. It depends on the weather if the ice is exposed and it well below 0C you will get no melting. If the air temperature is well above 0C you might get so melting from below but most of it will be on top with the warm water cutting holes through the ice to warm the water below as it makes it trip to the bottom. Oh by the way the last time I was ice fishing it was 70 F in late February in North Dakota and you could see the holes that the thawed water cut through the ice, that Ice remained on the lake for another month. No Ice does not thaw from the bottom up unless there a spring below it.

        • Anyone camped on the arctic ice has to measure the thickness of the ice if they want fixed wing supply flights. Thus there are many decades of data in camp logs showing that the arctic ice gets thinner between February and April with the air temperature well below freezing and no surface melting at all.

    • If the lights are powered by fossil fuels, then they are bad. Otherwise solar and wind powered red lights are fine.

      • Solar PV in the Arctic winter just needs taxpayer PTCs to make it a profitable venture for the operator-owners.
        They’ll get paid *not* to produce. It’s free money. Who doesn’t love free money?

          • Solar works just fine when there is no sun. All you need are diesel generators to power banks of lights – and if your feed-in subsidies are high enough, you can even make a tidy profit!

            So see? – solar power will indeed save the Earth – all we need is enough diesel fuel and rare earths for the generators to make it workable.

            /sarc, if it need be said…

    • On the other hand, during the winter, there is no Sun, but the Moon occasionally reflect some bluish light down through the bloody darkness.

  4. They are encountering the first problem with making scientific observations. Their mere presence is contaminating that which they are intent on measuring.

    • Always a problem for science. Lab studies are not “nature.”
      And studying nature “in situ” is alway corrupted by the observer intruding.
      What matters is how the scientist deals with that.

      Is the data any good? How to check it. How to quantify error.
      Can multiple observations be made changing observation -impact variables?
      What are the experimen’s error bars? (from observer impact)

      Real scientists deal honestly and forthright in their manuscripts with these questions.
      They want to find the problems. To move forward.

      But…. Mainstream climate Science with an alarmist climate agenda to protect because they (were encouraged to and) became “climate change advocates” … not so much.
      They sold their integrity for that next grant. We can call them “climate hoe’s”.

      • “And studying nature “in situ” is alway corrupted by the observer intruding.”

        Hence Steve Irwin and his ilk, molesting animals in the wild (or anywhere they find them), providing no scientific value.

    • They call them selves scientist, funny in high school physic class one of the first thing I learned is you act of measuring something changes what you are measuring. I guess these “scientist” skipped that lecture.

  5. The norwegian article says that there are 10 crew, 2 skiers, 6 skiers support team and 4 journalists/producers
    One non-crew has too little heart medicine, and the captain requests a medevac for that person. The resque central has rewieved the medical records and has so far refused a medevac.
    The food situation is not yet critical but will be in a couple of weeks.
    The captain wants all non-crew off the ship.
    They have plenty of seal meat.

    • If I was captain of that ice-locked ‘wessel’, I’d also want all non-crew to leave. Post-haste.
      Babysitting a potential “Dr Smith” thru a hard winter while locked in sea ice is not something I’d like.

    • “They have plenty of seal meat.”

      In that case no problem. Nansen and Johansen wintered in a stone hut on Franz Josephs Land in 1895/96 with nothing but seal meat for food and seal blubber for heating and cooking. Seals can synthesize Vitamin C, so a diet of nothing but seal meat will not cause in scurvy.

  6. The captain also demanded that a person onboard, who has a heart condition, be lifted off, as his medicine is running out. However, the Norwegian Sea Rescue Service, after consulting the man’s doctor, flatly refused.

  7. Well if Lance runs out of provisions, they can always shoot some polar bears to increase their meat rations, claiming “climate despair” or something like that. The white teddies have already paid a courtesy visit, curious creatures as they are. I guess they would like to increase their meat rations too. Here they are, a mother with two kids:

    https://www.vg.no/nyheter/innenriks/i/jd1vbo/lance-fikk-besoek-av-tre-isbjoerner-glad-de-ikke-kom-ti-minutter-tidligere?utm_source=vgfront&utm_content=row-7

    • Caption:
      “Minutter tidligere hadde en polfarer vært nede på isen.”
      “Minutes earlier a polar expedition member had been on the ice”

      Convolution:
      The polar bear mother was late for dinner./SARC

        • I had almost been such meal opportunity for the bears on Svalbard some years ago. I had a talk with the late Swedish Dr. Fred Goldberg from Swedish Polar Institute about a trip to Svalbard with him. However, I could not make the trip at the time. – Miss him and his great insights a lot.

    • And harp seal and Narwhale and belugas’ blubber can be heated in a vat to render a very fine, fuel-oil like kerosene to run their engines!
      While providing meat to eat!!

    • Henning, I bet the poley bears are waiting for the heart patient to expire and be “buried at sea”. Also, the poley bears are probably calculating the food stores versus persons on board and calculating when the “poley bear food assistance program kicks in”. That’s right, I think the poley bears are smarter than the fools on this ship.

          • Bear is a bit gamey, period. Most carnivore meat is. Once in a while, maybe, but not something I’d each much of.

            Give me venison any day…

          • “Caligula Jones December 20, 2019 at 6:10 am”

            The muscles in game meat are very read, they have burnt a lot of oxygen through constant work. Bear, and seal IIRC, meat is riddled with parasites, unless cooked to destruction.

    • “The white teddies have already paid a courtesy visit” – the Guardian and the BBC will most likely portray that as “starving polar bears desperate for food, are scavenging for scraps around polar research vessel”

  8. That soot smudge will be visible from space coming springtime.

    And those lights are like the golden arches to polar bears: here food.

    • I wonder what happens under the ice now with 24/7 light and protected from the harsh environment by at least 1 meter of ice. Any idea how much heat the ship radiates out under the waterline ?

  9. What on earth are 300 scientists doing, on what appears to be a luxury ship, spending up to 12 months finding out the effects of climate change in the Arctic. Surely just twenty five would be excessive. I’ll guarantee that the 300 will report that the situation is bad or very bad, and we need to do something about it. I wonder whether there might be just one scientist in the group who will report that ‘there is nothing to worry about’, or will his colleagues complain that a ‘no problem’ report would negate the need for their next twelve months jolly, and that would never do. No doubt Mr Harabin has already briefed the BBC, and it won’t be long before the negative reports start coming through, but ‘we should not broadcast that the ship is stuck in the ice.’

    • As Joel O’Bryan December 18, 2019 at 10:59 pm said, they are burning 15 tonnes of the worst kind of diesel to burn in a stationary vehicle day after day for 12 months. And they are now “bothered” about soot and oil deposits on the ice from the exhaust to prove global warming is destroying the ice.

      Yes, I know. The stupid it burns!

      • “it must serve as the expedition’s power plant, command center, and hotel—which some might call a five-star. There is a dining room that serves mouthwatering cakes every afternoon at tea time, a sauna, a swimming pool, a gym, a bar, and even small shops where you can buy sweets, tobacco, and alcohol.”
        It doesn’t sound like a working ship to me, and rotating a 100 scientist every few months still seems way over the top.

        • It’s a research vessel; white collar jobs get better perks, but it’s still a working vessel, not a luxury cruise liner. I seriously doubt the 100 persons were all scientists, even though an article I read said that.

    • If I’d be fed and oiled in 5 star luxury and offered a place on the same next year, well, I wouldn’t have to think 2 seconds about it.

  10. WWF must have a problem with this statement regarding mother bear and babies from Ousland onboard the Lance:

    – De ser veldig sunne og friske ut og det er utrolig flott å se. Dette er polhavets dronning med sine to små. Det er flott å se at de reproduserer seg og ser så sunne og fiske ut som de faktisk gjør, sier Ousland til VG.

    – They look very healthy and agile, it is very impressive to see. This is the polar ocean’s queen with it’s two small ones. It is impressive to see they reproduce and look so healthy as they actually do. says Ousland to VG.

    • The fact that they are impressed means they are believing their own lie. They have been telling themselves for years that all the bears are starving. To see that they are doing just fine with their own eyes is a real shock to these “scientists”.

    • Carl, I’ll try my hand at enviro-wacko journalistic editing:

      They look very healthy and agile emaciated, it is very impressive depressing to see. This is the polar ocean’s queen victim with it’s two doomed small ones. It is impressive depressing to see they reproduce hopelessly and look so unhealthy as they actually do. says Ousland to VG.

  11. Let me get this straight : there are “Lance”, “Polarstern” and “Boaty Macboatface” all adrift in polar ice, stuffed to the gunnels with scientists, shooting seals for food and scaring off inquisitive polar bears whilst exploring a wilderness that they have thoroughly polluted .
    How many more out there? Are they all getting together for a big Xmas party on the ice (bears not invited)?
    And they condemn oil exploration off the Alaska coast.

    • “And they condemn oil exploration …”

      Interestingly Sylvi Listhaug is, as far as I understand from VG, going to be energy minister in Norway. This seems to create heated discussion, because Sylvi has since 2011 condemned wind turbines both on land and sea. She does not think they are doing anything good, and most of all she regard the wind turbines as a disgrace to the otherwise beautiful Norwegian landscape.

  12. Topic: MOSAiC news (Read 37393 times) at the arctic sea ice forum. Well worth a read. 9 long pages of information. Last page has a picture of the ship lit up from a distance of half a kilometer. Very impressive, and using a lot of power.
    Warmist site but good writing.

  13. The polarstern will guzzle 15 tons of diesel per day, 15 tons of diesel is 18,000 liters every day, … day after day, months on end.

    What the hell 😐 Who is paying these idiots to ruin pristine ice and snow? To have a swimming pool, cakes, and 5 star housing? Al gora the should be locked up in jail for his part in the climate scam!!!

    • Hm.. how much electrical power does 18,000 liter a day compare to?

      18,000 / 24 = 750 liter per hour.
      750 * 10 ~ 7.5 MW

      All of the 7.5MW cannot go to the electrical appliances alone. My guess is that the major fuel is going to the oil burners for the central heating. – Despite global warming, it is fairly cold outside, and their world pool and sauna also need heating.

    • Why didn’t they rent one of the Rooskie Nuke powered Ice Breakers?
      Probably the lack of amenities, like pool, bar, etc, etc, etc.

  14. A 787-8 burns about 2 tons an hour of jet fuel (primarily diesel) for reference, equivalent to flying it from JFK to Heathrow every day.

    • No, jet fuel is not “primarily diesel” it is most similar to kerosene, consisting mostly of alkanes with 8 to 18 coal atoms. In very cold climates Jet B is used which is sort of in-between kerosene and gasoline.

    • The must be something wrong with a decimal point!
      I sailed with a warship in Denmark early 1970’s, where we sometimes used the two DC-10 turbines to sail very fast. The consumption was about 20 tons fuel an hour. I understand that modern engines are more efficient, but so much more…?

      • That figure is probably per engine. A 787-8 typically burns about 5,000 kg/hour according to Boeing, and that can be verified since it carries max 101 tons of fuel and is used over segments of up to 17-18 hours.

        Incidentally that equates to slightly less than 80 mpg per passenger at 100% load factor.

        Notice that during cuise jet engines normally operate well below maximum power.

        • The two most efficient modes of transportation are a bicycle and a jumble jet fulled loaded with passengers. Somehow greens missed that memo, I have know it for over forty years.

  15. These WWF heroes chose a good place to start their trip. There was unusually little ice in the Chukchi Sea this year:

    http://masie_web.apps.nsidc.org/pub/DATASETS/NOAA/G02186/plots/4km/r02_Chukchi_Sea_ts_4km.png

    But unfortunately there is also unusually much ice in the Svalbard area:

    http://masie_web.apps.nsidc.org/pub/DATASETS/NOAA/G02186/plots/4km/r06_Barents_Sea_ts_4km.png

    And I can understand that the Norwegian authorities are unwilling to send a helicopter. Flying several hundred kilometers from Nyålesund (the nearest settlement and airfield) in total darkness and unpredictable weather over freezing water and pack-ice is something you only do in extreme emergency.

    • Yes. A friend of mine who flew both helicopters and (supersonic) jets used to say that the basic difference between a conventional aircraft and a helicopter is that the aircraft wants to fly while the helicopter does not want to fly.

      There is a lot of truth in that, a conventional aircraft will keep flying as long as nothing really drastic happens, while very little is often needed for a helicopter to become uncontrollable.

      I also remember his answer when somebody asked him what glide ratio a helicopter has: “Marginally better than a brick”.

      • Losing the tail rotor will not end well. It’s why a French design (IIRC) used exhaust gases vented through a vectored port in the tail. Don’t know why that never took off.

        There is also a threshold, something like if you are without engine power and “gliding” slower than 100mph and at 100ft, you will crash, usually fatally. I think it is called “Dead man’s curve”.

        • Yes. A helicopter that loses power will sink quite rapidly and steeply. However an autorotative landing is possible by pulling collective at the right moment and using the accumulated energy in the rotor to slow the sink to a good landing.
          However the rotor must have time to accumulate enough energy, so an engine failure at low altitude and low speed is not good.

          Doing a good autorotative landing isn’t easy by the way. You have to pull collective at just the right moment, a split second too early or too late and it won’t be a good landing at all. A company I used to work for made a lot of money repairing army helicopters that got bent while training autorotative landings (military pilots must be able to make them, for obvious reasons)

  16. “The two guys had gone by skis to the North Pole and then continued towards the southern ice edge on the Atlantic side of the floating ice. ”
    If they were true believers they would have gone on Jet Skis®.

    • No such place in Norway

      “Polisen” means “the Polar Ice” in Norwegian.

      So that tracking data is essentially correct. It has arrived and is still there.

  17. Snap shots, ignorance and amnesia. Even if the polar ice is thinner it will not stay at that measurement. All liberal causes depend on people not knowing or remembering history and do depend on people only looking at the present.

    Stunts like this present more danger than benefit especially if life is at stake and all people see is stuck in the ice.

    • Every stunt like this shows how bad at math most people are – unfortunately, that seems to include scientists as well.

      Like someone who breaks their neck while diving into a pool that is, on average, 15 feet deep…

        • File that under “distinction without a difference”.

          Funny, political science was what the policy wonks who ran for class president in middle and high school went for in college.

          Now, political science means a politician with a typically over-hyped science degree that is awarded after a few decades of grade inflation and gold stars for showing up.

          • And people who didn’t do particularly well in high-school but went to college, majored in “communications/journalism/political science” and were able to somehow graduate. Those are most of the people currently running the goobermint, lame-stream media & Hollywood.

          • Well here in Toronto, some are lamenting the death of a liberal newspaper’s free giveaway commuter paper, launched with great fanfare only a year ago. Full of woke 20 something SJWs spewing the usual, it somehow didn’t catch on. Even liberal progressives can’t handle THAT much scolding I guess.

            BTW, the parent’ company’s stock has crashed to 40 cents, from a high a few years ago of $28, and will soon be de-listed from our stock exchange.

            Hopefully, this is a sign.

            Unfortunately, we still have the tax-payer funded CBC which will survive until a real conservative government guts it like deserves to be gutted.

  18. To tell you the truth, I would not like to ski nor sail in the polar night with polar bears.

    Nor I would like to be at 82N at Christmas. It is like you wait for the morning for months.

    This ship is not too small, let’s hope they make it comfortable there until they get loose.

  19. Gee a whole bunch of concerned climate scientists choose to be on ship in the middle of the arctic winter. Why is this ship powered by fossil instead of H2 or wind or Tesla batteries? I guess when THEIR lives are on the line renewables just won’t do.

  20. So … THIS is what the HOTTEST !!!! September … EVER … on Record looks like? Followed by the 2nd HOTTEST November EVER in the HISTORY of the PLANET!!!!

    https://www.noaa.gov/news/september-2019-tied-as-hottest-on-record-for-planet

    Perhaps it’s best to not take travel advice from NOAA. They seem to be, ah, well, ummm, inaccurate.

    https://news.yahoo.com/november-2019-second-hottest-record-us-184751019.html
    … adding that polar sea ice also shrank to near-record lows.

    YOU are being LIED to!! Manipulated, mutilated, data to “prove” their desired “catastrophic” climate change

  21. If Messrs. Ousland and Horn crossed the North Pole on skis, why don’t they ski southward to Svalbard?

    Of course, it’s rather dark up there this time of year, so they should take lots of spare batteries for their flashlights. Get them charged up by burning some good ol’ fossil fuel before they leave the ship.

    If they’re lucky, they can hitch a ride on Santa’s sleigh. Merry Christmas, and to all a good long night!

    • “why don’t they ski southward to Svalbard?”

      There is usually a strip of open water off NW Svalbard even in winter due to a branch of the Gulf Stream. They would have had to make landfall far to the east on Nordostlandet and then cross several hundred kilometers of glaciers, difficult mountainous terrain plus Hinlopenstraedet to get to Nyålesund or Longyearbyen:

      https://cryo.met.no/sites/cryo.met.no/files/latest/svalbard_latest.pdf

      It is feasible in spring with dog sleds (a friend of mine did about half of it and then back to Longyearbyen a few years ago), but not now in complete darkness.

  22. Latest news today, Friday morning, is that a helicopter will go to the rescue of one man (if not more) from the ship, Lance. He is empty of essential pills (blood pressure). This is in accordance with the Captain’s orders two days ago. The helicopter will fly from Svalbard later today. (Source TV2 News). http://www.tv2.no

    • He must have some serious BP issues if he has run out of the medication and has to be flown out for medical treatment. I wonder if they are beta-blockers, not the best in my experience, but everyone differs in that regard. I stopped taking medication I was given after a heart attack as it was causing too many other issues. I now take aspirin only and my BP is now down too ~138/82, which is very good for me.

  23. Why can’t they use automated measuring equipment such as used on the Mars Lander?
    It could be placed on the ice in a suitable location and would cause much less disturbance to the local environment
    Come to think of it, they could afford several sets of equipment placed around the Arctic for the cost of this ship-board jolly.

  24. It’s worse than we thought; although Lance has drifted 3 miles southwards during the night, they still don’t have intrnet access. How they must suffer! However, the heroic ski boys refuse to leave the ship, fearing that a heli-ride might tarnish their climate-saving image. In Norwegian media, the last part of their trip was turned into cheap sit-com, with scary stories about their dangerous situation, almost as if a reader might think they would soon perish. They had a standing offer of being rescued by helicopter from Svalbard, so were never in real danger, unlike explorers of other times. But of course they had to struggle on, these boys have books to sell and lectures to hold and money to make!

  25. I guess when the hive is doing well it produces more drones.
    Humans are doing very well at the moment , so we are seeing lots of drones

    the workers look at the drones and get mad. bl**dy drones.

    But , its a good sign really. although they can get a bit noisy and annoying

  26. Who needs to plan when you “know” things will be a certain way? Wishfull thinking is a core characteristic of those wanting climate action now!!!

  27. “The two ‘explorers’ refuse to leave the vessel by helicopter, probably as it destroys the narrative of their journey.

    There is a pending snowstorm coming to the area north of Svalbard around Christmas Eve, and this makes heli-transport impossible at that time.”

    ____________________________________

    Well done. The two Vikings in the snow storm will challenge Odin in all four cardinal wind corners.

    Valkyries will raise them over the Bifröst and in the evening they will dine with the heroes in Walhalla!

    https://www.google.com/search?q=bifr%C3%B6st&oq=bifroest&aqs=chrome.

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